Sample records for lowest observed adverse

  1. Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallery, S. J.

    ABSTRACT Steam is the most transferring heat from But most steam systems LOWEST PRESSURE STEAM SAVES MORE BTU'S THAN YOU THINK Stafford J. Vallery Armstrong Machine Works Three Rivers, Michigan steam to do the process heating rather than...

  2. Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine: New Development Rersults Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the...

  3. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofof Multiple

  4. RECENTER -ADVERSITY INTO TRANSFORMATION Course Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, William A.

    Center" delivers power tools and real time strategies for creating performance transformation ­ no matter what and practical system for transforming your communication skills from the inside and outside. · Use real timeRECENTER - ADVERSITY INTO TRANSFORMATION Course Description: Knowing how to use adversity

  5. Sun Sentinel Florida has lowest rate of workers saving in an employer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Sun Sentinel Florida has lowest rate of workers saving in an employer retirement plan January 08, 2012|By Donna Gehrke-White, Sun Sentinel Florida is at the bottom when it comes to workers

  6. Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, R. W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adverse Health Effects of Air Pollution Robert W. Haley, M.D. Professor of Medicine Director, Division of Epidemiology University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, Texas ? Texas Medical Association has adopted resolutions... Rice University study of how to maintain energy efficiency while reducing air pollution. ? Supported legislation based on the findings. The Medical Professor Increasingly Concerned ? Asthma ? Emphysema ? Heart Attacks ? Stunted lung...

  7. Introduction Risk associated with an adverse price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Introduction Risk associated with an adverse price change (price risk) is a normal part commodities are sold suggests price risk is an unavoidable part of being involved in the industry. Producers that have significant price variability. Recent domestic farm policy changes and trade barrier reductions

  8. Analysis of Various Pumping Methods With Respect to the Lowest Achievable Ultimate Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myneni, Ganapati; Rao Myneni, Ganapati; Favale, Anthony; Poelker, Benard; Stutzman, Marcy

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Labzs CEBAF Accelerator Facility uses most of the currently available vacuum pumping systems for its successful operations.These vacuum systems include turbo, ion, NEG and cryo pumps.The theoretical lowest pressure obtainable with these pumps is different and also the effective pumping speeds of all these pumps at lowest pressures are likely to vary depending on the prevailing conditions. Consequently, the ultimate pressure of a given vacuum system pumped by each of the above mentioned pumps could be expected to vary under the same operating conditions. In this paper the results of the analysis of above pumps with respect to their lowest achievable ultimate pressures are presented.z This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150

  9. Valence and ionic lowest-lying electronic states of ethyl formate as studied by high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption, He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?mia?ek, M. A., E-mail: smialek@pg.gda.pl [Department of Control and Energy Engineering, Faculty of Ocean Engineering and Ship Technology, Gda?sk University of Technology, Gabriela Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gda?sk (Poland); ?abuda, M.; Guthmuller, J. [Department of Theoretical Physic and Quantum Information, Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gda?sk University of Technology, Gabriela Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gda?sk (Poland); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Département de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules (PhLAM), UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille1 Sciences et Technologies, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Mason, N. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, S. V.; Jones, N. C. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, Building 1520, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The highest resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of ethyl formate, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OCHO, yet reported is presented over the wavelength range 115.0–275.5 nm (10.75–4.5 eV) revealing several new spectral features. Valence and Rydberg transitions and their associated vibronic series, observed in the photoabsorption spectrum, have been assigned in accordance with new ab initio calculations of the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths. Calculations have also been carried out to determine the ionization energies and fine structure of the lowest ionic state of ethyl formate and are compared with a newly recorded He(I) photoelectron spectrum (from 10.1 to 16.1 eV). New vibrational structure is observed in the first photoelectron band. The photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of ethyl formate in the upper stratosphere (20–50 km)

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - approval adverse event Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEFINITIONS & REGULATIONS Serious Adverse Event are any adverse experience... anomalybirth defect. Adverse events encompass both physical and psychological harms. Important...

  11. metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Rosemary

    #12;metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat horizon in each core. Substantially older radiocarbon ages from organic-rich gytjja (mineral peat- lands throughout the WSL, for a total of 29,350 measurements digitized. (ii) Our own field data

  12. Adverse Diversity Analysis Guidance | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO Access to OUO DOENuclearAdverse Diversity Analysis

  13. Improved calculations of the lowest vibrational transitions in HeH{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bubin, Sergiy [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Stanke, Monika [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, ulica Grudziadzka 5, PL 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kedziera, Dariusz [Department of Chemistry, Nicholas Copernicus University, ulica Gagarina 7, PL 87-100 Torun (Poland); Adamowicz, Ludwik [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate variational calculations of the lowest three pure vibrational states (v=0,1,2) of the {sup 4}HeH{sup +} molecular ion have been carried out without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. In the calculations we included the complete set of {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic corrections, i.e., mass-velocity, Darwin, spin-spin, and orbit-orbit. This allowed us to improve the agreement between the theory and the experiment for the vibrational frequencies of the 1{yields}0 and 2{yields}1 transitions as compared to our previous calculations [Stanke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 233002 (2006)].

  14. Lowest-order relativistic corrections to the fundamental limits of nonlinear-optical coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan J. Dawson

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of small relativistic corrections to the off-resonant polarizability, hyperpolarizability, and second hyperpolarizability are investigated. Corrections to linear and nonlinear optical coefficients are demonstrated in the three-level ansatz, which includes corrections to the Kuzyk limits when scaled to semi-relativistic energies. It is also shown that the maximum value of the hyperpolarizability is more sensitive than the maximum polarizability or second hyperpolarizability to lowest-order relativistic corrections. These corrections illustrate how the intrinsic nonlinear-optical response is affected at semi-relativistic energies.

  15. adversely affect neurological: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of microtubules, as is whether paclitaxel is released Walter, Nils G. 77 Does the knowledge of unaudited account balances adversely affect the performance of substantive...

  16. Energy Department Announces Secretarial Determination of No Adverse...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    sales or transfers of uranium will not have an adverse material impact on the domestic uranium mining, conversion, or enrichment industries. Find a copy of the Secretarial...

  17. Secretary Chu Announces Determination of No Adverse Material...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    this kind of transfer of uranium will not have an adverse material impact on the domestic uranium mining, conversion, or enrichment industries. View the Secretarial Determination...

  18. adversely impacting posttransplant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the prefrontal cortex. Next we consider studies that suggest that the effect of environmental adversity may be conditional on an individuals genotype. We also briefly...

  19. adverse perinatal outcome: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lynn 2012-01-01 5 Inflammatory bowel disease - risk factors for adverse outcomes, and preventive measures. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kornfeld D. 1997...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health impacts Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    factors thatagainst environmental factors that may adversely impactmay adversely impact human... National Environmental Public Health Performance Standards (NEnvPHPS)...

  1. THE LOWEST-MASS MEMBER OF THE {beta} PICTORIS MOVING GROUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L., E-mail: erice@amnh.or [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectral and kinematic evidence that 2MASS J06085283-2753583 (M8.5{gamma}) is a member of the {beta} Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG, age {approx}12 Myr), making it the latest-type known member of this young, nearby association. We confirm low-gravity spectral morphology at both medium and high resolutions in the near-infrared. We present new radial velocity and proper motion measurements, and use these to calculate galactic location and space motion consistent with other high-probability members of the BPMG. The predicted mass range consistent with the object's effective temperature, surface gravity, spectral type, and age is 15-35 M {sub Jup}, placing 2MASS 0608-27 well within the brown dwarf mass regime. 2MASS J06085283-2753583 is thus confidently added to the short list of very low mass, intermediate age benchmark objects that inform ongoing searches for the lowest-mass members of nearby young associations.

  2. Towards a direct transition energy measurement of the lowest nuclear excitation in 229Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. v. d. Wense; P. G. Thirolf; D. Kalb; M. Laatiaoui

    2012-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The isomeric first excited state of the isotope 229Th exhibits the lowest nuclear excitation energy in the whole landscape of known atomic nuclei. For a long time this energy was reported in the literature as 3.5(5) eV, however, a new experiment corrected this energy to 7.6(5) eV, corresponding to a UV transition wavelength of 163(11) nm. The expected isomeric lifetime is $\\tau=$ 3-5 hours, leading to an extremely sharp relative linewidth of Delta E/E ~ 10^-20, 5-6 orders of magnitude smaller than typical atomic relative linewidths. For an adequately chosen electronic state the frequency of the nuclear ground-state transition will be independent from influences of external fields in the framework of the linear Zeeman and quadratic Stark effect, rendering 229mTh a candidate for a reference of an optical clock with very high accuracy. Moreover, in the literature speculations about a potentially enhanced sensitivity of the ground-state transition of $^{229m}$Th for eventual time-dependent variations of fundamental constants (e.g. fine structure constant alpha) can be found. We report on our experimental activities that aim at a direct identification of the UV fluorescence of the ground-state transition energy of 229mTh. A further goal is to improve the accuracy of the ground-state transition energy as a prerequisite for a laser-based optical control of this nuclear excited state, allowing to build a bridge between atomic and nuclear physics and open new perspectives for metrological as well as fundamental studies.

  3. Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to the Rooftop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Deck; Rick Russell

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Soliant Energy is a venture-capital-backed startup focused on bringing advanced concentrating solar panels to market. Our fundamental innovation is that we are the first company to develop a racking solar concentrator specifically for commercial rooftop applications, resulting in the lowest LCOE for rooftop electricity generation. Today, the commercial rooftop segment is the largest and fastest-growing market in the solar industry. Our concentrating panels can make a major contribution to the SAI's objectives: reducing the cost of solar electricity and rapidly deploying capacity. Our commercialization focus was re-shaped in 2009, shifting from an emphasis solely on panel efficiency to LCOE. Since the inception of the SAI program, LCOE has become the de facto standard for comparing commercial photovoltaic systems. While estimation and prediction models still differ, the emergence of performance-based incentive (PBI) and feed-in tariff (FIT) systems, as well as power purchase agreement (PPA) financing structures make LCOE the natural metric for photovoltaic systems. Soliant Energy has designed and demonstrated lower-cost, higher-power solar panels that consists of 6 (500X) PV module assemblies utilizing multi-junction cells and an integrated two-axis tracker. In addition, we have designed and demonstrated a prototype 1000X panel assembly with 8. Cost reductions relative to conventional flat panel PV systems were realized by (1) reducing the amount of costly semiconductor material and (2) developing strategies and processes to reduce the manufacturing costs of the entire system. Performance gains against conventional benchmarks were realized with (1) two-axis tracking and (2) higher-efficiency multi-junction PV cells capable of operating at a solar concentration ratio of 1000X (1000 kW/m2). The program objectives are: (1) Develop a tracking/concentrating solar module that has the same geometric form factor as a conventional flat, roof mounted photovoltaic (PV) panel - the Soliant module will produce more power and cost less than conventional panels of the same size; (2) Target LCOE: $0.079/kWh in 2010; (3) Target efficiency - 26% in 2010 (22% for 2008 prototype, 24% for 2009 pilot); and (4) Target performance - equivalent to 650Wp in 2010 (490W for 2008 prototype, 540W for 2009 pilot).

  4. Carbon fiber composite characterization in adverse thermal environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Vasquez, Sylvia; Brown, Alexander L.; Hubbard, Joshua A.; Ramirez, Ciro J.; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of carbon fiber aircraft composites was studied in adverse thermal environments. The effects of resin composition and fiber orientation were measured in two test configurations: 102 by 127 millimeter (mm) test coupons were irradiated at approximately 22.5 kW/m{sup 2} to measure thermal response, and 102 by 254 mm test coupons were irradiated at approximately 30.7 kW/m{sup 2} to characterize piloted flame spread in the vertically upward direction. Carbon-fiber composite materials with epoxy and bismaleimide resins, and uni-directional and woven fiber orientations, were tested. Bismaleimide samples produced less smoke, and were more resistant to flame spread, as expected for high temperature thermoset resins with characteristically lower heat release rates. All materials lost approximately 20-25% of their mass regardless of resin type, fiber orientation, or test configuration. Woven fiber composites displayed localized smoke jetting whereas uni-directional composites developed cracks parallel to the fibers from which smoke and flames emanated. Swelling and delamination were observed with volumetric expansion on the order of 100% to 200%. The purpose of this work was to provide validation data for SNL's foundational thermal and combustion modeling capabilities.

  5. adverse events related: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with severe adverse events consistent with YEL-AND or YEL-AVD were reported. All six patients were vaccinated in the United States with 17Dderived YEL, required...

  6. adverse environmental conditions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract Autonomous Driving benefits strongly from a 3D recon- struction of the environment in real 7 THE BLOOD OF NORTH AMERICAN FRESH-WATER MUSSELS UNDER NORMAL AND ADVERSE...

  7. adverse health effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j.vaccine.2009.12.030 Expected and Unexpected adverse effects H1N1 vaccination for health care workers in a University Hospital CiteSeer Summary: All authors declare that...

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 045421 (2011) Unique nature of the lowest Landau level in finite graphene samples with zigzag edges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannouleas, Constantine

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 045421 (2011) Unique nature of the lowest Landau level in finite graphene-0430, USA (Received 8 October 2010; published 27 January 2011) Dirac electrons in finite graphene samples graphene flakes (with various shapes) to determine the sublattice components of the electron density

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse birth outcomes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perspectives Children's Health | Article Summary: adverse effects of exposure to air pollution during pregnancy on birth weight and other pregnancy outcomes... adverse birth...

  10. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Geha, Marla [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G., E-mail: fsantana@das.uchile.cl, E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  11. ICE AND DUST IN THE PRESTELLAR DARK CLOUD LYNDS 183: PREPLANETARY MATTER AT THE LOWEST TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Poteet, C. A.; Bajaj, V. M.; Horne, D. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy and New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Chiar, J. E. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Pagani, L. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Shenoy, S. S. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Adamson, A. J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust grains are nucleation centers and catalysts for the growth of icy mantles in quiescent interstellar clouds, the products of which may accumulate into preplanetary matter when new stars and solar systems form within the clouds. In this paper, we present the first spectroscopic detections of silicate dust and the molecular ices H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} in the vicinity of the prestellar core L183 (L134N). An infrared photometric survey of the cloud was used to identify reddened background stars, and we present spectra covering solid-state absorption features in the wavelength range 2-20 {mu}m for nine of them. The mean composition of the ices in the best-studied line of sight (toward J15542044-0254073) is H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2} Almost-Equal-To 100:40:24. The ices are amorphous in structure, indicating that they have been maintained at low temperature ({approx}< 15 K) since formation. The ice column density N(H{sub 2}O) correlates with reddening by dust, exhibiting a threshold effect that corresponds to the transition from unmantled grains in the outer layers of the cloud to ice-mantled grains within, analogous to that observed in other dark clouds. A comparison of results for L183 and the Taurus and IC 5146 dark clouds suggests common behavior, with mantles first appearing in each case at a dust column corresponding to a peak optical depth {tau}{sub 9.7} = 0.15 {+-} 0.03 in the silicate feature. Our results support a previous conclusion that the color excess E{sub J-K} does not obey a simple linear correlation with the total dust column in lines of sight that intercept dense clouds. The most likely explanation is a systematic change in the optical properties of the dust as the density increases.

  12. Criminal Squatting and Adverse Possession: The Best Solution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Martin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , unless the claimant had met all of the conditions for success (including completion of a full 12 years adverse possession under the Limitation Act 1980) prior to the entry into force of the 2002 Act. However, Best never made it as far as triggering...

  13. Human-Centered Systems Analysis of Aircraft Separation from Adverse Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence

    Adverse weather significantly impacts the safety and efficiency of flight operations. Weather information

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse events issues Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INFLUENZA IMMUNISATION CONSENT FORM Name: Date of Birth: Summary: NO POSSIBLE ADVERSE EVENTS AND PRECAUTIONS...

  15. In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL] [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

  16. Lowest vibrational states of {sup 4}He{sup 3}He{sup +}: Non-Born-Oppenheimer calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanke, Monika; Bubin, Sergiy [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Kedziera, Dariusz [Department of Chemistry, Nicholaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, PL 87-100 Torun (Poland); Molski, Marcin [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Grunwaldzka 6, Poznan, PL 60-780 (Poland); Adamowicz, Ludwik [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the first five vibrational states of the {sup 4}He{sup 3}He{sup +} molecular ion are reported. The calculations have been performed explicitly including the coupling of the electronic and nuclear motions [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. The nonrelativistic non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic mass velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin interaction corrections. For the lowest vibrational transition, whose experimental energy is established with high precision, the calculated and the experimental results differ by only 0.16 cm{sup -1}.

  17. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotoh, Hideki, E-mail: gotoh.hideki@lab.ntt.co.jp; Sanada, Haruki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Sogawa, Tetsuomi [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL) method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD). PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE) are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  18. Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA:May1.docEx5.docof Energy Adverse Motor and

  19. Human-centered systems analysis of aircraft separation from adverse weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeant-Langlois, Laurence, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adverse weather significantly impacts the safety and efficiency of flight operations. Weather information plays a key role in mitigating the impact of adverse weather on flight operations by supporting air transportation ...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse clinical events Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Source: Carmichael, Owen - Computer Science Department, University of California, Davis Collection: Engineering 2 Created on 012907 Serious Adverse Events & Unanticipated...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse reactions varied Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    redness, or swelling where the shot is given... . Hoarseness; sore, red or itchy eyes; cough, fever, aches. PNEUMONIA VACCINE ADVERSE REACTIONS: redness... or pain where the shot...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse reactions induced Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    redness, or swelling where the shot is given... . Hoarseness; sore, red or itchy eyes; cough, fever, aches. PNEUMONIA VACCINE ADVERSE REACTIONS: redness... or pain where the shot...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - adversely impacts biological Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office Summary: geographic area May affect, likely to adversely affect animal Impact a PCE Ecological function of PCE Change... are found physical and biological features......

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aripiprazole metabolic adverse Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the adverse drug profile, a higher adherence has been... The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with psychotic disorders in the Netherlands 51 Chapter 6... The incidence...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse side effects Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Binomial Probabilities, with Application to Safety Studies for Drugs Summary: . In the pharmaceutical industry, such side effects are often called adverse events, and the...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - amodiaquine-associated adverse effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Binomial Probabilities, with Application to Safety Studies for Drugs Summary: . In the pharmaceutical industry, such side effects are often called adverse events, and the...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse environmental effects Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > >> 1 bbsrc EPSRC WMyWNT E S R Cm mr*-** Summary: practice for environmental management; seek to minimise the adverse environmental impacts of new... be avoided; work...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - adrs adverse drug Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 29 List of publications related to pharmavovigilance Summary: , Stricker BHC. Attitudinal survey of voluntary reporting of adverse drug reactions. Br J Clin...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution adversely Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution adversely Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Department of...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambulatory anticoagulant adverse Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as drug-drug interactions, drug- disease interactions and adverse drug... of the Dutch health care system for ambulatory and institutionalised elderly. The Dutch nursing home......

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse reaction post Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    containing amino acid master mix. This will not adversely affect the reaction. 18. Vortex the tube... be a precipitate visible in the tube containing amino acid master mix....

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse events bone Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse events bone Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Mechanoregulated bone adaptation in osteoarthritis This...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse reaction reporting Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse reaction reporting Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Improving pharmacovigilance and the role of the pharmacist...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse bisphosphonate event Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse bisphosphonate event Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 151Summary | Musculoskeletal disease is a collection of...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse weather conditions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    announced... on the adverse ... Source: North Carolina State University, North Carolina Solar Center Collection: Renewable Energy ; Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 2...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse perinatal events Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perinatal period, including adverse effects of smoking... and birth weight, spontaneous abortion, perinatal mortality, passive smoking and pregnancy, breastfeeding... in the...

  17. Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring In Psychiatric OPD Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring In Psychiatric Outpatient Department Of A Tertiary Care Hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiren K. Prajapati; Nisarg D. Joshi; Hiren R. Trivedi; Manubhai C. Parmar; Shilpa P. Jadav; Dinesh M. Parmar; Jalpan G. Kareliya

    Abstracts Background:Pharmacovigilance in psychiatry units can play vital role in detecting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and alerting physician to such events, thereby protecting the user population from avoidable harm. Objective: To assess the suspected ADRs profile of psychotropic drugs in psychiatry OPD of a tertiary care hospital and its comparison with available literature data as well as to create awareness among the consultant psychiatrists to these ADRs profile. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted in the psychiatry OPD. Thirty five consecutive patients per day were screened irrespective of their psychiatric diagnosis for suspected ADRs on 3 fixed days in a week from January 2011 to December 2011. CDSCO form was used to record the ADRs. Causality was assessed by WHO causality assessment scale while severity was assessed using Hartwig and Siegel scale. Results: Out of 4410 patients were screened, 383 patients were suspected of having at least one ADR. Thus, 8.68 % of our study population reported ADRs. Of 407 events recorded, 369(90.60%) were “probable ” and rest “possible ” according to WHO-UMC causality assessment

  18. Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    #12;Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3 Aerogels hold 15 different records for material properties, including best insulator 2.38 g piece of aerogel supports a 2.5 kg brick. #12;#12;#12;l = m Ã? n unit vector in orbital space

  19. The lowest-mass stellar black holes: catastrophic death of neutron stars in gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belczynski; R. O'Shaughnessy; V. Kalogera; F. Rasio; R. Taam; T. Bulik

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mergers of double neutron stars are considered the most likely progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. Indeed such a merger can produce a black hole with a transient accreting torus of nuclear matter (Lee & Ramirez-Ruiz 2007, Oechslin & Janka 2006), and the conversion of a fraction of the torus mass-energy to radiation can power a gamma-ray burst (Nakar 2006). Using available binary pulsar observations supported by our extensive evolutionary calculations of double neutron star formation, we demonstrate that the fraction of mergers that can form a black hole -- torus system depends very sensitively on the (largely unknown) maximum neutron star mass. We show that the available observations and models put a very stringent constraint on this maximum mass under the assumption that a black hole formation is required to produce a short gamma-ray burst in a double neutron star merger. Specifically, we find that the maximum neutron star mass must be within 2 - 2.5 Msun. Moreover, a single unambiguous measurement of a neutron star mass above 2.5 Msun would exclude a black hole -- torus central engine model of short gamma-ray bursts in double neutron star mergers. Such an observation would also indicate that if in fact short gamma-ray bursts are connected to neutron star mergers, the gamma-ray burst engine is best explained by the lesser known model invoking a highly magnetized massive neutron star (e.g., Usov 1992; Kluzniak & Ruderman 1998; Dai et al. 2006; Metzger, Quataert & Thompson 2007).

  20. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, Michael J. [Raytheon, Inc., Network Centric Systems, P.O. Box 12248, St. Petersburg, FL, 33733 (United States); Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Florida, 303 Weil Hall, Gainesville, FL, 32611 (United States); Resende, Mauricio G. C. [Algorithms and Optimization Research Department, AT and T Labs Research, 180 Park Avenue, Room C241, Florham Park, NJ 07932 (United States)

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse pulmonary events Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Long-Term Safety of Deep Brain Stimulation In the Treatment of Movement Disorders C. Kenney, MD, R. Simpson, MD, PhD, C. Hunter, RN, W. Ondo, MD, Summary: adverse events...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing adverse events Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Long-Term Safety of Deep Brain Stimulation In the Treatment of Movement Disorders C. Kenney, MD, R. Simpson, MD, PhD, C. Hunter, RN, W. Ondo, MD, Summary: adverse events...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse events aes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Long-Term Safety of Deep Brain Stimulation In the Treatment of Movement Disorders C. Kenney, MD, R. Simpson, MD, PhD, C. Hunter, RN, W. Ondo, MD, Summary: adverse events...

  4. Strategies for mitigating adverse environmental impacts due to structural building materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturvedi, Swati, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis assesses the problem of adverse environmental impacts due to the use of Portland cement and structural steel in the construction industry. The thesis outlines three technology and policy strategies to mitigate ...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse cardiac remodeling Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ajpheart.00831.2005 290:837-843, 2006. First published Sep 23, 2005;Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol Summary: to limit the adverse contractile and metabolic consequences...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse health risks Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: adverse health risks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Health Care through the Lens of Risk Call for Papers for a four part special issue of...

  7. Unique nature of the lowest Landau level in finite graphene samples with zigzag edges: Dirac electrons with mixed bulk-edge character

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Romanovsky; Constantine Yannouleas; Uzi Landman

    2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Dirac electrons in finite graphene samples with zigzag edges under high magnetic fields (in the regime of Landau-level formation) are investigated with regard to their bulk-type and edge-type character. We employ tight-binding calculations on finite graphene flakes (with various shapes) to determine the sublattice components of the electron density in conjunction with analytic expressions (via the parabolic cylinder functions) of the relativistic-electron spinors that solve the continuous Dirac-Weyl equation for a semi-infinite graphene plane. Away from the sample edge, the higher Landau levels are found to comprise exclusively electrons of bulk-type character (for both sublattices); near the sample edge, these electrons are described by edge-type states similar to those familiar from the theory of the integer quantum Hall effect for nonrelativistic electrons. In contrast, the lowest (zero) Landau level contains relativistic Dirac electrons of a mixed bulk-edge character without an analog in the nonrelativistic case. It is shown that such mixed bulk-edge states maintain also in the case of a square flake with combined zigzag and armchair edges. Implications for the many-body correlated-electron behavior (relating to the fractional quantum Hall effect) in finite graphene samples are discussed.

  8. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: the lowest energy states in $^9$He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in $^9$Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uberseder, E; Goldberg, V Z; Koshchiy, E; Roeder, B T; Alcorta, M; Chubarian, G; Davids, B; Fu, C; Hooker, J; Jayatissa, H; Melconian, D; Tribble, R E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound $^9$He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy $^9$He states exist with spins $J^\\pi=1/2^+$ and $J^\\pi=1/2^-$ and widths on the order of hundreds of keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the $^8$He$+n$ system, performed via a search for the T=5/2 isobaric analog states in $^9$Li populated through $^8$He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad $J^{\\pi}=1/2^+$ state in $^9$He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

  9. Defining and Modeling Known Adverse Outcome Pathways: Domoic Acid and Neuronal Signaling as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Karen H.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Basu, Nil; Carvan, Michael J.; Crofton, Kevin M.; King, Kerensa A.; Sunol, Cristina; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a sequence of key events from a molecular-level initiating event and an ensuing cascade of steps to an adverse outcome with population level significance. To implement a predictive strategy for ecotoxicology, the multiscale nature of an AOP requires computational models to link salient processes (e.g., in chemical uptake, toxicokinetics, toxicodynamics, and population dynamics). A case study with domoic acid was used to demonstrate strategies and enable generic recommendations for developing computational models in an effort to move toward a toxicity testing paradigm focused on toxicity pathway perturbations applicable to ecological risk assessment. Domoic acid, an algal toxin with adverse effects on both wildlife and humans, is a potent agonist for kainate receptors (ionotropic glutamate receptors whose activation leads to the influx of Na+ and Ca2+). Increased Ca2+ concentrations result in neuronal excitotoxicity and cell death primarily in the hippocampus, which produces seizures, impairs learning and memory, and alters behavior in some species. Altered neuronal Ca2+ is a key process in domoic acid toxicity which can be evaluated in vitro. Further, results of these assays would be amenable to mechanistic modeling for identifying domoic acid concentrations and Ca2+ perturbations that are normal, adaptive, or clearly toxic. In vitro assays with outputs amenable to measurement in exposed populations can link in vitro to in vivo conditions, and toxicokinetic information will aid in linking in vitro results to the individual organism. Development of an AOP required an iterative process with three important outcomes: (1) a critically reviewed, stressor-specific AOP; (2) identification of key processes suitable for evaluation with in vitro assays; and (3) strategies for model development.

  10. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Ryan T. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Tappert, Claus [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile); Hoffman, Douglas I. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Campbell, Ryan K., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: rthamilt@nmsu.edu, E-mail: claus.tappert@uv.cl, E-mail: dhoffman@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: Ryan.Campbell@humobldt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, CA 95521 (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the PACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to observe eight cataclysmic variables at 70 and 160 {mu}m. Of these eight objects, only AM Her was detected. We have combined the Herschel results with ground-based, Spitzer, and WISE observations to construct spectral energy distributions for all of the targets. For the two dwarf novae in the sample, SS Cyg and U Gem, we find that their infrared luminosities are completely dominated by their secondary stars. For the two highly magnetic 'polars' in our survey, AM Her and EF Eri, we find that their mid-infrared excesses, previously attributed to circumbinary dust emission, can be fully explained by cyclotron emission. The WISE light curves for both sources show large, orbitally modulated variations that are identically phased to their near-IR light curves. We propose that significant emission from the lowest cyclotron harmonics (n {<=} 3) is present in EF Eri and AM Her. Previously, such emission would have been presumed to be optically thick, and not provide significant orbitally modulated flux. This suggests that the accretion onto polars is more complicated than assumed in the simple models developed for these two sources. We develop a model for the near-/mid-IR light curves for WZ Sge with an L2 donor star that shows that the ellipsoidal variations from its secondary star are detected. We conclude that none of the targets surveyed have dusty circumbinary disks.

  11. Quantifying the Impact of Adverse Events on the Electricity Grid as a Function of Grid Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Du, Pengwei

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract--Traditional approaches to the study of grid vulnerability have taken an asset based approach, which seeks to identify those assets most likely to result in grid-wide failures or disruptions in the event that they are compromised. We propose an alternative approach to the study of grid vulnerability, one based on the topological structure of the entire grid. We propose a method that will identify topological parameters most closely related to the ability of the grid to withstand an adverse event. We compare these topological parameters in terms of their impact on the vulnerability metric we have defined, referred to as the grid’s “survivability”. Our approach is motivated by Paul Baran’s work on communications networks, which also studied vulnerability in terms of network-wide parameters. Our approach is useful both as a planning model for evaluating proposed changes to a grid and as a risk assessment tool.

  12. Correlation of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors With Adverse Pulmonary Outcomes in Children After Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar, E-mail: rvenkatramani@chla.usc.edu [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Kamath, Sunil [Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Olch, Arthur J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Malvar, Jemily [Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sposto, Richard [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Goodarzian, Fariba [Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Freyer, David R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Keens, Thomas G. [Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Pulmonology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); and others

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To identify the incidence and the risk factors for pulmonary toxicity in children treated for cancer with contemporary lung irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed clinical features, radiographic findings, pulmonary function tests, and dosimetric parameters of children receiving irradiation to the lung fields over a 10-year period. Results: We identified 109 patients (75 male patients). The median age at irradiation was 13.8 years (range, 0.04-20.9 years). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years. The median prescribed radiation dose was 21 Gy (range, 0.4-64.8 Gy). Pulmonary toxic chemotherapy included bleomycin in 58.7% of patients and cyclophosphamide in 83.5%. The following pulmonary outcomes were identified and the 5-year cumulative incidence after irradiation was determined: pneumonitis, 6%; chronic cough, 10%; pneumonia, 35%; dyspnea, 11%; supplemental oxygen requirement, 2%; radiographic interstitial lung disease, 40%; and chest wall deformity, 12%. One patient died of progressive respiratory failure. Post-irradiation pulmonary function tests available from 44 patients showed evidence of obstructive lung disease (25%), restrictive disease (11%), hyperinflation (32%), and abnormal diffusion capacity (12%). Thoracic surgery, bleomycin, age, mean lung irradiation dose (MLD), maximum lung dose, prescribed dose, and dosimetric parameters between V{sub 22} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?22 Gy) and V{sub 30} (volume of lung exposed to a radiation dose ?30 Gy) were significant for the development of adverse pulmonary outcomes on univariate analysis. MLD, maximum lung dose, and V{sub dose} (percentage of volume of lung receiving the threshold dose or greater) were highly correlated. On multivariate analysis, MLD was the sole significant predictor of adverse pulmonary outcome (P=.01). Conclusions: Significant pulmonary dysfunction occurs in children receiving lung irradiation by contemporary techniques. MLD rather than prescribed dose should be used to perform risk stratification of patients receiving lung irradiation.

  13. Modified design of radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator to mitigate adverse effect of measured cell voltage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, A.; Or, C.T.; Kumar, V. [Orbital Sciences Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A preceding OSC paper described a number of changes in the data base and in the methods--considerably more rigorous than those employed in the past--for analyzing the performance of Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) converters. As shown, some of those changes were beneficial, but others--particularly the use of EDTEK`s experimentally measured open-circuit voltages and fill factors instead of previously used theoretical equations--had a substantial adverse effect on the predicted converter performance. EDTEK is continuing work on improved PV cells to more closely approach theoretical voltage predictions. In parallel with that effort, OSC has been investigating a number of generator design modifications to achieve additional improvements in system performance. Specifically, OSC found that the converter`s performance could be significantly improved by increasing the heat flux incident on the PV cells. As will be explained, OSC`s preferred design, which entails placing the TPV converters on the housing`s end covers instead of its side walls, not only improves the generator`s performance but also offers important programmatic, fabrication, and processing advantages.

  14. Most informed people realize that cumulative impacts have had significant adverse effects on water quality and aquatic resources.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are highly inter-related. One large variable in the puzzle are the choices people make. Choices Affect us AllMost informed people realize that cumulative impacts have had significant adverse effects on water to look at shorelines as an ecosystem. The ecosystem concept is important because our coastal lands, air

  15. Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    , national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

  16. Observables of Macdonald processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

  17. Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

  18. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

  19. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jian-Bo [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Wang, Hao [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Zhi-Liang, E-mail: appo@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  20. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  1. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  2. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  3. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  4. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

  5. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

  6. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  7. EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

  8. Observation of the Kondo effect in a spin-3/2 hole quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klochan, O.; Micolich, A. P.; Hamilton, A. R. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Trunov, K.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D. [Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of the Kondo effect in a spin-3/2 hole quantum dot formed near pinch-off in a GaAs quantum wire. We clearly observe two distinctive hallmarks of quantum dot Kondo physics. First, the zero-bias peak in the differential conductance splits an in-plane magnetic field and the splitting is independent of gate voltage. Second, the splitting rate is twice as large as that for the lowest one-dimensional subband. We show that the Zeeman splitting of the zero-bias peak is highly anisotropic and attribute this to the strong spin-orbit interaction for holes in GaAs.

  9. Observation of spin-wave dispersion in Nd-Fe-B magnets using neutron Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, K., E-mail: kanta.ono@kek.jp; Inami, N.; Saito, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Kawana, D.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yano, M.; Shoji, T.; Manabe, A.; Kato, A. [Toyota Motor Corporation, Toyota, Aichi 471-8571 (Japan); Kaneko, Y. [Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-energy spin-wave dispersion in polycrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets was observed using neutron Brillouin scattering (NBS). Low-energy spin-wave excitations for the lowest acoustic spin-wave mode were clearly observed. From the spin-wave dispersion, we were able to determine the spin-wave stiffness constant D{sub sw} (100.0?±?4.9?meV.Å{sup 2}) and the exchange stiffness constant A (6.6 ± 0.3 pJ/m)

  10. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofofEdge Turbulence

  11. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

  12. Observing alternatives to inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Peter

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

  13. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  14. Implications of SCUBA observations for the Planck Surveyor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Scott; Martin White

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the implications for the Planck Surveyor of the recent sub-millimetre number counts obtained using the SCUBA camera. Since it observes at the same frequency as one of the higher frequency science channels on Planck, SCUBA can provide constraints on the point-source contribution to the CMB angular power spectrum, which require no extrapolation in frequency. We have calculated the two-point function of these sub-millimetre sources, using a Poisson model normalized to the observed counts. While the current data are uncertain, under reasonable assumptions the point-source contribution to the anisotropy is comparable to the noise in the 353GHz channel. The clustering of these sources is currently unknown, however if they cluster like the z~3 Lyman-break galaxies their signal would be larger than the primary anisotropy signal on scales smaller than about 10 arcmin. We expect the intensity of these sources to decrease for wavelengths longward of 850 microns. At the next lowest Planck frequency, 217GHz, the contribution from both the clustered and Poisson terms are dramatically reduced. Hence we do not expect these sources to seriously affect Planck's main science goal, the determination of the primordial anisotropy power spectrum. Rather, the potential determination of the distribution of sub-mm sources is a further piece of cosmology that Planck may be able to tackle.

  15. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    each station (typical gasoline stations today receive fuelstations, like gasoline stations, are likely to come in acomparable to a large gasoline station. For a given city

  16. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    each station (typical gasoline stations today receive fuelstations, like gasoline stations, are likely to come in acomparable to a large gasoline station. For a given city

  17. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquefaction and liquid hydrogen storage tanks are needed.low cost of liquid hydrogen storage is offset by the highrefueling pressure. Hydrogen storage requirements vary among

  18. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquefaction and liquid hydrogen storage tanks are needed.low cost of liquid hydrogen storage is offset by the highrefueling pressure. Hydrogen storage requirements vary among

  19. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a central hydrogen production plant to a single point)atm at the central hydrogen production plant. The trailer isemissions at the hydrogen production plant, as well. This is

  20. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from a central hydrogen production plant to a single point)atm at the central hydrogen production plant. The trailer isemissions at the hydrogen production plant, as well. This is

  1. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs to estimate hydrogen pipeline costs. Davis, CA: ITS-hydrogen. The cost of hydrogen pipeline delivery de- pendshydrogen trucks, and hydrogen pipelines, were devel- oped

  2. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. 2004, ITS-Davis:hydrogen. The cost of hydrogen pipeline delivery depends onCosts to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs. 2004, ITS-Davis:

  3. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    costs to estimate hydrogen pipeline costs. Davis, CA: ITS-hydrogen trucks, and hydrogen pipelines, were devel- opedFor large amounts of hydrogen, pipeline transmission is pre-

  4. Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal energy - energy derived from the heat of the earth - has the ability to produce electricity consistently around the clock, draws a small environmental footprint, and...

  5. Lowest-rank Solutions of Continuous and Discrete Lyapunov ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    equations via nuclear norm minimization, SIAM Review, Vol.52,. No.3, (2010) .... variable is symmetric and positive semidefinite, the nuclear norm turns out to be ...

  6. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen flow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressorhydrogen storage tanks are needed. Costs for central plant compressors

  7. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,and compressors have small-scale economies at this size range. Liquid hydrogenhydrogen ?ow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor

  8. Federal Government's Energy Consumption Lowest in Almost 40 Years |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES ANDIndustrialEnergy Federal EfficiencyReporting & Data

  9. Thermalization at lowest energies? A view from a transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C Hartnack; H Oeschler; J Aichelin

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model we analyzed the production of pions and kaons in the energy range of 1-2 AGeV in order to study the question why thermal models could achieve a successful description. For this purpose we study the variation of pion and kaon yields using different elementary cross sections. We show that several ratios appear to be rather robust versus their variations.

  10. Determining the lowest-cost hydrogen delivery mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen ?ow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor cost.hydrogen storage tanks are needed. Costs for central plant compressors

  11. Determining the Lowest-Cost Hydrogen Delivery Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid hydrogen pumps cost less than compressors. Further,hydrogen flow rate, though there are slight economies of scale associated with compressor cost.

  12. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa Higgs-like

  13. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa

  14. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding accessandBusinessDevelopmentObligations

  15. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding

  16. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  17. Gamma Ray Burst Afterglow Observations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updike, Adria

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe. We present an overview of the observational history of GRBs and the… (more)

  18. 8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut f¨ur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

  19. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barrau; J. Grain

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  20. First XMM-Newton observations of a Cataclysmic Variable I: Timing studies of OY Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin Ramsay; Tracey Poole; Keith Mason; France Cordova; William Priedhorsky; Alice Breeveld; Rudi Much; Julian Osborne; Dirk Pandel; Stephen Potter; Jennifer West; Peter Wheatley

    2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing, disc accreting, cataclysmic variable OY Car which were obtained as part of the performance verification phase of the mission. The star was observed 4 days after an outburst and then again 5 weeks later when it was in a quiescent state. There is a quasi-stable modulation of the X-rays at ~2240 sec, which is most prominent at the lowest energies. We speculate that this may be related to the spin period of the white dwarf. The duration of the eclipse ingress and egress in X-rays is 20--30 sec. This indicates that the bulk of the X-ray emission originates from the boundary layer which has a negligible height above the surface of the white dwarf. The eclipse profile implies a white dwarf of mass M_{1}=0.9-1.1Msun and a secondary star of M_{2}=0.08-0.11Msun.

  1. Observational Tests of Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhuvnesh Jain; Pengjie Zhang

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structure than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics and the ISW effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the Gravitational ``constant'' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which breaks the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions).

  2. Adventure and Adversity Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    looked after Alys and the children for me when they could, although being 17 and at Cambridge, my darling Robin can hardly be called a child any longer. My eldest son, his mother and his siblings are well. Having come out several months ago, Dinah.... My organ does not erupt, nor does it even stiffen beyond moderation, yet there, is as much pleasure...no,more so, than in the memories of a dozen nights making passionate love to my darlings. "Jamie? Whafs wrong?" Edward asks softly. Breathless...

  3. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  4. Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  5. Observational Consequences of a Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Freivogel; Matthew Kleban; Maria Rodriguez Martinez; Leonard Susskind

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the implications of the "landscape" paradigm for the large scale properties of the universe. The most direct implication of a rich landscape is that our local universe was born in a tunnelling event from a neighboring vacuum. This would imply that we live in an open FRW universe with negative spatial curvature. We argue that the "overshoot" problem, which in other settings would make it difficult to achieve slow roll inflation, actually favors such a cosmology. We consider anthropic bounds on the value of the curvature and on the parameters of inflation. When supplemented by statistical arguments these bounds suggest that the number of inflationary efolds is not very much larger than the observed lower bound. Although not statistically favored, the likelihood that the number of efolds is close to the bound set by observations is not negligible. The possible signatures of such a low number of efolds are briefly described.

  6. Observations of the Icy Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

  7. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Dorgan, Vincent E. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Estrada, David [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Wood, Joshua D. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Vlassiouk, Ivan V [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Lyding, Joseph W [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; King, William P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Pop, Eric [Stanford University

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with 50 nm spatial and 0.2K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8 150 X lm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  8. Multicolor Infrared Observations of SN 2006aj, the Supernova Associated with XRF 060218 - Paper I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocevski, D; Bloom, J S; Foley, R; Starr, D; Blake, C H; Wood-Vasey, M; Falco, E E; Butler, N R; Skrutskie, M F; Szentgyorgyi, A; Kocevski, Daniel; Modjaz, Maryam; Bloom, Joshua S.; Foley, Ryan; Starr, Daniel; Blake, Cullen H.; Wood-Vasey, Michael; Falco, Emilio E.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Skrutskie, Mike; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report simultaneous multicolor near-infrared (NIR) observations of the supernova associated with x-ray Flash 060218 during the first 16 days after the high energy event. We find that the light curve rises and peaks relatively fast compared to other SN Ic, with the characteristic broad NIR peak seen in all three bands. We find that the rise profile before the peak is largely independent of NIR wavelength, each band appearing to transition into a plateau phase around day 10--13. Since the light curve is in the plateau phase when our observations end at day 16, we can only place limits on the peak absolute magnitudes, but we estimate that SN 2006aj is one of the lowest NIR luminosity XRF/GRB associated SNe observed to date. The broad peaks observed in the {\\em JHK$_s$} bands point to a large increase in the NIR contribution of the total flux output from days 10--16. This evolution can be seen in the broad color and SED diagrams constructed using {\\em UBVRIJHK$_s$} monochromatic flux measurements for the first...

  9. Null geodesics and observational cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley

    2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Universe is not isotropic or spatially homogeneous on local scales. The averaging of local inhomogeneities in general relativity can lead to significant dynamical effects on the evolution of the Universe, and even if the effects are at the 1% level they must be taken into account in a proper interpretation of cosmological observations. We discuss the effects that averaging (and inhomogeneities in general) can have on the dynamical evolution of the Universe and the interpretation of cosmological data. All deductions about cosmology are based on the paths of photons. We discuss some qualitative aspects of the motion of photons in an averaged geometry, particularly within the context of the luminosity distance-redshift relation in the simple case of spherical symmetry.

  10. Observational Field Assessment of Invasiveness for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    synthesis............................................................... 8 Jatropha observations.................................................................. 9 Jatropha risk synthesis................................................................. 12 and invasiveness. Observations were made around field plantings of banagrass, Jatropha (Jatropha curcas

  11. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

  12. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF 1ES 1959+650 IN A LOW FLUX STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the VERITAS observations of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 in the period 2007-2011. This source is detected at TeV energies by VERITAS at 16.4 standard deviation ({sigma}) significance in 7.6 hr of observation in a low flux state. A multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) is constructed from contemporaneous data from VERITAS, Fermi-LAT, RXTE PCA, and Swift UVOT. Swift XRT data is not included in the SED due to a lack of simultaneous observations with VERITAS. In contrast to the orphan {gamma}-ray flare exhibited by this source in 2002, the X-ray flux of the source is found to vary by an order of magnitude, while other energy regimes exhibit less variable emission. A quasi-equilibrium synchrotron self-Compton model with an additional external radiation field is used to describe three SEDs corresponding to the lowest, highest, and average X-ray states. The variation in the X-ray spectrum is modeled by changing the electron injection spectral index, with minor adjustments of the kinetic luminosity in electrons. This scenario produces small-scale flux variability of the order of {approx}< 2 in the high energy (E > 1 MeV) and very high energy (E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray regimes, which is corroborated by the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS, and Whipple 10 m telescope light curves.

  13. Discrimination of quantum observables using limited resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Ziman; Teiko Heinosaari

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of unambiguous discrimination and identification among quantum observables. We set a general framework and investigate in details the case of qubit observables. In particular, we show that perfect discrimination with two shots is possible only for sharp qubit observables (e.g. Stern-Gerlach apparatuses) associated with mutually orthogonal directions. We also show that for sharp qubit observables associated to nonorthogonal directions unambiguous discrimination with an inconclusive result is always possible.

  14. JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;1 Disasters Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Earth Observation Targets (JFY) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

  15. STAR FORMATION IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: OBSERVATIONS CONFRONT SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damen, Maaike; Franx, Marijn [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Labbe, Ivo [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Toft, Sune [Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 172100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Wuyts, Stijn, E-mail: damen@strw.leidenuniv.n [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the star formation history of the universe using FIREWORKS, a multiwavelength survey of the Chandra Deep Field South. We study the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR) with redshift in different mass bins from z = 0 to z approx 3. We find that the sSFR increases with redshift for all masses. The logarithmic increase of the sSFR with redshift is nearly independent of mass, but this cannot yet be verified at the lowest-mass bins at z>0.8, due to incompleteness. We convert the sSFRs to a dimensionless growth rate to facilitate a comparison with a semianalytic galaxy formation model that was implemented on the Millennium Simulation. The model predicts that the growth rates and sSFRs increase similarly with redshift for all masses, consistent with the observations. However, we find that for all masses, the inferred observed growth rates increase more rapidly with redshift than the model predictions. We discuss several possible causes for this discrepancy, ranging from field-to-field variance, conversions to SFR, and shape of the initial mass function. We find that none of these can solve the discrepancy completely. We conclude that the models need to be adapted to produce the steep increase in growth rate between redshift z = 0 and z = 1.

  16. SOFIA/EXES Observations of Water Absorption in the Protostar AFGL 2591 at High Spectral Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indriolo, Nick; DeWitt, C N; Richter, M J; Boogert, A C A; Harper, G M; Jaffe, D T; Kulas, K R; McKelvey, M E; Ryde, N; Vacca, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high spectral resolution (~3 km/s) observations of the nu_2 ro-vibrational band of H2O in the 6.086--6.135 micron range toward the massive protostar AFGL 2591 using the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Ten absorption features are detected in total, with seven caused by transitions in the nu_2 band of H2O, two by transitions in the first vibrationally excited nu_2 band of H2O, and one by a transition in the nu_2 band of H2{18}O. Among the detected transitions is the nu_2 1(1,1)--0(0,0) line which probes the lowest lying rotational level of para-H2O. The stronger transitions appear to be optically thick, but reach maximum absorption at a depth of about 25%, suggesting that the background source is only partially covered by the absorbing gas, or that the absorption arises within the 6 micron emitting photosphere. Assuming a covering fraction of 25%, the H2O column density and rotational temperature that best fit the observed abs...

  17. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  18. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  19. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  20. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  1. HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maynard, J. Barry

    HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861 - 1881 October 2004 Prepared By Glen Conner Center under the auspices of the Climate Database Modernization Program, NOAA's National Climatic Data;1 HISTORY OF WEATHER OBSERVATIONS MOUNT AUBURN, OHIO 1861-1881 Glen Conner Kentucky State Climatologist

  2. Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    Astronomy 362: Observational Astronomy University of Montana Fall 2010 T/Th 2:10 ­ 3:30 pm CHCB 227://www.physics.umt.edu/~nate/astr362/ Course Description Observational astronomy relies heavily on application of advanced technology astronomy is dominated by the CCD and related pixel array detectors: digital devices with unprecedented

  3. ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORTPERIOD COMETS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    1 ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORT­PERIOD COMETS \\Lambda J. Crovisier 1 , T. Encrenaz 1 , E 4 , E. van Dishoeck 5 , R. Knacke 6 , T.Y. Brooke 7 1 Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, France 2 ISO are found in a short­period comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiter­family comet P/Hartley 2, presum

  4. NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CIVIL EARTH OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    for providing satellite observations. The final step in this process will be the publication of a National Plan; Homeland and National Security; Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education; ScienceNATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CIVIL EARTH OBSERVATIONS Executive Office of the President National Science

  5. Observed Cosmological Redshifts Support Contracting Accelerating Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The main argument that Universe is currently expanding is observed redshift increase by distance. However, this conclusion may not be correct, because cosmological redshift depends only on the scaling factors, the change in the size of the universe during the time of light propagation and is not related to the speed of observer or speed of the object emitting the light. An observer in expanding universe will measure the same redshift as observer in contracting universe with the same scaling. This was not taken into account in analysing the SN Ia data related to the universe acceleration. Possibility that universe may contract, but that the observed light is cosmologically redshifted allows for completely different set of cosmological parameters $\\Omega_M, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}$, including the solution $\\Omega_M=1, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0$. The contracting and in the same time accelerating universe explains observed deceleration and acceleration in SN Ia data, but also gives significantly larger value for the age of the universe, $t_0 = 24$ Gyr. This allows to reconsider classical cosmological models with $\\Lambda =0$. The contracting stage also may explain the observed association of high redshifted quasars to low redshifted galaxies.

  6. Time changes in gradient and observed winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD DALE CARLSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillm=n of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1972 Major Subject...: Meteorology TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD D. CARLSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co , ee) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT Time Changes in Gradient and Observed Winds. (May 1972) Ronald Dale...

  7. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE OLDEST WHITE DWARFS IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilic, Mukremin [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kowalski, Piotr M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Reach, William T. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Von Hippel, Ted [Physics Department, Siena College, 515 Loudon Road, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)], E-mail: mkilic@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Spitzer 5-15 {mu}m spectroscopy of one cool white dwarf and 3.6-8 {mu}m photometry of 51 cool white dwarfs with T {sub eff} < 6000 K. The majority of our targets have accurate BVRIJHK photometry and trigonometric parallax measurements available, which enables us to perform a detailed model atmosphere analysis using their optical, near- and mid-infrared photometry with state-of-the-art model atmospheres. We demonstrate that the optical and infrared spectral energy distributions of cool white dwarfs are well reproduced by our grid of models. Our best-fit models are consistent with the observations within 5% in all filters except the IRAC 8 {mu}m band, which has the lowest signal-to-noise ratio photometry. Excluding the ultracool white dwarfs, none of the stars in our sample show significant mid-infrared flux deficits or excesses. The nondetection of mid-infrared excess flux around our {approx}2-9 Gyr old targets constrain the fraction of cool white dwarfs with warm debris disks to 0.8{sup +1.5} {sub -0.8} %.

  8. PEP Classroom Observation Protocol Project # _______ District __________________________ School ________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    PEP Classroom Observation Protocol Project # _______ District __________________________ School (mark all that apply) Demonstrate or confirm known concepts/procedures Demonstrate or confirm known concepts/procedures Explore ideas, test conjectures, look for patterns Explore ideas, test conjectures

  9. Near-Infrared Observations April 9, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    idea: correct wavefront distortions using a deformable secondary mirror · can achieve better correction;Energy Generation · what are we seeing when we observe solar system objects in the NIR? · reflected

  10. INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

  11. MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

  12. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  13. Infrasonic observations of the Northridge, California, earthquake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutschlecner, J.P.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrasonic waves from the Northridge, California, earthquake of 17 January 1994 were observed at the St. George, Utah, infrasound array of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The distance to the epicenter was 543 kilometers. The signal shows a complex character with many peaks and a long duration. An interpretation is given in terms of several modes of signal propagation and generation including a seismic-acoustic secondary source mechanism. A number of signals from aftershocks are also observed.

  14. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  15. Experimental and Numerical Observations of Hydrate Reformation during Depressurization in a Core-Scale Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Myshakin, Evgeniy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrate has been predicted to reform around a wellbore during depressurization-based gas production from gas hydrate-bearing reservoirs. This process has an adverse effect on gas production rates and it requires time and sometimes special measures to resume gas flow to producing wells. Due to lack of applicable field data, laboratory scale experiments remain a valuable source of information to study hydrate reformation. In this work, we report laboratory experiments and complementary numerical simulations executed to investigate the hydrate reformation phenomenon. Gas production from a pressure vessel filled with hydrate-bearing sand was induced by depressurization with and without heat flux through the boundaries. Hydrate decomposition was monitored with a medical X-ray CT scanner and pressure and temperature measurements. CT images of the hydrate-bearing sample were processed to provide 3-dimensional data of heterogeneous porosity and phase saturations suitable for numerical simulations. In the experiments, gas hydrate reformation was observed only in the case of no-heat supply from surroundings, a finding consistent with numerical simulation. By allowing gas production on either side of the core, numerical simulations showed that initial hydrate distribution patterns affect gas distribution and flow inside the sample. This is a direct consequence of the heterogeneous pore network resulting in varying hydraulic properties of the hydrate-bearing sediment.

  16. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  17. Predictions for Observing Protostellar Outflows with ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, C; Arce, H G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protostellar outflows provide a means to probe the accretion process of forming stars and their ability to inject energy into their surroundings. However, conclusions based on outflow observations depend upon the degree of accuracy with which their properties can be estimated. We examine the quality of Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of protostellar outflows by producing synthetic $^{12}$CO(1-0) and $^{13}$CO(1-0) observations of numerical simulations. We use various ALMA configurations, observational parameters, and outflow inclinations to assess how accurately different assumptions and setups can recover underlying properties. We find that more compact arrays and longer observing times can improve the mass and momentum recovery by a factor of two. During the first $\\sim$0.3 Myr of evolution, $^{12}$CO(1-0) is optically thick, even for velocities $|v|\\ge 1$ km s$^{-1}$, and outflow mass is severely underestimated without an optical depth correction. Likewise, $^{13}$CO(1-0) i...

  18. The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

  19. Using the Galileoscope in astronomical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, V A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to attract school students and teachers from the state education system from Ca\\c{c}apava do Sul - RS to Sciences and specially to Astronomy. We made astronomical observations using a Galileoscope choosing the Moon as a primary target. We also observed others objects that present high brightness in the night sky. The selection of targets, and their identification during the observations were carried out by a free software of planetary simulation, Stellarium. The results were in qualitative form and they show the great interest demonstrated by those participating in the project. Furthermore, this project helped to improve the understanding of the physical proprieties of the night sky objects (e.g. color). Finally, the project has showed that using a simple equipment and of relatively low cost it is possible to bring more people, specially the young students, to the Science World and to Astronomy.

  20. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANITA collaboration; P. W. Gorham; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  1. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Goodhue, A; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B; Miki, C; Miocinovic, P; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R; Palladino, K J; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Saltzberg, D; Secke, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  2. Sources of Gravitational Waves: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Buonanno; B. S. Sathyaprakash

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational-wave astronomy will soon become a new tool for observing the Universe. Detecting and interpreting gravitational waves will require deep theoretical insights into astronomical sources. The past three decades have seen remarkable progress in analytical and numerical computations of the source dynamics, development of search algorithms and analysis of data from detectors with unprecedented sensitivity. This Chapter is devoted to examine the advances and future challenges in understanding the dynamics of binary and isolated compact-object systems, expected cosmological sources, their amplitudes and rates, and highlights of results from gravitational-wave observations. All of this is a testament to the readiness of the community to open a new window for observing the cosmos, a century after gravitational waves were first predicted by Albert Einstein.

  3. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  4. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  5. Observation of d-Orbital Aromaticity. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation of aObservation

  6. Satellite Observations towards the Agriculture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    map by AVNIR-2 20m spatial resolution 1 , Bare surface 2 Water 3 Urban 4 Paddy 5 Crop 6 Atmospheric Remote Sensing External Ground Truth (Country Reports/News Services) Ag Industry Trade Industry water stress index (2010/07) · Low NDVI Land Environment Information observed by MODIS, etc. 2010

  7. Direct Observation of Born-Oppenheimer Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Steve

    Direct Observation of Born-Oppenheimer Approximation Breakdown in Carbon Nanotubes Adam W of the theoretically predicted breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes. The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) or adiabatic approximation is widely used to simplify the very complex

  8. 8) Stratospheric equatorial variability a) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal;5 Satellites wind observations (UARS, Swinbak et Ortland 1997) The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (low stratosphere

  9. Energy flow observables in hadronic collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hautmann

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent QCD calculations of energy flow distributions associated with the production of jets at wide rapidity separations in high-energy hadron collisions, and discuss the role of these observables to analyze contributions from parton showering and from multiple parton collisions.

  10. observation at CDF Dmitry Litvintsev (Fermilab CD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    b observation at CDF Dmitry Litvintsev (Fermilab CD) for CDF June 15, 2007 Special seminar #12 and plans q Conclusion June 15, 2007 Dmitry Litvintsev, Fermilab, CDF 2 #12;Introduction Happy to show, Fermilab, CDF 3 #12;Source of data: CDF II 3 ¡ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ total 2 ¢ ¡ ¢ £ ¤ on tape Analysis uses data

  11. Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, Joseph Y.

    Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier Dept. Computer Science University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia Canada, V6T 1W5 cebly@cs.ubc.ca Nir Friedman ¡£¢ Computer Research in belief revision has been dominated by work that lies firmly within the classic AGM paradigm

  12. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Mike

    INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND ERHAN BAYRAKTAR AND MICHAEL LUDKOVSKI Abstract. We consider a continuous-time model for inventory management with Markov mod- ulated non inventory level. We then solve this equivalent formulation and directly characterize an optimal inventory

  13. AN INTEGRATED GLOBAL OBSERVING SYSTEM FOR SEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) transition of the research results into sustained operations; and 3) management ap- plications in the U, and effective data integration and dissemination. Efficient management of sustained observing sys- tem, and the management and strategic planning applications at CPO. The final discussion contains some concluding remarks

  14. Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    that energetic electron fluxes peak at sites of compressed density within islands, which imposes a new constraintLETTERS Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands L.-J. CHEN1 *, A. BHATTACHARJEE1, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA 2 National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2

  15. INTEGRAL observations of Her X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; K. Postnov; N. Shakura; A. Santangelo; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate the X-ray spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005. Methods: The data analyzed in this work cover a substantial part of one main-on state of the source. The short-time scale pulse period development is measured. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy ranges and time intervals are constructed. Pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved broad band X-ray spectra are studied. Spectral changes during X-ray dips are explored. Results: The X-ray pulse profiles are found to change significantly during the period of observations. For the first time a strong spinup is measured within one 35 d cycle. Spectral characteristics observed during the X-ray dips are consistent with their interpretaion as due to partial covering as has been reported by several authors. The fundamental cyclotron absorption line is firmly observed in both pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved X-ray spectra. The energy, width, and the depth of the line are found to vary significantly with pulse phase.

  16. ISO observations of four active galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Dennefeld; Thomas Boller; Dimitra Rigopoulou; Henrik Spoon

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ISO PHOT-S spectra of four galaxies known or suspected to host a central AGN, selected from the initial Iras/Rosat sample of Boller et al. (1992). Two of them had no obvious Seyfert features in their previous optical spectra: IRAS 14201+2956, and IRAS 21582+1018. The latter was bright enough to also allow SWS observations around selected neon lines, to establish its excitation. While both PHOT-S spectra are characteristic of starburst-dominated galaxies, the neon line ratios in IRAS 21582+1018 indicate the presence of a hard excitation source. New, high-resolution, optical spectra show only a weak, broad component around Halpha, classifying now these two objects as Sey 1.9 galaxies. The two other galaxies observed are the NLS1 galaxies Mrk 359 and Mrk 1388. Their ISO spectra however do not reveal the typical, strong PAH features found in the starburst galaxies and are more like those of standard Seyferts. These results show therefore that, although IR observations were expected to be able to always reveal the presence of an active nucleus by piercing through the central obscuration, the result may be ambiguous: the broad band IR energy distribution can still be dominated by starburts located in a circumnuclear region, and the AGN appear only in specific observations (high-excitation lines in the IR, or optical spectra with better quality than classification spectra). The obscuration needs however to be patchy rather than complete, to explain the detection of the high-excitation lines or broad Balmer wings. Only high-energy observations can then establish the strength of the central AGN and the amount of extinction with certainty.

  17. Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations to model the quantum harmonic oscillator modes observed in uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J. Y. Y. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Aczel, Adam A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL] [ORNL; Buyers, W. J. L. [National Research Council of Canada] [National Research Council of Canada; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently an extended series of equally spaced vibrational modes was observed in uranium nitride (UN) by performing neutron spectroscopy measurements using the ARCS and SEQUOIA time-of- flight chopper spectrometers [A.A. Aczel et al, Nature Communications 3, 1124 (2012)]. These modes are well described by 3D isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) behavior of the nitrogen atoms, but there are additional contributions to the scattering that complicate the measured response. In an effort to better characterize the observed neutron scattering spectrum of UN, we have performed Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations of the ARCS and SEQUOIA experiments with various sample kernels, accounting for the nitrogen QHO scattering, contributions that arise from the acoustic portion of the partial phonon density of states (PDOS), and multiple scattering. These simulations demonstrate that the U and N motions can be treated independently, and show that multiple scattering contributes an approximate Q-independent background to the spectrum at the oscillator mode positions. Temperature dependent studies of the lowest few oscillator modes have also been made with SEQUOIA, and our simulations indicate that the T-dependence of the scattering from these modes is strongly influenced by the uranium lattice.

  18. First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P [Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C [Rutherford; Auty, D J [Sussex U.; Ayres, D S [Argonne; Backhouse, C [Oxford U.; Barr, G [Oxford U.; Bishai, M [Brookhaven; Blake, A [Cambridge U.; Bock, G J [Fermilab; Boehnlein, D J [/Fermilab; Bogert, D [Fermilab; Harvard U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

  19. Observation of single top at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casal, Bruno; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observation of electroweak single top quark production using 3.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF experiment. Candidate events are selected for further classification by five parallel analysis techniques: one using a likelihood discriminant, one using a matrix-element discriminant, one using decision trees, one using a neural network, and one using a complementary dataset. The results of these analyses are combined in order to improve the expected sensitivity. The significance of the observed data is 5.0 standard deviations, and the expected sensitivity is in excess of 5.9 standard deviations. We also present the most current value of the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|.

  20. Observational constraints on braneworld chaotic inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R Liddle; Anthony J Smith

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine observational constraints on chaotic inflation models in the Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld. If inflation takes place in the high-energy regime, the perturbations produced by the quadratic potential are further from scale-invariance than in the standard cosmology, in the quartic case more or less unchanged, while for potentials of greater exponent the trend is reversed. We test these predictions against a data compilation including the WMAP measurements of microwave anisotropies and the 2dF galaxy power spectrum. While in the standard cosmology the quartic potential is at the border of what the data allow and all higher powers excluded, we find that in the high-energy regime of braneworld inflation even the quadratic case is under strong observational pressure. We also investigate the intermediate regime where the brane tension is comparable to the inflationary energy scale, where the deviations from scale-invariance prove to be greater.

  1. Electron Cloud observation in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Höfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Métral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

  2. Observable Proxies For 26 Al Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Patrick A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ellinger, Carola I [ASU; Arnett, William D [UNIV ARIZONA

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the cospatial production of elements in supernova explosions to find observationally detectable proxies for enhancement of {sup 26}Al in supernova ejecta and stellar systems. Using four progenitors we explore a range of 1D explosions at different energies and an asymmetric 3D explosion. We find that the most reliable indicator of the presence of {sup 26}Al in unmixed ejecta is a very low S/Si ratio ({approx} 0.05). Production of N in O/S/Si-rich regions is also indicative. The biologically important element P is produced at its highest abundance in the same regions. Proxies should be detectable in supernova ejecta with high spatial resolution multi wavelength observations, but the small absolute abundance of material injected into a proto-planetary disk makes detection unlikely in existing or forming stellar/planetary systems.

  3. Constraining the Braneworld with Gravitational Wave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWilliams, Sean T. [Gravitational Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the {approx}1 {mu}m level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l{<=}5 {mu}m.

  4. Velocity coordinate spectrum: geometrical aspects of observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chepurnov; A. Lazarian

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a technique of obtaining turbulence power spectrum using spectral line data along the velocity coordinate, which we refer to as Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS). We formalize geometrical aspects of observation through a single factor, "geometric term". We find that all variety of particular observational configurations can be described using correspondent variants of this term, which we explicitly calculate. This allows us to obtain asymptotics for both parallel lines of sight and crossing lines of sight. The latter case is especially important for studies of turbulence within diffuse ISM in Milky Way. For verification of our results, we use direct calculation of VCS spectra, while the numerical simulations are presented in a companion paper.

  5. Observation of Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan State U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report first observation of the electroweak production of single top quarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 2.3 fb{sup ?1} of data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using events containing an isolated electron or muon and missing transverse energy, together with jets originating from the fragmentation of b quarks, we measure a cross section of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 2.5 x 10{sup ?7}, corresponding to a 5.0 standard deviation significance for the observation.

  6. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  7. Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

  8. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  9. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

  10. Extreme commutative quantum observables are sharp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teiko Heinosaari; Juha-Pekka Pellonpää

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that, in the description of quantum observables, positive operator valued measures (POVMs) generalize projection valued measures (PVMs) and they also turn out be more optimal in many tasks. We show that a commutative POVM is an extreme point in the convex set of all POVMs if and only if it is a PVM. This results implies that non-commutativity is a necessary ingredient to overcome the limitations of PVMs.

  11. WTERT-India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the city could not find a new landfill site. Author Ranjith Annepu, WTERT ­ India Date February 04, 2013WTERT- India Observations from India's Crisis Ranjith Annepu Observations from India's Crisis Waste-to-Energy Research and Technology Council (WTERT) ­ India, 89-B, NEERI Mumbai Zonal Lab, Worli

  12. GUIDANCE ON CONDUCTING ADVERSE DIVERSITY ANALYSIS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for natural gas asWindEECBG PROGRAM

  13. Apparatus for observing a hostile environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

  14. Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

    1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

  15. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  16. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SS 433 JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Nowak, Michael [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hillwig, Todd [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heinz, Sebastian, E-mail: hermanm@space.mit.edu, E-mail: crc@space.mit.edu, E-mail: nss@space.mit.edu, E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu, E-mail: todd.hillwig@valpo.edu, E-mail: amiodusz@nrao.edu, E-mail: mrupen@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: heinzs@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomy Department, 5408 Sterling Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and Very Long Baseline Array observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. The line Doppler shifts from the optical and X-ray lines match well, indicating that they are less than 3 × 10{sup 14} cm apart. The jet Doppler shifts show aperiodic variations that could result from shocks in interactions with the local environment. These perturbations are consistent with a change in jet direction but not jet speed. The proper motions of the radio knots match the kinematic model only if the distance to SS 433 is 4.5 ± 0.2 kpc. Observations during eclipse show that the occulted emission is very hard, seen only above 2 keV and rising to comprise >50% of the flux at 8 keV. The soft X-ray emission lines from the jet are not blocked, constraining the jet length to ?> 2 × 10{sup 12} cm. The base jet density is in the range 10{sup 10-13} cm{sup –3}, in contrast to our previous estimate based on the Si XIII triplet, which is likely to have been affected by UV de-excitation. There is a clear overabundance of Ni by a factor of about 15 relative to the solar value, which may have resulted from an unusual supernova that formed the compact object.

  17. Magnetic changes observed in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, R.L.; Hurford, G.J.; Jones, H.P.; Kane, S.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of a fairly large impulsive flare (1B/M4, starting 17:22 UT, 1980 April 10). Observations of the microwave/hard X-ray burst show the time development of the impulsive energy release. Chromospheric (H..cap alpha..) and photospheric (Fe I lambda5324) filtergrams and photospheric (Fe I lambda8688) magnetograms, intensitygrams, and velocitygrams show magnetic strucutre, flare emission, mass motion, and magnetic changes. From these observations, we conclude: 1. The flare was triggered by a small emerging magnetic bipole. 2. The peak impulsive energy release occurred in the explosive eruption of a filament from over the magnetic inversion line. Hence: a) The filament eruption was the magnetic transient in the heart of the primary energy release in the chromosphere and corona. b) The primary energy release did not occur in approximately stationary magnetic loops, but on field lines undergoing violet motion and drastic changes in direction. 3. In the photospheric magnetograph lines. Fe I lambda5324 and Fe I lambda8688, the impulsive peak of the flare produced emission in a unipolar area of a sunspot. In synchrony with the emission, the polarity of this area transiently reversed in the lambda8688 magnetigrams; apparently, this was an artifact of the line emission. 4. Within a few minutes after the explosive filament eruption. a) A permanent decrease in magnetic flux accompanied the truncation of an umbra. b) A permanent increase in magnetic flux accompanied the severance of the penumbral bridge to a satellite sunspot. Apparently, thee genuine photospheric magnetic changes were consequences of strong flare-wrought magnetic changes in the chromospher and corona.

  18. Pair-Production Supernovae: Theory and Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Scannapieco

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the physical properties of pair-production supernovae (PPSNe) as well as the prospects for them to be constrained observationally. In very massive (140-260 solar mass) stars, much of the pressure support comes from the radiation field, meaning that they are loosely bound, with an adiabatic coefficient that is close to the minimum stable value. Near the end of C/O burning, the central temperature increases to the point that photons begin to be converted into electron-positron pairs, softening gamma below this critical value. The result is a runaway collapse, followed by explosive burning that completely obliterates the star. While these explosions can be up to 100 times more energetic that core collapse and Type Ia supernovae, their peak luminosities are only slightly greater. However, due both to copious Ni-56 production and hydrogen recombination, they are brighter much longer, and remain observable for ~ 1 year. Since metal enrichment is a local process, PPSNe should occur in pockets of metal-free gas over a broad range of redshifts, greatly enhancing their detectability, and distributing their nucleosyntehtic products about the Milky Way. This means that measurements of the abundances of metal-free stars should be thought of as directly constraining these objects. It also means that ongoing supernova searches, already provide weak constraints for PPSN models. A survey with the NIRCam instrument on JWST, on the other hand, would be able to extend these limits to z ~ 10. Observing a 0.3 deg^2 patch of sky for one week per year for three consecutive years, such a program would either detect or rule out the existence of these remarkable objects.

  19. Direct Observation of Paramagnons in Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doubble, R. [University of Bristol, UK; Hayden, S M. [University of Bristol, UK; Dai, Pengcheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Frost, C. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin fluctuations in the nearly ferromagnetic element palladium. Dispersive over-damped collective magnetic excitations or 'paramagnons' are observed up to 128 meV. We analyze our results in terms of a Moriya-Lonzarich-type spin-fluctuation model and estimate the contribution of the spin fluctuations to the low-temperature heat capacity. In spite of the paramagnon excitations being relatively strong, their relaxation rates are large. This leads to a small contribution to the low-temperature electronic specific heat.

  20. Quantum discord between relatively accelerated observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Animesh Datta

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the quantum discord between two free modes of a scalar field which start in a maximally entangled state and then undergo a relative, constant acceleration. In a regime where there is no distillable entanglement due to the Unruh effect, we show that there is a finite amount of quantum discord, which is a measure of purely quantum correlations in a state, over and above quantum entanglement. Even in the limit of infinite acceleration of the observer detecting one of the modes, we provide evidence for a non-zero amount of purely quantum correlations, which might be exploited to gain non-trivial quantum advantages.

  1. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Lemonick

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus?the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  2. Observing AAPI Heritage Month | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National1 -OSSGas andFleetWeatherizationObserving

  3. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofof

  4. Category:Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd aMinutesMap Files JumpObservation

  5. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm UsesNuclearFirst Observation of

  6. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField OfficeFirm UsesNuclearFirst Observation ofFirst

  7. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access toSpeedingScientificASecurityObservation of

  8. SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gaier, T., E-mail: ibuder@uchicago.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  9. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Grenoble Observ. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  10. X-Ray Observations of Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Harris

    1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some of the ways that X-ray observations provide unique information on radio galaxies. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission provides detailed data on ambient densities and temperatures. These parameters in turn can be used for pressure balance calculations and can demonstrate how the ambient gas affects radio source structure. Additionally, many signatures of the interaction of radio jets and lobes with the hot gas are found in high resolution X-ray maps. Non-thermal X-ray emission from knots and hotspots of radio jets can give us constraints on the relativistic electron population for energies greater that that normally sampled in the radio (in the case of synchrotron emission) or can give us an independent estimate of the average magnetic field strength (if inverse Compton emission is the origin of the X-rays). From recent ROSAT HRI observations of 3C 390.3 and 3C 120, we show evidence that X-ray emission from knots and hotspots appears to be associated with regions of large gradients in the radio surface brightness; i.e. at the location of powerful shocks.

  11. Photometric defocus observations of transiting extrasolar planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinse, Tobias C; Yoon, Jo-Na; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Yong-Gi; Kim, Chun-Hwey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out photometric follow-up observations of bright transiting extrasolar planets using the CbNUOJ 0.6m telescope. We have tested the possibility of obtaining high photometric precision by applying the telescope defocus technique allowing the use of several hundred seconds in exposure time for a single measurement. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of obtaining a root-mean-square scatter of order sub-millimagnitude over several hours for a V $\\sim$ 10 host star typical for transiting planets detected from ground-based survey facilities. We compare our results with transit observations with the telescope operated in in-focus mode. High photometric precision is obtained due to the collection of a larger amount of photons resulting in a higher signal compared to other random and systematic noise sources. Accurate telescope tracking is likely to further contribute to lowering systematic noise by probing the same pixels on the CCD. Furthermore, a longer exposure time helps reducing the eff...

  12. VERITAS Observations of the Galactic Center Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to its extraordinarily high concentration of known relativistic particle accelerators such as pulsar wind nebula, supernova remnants, dense molecular cloud regions, and the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*); the center of the Milky Way galaxy has long been an ideal target for high energy (HE, 0.1-100 GeV) and very high energy ( VHE, 50 GeV-50 TeV) gamma-ray emission. Indeed, detections of Sgr A* and other nearby regions of gamma-ray emission have been reported by EGRET and Fermi-LAT in the HE band, as well as CANGAROO, Whipple, HESS, VERITAS, and MAGIC in the VHE band. Here we report on the results of extended observations of the region with VERITAS between 2010-2014. Due to the visibility of the source for VERITAS in the Northern Hemisphere, these observations provide the most sensitive probe of gamma-ray emission above 2 TeV in one of the most complicated and interesting regions of our home galaxy.

  13. METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kurtz, S. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Bieging, J. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Araya, E. D. [Physics Department, Western Illinois University, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

  14. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

  15. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of the lowest triplet state of thymine and thymidine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, John

    in the triplet state are seen at 1603 and $1700 cmÃ?1 in room-tem- perature acetonitrile-d3 solution. These bands and singlet IR absorption cross sections, confirming the peak assignments and elucidating the nature

  16. Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J. N.

    . The lower the energy rating (KW/Ton or KW/HP or KW/BTU) the more efficient the equipment and the less demand draw on the electric power plants, thereby reducing the need to build new power plants. To encourage DSM, utilities give rebates for high...: Bob Allwein, Oklahoma Natural Gas Company. Dick Landry, Gulf States Utility. Curtis Williford, Entex Gas Company. Bret McCants, Central Power and Light Company. Frank Tanner, Southern Union. Patric Coon, West Texas utilities. ESL-IE-93...

  17. Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for spec. power > 25-26 kW ltr * PfP - potential > 200 bar * Fully flexible FIS with pressure potential > 2400bar HDDE HDDE Development Strategies for US Development...

  18. S june 2007| Negro Rivers reached their lowest values since 1968,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for additional water supplies for irrigation and pro- duction of hydroelectric power in the Central Valley

  19. U.S. diesel fuel price continue to decrease; lowest level since February 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportation

  20. U.S. diesel fuel price continue to decrease; lowest level since March 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdiesel fuel price continue to decrease;

  1. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level in four years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdiesel fuel pricediesel fuel

  2. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since February 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdiesel fuel pricediesel fuel3, 2014 U.S.

  3. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since January 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdiesel fuel pricediesel fuel3, 2014

  4. U.S. diesel fuel price falls to lowest level since July 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdiesel fuel pricediesel fuel3, 2014diesel

  5. U.S. diesel fuel prices falls to lowest level since mid-July 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdiesel fueldiesel fuel pricesdiesel6,

  6. U.S. diesel fuel prices falls to lowest level since mid-July 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdiesel fueldiesel fuel pricesdiesel6,4,

  7. U.S. gasoline price falls to lowest point of year so far (long version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline price decreasesU.S.7,long

  8. U.S. gasoline price falls to lowest point of year so far (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline price

  9. U.S. gasoline prices at its lowest since February 2011 (long version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline priceNovember 3,3,long

  10. U.S. gasoline prices at its lowest since February 2011 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline priceNovember

  11. U.S. gasoline prices at its lowest since February 2011 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline priceNovemberU.S. crude

  12. U.S. gasoline prices at its lowest since February 2011 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline priceNovemberU.S.

  13. U.S. gasoline prices at its lowest since February 2011 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline priceNovemberU.S.More U.S.

  14. U.S. gasoline prices at lowest level since November 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sector Transportationdieselgasoline priceNovemberU.S.More

  15. U.S. gasoline prices decrease to lowest level since May 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong version)longshort9,

  16. U.S. gasoline prices decrease to lowest level since May 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong

  17. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level of the year (long version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314, 2014 U.S.

  18. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since December 2010 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314, 2014

  19. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since December 2010 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314, 2014Woodyard

  20. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since February 2010 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314,

  1. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since February 2010 (long version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314,8, 2014 U.S.

  2. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since January 2011 (long version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314,8, 2014

  3. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since January 2011 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314,8, 20140,

  4. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since October 2009 (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314,8,

  5. U.S. gasoline prices fall to lowest level since October 2009 (long version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. averagelong, 201314,8,5, 2014

  6. U.S. monthly gasoline price in December on track to be lowest in 3 years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S.1, 2014 U.S.gasoline

  7. U.S. monthly gasoline price in December on track to be lowest in 3 years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S.1, 2014 U.S.gasolinegasoline price

  8. Getting beyond the lowest common denominator : Developing countries in global environmental negotiations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najam, Adil

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the collective negotiation behavior of the developing countries of the South in international environmental politics. The so-called 'South'-represented in global negotiations by Group of 77 (G77)-is an ...

  9. Lattice calculation of the lowest-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic momen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Blum

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I present quenched domain wall fermion and 2+1 flavor improved Kogut-Susskind fermion calculations of the hadronic vacuum polarization which are used to calculate the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha^2)$ hadronic contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. Together with previous quenched calcuations, the new results confirm that in the quenched theory the hadronic contribution is signifcantly smaller ($\\sim 30%$) than the value obtained from the total cross section of $e^+e^-$ annhilation to hadrons. The 2+1 flavor results show an increasing contribution to $g-2$ as the quark mass is reduced.

  10. Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy-Duty

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-Temperature Combustion DemonstratorEast Fork Poplar

  11. Climate Change Update: Baseload Geothermal is One of the Lowest Emitting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FORSuperiorThe Office of Fossil Energy (FE)ClientW H

  12. Average summer electric power bills expected to be lowest in four years

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World liquids consumption by9 U.S. EnergyDecadesummer electric power

  13. Observables in Neutrino Mass Spectroscopy Using Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. N. Dinh; S. T. Petcov; N. Sasao; M. Tanaka; M. Yoshimura

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP.

  14. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  15. Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novosyadlyj, B; Shtanov, Yu; Zhuk, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

  16. Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

  17. Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: an overviewNetworked Aquatic Microbial Observing Sys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: The Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing SystemThe Autonomous Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing System Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems Ocean Research Goals · Development of autonomous networks of heterogeneous sensors to monitor and sample

  18. Global Hydrometeor Occurrence as Observed by CloudSAT: Initial Observations from Summer 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Marchand, Roger T.; Zhang, Qiuqing; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of global hydrometeor coverage and occurrence frequencies as observed by the cloud radar on CloudSat are summarized using data collected during Summer 2006. CloudSat was launched on 28 April 2006 and began collecting data routinely on 7 June 2006. In this article we document the distribution of cloudiness from the ITCZ to the Polar regions as observed by CloudSat during the first summer of operations. The overall global hydrometeor coverage as observed by CloudSat is found to be 0.506. The vertical distribution of zonally averaged hydrometeor occurrence shows the relationship of clouds with components of the atmospheric general circulation such as the Hadley Cell, the ubiquitous storms over the Southern Ocean, and the subtropical stratocumulus regimes.

  19. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase,...

  20. Direct observations of thermally induced structural changes in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observations of thermally induced structural changes in amorphous silicon carbide. Direct observations of thermally induced structural changes in amorphous silicon carbide....

  1. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by...

  2. Direct Experimental Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials of Guanine in Free Oligonucleotides by Using Photoelectron Direct Experimental Observation of the Low Ionization Potentials of Guanine...

  3. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice...

  4. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Abstract: The...

  5. X-ray Observations of Galaxies: The Importance of Deep High-Resolution Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray observations of galaxies have grown from a curiosity into a full-fledged field of astronomy. These observations provide unique information on black holes, binary stars, and the hot phase of the ISM, which can be used to constrain the chemical evolution of the Universe, and the joint evolution of galaxies and massive black holes. These exciting results are due in large part to the high-resolution capability of {\\it Chandra}. To follow on {\\it Chandra} and push forward this science past the present capabilities, our community must build a high-resolution (sub-arcsecond) large-area (several square meters) X-ray telescope.

  6. Observational tests for ?(t)CDM cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigozzo, C.; Carneiro, S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Dantas, M.A.; Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br, E-mail: aldinez@on.br, E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Observatório Nacional, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the observational viability of a class of cosmological models in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, resulting in a production of cold dark matter particles at late times. Similarly to the flat ?CDM case, there is only one free parameter to be adjusted by the data in this class of ?(t)CDM scenarios, namely, the matter density parameter. To perform our analysis we use three of the most recent SNe Ia compilation sets (Union2, SDSS and Constitution) along with the current measurements of distance to the BAO peaks at z = 0.2 and z = 0.35 and the position of the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum. We show that in terms of ?{sup 2} statistics both models provide good fits to the data and similar results. A quantitative analysis discussing the differences in parameter estimation due to SNe light-curve fitting methods (SALT2 and MLCS2k2) is studied using the current SDSS and Constitution SNe Ia compilations. A matter power spectrum analysis using the 2dFGRS is also performed, providing a very good concordance with the constraints from the SDSS and Constitution MLCS2k2 data.

  7. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  8. Radio Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Carilli; H. J. A. Rottgering; G. K. Miley L. Pentericci; D. E. Harris

    1998-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some aspects of radio continuum polarimetric imaging of high redshift radio galaxies. The correlation between extreme values of Faraday rotation observed toward radio emitting structures in nearby radio galaxies, and X-ray emitting cluster atmospheres, is presented as a method for targeting objects at high redshift for deep X-ray searches. We present an X-ray detection of the extreme rotation measure radio galaxy PKS 1138-262 at z = 2.156, and we argue that the X-ray emission is from a cluster atmosphere with a luminosity of 1.7x10^{44} h^{-2} ergs sec^{-1}. We also present results on the correlation between size and redshift for a sample of ultra-luminous radio galaxies between 0 < z < 4.3. Source sizes decrease systematically with redshift, suggesting either denser environments, or younger sources, at high redshift. An alternative explanation is significant inverse Compton losses off the microwave background at high redshift.

  9. Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

  10. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safonova, Margarita; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A G; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130--180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50 deg or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40 deg off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic lat...

  11. Internetwork chromospheric bright grains observed with IRIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M D; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Kleint, Lucia; Lemen, James; Tarbell, Ted D; Title, Alan; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Hansteen, Viggo H; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy K; Saar, Steven; Testa, Paola; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah; Kankelborg, Charles

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals small-scale rapid brightenings in the form of bright grains all over coronal holes and the quiet sun. These bright grains are seen with the IRIS 1330 \\AA, 1400 \\AA\\ and 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filters. We combine coordinated observations with IRIS and from the ground with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) which allows us to have chromospheric (Ca II 8542 \\AA, Ca II H 3968 \\AA, H\\alpha, and Mg II k 2796 \\AA), and transition region (C II 1334 \\AA, Si IV 1402) spectral imaging, and single-wavelength Stokes maps in Fe I 6302 \\AA at high spatial (0.33"), temporal and spectral resolution. We conclude that the IRIS slit-jaw grains are the counterpart of so-called acoustic grains, i.e., resulting from chromospheric acoustic waves in a non-magnetic environment. We compare slit-jaw images with spectra from the IRIS spectrograph. We conclude that the grain intensity in the 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filter comes from both the Mg II k core and wings. The signal in the C II ...

  12. Tropical synoptic scale moisture fields observed from the Nimbus-7 SMMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Jeffrey David

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are clear and the radiating surface is near sea level and warm. Correlation in the low (less than 220 W m ) OLR (wet) regions of the TP and AITCZ have a large scatter and the highest precipitable water values do not correspond to the lowest OLR values... there is little relation between the variations of moisture and the absence of cloud. The lowest (wet) values of OLR, mostly from the TP and AITCZ, occupy s, 15 kg m range (excluding many SMMR values erroneously low) of SMMR precipitable water estimates. Cadet...

  13. Simultaneous observations of Schumann resonances in California and Australia: Evidence for intensity modulation by the local height of the D region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sentman, D.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Fraser, B.J. (Univ. of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations are presented of the horizontal magnetic component of Schumann resonance intensities as simultaneously measured at locations in California and Western Australia during two separate intervals September 2-17, 1989, and April 14-21, 1990. For both intervals, diurnal variations of the average magnetic power over the lowest three modes of the Schumann resonances showed substantially different temporal profiles at the California and Western Australia stations, with interstation correlations of 0.51 and 0.39, respectively. A method is demonstrated for determining from these observations the average local time variation of the height of the D region. A height variation is obtained that is nearly identical for the respective analysis intervals, with a minimum height occurring at approximately 1300-1400 LT and a maximum-to-minimum height difference of roughly 50% of the mean. When corrected for the local D region height, the detailed diurnal intensity profiles over the analysis intervals display a greatly improved similarity, with interstation correlation coefficients increasing from 0.51 to 0.70 and from 0.39 to 0.82, respectively. Substantial agreement between the two stations after correction for D region height suggest that such observations could be used to monitor the global totality and variability of lightning, quantitatively and at time resolutions of the order of 10 min or less, in studies of global change.

  14. Observability Criteria and Estimator Design for Stochastic Linear Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    . Alessandri and Coletta [5] proposed a Luenberger observer design methodology for deterministic linear hybrid

  15. University of Hawaii#Institute for Astronomy OBSERVING TIME REQUEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, John

    of the tidal features, and nuclear separation. By comparing the observed characteristics of such an optica

  16. Optimization of satellite coverage in observing cause and effect changes in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and solar wind. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveless, M.J.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disturbances in the ionosphere sometimes cause adverse effects to communications systems, power grids, etc. on the earth. Currently, very little, if any, lead time is given to warn of an impending problem. If a forecast could be made of ionospheric occurrences, some lead time may be given to appropriate agencies and equipment may be saved. Most changes that occur in the ionosphere are a result of interaction of energy, currents, etc. between the magnetosphere and/or solar wind. Before a forecast can be made, however, improvement of ionospheric models currently in use need to be made. The models currently depict features in various regions of the ionosphere but not always where these features are actually observed. So an improvement to the model is needed to create an accurate baseline condition, or in other words an accurate depiction of the current ionosphere. Models could be improved by inputting real-time data from the ionosphere into the model. This data would come from satellites and/or ground-based stations.

  17. Observing and modeling Earths energy flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens B.; Schwartz S.

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews, from the authors perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within {+-}2 W m{sup -2}. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute importantly to this adjustment and thus contribute both to uncertainty in estimates of radiative forcing and to uncertainty in the response. Models are indispensable to calculation of the adjustment of the system to a compositional change but are known to be flawed in their representation of clouds. Advances in tracking Earth's energy flows and compositional changes on daily through decadal timescales are shown to provide both a critical and constructive framework for advancing model development and evaluation.

  18. Reply to comment by Finnigan on ``On micrometeorological observations of surface-air exchange over tall vegetation''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    hills (Raupach et al., 1992) to illustrate how the concentration ®eld might respond to ¯ow conver- gence within the lowest portion of the 2D Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 97 (1999) 65±67 * Tel.: +1

  19. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  20. Optimization of the transmission of observable expectation values and observable statistics in Continuous Variable Teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Albano Farias; J. Stephany

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the statistics of observables in continuous variable quantum teleportation in the formalism of the characteristic function. We derive expressions for average values of output state observables in particular cumulants which are additive in terms of the input state and the resource of teleportation. Working with Squeezed Bell-like states, which may be optimized in a free parameter for better teleportation performance we discuss the relation between resources optimal for fidelity and for different observable averages. We obtain the values of the free parameter which optimize the central momenta and cumulants up to fourth order. For the cumulants the distortion between in and out states due to teleportation depends only on the resource. We obtain optimal parameters for the second and fourth order cumulants which do not depend on the squeezing of the resource. The second order central momenta which is equal to the second order cumulants and the photon number average are optimized by the same resource. We show that the optimal fidelity resource, found in reference (Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76}, 022301 (2007)) to depend also on the characteristics of input, tends for high squeezing to the resource which optimizes the second order momenta. A similar behavior is obtained for the resource which optimizes the photon statistics which is treated here using the sum of the squared differences in photon probabilities of input and output states as the distortion measure. This is interpreted to mean that the distortions associated to second order momenta dominates the behavior of the output state for large squeezing of the resource. Optimal fidelity and optimal photon statistics resources are compared and is shown that for mixtures of Fock states they are equivalent.

  1. PoGOLite -The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer CECILIA MARINI BETTOLO Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2008 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis PoGOLite - The Polarised Gamma-ray Observer Cecilia Marini Bettolo

  2. Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) initialization product. The 1-year deployment period enabled measurements in the dry and wet (monsoon) seasons radar. Peak surface rainfall is observed during August, and the largest daily rainfall rates are observed during the period from July to September. The lifting condensation level (LCL) is observed

  3. AN ALTERNATIVE OBSERVER FOR ZERO DEFICIENCY CHEMICAL NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaves, Madalena

    for detectability, and went on to explicitly construct a full-state observer that is guaranteed to converge 1 Email by a construction di#11;erent from the one employed in a previous paper. The new observer exhibits slower (Sontag, 2001) for background material on stability), which dealt with the construction of observers

  4. Targeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    for a simulation of atmospheric pollution in East Asia in March 2001 show that the optimal location of observations, targeted observations. 1 Introduction Our ability to anticipate and manage changes in atmospheric pollutantTargeted Observations for Atmospheric Chemistry and Transport Models Adrian Sandu Department

  5. Nonlinear observer and parameter estimation for electropneumatic clutch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    coefficient. General designs for nonlinear observer design are devel- oped for particular classes of nonlinear of estimate errors. They also consider a three-way proportional valve as con- trol valve while we consider on/off-solenoid valves. The presented observer in this paper is a deterministic observer with linear output

  6. New Insights into the 243Am 48Ca Reaction Products Previously Observed in the Experiments on Elements 113, 115, and 117

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oganessian, Yuri Ts. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Abdullin, F. Sh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Dmitriev, S. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Gostic, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hamilton, Joseph [Vanderbilt University; Henderson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Itkis, M. G. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Moody, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Polyakov, A. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Ramayya, A. V. [Vanderbilt University; Roberto, James B [ORNL; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Sagaidak, R. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Shaughnessy, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shirokovsky, I. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Stoyer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Subbotin, V. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Sukhov, A. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Tsyganov, Yu. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Utyonkov, V. [FLNR-JINR, Russia; Voinov, A. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Vostokin, G. K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a new series of experiments on the study of production cross sections and decay properties of the isotopes of element 115 in the reaction {sup 243}Am + {sup 48}Ca are presented. Twenty-one new decay chains originating from {sup 288}115 were established as the product of the 3n-evaporation channel by measuring the excitation function at three excitation energies of the compound nucleus {sup 291}115. The decay properties of all newly observed nuclei are in full agreement with those we measured in 2003. At the lowest excitation energy E* = 33 MeV, for the first time we registered the product of the 2n-evaporation channel, {sup 289}115, which was also observed previously in the reaction {sup 249}Bk + {sup 48}Ca as the daughter nucleus of the decay of {sup 293}117. The maximum cross section for the production of {sup 288}115 is found to be 8.5 pb at E* {approx} 36 MeV.

  7. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Masuda, Satoshi [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Ohno, Masanori, E-mail: watanabe.kyoko@isas.jaxa.jp [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere.

  8. Partial and Complete Observables for Canonical General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dittrich

    2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we will consider the concepts of partial and complete observables for canonical general relativity. These concepts provide a method to calculate Dirac observables. The central result of this work is that one can compute Dirac observables for general relativity by dealing with just one constraint. For this we have to introduce spatial diffeomorphism invariant Hamiltonian constraints. It will turn out that these can be made to be Abelian. Furthermore the methods outlined here provide a connection between observables in the space--time picture, i.e. quantities invariant under space--time diffeomorphisms, and Dirac observables in the canonical picture.

  9. NS&T Managment Observations - 1st Quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gianotto

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  10. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  11. Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiss, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 12 sequential images sam- pled at 7.5Hz. Observations 2,distributions of six sam- ple image sequences selected from

  12. ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christopher R. Samoray Communications ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside bulk material Selected frames from a sequence of scanning transmission electron...

  13. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

  14. Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiss, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

  15. average observational quantities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposed observationally viable alternative to homogeneous cosmology with smooth dark energy, the timescape cosmology. In the timescape model cosmic acceleration is realized as an...

  16. AAO support observations for the Hubble Deep Field Sout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Boyle

    1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present proposed ground-based support observations at the AAO for the forthcoming Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) campaign.

  17. Transport Regulation from Theory to Practice: General Observations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and a Case Study Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transport Regulation from Theory to Practice: General Observations and a Case Study Agency...

  18. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

  19. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

  20. Millimeter and Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune's Atmospheric Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Statia Honora Luszcz

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B Near-Infrared Radiative Transfer Model B.15 Near-Infrared Observations of Neptune’s Clouds with the133 6.2 Near-infrared spectroscopy . . . . . .

  1. Direct Observation of the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatizati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using an Ultrahigh Field 95Mo NMR Spectroscopy. Direct Observation of the Active Center for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using an...

  2. airborne radar observations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of ionospheric modication by high power radio waves Physics Websites Summary: with the Finland component of CUTLASS, and the rst observations of articial irregularities by...

  3. Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REVIEW Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints BY PETER A. STOTT 1,* AND CHRIS E. FOREST 2 1 Hadley Centre for Climate Change (Reading Unit), Meteorology Building for constraining climate predictions based on observations of past climate change. The first uses large ensembles

  4. 62 Bureau of Meteorology Annual Report 201314 Observations and infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    resources in the taking and recording of observations. It strategically plans, builds and operates improving delivery efficiencies; and · facilitating both management and cultural change to ensure continued System Strategy; · Observing Network Operations; and · Infrastructure Management. The performance of each

  5. Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru Renos Vakis, Elisabeth these transactions costs. When opportunities exist to sell a crop on alternative markets, the observed choice of market can be used to infer a monetary measure of transactions costs in market participation. The market

  6. Data augmentation for a Bayesian spatial model involving censored observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data augmentation for a Bayesian spatial model involving censored observations Brooke L Fridley1 (fax) 1 #12;SUMMARY Spatial environmental data sometimes include below detection limit observations (i. We develop a measurement error Bayesian spatial model for the analysis of spatial data with censored

  7. Nembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nembhard, Harriet Black

    observations. The Shewhart chart has been well-discussed in the literature and introductory texts on SPC (seeNembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts for Systems with Response Lags Engineering April 2002 Abstract Previously, it has been held that statistical process control (SPC

  8. High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability E.E. Ortiz, M.E. Mauel, D observed in high-beta plasma created in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). We have previously of anisotropic high beta equilibrium · Measuring Electrostatic Fluctuations · Hot Electron Interchange (HEI

  9. Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullo, Francesco

    Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication Florian D¨orfler, Fabio-permissions@ieee.org. This material is based upon work supported by NSF grants IIS-0904501 and CPS-1135819. Florian D¨orfler, Fabio, University of California, Santa Barbara, {dorfler,fabiopas,bullo}@engineering.ucsb.edu Distributed observers

  10. What is the reference frame of an accelerated observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -P. Marzlin

    1998-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The general construction of extended refrence frames for noninertial observers in flat space is studied. It is shown that, if the observer moves inertially before and after an arbitrary acceleration and rotation, the region where reference frames can coincide with an inertial system is bounded for final velocities exceeding 0.6 c.

  11. Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

  12. ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pak, Soojong

    ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong a,*, Soojong instruments, the far-infrared surveyor (FIS) will map the entire sky in four bands using short wavelength (SW- oped a suite of software with an aim to simulate the FIS observations (Jeong et al., 2000, 2003, 2004

  13. UAV PATH FOLLOWING FOR TARGET OBSERVATION IN WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    UAV PATH FOLLOWING FOR TARGET OBSERVATION IN WIND Rolf Rysdyk, University of Washington, Seattle is affected by wind, aircraft performance, and camera limits. Analytic expressions are derived for paths which, and stability of its integration with aircraft dynamics is assessed. An observer estimates wind data, which

  14. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We report the observation of single top-quark production using 3.2??fb[superscript -1] of pp? collision data with ?s=1.96??TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The significance of the observed data is 5.0 ...

  15. Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

  16. Infrared Observations of Soft GammaRay Repeaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ian Andrew

    Infrared Observations of Soft Gamma­Ray Repeaters I. A. Smith Department of Space Physics been found for SGR 0525--66. This paper gives a brief overview of some recent and ongoing infrared observing programs. For a more detailed review article, see Smith (1997) [2]. INFRARED SPECTRA OF SGR 1806

  17. Observations of non-conjugate theta aurora N. stgaard,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Observations of non-conjugate theta aurora N. Østgaard,1 S. B. Mende,1 H. U. Frey,1 L. A. Frank,2 particle measurements we report two events where a theta aurora was observed in one hemisphere for the occurrence of non-conjugate theta aurora. INDEX TERMS: 2475 Ionosphere: Polar cap ionosphere; 2704

  18. Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santolik, Ondrej

    Power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) observed by the DEMETER spacecraft F. Nemec,1,2 O. Santoli´k,3 January 2006; published 22 April 2006. [1] Results of a systematic survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation from the electric power systems which are magnetically conjugated with the place of observation

  19. LWA Station-Level Observing Procedure and Associated Metadata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    ) and declination (DEC). · Solar Tracking (TRK SOL). This is a beam output mode in which the beam tracks the Sun of observation "metadata"; that is, data which is produced by MCS as part of the processes of scheduling and conducting the observation. Metadata is distinct from the primary instrument output, which is captured by MCS

  20. Thermal evolution of Mercury as constrained by MESSENGER observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    observations have constrained the rate of radiogenic heat production via measurement of uranium, thorium melting, consistent with MESSENGER observations of the planet's surface chemistry and geology. Citation, provides cru- cial context for interpreting a planet's geological history [e.g., Schubert et al., 2001

  1. absorption bands observed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption bands observed First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AKARI observations of ice...

  2. STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS Rick Katz Institute) Unified Modeling of Distributions (6) Resources #12;4 #12;5 (1) Background · Use of Extremal Models -- Stochastic weather generators Improved treatment of extremes #12;6 (2) Observed Tail Behavior · Extreme Value

  3. NS&T Management Observations - 3rd Quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gianotto

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  4. The physical observer I: Absolute and relative fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Larsson

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Jet Theory (QJT) is a deformation of QFT where also the quantum dynamics of the observer is taken into account. This is achieved by introducing relative fields, labelled by locations measured by rods relative to the observer's position. In the Hamiltonian formalism, the observer's momentum is modified: p_i \\to p_i - P_i, where P_i is the momentum carried by the field quanta. The free scalar field, free electromagnetism and gravity are treated as examples. Standard QFT results are recovered in the limit that the observer's mass M \\to \\infty and its charge e \\to 0. This limit is well defined except for gravity, because e = M in that case (heavy mass equals inert mass). In a companion paper we describe how QJT also leads to new observer-dependent gauge and diff anomalies, which can not be formulated within QFT proper.

  5. Observation of interference between two Bose condensates The spatial coherence of a Bose condensate was demonstrated by observing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observation of interference between two Bose condensates The spatial coherence of a Bose condensate was demonstrated by observing interference between two Bose condensates [1]. They were created by cooling atoms the condensates expand for 40 milliseconds and overlap (see figure). This demonstrates that Bose condensed atoms

  6. Observations of Transient Active Region Heating with Hinode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry P. Warren; Ignacio Ugarte-Urra; David H. Brooks; Jonathan W. Cirtain; David R. Williams; Hirohisa Harra

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of transient active region heating events observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. This initial investigation focuses on NOAA active region 10940 as observed by Hinode on February 1, 2007 between 12 and 19 UT. In these observations we find numerous examples of transient heating events within the active region. The high spatial resolution and broad temperature coverage of these instruments allows us to track the evolution of coronal plasma. The evolution of the emission observed with XRT and EIS during these events is generally consistent with loops that have been heated and are cooling. We have analyzed the most energetic heating event observed during this period, a small GOES B-class flare, in some detail and present some of the spectral signatures of the event, such as relative Doppler shifts at one of the loop footpoints and enhanced line widths during the rise phase of the event. While the analysis of these transient events has the potential to yield insights into the coronal heating mechanism, these observations do not rule out the possibility that there is a strong steady heating level in the active region. Detailed statistical analysis will be required to address this question definitively.

  7. Observer-dependent optical properties of stationary axisymmetric spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The world lines of null particles admit arbitrary parametrizations. In the presence of a family of observers one may introduce along a null world line an extension of the so-called Cattaneo's relative standard time parameter (valid for massive particles) which plays a special role. Another possibility is to use the coordinate time itself as a parameter. The relation between relative standard time and coordinate time allows for the introduction of an observer-dependent optical path and associated refraction index. Both these quantities are studied here working out explicit examples concerning familiar null orbits and observers in black hole spacetimes.

  8. Polarization Observables in the Photoproduction of Two Pseudoscalar Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston Roberts

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The many polarization observables that can be measured in process like {gamma}N {yields} M{sub 1}M{sub 2}B, where M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} are pseudoscalar mesons and B is a spin-1/2 baryon, are discussed. The relationships among these observables, their symmetries, as well as inequalities that they satisfy are briefly discussed. Within the context of a particular model for {gamma}N {yields} NKK, some of the observables are calculated, and their sensitivity to the ingredients of the model, and hence to the underlying dynamics of the process, are discussed.

  9. Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qing, 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

  10. Optical technologies for the observation of low Earth orbit objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampf, Daniel; Riede, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to avoid collisions with space debris, the near Earth orbit must be continuously scanned by either ground- or spaced-based facilities. For the low Earth orbit, radar telescopes are the workhorse for this task, especially due to their continuous availability. However, optical observation methods can deliver complementary information, especially towards high accuracy measurements. Passive-optical observations are inexpensive and can yield very precise information about the apparent position of the object in the sky via comparison with background stars. However, the object's distance from the observer is not readily accessible, which constitutes a major drawback of this approach for the precise calculation of the orbital elements. Two experimental methods have been devised to overcome this problem: Using two observatories a few kilometres apart, strictly simultaneous observations of the same object yield an accurate, instantaneous 3D position determination through measurement of the parallax. If only on...

  11. Sivers and Boer-Mulders observables from lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musch, B. U.

    We present a first calculation of transverse momentum-dependent nucleon observables in dynamical lattice QCD employing nonlocal operators with staple-shaped, “process-dependent” Wilson lines. The use of staple-shaped Wilson ...

  12. Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverstone, Harris J.

    Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier Hujun Shen1 and Harris J. Silverstone2 June, 2006. Accepted 11 July, 2006. #12;238 Hujun Shen and Harris J. Silverstone where ±x0 = ± -2E

  13. BOWHUNTER OBSERVATIONS VERSUS SPOTLIGHTING AS AN INDEX TO DEER ABUNDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arboretum (MFCA) in southeastern New York State since 1970 (Davis 1975, Winchcombe 1993). The objective and observations of deer by bowhunters) were used at the MFCA to assess effectiveness in reaching the objective

  14. OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA MACKEREL (SCOMBEROMORUS SIERRA) FROM September 1948. While operating in Hawaiian waters, seven juvenile KatsllwollllS pelamis (Linnaeus) 1758

  15. Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Brandon H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

  16. Einstein-aether gravity: theory and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted Jacobson

    2007-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein-aether theory is general relativity coupled to a dynamical unit timelike vector field. A brief review of current theoretical understanding and observational constraints on the four coupling parameters of the theory is given.

  17. Observation of molecular orbital gating Hyunwook Song1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark

    , Heejun Jeong3 , Mark A. Reed4 & Takhee Lee1,2 The control of charge transport in an active electronic to be observed in an electrochemical break junction11 , but until now proof of directorbitalgate controlofa solid

  18. Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires and nanotubes December 1, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Eric Stach Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National...

  19. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aune, Taylor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), thought to be produced by the core-collapse of massive stars or merging compact objects, are the most luminous events observed since the… (more)

  20. Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Friday, December 20, 2013 Fuel Cell Figure 1 Figure 1. In situ x-ray...

  1. Observation of suppressed terahertz absorption in photoexcited graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenzel, Alex James

    When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap ...

  2. Observation of Two New ? [subscript b][superscript ?] Baryon Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaij, R.

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the ?[0 over b]?[superscript -] mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0??fb[superscript ...

  3. Observing Healthcare Interior Environments and the Effect on Patient Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Courtney R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    variables in the interior environments that have the greatest impact, whether positive or negative, on patients. The methods used to perform this research include: inspections of the facility, observations, and surveys. By combining all of these methods...

  4. Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the Longitudinal Valley Fault, Taiwan myself lucky to do what I love and to wake up every day, happy and excited about the day to come

  5. Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    off of Fire Island, NY. The Wave Glider records data on the wind, water temperature and salinity pressure, temperature and sound velocity. The Wave Glider is an autonomous ocean observing platform

  6. Observer Variability in Metameric Color Matches using Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    * Correspondence to: R. L. Alfvin, Eastman Kodak Company, Build- to another observer. This phenomenon is caused by ob- ing 65, Rochester, NY 14650-1829 server metamerism. Contract grant sponsor: NSF-NYS

  7. agn feedback observations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christopher S; Heinz, Sebastian 2008-01-01 18 Feeding Versus Feedback in AGNs from Near-Infrared IFU Observations: The Case of Mrk79 CERN Preprints Summary: We have mapped the...

  8. Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

  9. Integrated assessment of packaging architectures in earth observing programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva Valero, Daniel

    When designing Earth observation missions, it is essential to take into account the programmatic context. Considering individual missions as part of a whole enables overall program optimization, which may bring important ...

  10. Observable signatures of general relativistic dynamics in compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Ryan N. (Ryan Nathan)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of general relativity (GR) in astrophysical systems are often difficult to calculate, but they can have important consequences for observables. This thesis considers the impact of previously-ignored GR effects ...

  11. Observation of New Charmless Decays of Bottom Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We search for new charmless decays of neutral b hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons, using 1??fb[superscript -1] of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We report the first observation of the ...

  12. A multisensory observer model for human spatial orientation perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative "observer" models for spatial orientation and eye movements have been developed based on 1-G data from humans and animals (e.g. Oman 1982, 1991, Merfeld, et al 1993, 2002; Haslwanter 2000, Vingerhoets 2006). ...

  13. Inventory of NMFS Fishery-Independent Surveys and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Inventory of NMFS Fishery-Independent Surveys and Observations Phase 1: A One-year Snapshot of Appendixes Appendix I. Inventory working group .............................................................. 22 Appendix II. Glossary for terms used in the inventory

  14. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts at Extreme Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aune, Taylor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gamma-Ray Bursts . . . . . . . . . . . . . Redshift-CRUZ OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AT EXTREME ENERGIES AAncient Unvierse with Gamma-Ray Bursts, pages 330–333. AIP,

  15. MACHO Mass Determination Based on Space Telescope Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mareki Honma

    1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of lens mass determination for a caustic crossing microlensing event based on a space telescope observation. We demonstrate that the parallax due to the orbital motion of a space telescope causes a periodic fluctuation of the light curve, from which the lens distance can be derived. Since the proper motion of the lens relative to the source is also measurable for a caustic crossing event, one can find a full solution for microlensing properties of the event, including the lens mass. To determine the lens mass with sufficient accuracy, the light curve near the caustic crossing should be observed within uncertainty of $\\sim$ 1%. We argue that the Hubble Space Telescope observation of the caustic crossing supplied with ground-based observations of the full light curve will enable us to determine the mass of MACHOs, which is crucial for understanding the nature of MACHOs.

  16. H$\\alpha$ and EUV observations of a partial CME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Damian J; Antolin, Patrick; Mathioudakis, Mihalis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained H$\\alpha$ high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and the {\\it Hinode} ExtremeUltraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The H$\\alpha$ observations were conducted on 11 February 2012 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera (HARDcam) instrument at the National Solar Observatory's Dunn Solar Telescope. Our H$\\alpha$ observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations ("blobs") returning to the solar surface at velocities of $\\approx$200 km s$^{-1}$ in both H$\\alpha$ and several SDO AIA band passes. The average derived size of these "blobs" in H$\\alpha$ is 500 by 3000 km$^2$ in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our "blob" widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate...

  17. FIRST SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA AT 43 GHz IN THE MULTIPOLE RANGE 25 {<=} l {<=} 475

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.; Smith, K. M. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Zuntz, J. A. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C., E-mail: akito@kicp.uchicago.edu [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) employs coherent receivers at 43 GHz and 94 GHz, operating on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert in Chile, to measure the anisotropy in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). QUIET primarily targets the B modes from primordial gravitational waves. The combination of these frequencies gives sensitivity to foreground contributions from diffuse Galactic synchrotron radiation. Between 2008 October and 2010 December, over 10,000 hr of data were collected, first with the 19 element 43 GHz array (3458 hr) and then with the 90 element 94 GHz array. Each array observes the same four fields, selected for low foregrounds, together covering Almost-Equal-To 1000 deg{sup 2}. This paper reports initial results from the 43 GHz receiver, which has an array sensitivity to CMB fluctuations of 69 {mu}K{radical}s. The data were extensively studied with a large suite of null tests before the power spectra, determined with two independent pipelines, were examined. Analysis choices, including data selection, were modified until the null tests passed. Cross-correlating maps with different telescope pointings is used to eliminate a bias. This paper reports the EE, BB, and EB power spectra in the multipole range l = 25-475. With the exception of the lowest multipole bin for one of the fields, where a polarized foreground, consistent with Galactic synchrotron radiation, is detected with 3{sigma} significance, the E-mode spectrum is consistent with the {Lambda}CDM model, confirming the only previous detection of the first acoustic peak. The B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero, leading to a measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.35{sup +1.06}{sub -0.87}. The combination of a new time-stream 'double-demodulation' technique, side-fed Dragonian optics, natural sky rotation, and frequent boresight rotation leads to the lowest level of systematic contamination in the B-mode power so far reported, below the level of r = 0.1.

  18. Observation of the photodielectric effect in an amorphous semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Stephen Anthony

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBSERVATION OF THE PHOTODIELECTRIC EFFECT IN AN AHGRPBGUS SFNICONDUCTOR A THESIS by STEPHEN ANTHONY COLLINS Subqitted tu the Graduate College of Texas A&M University iu Partial fulfillment of. the requirement for the. degree of 1IASTER OI...' SCIFNCE August 1971 Hajcr Suhjec '. Fleqtricel magic. earing OBSERVATION OF THE PHOTODIELECTRIC EFFECT IN AN AMORPHOUS SEMICONDUCTOR A THESIS by STEPHEN ANTHONY COLLINS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of epartm...

  19. Observations from Australasia using the Gravitational Microlensing Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Yock

    1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The new astronomical technique of gravitational microlensing enables measurements of high precision to be made in certain circumstances. Useful advances have been made in the fields of galactic astronomy, stellar astronomy and planetary science. The technique is best suited to the southern sky, and several observations have been made from Australasia. A sample of these observations is described here. A case is also made for a telescope at the Antarctic dedicated to gravitational microlensing.

  20. A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

  1. Dynamics and variability of the plasmasphere observed from synchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moldwin, M.B.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of the cold ions in the outer plasmasphere is studied using data obtained with the magnetospheric plasma analyzers from multiple geosynchronous satellites. Dense (10-100 cm{sup {minus}3}), cold ({approx}1 eV) regions of plasma are often observed at geosynchronous orbit; in this study the authors refer to these as plasmaspheric intervals. The duration, local time of observation, density variability, and temperature behavior within these regions often depend in a systematic way on geomagnetic and substorm activity. With increasing geomagnetic activity (as indicated by Kp) the plasmaspheric regions are generally observed over shorter durations and at earlier local times. With increasing substorm activity (as indicated by geosynchronous energetic electron injections) the density becomes increasingly variable in these regions. Occasionally, up to order-of-magnitude density variations are observed over several minute timescales corresponding to regions with physical dimensions on the order of 1000 km or less. The appearance of these short-duration, cold-plasma intervals is strongly correlated with energetic ion and electron signatures both at the spacecraft making the plasmaspheric observations and at other spacecraft observing simultaneously in the midnight region. Such energetic particle signatures are indicative of the growth and expansive phase of geomagnetic substorms. The authors conclude that the appearance of these short-duration, plasmaspheric intervals is due to a reconfiguration of the duskside magnetosphere during geomagnetic substorms.

  2. High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold O. Benz; Peter Messmer; Christian Monstein

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1 - 2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference (cellular phones) causing a spurious symmetric pattern in the spectrogram at 1.4 GHz. Symmetric features in the 1 - 2 GHz range, some already reported in the literature, therefore must be considered with utmost caution.

  3. Autonomous observing strategies for the ocean carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, James K.; Davis, Russ E.

    2000-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the exchanges of carbon between the atmosphere and ocean and the fate of carbon delivered to the deep sea is fundamental to the evaluation of ocean carbon sequestration options. An additional key requirement is that sequestration must be verifiable and that environmental effects be monitored and minimized. These needs can be addressed by carbon system observations made from low-cost autonomous ocean-profiling floats and gliders. We have developed a prototype ocean carbon system profiler based on the Sounding Oceanographic Lagrangian Observer (SOLO; Davis et al., 1999). The SOLO/ carbon profiler will measure the two biomass components of the carbon system and their relationship to physical variables, such as upper ocean stratification and mixing. The autonomous observations within the upper 1500 m will be made on daily time scales for periods of months to seasons and will be carried out in biologically dynamic locations in the world's oceans that are difficult to access with ships (due to weather) or observe using remote sensing satellites (due to cloud cover). Such an observational capability not only will serve an important role in carbon sequestration research but will provide key observations of the global ocean's natural carbon cycle.

  4. A Study of the Forcing of the 22–25 June 2006 Coastally Trapped Wind Reversal Based on Numerical Simulations and Aircraft Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahn, David A.; Parish, Thomas R.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastally trapped wind reversals (CTWRs) occur periodically in the lowest several hundred meters of the marine boundary layer west of California and disrupt the northerly flow that typically occurs during summer. South ...

  5. The 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF12): Observational Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koekemoer, Anton M; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James S; Robertson, Brant E; Ono, Yoshiaki; Schenker, Matthew A; Ouchi, Masami; Bowler, Rebecca A A; Rogers, Alexander B; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P; Furlanetto, Steven R; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V; Targett, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128-orbit Cycle 19 \\HST\\ program aimed at extending previous WFC3/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at $z$$\\,\\gtrsim\\,$8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at $z$$\\,\\sim\\,7\\,-\\,$8, facilitate the construction of new samples of $z$$\\,\\sim\\,9\\,-\\,$10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to $z$$\\,\\sim\\,$12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset, to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky currently achievable. In this paper we present the observational overview of the pr...

  6. Optimization of radio astronomical observations using Allan variance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schieder; C. Kramer

    2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability tests based on the Allan variance method have become a standard procedure for the evaluation of the quality of radio-astronomical instrumentation. They are very simple and simulate the situation when detecting weak signals buried in large noise fluctuations. For the special conditions during observations an outline of the basic properties of the Allan variance is given, and some guidelines how to interpret the results of the measurements are presented. Based on a rather simple mathematical treatment clear rules for observations in ``Position-Switch'', ``Beam-'' or ``Frequency-Switch'', ``On-The-Fly-'' and ``Raster-Mapping'' mode are derived. Also, a simple ``rule of the thumb'' for an estimate of the optimum timing for the observations is found. The analysis leads to a conclusive strategy how to plan radio-astronomical observations. Particularly for air- and space-borne observatories it is very important to determine, how the extremely precious observing time can be used with maximum efficiency. The analysis should help to increase the scientific yield in such cases significantly.

  7. NuSTAR Observations of X-Ray Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomsick, John A; Fuerst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bhalerao, Varun; Chakrabarty, Deepto; King, Ashley; Miller, Jon M; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As of 2014 August, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) had observed ~30 X-ray binaries either as part of the planned program, as targets of opportunity, or for instrument calibration. The main science goals for the observations include probing the inner part of the accretion disk and constraining black hole spins via reflection components, providing the first observations of hard X-ray emission from quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), measuring cyclotron lines from accreting pulsars, and studying type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Here, we describe the science objectives in more depth and give an overview of the NuSTAR observations that have been carried out to achieve the objectives. These include observation of four "IGR" High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) discovered by INTEGRAL. We also summarize the results that have been obtained and their implications. Among the IGR HMXBs, we focus on the discovery of a cyclotron line in the spectrum of IGR J17544-2619.

  8. Detection of CFIRB with AKARI/FIS Deep Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woong-Seob Jeong; Chris P. Pearson; Hyung Mok Lee; Shuji Matsuura; Mitsunobu Kawada; Takao Nakagawa; Sang Hoon Oh; Mai Shirahata; Sungho Lee; Ho Seong Hwang; Hideo Matsuhara

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cosmic Far-Infrared Background (CFIRB) contains information about the number and distribution of contributing sources and thus gives us an important key to understand the evolution of galaxies. Using a confusion study to set a fundamental limit to the observations, we investigate the potential to explore the CFIRB with AKARI/FIS deep observations. The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) is one of the focal-plane instruments on the AKARI (formerly known as ASTRO-F) satellite, which was launched in early 2006. Based upon source distribution models assuming three different cosmological evolutionary scenarios (no evolution, weak evolution, and strong evolution), an extensive model for diffuse emission from infrared cirrus, and instrumental noise estimates, we present a comprehensive analysis for the determination of the confusion levels for deep far-infrared observations. We use our derived sensitivities to suggest the best observational strategy for the AKARI/FIS mission to detect the CFIRB fluctuations. If the source distribution follows the evolutionary models, observations will be mostly limited by source confusion. We find that we will be able to detect the CFIRB fluctuations and that these will in turn provide information to discriminate between the evolutionary scenarios of galaxies in most low-to-medium cirrus regions.

  9. Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

  10. HALO GAS AND GALAXY DISK KINEMATICS DERIVED FROM OBSERVATIONS AND LAMBDACDM SIMULATIONS OF Mg II ABSORPTION-SELECTED GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Murphy, Michael T. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Churchill, Christopher W.; Ceverino, Daniel; Klypin, Anatoly [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Steidel, Charles C., E-mail: gkacprzak@astro.swin.edu.a, E-mail: mmurphy@astro.swin.edu.a, E-mail: cwc@nmsu.ed, E-mail: ceverino@nmsu.ed, E-mail: aklypin@nmsu.ed, E-mail: ceverino@phys.huji.ac.i, E-mail: ccs@astro.caltech.ed [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtained ESI/Keck rotation curves of 10 Mg II absorption-selected galaxies (0.3 <= z <= 1.0) for which we have WFPC-2/HST images and high-resolution HIRES/Keck and UVES/VLT quasar spectra of the Mg II absorption profiles. We perform a kinematic comparison of these galaxies and their associated halo Mg II absorption. For all 10 galaxies, the majority of the absorption velocities lie in the range of the observed galaxy rotation velocities. In 7/10 cases, the absorption velocities reside fully to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity and usually align with one arm of the rotation curve. In all cases, a constant rotating thick-disk model poorly reproduces the full spread of observed Mg II absorption velocities when reasonably realistic parameters are employed. In 2/10 cases, the galaxy kinematics, star formation surface densities, and absorption kinematics have a resemblance to those of high-redshift galaxies showing strong outflows. We find that Mg II absorption velocity spread and optical depth distribution may be dependent on galaxy inclination. To further aid in the spatial-kinematic relationships of the data, we apply quasar absorption-line techniques to a galaxy (v{sub c} = 180 km s{sup -1}) embedded in LAMBDACDM simulations. In the simulations, Mg II absorption selects metal-enriched 'halo' gas out to {approx}100 kpc from the galaxy, tidal streams, filaments, and small satellite galaxies. Within the limitations inherent in the simulations, the majority of the simulated Mg II absorption arises in the filaments and tidal streams and is infalling toward the galaxy with velocities between -200 km s{sup -1} <= v{sub r} <= -180 km s{sup -1}. The Mg II absorption velocity offset distribution (relative to the simulated galaxy) spans {approx}200 km s{sup -1} with the lowest frequency of detecting Mg II at the galaxy systematic velocity.

  11. REALITY AND GEOMETRY OF STATES AND OBSERVABLES IN QUANTUM THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Anandan

    1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the quantum state of a single system by protective observation is used to justify operationally a formulation of quantum theory on the quantum state space (projective Hilbert space) $\\cal P$. Protective observation is extended to a more general quantum theory in which the Schrodinger evolution is generalized so that it preserves the symplectic structure but not necessarily the metric in $\\cal P$. The relevance of this more general evolution to the apparant collapse of the state vector during the usual measurement, and its possible connection to gravity is suggested. Some criticisms of protective observation are answered. A comparison is made between the determination of quantum states using the geometry of $\\cal P$ by protective measurements, via a reconstruction theorem, and the determination of space-time points by means of the space-time geometry, via Einstein's hole argument. It is argued that a protective measurement may not determine a time average.

  12. Observational Constraints on the Topology (Global Geometry) of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. F. Roukema

    2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Universe is a physical object. Physical objects have shapes and sizes. General relativity is insufficient to describe the global shape and size of the Universe: the Hilbert-Einstein equations only treat limiting quantities towards an arbitrary point. Empirical work on measuring the shape and size of the Universe (formally: the ``3-manifold of the spatial hypersurface at constant cosmological time'', and, e.g. the ``injectivity diameter'' respectively) has progressed significantly in the late 1980's and the 1990's, using observational catalogues of galaxy clusters, of quasars and of the microwave background, though the analyses are still hindered by simplifying (and often observationally unsupported) assumptions. A review of the different observational strategies and claimed constraints was presented at the meeting.

  13. Reasonable conditions for joint probabilities of non-commuting observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger F. Hofmann

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the operator formalism of quantum mechanics, the density operator describes the complete statistics of a quantum state in terms of d^2 independent elements, where d is the number of possible outcomes for a precise measurement of an observable. In principle, it is therefore possible to express the density operator by a joint probability of two observables that cannot actually be measured jointly because they do not have any common eigenstates. However, such joint probabilities do not refer to an actual measurement outcome, so their definition cannot be based on a set of possible events. Here, I consider the criteria that could specify a unique mathematical form of joint probabilities in the quantum formalism. It is shown that a reasonable set of conditions results in the definition of joint probabilities by ordered products of the corresponding projection operators. It is pointed out that this joint probability corresponds to the quasi probabilities that have recently been observed experimentally in weak measurements.

  14. Observation of the negative muonium ion in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Yunan

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The negative muonium ion (M/sup /minus//), which is the bound system of a positive muon and two electrons, has been produced and observed for the first time. Its counterpart H/sup /minus// is well known, and spectroscopy and collision studies with H/sup /minus// have yielded many fruitful results. Noteworthy are recent investigations of the photoionization of a relativistic H/sup /minus// beam. The negative positronium ion has also been formed and observed. The discovery of M/sup /minus// provides us with a new leptonic system for spectroscopy and collision studies, which may reveal interesting physics associated with mass effects. Since M/sup /minus// is a charged particle, it can also be used to produce a beam of exotic atoms with a small phase space. This dissertation is a detailed account of the observation of M/sup /minus//. 93 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Testing protostellar disk formation models with ALMA observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; Li, Zhi-Yun; Jorgensen, Jes

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abridged: Recent simulations have explored different ways to form accretion disks around low-mass stars. We aim to present observables to differentiate a rotationally supported disk from an infalling rotating envelope toward deeply embedded young stellar objects and infer their masses and sizes. Two 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) formation simulations and 2D semi-analytical model are studied. The dust temperature structure is determined through continuum radiative transfer RADMC3D modelling. A simple temperature dependent CO abundance structure is adopted and synthetic spectrally resolved submm rotational molecular lines up to $J_{\\rm u} = 10$ are simulated. All models predict similar compact components in continuum if observed at the spatial resolutions of 0.5-1$"$ (70-140 AU) typical of the observations to date. A spatial resolution of $\\sim$14 AU and high dynamic range ($> 1000$) are required to differentiate between RSD and pseudo-disk in the continuum. The peak-position velocity diagrams indicate that the...

  16. Observational Constraints of New Variable Modified Chaplygin Gas Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhumpa Bhadra; Ujjal Debnath

    2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming the flat FRW universe in Einstein's gravity filled with New Variable Modified Chaplygin gas (NVMCG) dark energy and dark matter having negligible pressure. In this research work we analyze the viability on the basis of recent observation. Hubble parameter $H$ is expressed in terms of the observable parameters $H_0$, $\\Omega_m^0$ and the model parameters $A_0$, $B_0$, $C_0$, $m$, $n$, $\\alpha$ and the red shift parameter $z$. Here we find a best fitted parameter range of $A_0$, $B_0$ keeping $0\\leq \\alpha \\leq 1$ and using Stern data set (12 points) by minimizing the $\\chi^2$ test at 66%, 90% and 99% confidence levels. Next we do the joint analysis with BAO and CMB observations. Again evaluating the distance modulus $\\mu(z)$ vs redshift ($z$) curve obtained in the model NVMCG with dark matter with the best fitted value of the parameters and comparing with that derived from the union2 compilation data.

  17. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fan Yizhong, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

  18. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

  19. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF THE NOVA IN V407 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Decerprit, G. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Duke, C., E-mail: daniel-d-gall@uiowa.edu, E-mail: kazuma-tsurusaki@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); and others

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1-10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

  20. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N. [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)] [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of {+-}0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  1. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  2. Properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroll, R.J.; Chen, J.; Hill, H.A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Further evidence has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands whose amplitudes vary from year to year are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the nonuniform solar surface. These findings are for non axisymmetric modes and corroborate the findings of Kroll, Hill and Chen for axisymmetric modes. It is demonstrated the the generation of the sidebands lifts the usual restriction on the parity of the eigenfunctions for modes detectable in total irradiance observations. 14 refs.

  3. On the performance of infrared sensors in earth observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Luther Franklin

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON THE PERFORMANCE OF INFRARED SENSORS IN EARTH OBSERVATIONS A Thesis by LUTHER FRANKLIN JOHNSON III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... Augus t 19 72 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ON THE PERFORMANCE O'F INFRARED SENSORS IN EARTH OBSERVATIONS A Thesis by LUTHER FRANKLIN JOHNSON III Approved as to style and content by: r rman o ommr t Hea o Depart ent Mem er em er, em er...

  4. The physical observer II: Gauge and diff anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Larsson

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In a companion paper we studied field theory in the presence of a physical observer with quantum dynamics. Here we describe the most striking consequence of this assumption: new gauge and diff anomalies arise. The relevant cocycles depend on the observer's spacetime trajectory and can hence not appear in QFT, where this quantity is never introduced. Diff anomalies necessarily arise in every locally nontrivial, non-holographic theory of quantum gravity. Cancellation of the divergent parts of the anomalies only works if spacetime has four dimensions.

  5. Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation of aObservation of

  6. Observing the Sparks of Life | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservationObserved

  7. High-resolution radio observations of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Miller-Jones

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an overview of important results obtained using high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of X-ray binary systems. These results derive from both astrometric observations and resolved imaging of sources, from black holes to neutron star and even white dwarf systems. I outline a number of upcoming developments in instrumentation, both new facilities and ongoing upgrades to existing VLBI instruments, and I conclude by identifying a number of important areas of investigation where VLBI will be crucial in advancing our understanding of X-ray binaries.

  8. Observation of B ->phi K and B ->phi K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied two-body charmless hadronic decays of R mesons into the final states phiK and phiK(*). Using 9.7 million B (B) over bar pairs collected with the CLEO II detector, we observe the decays B- --> phiK(-) and ...

  9. Observations of Non-radial Pulsations in Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Clemens; R. Rosen

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a model for pulsars in which non-radial oscillations of high spherical degree (l) aligned to the magnetic axis of a spinning neutron star reproduce the morphological features of pulsar beams. In our model, rotation of the pulsar carries a pattern of pulsation nodes underneath our sightline, reproducing the longitude stationary structure seen in average pulse profiles, while the associated time-like oscillations reproduce "drifting subpulses"--features that change their longitude between successive pulsar spins. We will show that the presence of nodal lines can account for observed 180 degree phase jumps in drifting subpulses and their otherwise poor phase stability, even if the time-like oscillations are strictly periodic. Our model can also account for the "mode changes" and "nulls" observed in some pulsars as quasiperiodic changes between pulsation modes of different l or radial overtone n, analogous to pulsation mode changes observed in oscillating white dwarf stars. We will discuss other definitive and testable requirements of our model and show that they are qualitatively supported by existing data. While reserving judgment until the completion of quantitative tests, we are inspired enough by the existing observational support for our model to speculate about the excitation mechanism of the non-radial pulsations, the physics we can learn from them, and their relationship to the period evolution of pulsars.

  10. Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    Observational evidence of an intensifying hydrological cycle in northern Canada Stephen J. De´ry,1 for 45 rivers spanning 5.2 � 106 km2 of northern Canada are investigated. Discharge averages 1153 km3 yr of northern Canada, excluding some rivers with outlets to the Labrador Sea and eastern James Bay

  11. PRICING COMMODITY DERIVATIVES WITH BASIS RISK AND PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Mike

    LUDKOVSKI Abstract. We study the problem of pricing claims written on an over-the-counter energy con- tractPRICING COMMODITY DERIVATIVES WITH BASIS RISK AND PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS REN´E CARMONA AND MICHAEL. Because the underlying is illiquid, we work with an indifference pricing framework based on a liquid

  12. Sponsored by: Texas Soil Observation Network (TxSON)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Sponsored by: Texas Soil Observation Network (TxSON) A Program for Monitoring SOIL MOISTURE Across the State of Texas Refined soil moisture satellite data products for operational use and improved to meet water, wind, and energy demands Real-time emergency response data for natural disasters

  13. MingJie Zhao Herbert Jaeger Norm observable operator models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (HMMs). Nevertheless, there is a critical issue, the negative probability problem (NPP), which remains. To avoid the NPP we introduce in this report a variation of OOM, the norm observable operator models (norm-product space D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3.2 Constructing norm-OOMs in the space D

  14. Observations and Theories of Langmuir Circulation: A Story of Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    occasion to review the history of this field of study. An underlying theme here is that the study interdisciplinary history; the first half of this work is a brief and eclectic review of this. Much of the research recent observations and the nature of this unexplained variability. 1 Introduction The oceanic surface

  15. Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer D.G. Long', P.J. Hardin2, and RA to SASS data for the study of Greenland's ice sheet. We present a time series of the radar backscatter images over Greenland covering the time period July-September 1978. The images provide an island

  16. INTEGRATING THE OCEAN OBSERVING SYSTEM: MOBILE PLATFORMS Dean Roemmich(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /AOML, 4301 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami FL 33149 USA, Email: rick.lumpkin@noaa.gov (12) Center for Ocean, including oxygen, chlorophyll-A, and particulate organic carbon, and coordination with shipboard and moored. The observing system infrastructure must evolve in parallel with the system's scope and complexity. Expanded

  17. 1. ABSTRACT Clouds substantially affect the observed infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initial guess Clouds vary over orders from BT difference between observed of magnitude and Jacobians of clouds 4. TESTING ASSUMPTIONS: FORWARD MODEL ERRORS * Comparing model that includes scattering (CHARTS heights and optical depths can be adequately modeled by our approach 3. ASSUMPTIONS / APPROACH In order

  18. Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures GREGG R. GITSCHLAG and BRYAN A. HERCZEG Introduction In July 1992 the total number of oil and gas production platformsI in the Gulfof. In that year 51 dead sea turtles were found on upper Texas beaches during mid-March to mid-April following

  19. First observation of the decay B-0 -> D*D+*(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed four fully reconstructed B-0 --> D*+D*- candidates in 5.8 x 10(6) Y(4S) --> B (B) over bar decays recorded with the CLEO detector. The background is estimated to be 0.31 +/- 0.10 events. The probability that the background could...

  20. Some Observational Aspects of R Coronae Borealis Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kameswara Rao

    2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the observational aspects related to the evolutionary status and dust production in R Cor Bor stars are discussed. Recent work regarding the surface abundances, stellar winds and evidence for dust production in these high luminosty hydrogen deficient stars are also reviewed. Possibility of the stellar winds being maintained by surface magnetic fields is also considered.

  1. 8) Equatorial waves a)Observations in the low stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal End on May 11 #12;Zonal wind Meridional wind a) Observation in the low stratosphere A balloon trip field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal

  2. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

  3. Experimental observables on nuclear liquid gas phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Ma

    2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress on nuclear liquid gas phase transition (LGPT) or critical behavior has been simply reviewed and some signals of LGPT in heavy ion collisions, especially in NIMROD data, are focused. These signals include the power-law charge distribution, the largest fluctuation of the fragment observables, the nuclear Zipf law, caloric curve and critical exponent analysis etc.

  4. Time evolution of observable properties of parametrized systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hajicek

    1996-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review of some recent work on the problem of time and of observables for the reparametrization invariant systems is given. A talk presented at the Second Meeting on Constraint Dynamics and Quantum Gravity at Santa Marguerita Ligure, September 17--21 1996.

  5. Observation of Thermopower Oscillations in the Coulomb Blockade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    capacitance C oscillates about zero in a sawtooth fashion as a function of gate voltage with a peakObservation of Thermopower Oscillations in the Coulomb Blockade Regime in a Semiconducting Carbon-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) in the quantum dot regime. The TEP measured as a function of gate voltage

  6. Circle criterion observer for a compression system Bjrnar Bhagen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    .gravdahl@itk.ntnu.no Abstract-- Observers for a compression system using turbo compressors are derived for a model that captures speed. Results are validated by simulations. I. MOTIVATION Compression systems using turbo compressors, centrifugal or axial, are exposed to the phenomenons of surge and rotating stall. Surge is an axisymmtrical

  7. 12 Years of Stellar Activity Observations in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauas, Pablo J D; Diaz, R; Vieytes, M; Petrucci, R; Jofre, E; Abrevaya, X; Luoni, M L; Valenzuela, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an observational program we started in 1999, to systematically obtain mid-resolution spectra of late-type stars, to study in particular chromospheric activity. In particular, we found cyclic activity in four dM stars, including Prox-Cen. We directly derived the conversion factor that translates the known S index to flux in the Ca II cores, and extend its calibration to a wider spectral range. We investigated the relation between the activity measurements in the calcium and hydrogen lines, and found that the usual correlation observed is the product of the dependence of each flux on stellar color, and it is not always preserved when simultaneous observations of a particular star are considered. We also used our observations to model the chromospheres of stars of different spectral types and activity levels, and found that the integrated chromospheric radiative losses, normalized to the surface luminosity, show a unique trend for G and K dwarfs when plotted against the S index.

  8. Smog and Photochemical Pollution First observed in Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Smog and Photochemical Pollution #15; First observed in Los Angeles { Transportation emissions: reservoir gases for NO 2 and organic radicals. #12; Measurement of pollution levels: Concentrations of toxic; Problem worst in Mexico City: Exceed WHO standards 310 days/yr { Thousands of premature deaths annually

  9. VOLUNTARY OBSERVING SHIPS (VOS) CLIMATE SUBSET PROJECT (VOSCLIM) PROJECT DOCUMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Data management procedures 8. Project management 9. Information exchange Attachment 1: ScientificWMO IOC JCOMM VOLUNTARY OBSERVING SHIPS (VOS) CLIMATE SUBSET PROJECT (VOSCLIM) PROJECT DOCUMENT #12 Attachment 5: List of focal points Attachment 7: Preliminary action plan #12;PROJECT DOCUMENT

  10. Loop Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: Linking Loops to Observational Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Girelli; Franz Hinterleitner; Seth A. Major

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Research during the last decade demonstrates that effects originating on the Planck scale are currently being tested in multiple observational contexts. In this review we discuss quantum gravity phenomenological models and their possible links to loop quantum gravity. Particle frameworks, including kinematic models, broken and deformed Poincar\\'e symmetry, non-commutative geometry, relative locality and generalized uncertainty principle, and field theory frameworks, including Lorentz violating operators in effective field theory and non-commutative field theory, are discussed. The arguments relating loop quantum gravity to models with modified dispersion relations are reviewed, as well as, arguments supporting the preservation of local Lorentz invariance. The phenomenology related to loop quantum cosmology is briefly reviewed, with a focus on possible effects that might be tested in the near future. As the discussion makes clear, there remains much interesting work to do in establishing the connection between the fundamental theory of loop quantum gravity and these specific phenomenological models, in determining observational consequences of the characteristic aspects of loop quantum gravity, and in further refining current observations. Open problems related to these developments are highlighted. characteristic aspects of loop quantum gravity, and in further refining current observations. Open problems related to these developments are highlighted.

  11. Observations from The EV Project in Q4 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a summary report for The EV Project 4th quarter 2013 reports. It describes electric vehicle driver driving and charging behavior observed in Q4. It is the same report as the previously approved/published Q3 2013 report, only the numbers have been updated. It is for public release and does not have limited distribution.

  12. Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1. Wang,6 D. R. Blake,7 E. Atlas,8 A. Fried,8 B. Potter,9 M. A. Avery,10 G. W. Sachse,10 S. T. Sandholm,11 the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment are used in conjunction

  13. Algebraic Characterization of Observability in Distance-Regular Consensus Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , robotic networks, and biological networks to cite few. As a first step, pioneering works were devoted. In consensus networks, observability properties can serve for designing finite-time average consensus protocols through Cartesian products of paths and ring graphs respectively [14], [15]. Extension to arbitrary graphs

  14. Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho Alan G. Jones Dublin Institute Electrical Moho Electrical conductivity Electrical resistivity Crust­mantle boundary Defining the depth on crustal and mantle rocks suggest that there should be a concomitant step-lie change in electrical

  15. Statistics from Lagrangian observations J.H. LaCasce *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCasce, Joseph H.

    Review Statistics from Lagrangian observations J.H. LaCasce * Department of Geosciences, University February 2008 Keywords: Lagrangian statistics Floats Drifters Absolute and relative dispersion a b s t r a c t We review statistical analyses of Lagrangian data from the ocean. These can be grouped

  16. Dark energy and dark matter from cosmological observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen Hannestad

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of our knowledge about the dark matter and dark energy is reviewed. Bounds on the content of cold and hot dark matter from cosmological observations are discussed in some detail. I also review current bounds on the physical properties of dark energy, mainly its equation of state and effective speed of sound.

  17. Future prospects in n-nuclear interactions. [Polarization observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, J.M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine in detail two research areas, polarization observables and antiproton-nucleus reactions, which should have near-term future impact on our understanding of the interaction of medium-energy nucleons in nuclei. More speculative future experiments employing cooled beams, double spectrometer systems, and large Q-valure low momentum-transfer reactions are also discussed.

  18. ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyung Mok

    ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

  19. Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Observatory in China, and will explore collaboration with observatories in Canary Island to extendSynoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory Haimin Wang and Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA Abstract. New Jersey

  20. Correspondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Peter G.

    , others argue that supercooling is not the only mechanism for producing thick basal ice sequencesCorrespondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen from supercooled water. Supercooling has been invoked to explain anomalously thick basal ice sequences beneath temperate glaciers

  1. Multi-Observer Privacy-Preserving Hidden Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roughan, Matthew

    legislation or expose business secrets. However, secure distributed computation allows calculations to be made, and becomes more and more a part of the modern world's critical infrastructure, the issue of maintaining cyber-security anomalies. We extend prior work on HMMs in network security to include observations from multiple ISPs

  2. Gamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    detection reported Flare activity reported via ATel Gamma Ray Bursts reported via GCN Giant MC imageGamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope RESCEU Symposium on Astroparticle Physics) Measure the photon direction Identification of the gamma-ray shower 36 planes of Si strip detectors (228 m

  3. Photoevaporation of protoplanetary discs II: evolutionary models and observable properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Alexander; C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

    2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new model for protoplanetary disc evolution. This model combines viscous evolution with photoevaporation of the disc, in a manner similar to Clarke, Gendrin & Sotomayor (2001). However in a companion paper (Alexander, Clarke & Pringle 2006a) we have shown that at late times such models must consider the effect of stellar radiation directly incident on the inner disc edge, and here we model the observational implications of this process. We find that the entire disc is dispersed on a time-scale of order $10^5$yr after a disc lifetime of a few Myr, consistent with observations of T Tauri (TT) stars. We use a simple prescription to model the spectral energy distribution of the evolving disc, and demonstrate that the model is consistent with observational data across a wide range of wavelengths. We note also that the model predicts a short ``inner hole'' phase in the evolution of all TT discs, and make predictions for future observations at mid-infrared and millimetre wavelengths.

  4. Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Nir

    Belief Revision with Unreliable Observations Craig Boutilier \\Lambda Dept. Computer Science University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia Canada, V6T 1W5 cebly@cs.ubc.ca Nir Friedman yz@cs.cornell.edu Abstract Research in belief revision has been dominated by work that lies firmly within the classic AGM

  5. Observation of O++++ 4 lines in proton aurora over Svalbard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Observation of O++++ 4 P-4 D0 lines in proton aurora over Svalbard N. Ivchenko,1,2 M. Galand,3 B. S March 2004; accepted 26 March 2004; published 29 May 2004. [1] Spectra of a proton aurora event show electron aurora. Conjugate satellite particle measurements are used as input to electron and proton

  6. Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1 D. L. Hysell,2 D. Lummerzheim,3 M of the E region radar aurora obtained with a 30 MHz imaging radar and the optical aurora (green line, the radar aurora in the vicinity of a stable evening auroral arc arises because of the arc's polarization

  7. Electron and proton aurora observed spectroscopically in the far ultraviolet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Electron and proton aurora observed spectroscopically in the far ultraviolet M. Galand,1 D the location of the electron and proton aurorae is discussed. The estimation of the particle characteristics aurora. Because protons and electrons do not interact in the same way with the atmosphere, our study

  8. Exploring GLIMPSE Bubble N107: Multiwavelength Observations and Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorin, Vojtech; Palous, Jan; Wunsch, Richard; Ehlerova, Sona

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Bubble N107 was discovered in the infrared emission of dust in the Galactic Plane observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope (GLIMPSE survey: l ~ 51.0 deg, b ~ 0.1 deg). The bubble represents an example of shell-like structures found all over the Milky Way Galaxy. Aims. We aim to analyse the atomic and molecular components of N107, as well as its radio continuum emission. With the help of numerical simulations, we aim to estimate the bubble age and other parameters which cannot be derived directly from observations. Methods. From the observations of the HI (I-GALFA) and 13CO (GRS) lines we derive the bubble's kinematical distance and masses of the atomic and molecular components. With the algorithm DENDROFIND, we decompose molecular material into individual clumps. From the continuum observations at 1420 MHz (VGPS) and 327 MHz (WSRT), we derive the radio flux density and the spectral index. With the numerical code ring, we simulate the evolution of stellar-blown bubbles similar to N107. Results. The tot...

  9. TETHERED VERSUS LOOSE SOWS: ETHOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AND MEASURES OF PRODUCTIVITY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OBSERVATIONS DURING PREGNANCY AND FARROWING K. VESTERGAARD L.L. HANSEN2 7 : Royal Veterinary and Agricultural lactation (groupe LL et TL). L'enregistrement en continu sur film de l'activité des animaux a montré un

  10. ISO Observations of Quasars and Quasar Hosts Belinda J. Wilkes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Belinda

    ISO Observations of Quasars and Quasar Hosts Belinda J. Wilkes Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Abstract. The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), launched spiral galaxies. In the near­IR, the ISO data confirm an excess due to a warm `AGN­related' dust

  11. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of the substantial biologically mediated carbon flows in a rapidly changing and acidifying ocean requires model simulations informed by observations of key carbon cycle processes on the appropriate space and time scales. From 2000 to 2004, the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) supported the development of the first low-cost fully-autonomous ocean profiling Carbon Explorers that demonstrated that year-round real-time observations of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration and sedimentation could be achieved in the world's ocean. NOPP also initiated the development of a sensor for particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) suitable for operational deployment across all oceanographic platforms. As a result, PIC profile characterization that once required shipboard sample collection and shipboard or shore based laboratory analysis, is now possible to full ocean depth in real time using a 0.2W sensor operating at 24 Hz. NOPP developments further spawned US DOE support to develop the Carbon Flux Explorer, a free-vehicle capable of following hourly variations of particulate inorganic and organic carbon sedimentation from near surface to kilometer depths for seasons to years and capable of relaying contemporaneous observations via satellite. We have demonstrated the feasibility of real time - low cost carbon observations which are of fundamental value to carbon prediction and when further developed, will lead to a fully enhanced global carbon observatory capable of real time assessment of the ocean carbon sink, a needed constraint for assessment of carbon management policies on a global scale.

  12. OBSERVATIONS ON THE WEB AND BEHAVIOR OF WENDILGARDA SPIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    OBSERVATIONS ON THE WEB AND BEHAVIOR OF WENDILGARDA SPIDERS (ARANEAE: THERIDIOSOMATIDAE that theridiosomatids spin modified orb-webs, but only the web of the holarctic Theridiosoma gemmosum (C. L. Koch) has the unusual webs ofsome tropical theridio- somatid spiders that the senior author later identified

  13. DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S: tdekker@limno.com 2 NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, email: steve, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction

  14. Breakthrough Technologies In Vivo Observation of Cavitation and Embolism Repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    Breakthrough Technologies In Vivo Observation of Cavitation and Embolism Repair Using Magnetic that approximately 10 vessels had cavitated during this time. Leaf water potentials decreased from 1.25 to 2.1 MPa cavitation. Refilling of xylem vessels occurred as soon as the lights were switched off, with the majority

  15. Addendum: Observables for General Relativity related to geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duch, Pawe?; Lewandowski, Jerzy; ?wie?ewski, Jedrzej

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this addendum we clarify a point which strengthens one of the results from [the original paper]. Namely, we show that the algebra of the observables $F(r,\\theta)$ is yet simpler then it was described in [the original paper]. This is an important point, because with this simplification an important subalgebra becomes canonical, allowing for a natural reduction of the phase space.

  16. Observing the Origin of the Universe Ned Wright (UCLA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Edward L. "Ned"

    Observing the Origin of the Universe by Ned Wright (UCLA) ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/intro.html ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/cosmolog.htm ·http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/CMB-DT.html ·http

  17. Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    Observationally based assessment of polar amplification of global warming Igor V. Polyakov,1) are similar, and do not support the predicted polar amplification of global warming. The possible moderating amplification of global warming. Intrinsic arctic variability obscures long-term changes, limiting our ability

  18. LWA Station-Level Observing Procedure and Associated Metadata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    output, which is captured by MCS data recorders (MCS-DRs). The latter is documented in the ICDs of the DP of data from the session-specified DP output, during which the parameters defining the observation (as a specified right ascension (RA) and declination (DEC). · Solar Tracking (TRK SOL). This is a beam output mode

  19. Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems) Peter Bulychev1 , Franck is the computation of a subset of predicates sufficient for control and whose cost is minimal. Our solution avoids, Danish-Chinese Center for Cyber Physical Systems (IDEA4CPS) and VKR Center of Excellence MT-LAB. #12;The

  20. Observation of Bogoliubov excitations in exciton-polariton condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Observation of Bogoliubov excitations in exciton-polariton condensates S. UTSUNOMIYA1 predicted the occurrence of Bose­Einstein condensation (BEC) in an ideal gas of non-interacting bosonic Bose condensed system was developed by Bogoliubov in 1947, which predicted the phonon-like excitation

  1. Quantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    , with considerable spatial and temporal variability, resulting in a global annual total of 0.1 Tg C/yr. Air vegetation [Guenther et al., 1995], with the tropics responsible for most of the global annual total ($500 TgQuantifying global marine isoprene fluxes using MODIS chlorophyll observations Paul I. Palmer

  2. Laser Altimeter Observations from MESSENGER's First Mercury Flyby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck II, Steven A.

    REPORT Laser Altimeter Observations from MESSENGER's First Mercury Flyby Maria T. Zuber,1 * David E Barnouin-Jha,8 John K. Harmon10 A 3200-kilometers-long profile of Mercury by the Mercury Laser Altimeter compensated. Sampled craters on Mercury are shallower than their counterparts on the Moon, at least in part

  3. MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure and dynamics at Mercury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure and dynamics at Mercury Gina A. DiBraccio,1 James December 2012; accepted 10 January 2013; published 1 March 2013. [1] On 18 March 2011, MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury

  4. Collaborative Spectrum Sensing from Sparse Observations in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Wotao

    1 Collaborative Spectrum Sensing from Sparse Observations in Cognitive Radio Networks Jia (Jasmine for the implementation of cognitive radio. Collaborative spectrum sensing among the cognitive radio nodes is expected to improve the ability of checking complete spectrum usage. Due to hardware limitations, each cognitive radio

  5. Observation of the top quark with the DO detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, N.J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DO Collaboration reports on the observation of the top quark in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the top quark mass to be 199{sub -21}{sup -19}(stat){sub -21}{sup +14}(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2} and its production cross section to be 6.4 {+-}2.2 pb. Our result is based on approximately 50 pb{sup -1} of data. We observe 17 events with an expected background of 3.8 {+-} 0.6 events. The probability of an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2 x 10{sup -6} (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the events are consistent with top quark decay, and the distribution of events across the seven decay channels is consistent with the Standard Model top quark branching fractions. We describe the analysis that led to the observation of the top quark as well as the properties of the top quark events.

  6. Expanding the Discovery Potential of VERITAS via Moonlight Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benbow, Wystan R. [PI

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant partially supported the base research efforts of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), Very-High-Energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray research group from 8/1/09 to 7/31/14. During the project period, the SAO gamma-ray group carried out a wide-range of research efforts, but focused on VHE observations of extragalactic sources with VERITAS. The SAO group led or co-lead nearly all VERITAS extragalactic working groups and the observations addressed themes in Particle Physics and Fundamental Laws, Cosmology, and Black Holes. The primary topics of this research were processes in exotic galaxies, especially active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies, which have implications for cosmology and Lorentz invariance violation, as well as indirect dark matter detection via VERITAS observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In addition, the SAO group let the development of unique capabilities for VERITAS to observe during all periods of moonlight. Overall, this has increased the VERITAS data yield by 60% and these data are both scientifically useful and regularly published. This grant funded research that led to contributions towards the publication of 51 refereed journal articles during the project period, including several led by, or with significant contributions from, the SAO group.

  7. Are we observing Lorentz violation in gamma ray bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore G. Pavlopoulos

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    From recent observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it appears that spectral time lags between higher-energy gamma rays photons and lower-energy photons vary with energy difference and time (distance) traveled. These lags appear to be smaller for the most luminous (close) bursts but larger for the fainter (farther away) bursts. From this observation, it has been suggested that it might be possible to determine the distance (L) these bursts have traveled from these time lags alone, without performing any red-shift measurements. These observed spreads (dispersion) of high-energy electromagnetic pulses of different energies with time contradict the special theory of relativity (STR). However, extended theories (ET) of the STR have been developed that contain a dispersive term, predicting the above observations. An example of such an ET is presented, allowing us to derive a relationship between time lags of gamma rays of different energies and distance L traveled from their origin. In addition, this theory predicts the origin of X-ray flashes.

  8. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  9. Saline absorption in calcium silicate brick observed by NMR scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Saline absorption in calcium silicate brick observed by NMR scanning L. Pel #3; , K. Kopinga #3 in calcium-silicate brick was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance scanning. This method hasCl solution in a calcium silicate brick will be discussed. 2 Theory If gravity is neglected, the isothermal

  10. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DETECTED BY SWIFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Christiansen, J. L. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 94307 (United States); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of 16 Swift-triggered Gamma-ray burst (GRB) follow-up observations taken with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) telescope array from 2007 January to 2009 June. The median energy threshold and response time of these observations were 260 GeV and 320 s, respectively. Observations had an average duration of 90 minutes. Each burst is analyzed independently in two modes: over the whole duration of the observations and again over a shorter timescale determined by the maximum VERITAS sensitivity to a burst with a t{sup -1.5} time profile. This temporal model is characteristic of GRB afterglows with high-energy, long-lived emission that have been detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite. No significant very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission was detected and upper limits above the VERITAS threshold energy are calculated. The VERITAS upper limits are corrected for gamma-ray extinction by the extragalactic background light and interpreted in the context of the keV emission detected by Swift. For some bursts the VHE emission must have less power than the keV emission, placing constraints on inverse Compton models of VHE emission.

  11. Testing gravity with halo density profiles observed through gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro, E-mail: narikawa@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp, E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new test of the modified gravity endowed with the Vainshtein mechanism with the density profile of a galaxy cluster halo observed through gravitational lensing. A scalar degree of freedom in the galileon modified gravity is screened by the Vainshtein mechanism to recover Newtonian gravity in high-density regions, however it might not be completely hidden on the outer side of a cluster of galaxies. Then the modified gravity might yield an observational signature in a surface mass density of a cluster of galaxies measured through gravitational lensing, since the scalar field could contribute to the lensing potential. We investigate how the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism affects the surface mass density observed through gravitational lensing, assuming that the density profile of a cluster of galaxies follows the original Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, the generalized NFW profile and the Einasto profile. We compare the theoretical predictions with observational results of the surface mass density reported recently by other researchers. We obtain constraints on the amplitude and the typical scale of the transition in the Vainshtein mechanism in a subclass of the generalized galileon model.

  12. Internal and Boundary Observability Estimates for the Heterogeneous Maxwell's System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicaise, Serge [Universite de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambresis, MACS, Institut des Sciences et Techniques de Valenciennes, 59313 Valenciennes Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: snicaise@univ-valenciennes.fr; Pignotti, Cristina [Dipartimento di Matematica Pura e Applicata, Universita di L'Aquila, Via Vetoio, Loc. Coppito, 67010 L'Aquila (Italy)], E-mail: pignotti@univqaq.it

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Observability estimates for Maxwell's system with variable coefficients are established using the differential geometry method recently developed for scalar wave equations.The main tool is that Maxwell's system is reducible to a perturbed vectorial wave equation with a decoupled principal part.

  13. U.S. Recordable Injury and Illness Rates and Lost Workday Rates Lowest Since BLS Began Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acting Assistant Secretary for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Jonathan L. Snare, told a gathering of safety and health professionals at the American Society of Safety Engineers Annual National Conference in New Orleans, LA, that the nation’s recordable injury and illness rates have declined 7.1 percent from 2002 to 2003.

  14. Compressed Air Systems Optimized: What Do You Really Need and How to Get It at the Lowest Total Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuley, J. G.; McAuley, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it in the field. We discuss all the proven supply side optimization strategies with real examples and results. ISO air quality standards are discussed and how their interpretation impacts the cost of operating compressed air systems. We offer best practice methods...

  15. U.S. gasoline prices continues to decrease at lowest level since May 2009; 2 states with sub $2 prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlong version) The U.S. average retailshort9, 2013U.S.5,

  16. Effect of increasing the energy gap between the two lowest energy states on the mixing time of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswas, Somenath

    Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, India Abstract. In order to understand what makes natural proteins fold rapidly for the minimum energy conforma- tions of chains of beads in the lattice model of protein folding. Based algorithm, Markov chain mixing time, protein folding, randomized algorithms. 1 Introduction One of the most

  17. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON RED AND BLUE HELIUM BURNING SEQUENCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Holtzman, Jon, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001-Department 4500, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the optical luminosity, colors, and ratios of the blue and red helium burning (HeB) stellar populations from archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of nineteen starburst dwarf galaxies and compare them with theoretical isochrones from Padova stellar evolution models across metallicities from Z = 0.001 to 0.009. We find that the observational data and the theoretical isochrones for both blue and red HeB populations overlap in optical luminosities and colors and the observed and predicted blue to red HeB ratios agree for stars older than 50 Myr over the time bins studied. These findings confirm the usefulness of applying isochrones to interpret observations of HeB populations. However, there are significant differences, especially for the red HeB population. Specifically, we find (1) offsets in color between the observations and theoretical isochrones of order 0.15 mag (0.5 mag) for the blue (red) HeB populations brighter than M{sub V} {approx} -4 mag, which cannot be solely due to differential extinction; (2) blue HeB stars fainter than M{sub V} {approx} -3 mag are bluer than predicted; (3) the slope of the red HeB sequence is shallower than predicted by a factor of {approx}3; and (4) the models overpredict the ratio of the most luminous blue to red HeB stars corresponding to ages {approx}< 50 Myr. Additionally, we find that for the more metal-rich galaxies in our sample (Z {approx}> 0.5 Z{sub sun}), the red HeB stars overlap with the red giant branch stars in the color-magnitude diagrams, thus reducing their usefulness as indicators of star formation for ages {approx}> 100 Myr.

  18. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

  19. THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD (UDF12): OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V.; Targett, T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Charlot, Stephane [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France); Furlanetto, Steven R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128 orbit Cycle 19 Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at extending previous Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%, as well as adding an extremely deep parallel field with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F814W filter with a total exposure time of 128 orbits. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at z ?> 8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at z ? 7-8, facilitate the construction of new samples of z ? 9-10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to z ? 12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky. In this paper we present the observational overview of the project and describe the procedures used in reducing the data as well as the final products that were produced. We present the details of several special procedures that we implemented to correct calibration issues in the data for both the WFC3/IR observations of the main UDF field and our deep 128 orbit ACS/WFC F814W parallel field image, including treatment for persistence, correction for time-variable sky backgrounds, and astrometric alignment to an accuracy of a few milliarcseconds. We release the full, combined mosaics comprising a single, unified set of mosaics of the UDF, providing the deepest near-infrared blank-field view of the universe currently achievable, reaching magnitudes as deep as AB ? 30 mag in the near-infrared, and yielding a legacy dataset on this field.

  20. Observation of the Goos-Haenchen Shift with Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haan, Victor-O. de; Plomp, Jeroen; Rekveldt, Theo M.; Kraan, Wicher H.; Well, Ad A. van; Dalgliesh, Robert M.; Langridge, Sean [Department Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); STFC, ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Goos-Haenchen effect is a spatial shift along an interface resulting from an interference effect that occurs for total internal reflection. This phenomenon was suggested by Sir Isaac Newton, but it was not until 1947 that the effect was experimentally observed by Goos and Haenchen. We provide the first direct, absolute, experimental determination of the Goos-Haenchen shift for a particle experiencing a potential well as required by quantum mechanics: namely, wave-particle duality. Here, the particle is a spin-polarized neutron reflecting from a film of magnetized material. We detect the effect through a subtle change in polarization of the neutron. Here, we demonstrate, through experiment and theory, that neutrons do exhibit the Goos-Haenchen effect and postulate that the associated time shift should also be observable.

  1. X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippo Frontera

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observational status of the X-ray afterglow emission, its mean properties (detection rate, continuum spectra, line features, and light curves), and the X-ray constraints on theoretical models of gamma-ray bursters and their progenitors. I also discuss the early onset afterglow emission, the remaining questions, and the role of future X-ray afterglow observations.

  2. Observational constraints on late-time {lambda}(t) cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador-BA, 40210-340 (Brazil); Dantas, M. A. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, 20921-400 (Brazil); Alcaniz, J. S. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, 20921-400 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais/CRN, 59076-740, Natal-RN (Brazil)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological constant {lambda}, i.e., the energy density stored in the true vacuum state of all existing fields in the Universe, is the simplest and the most natural possibility to describe the current cosmic acceleration. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well-known {lambda} problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we study cosmological consequences of a scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, {lambda}{proportional_to}H. We test the viability of this scenario and study a possible way to distinguish it from the current standard cosmological model by using recent observations of type Ia supernova (Supernova Legacy Survey Collaboration), measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the position of the first peak of the cosmic microwave background angular spectrum from the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  3. Moon and Sun Shadowing Observed by the MACRO Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Giglietto; for the MACRO collaboration

    1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using over 40 million muons collected since 1989 by the MACRO detector we have searched for a depletion of muons coming from the direction of the Moon due to primary cosmic rays striking the Moon. We observe this Moon shadow in the expected position with a statistical significance of more than 5 standard deviations. We have analyzed the same data for an analogous Sun shadow, and have found a signal with a significance of about 4 standard deviations. The Sun shadow is displaced from the Sun's position by about 0.6 degrees North in ecliptic coordinates. This displacement is compatible with a deflection of primary cosmic rays due to the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the 10-20 TeV primary energy range which is relevant to the underground muons observed by MACRO.

  4. Kink waves in solar spicules: observation and modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Kukhianidze; T. V. Zaqarashvili; E. Khutsishvili

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Height series of Doppler observation at the solar limb (covering 3800 - 8700 km distance above the photosphere) in $H_{\\alpha}$ spectral line obtained by big coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory \\citep{khu} show the periodic spatial distribution of Doppler velocities in spicules. We suggest that the periodic spatial distribution is caused by propagating kink waves in spicule. The wave length is found to be $\\sim$ 3500 km. Numerical modelling of kink wave propagation from the photosphere to observed heights gives the wave length of kink waves at the photosphere to be $\\sim$ 1000 km, which indicates to the granular origin of the waves. The period of waves is estimated to be in the range of 35-70 s.

  5. Near Infrared observations of Soft X-ray selected AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Grupe; H. -C Thomas

    2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of near infrared observations of 19 soft X-ray selected AGN. The goal of the observations was to search for strong, narrow Paschen-alpha or Brackett-gamma emission lines, as a sign of nuclear starbursts. We found Pa-alpha emission in the spectra of 11 sources and Br-gamma in at least five. Strong NIR emission has been found in two sources, CBS 126 and Mkn 766, both objects with strong [OIII]5007 emission, weak FeII emission and wavelength dependent degree of polarization in the optical. Classical Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies do not show exceptionally strong NIR emission lines. We present the results of our study and discuss how our findings fit into an evolutionary scheme of AGN.

  6. Observation of Dirac Monopoles in a Synthetic Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, M W; Kandel, S; Möttönen, M; Hall, D S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic monopoles --- particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles --- have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin-ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3. Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in b...

  7. Observing photonic de Broglie waves without the NOON state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osung Kwon; Young-Sik Ra; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The photonic de Broglie wave, in which an ensemble of $N$ identical photons with wavelength $\\lambda$ reveals $\\lambda/N$ interference fringes, has been known to be a unique feature exhibited by the photon number-path entangled state or the NOON state. Here, we report the observation of the photonic de Broglie wave for a pair of photons, generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion, that are not photon number-path entangled. We also show that the photonic de Broglie wave can even be observed for a pair of photons that are completely separable (i.e., no entanglement in all degrees of freedom) and distinguishable. The experimental and theoretical results suggest that the photonic de Broglie wave is, in fact, not related to the entanglement of the photons, rather it is related to the indistinguishable pathways established by the measurement scheme.

  8. Observation of detection-dependent multi-photon coherence times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Sik Ra; Malte C. Tichy; Hyang-Tag Lim; Osung Kwon; Florian Mintert; Andreas Buchleitner; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The coherence time constitutes one of the most critical parameters that determines whether or not interference is observed in an experiment. For photons, it is traditionally determined by the effective spectral bandwidth of the photon. Here we report on multi-photon interference experiments in which the multi-photon coherence time, defined by the width of the interference signal, depends on the number of interfering photons and on the measurement scheme chosen to detect the particles. A theoretical analysis reveals that all multi-photon interference with more than two particles features this dependence, which can be attributed to higher-order effects in the mutual indistinguishability of the particles. As a striking consequence, a single, well-defined many-particle quantum state can exhibit qualitatively different degrees of interference, depending on the chosen observable. Therefore, optimal sensitivity in many-particle quantum interferometry can only be achieved by choosing a suitable detection scheme.

  9. Hadronic sizes and observables in high-energy scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erasmo Ferreira; Flávio Pereira

    1997-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The functional dependence of the high-energy observables of total cross section and slope parameter on the sizes of the colliding hadrons predicted by the model of the stochastic vacuum and the corresponding relations used in the geometric model of Povh and H\\"ufner are confronted with the experimental data. The existence of a universal term in the expression for the slope, due purely to vacuum effects, independent of the energy and of the particular hadronic system, is investigated. Accounting for the two independent correlation functions of the QCD vacuum, we improve the simple and consistent description given by the model of the stochastic vacuum to the high-energy pp and pbar-p data, with a new determination of parameters of non-perturbative QCD. The increase of the hadronic radii with the energy accounts for the energy dependence of the observables.

  10. Recycling of quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a finite number of copies of an unknown qubit state that have already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? We give a positive answer to this question and quantify the information obtainable by a given observer as a function of the number of copies in the ensemble, and of the number of independent observers that, one after the other, have independently measured the same ensemble of qubits before him. The optimality of the protocol is proven and extensions to other states and encodings are also studied. According to the general lore, the state after a measurement has no information about the state before the measurement. Our results manifestly show that this statement has to be taken with a grain of salt, specially in situations where the quantum states encode confidential information.

  11. High Spatial Resolution Observations of Loops in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Winebarger, Amy R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determining how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in July 2012. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data for a subset of 79 of these loops and find that their temperature distributions are narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of proposed physical mechanisms.

  12. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  13. Observation of Materials Processes in Liquids in the Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chong M.; Liao, Honggang; Ross, Frances M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials synthesis and the functioning of devices often indispensably involve liquid media. But direct visualization of dynamic process in liquids, especially with high spatial and temporal resolution, has been challenging. For solid materials, advances in aberration corrected electron microscopy have made observation of atomic level features a routine practice. Here we discuss the extent to which one can take advantage of the resolution of modern electron microscopes to image phenomenon occuring in liquids. We will describe the fundamentals of two different experimental approaches, closed and open liquid cells. We will illustrate the capabilities of each approach by considering processes in batteries and nucleation and growth of nanoparticles from solution. We conclude that liquid cell electron microscopy appears to be duly fulfilling its role for in situ studies of nanoscale processes in liquids, revealing physical and chemical processes otherwise difficult to observe.

  14. CORONAL MASS EJECTION INDUCED OUTFLOWS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, M.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Imada, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)], E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: shinsuke.imada@nao.ac.jp

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the outflows associated with two halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred on 2006 December 13 and 14 in NOAA 10930, using the Hinode/EIS observations. Each CME was accompanied by an EIT wave and coronal dimmings. Dopplergrams in the dimming regions are obtained from the spectra of seven EIS lines. The results show that strong outflows are visible in the dimming regions during the CME eruption at different heights from the lower transition region to the corona. It is found that the velocity is positively correlated with the photospheric magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the dimming. We estimate the mass loss based on height-dependent EUV dimmings and find it to be smaller than the CME mass derived from white-light observations. The mass difference is attributed partly to the uncertain atmospheric model, and partly to the transition region outflows, which refill the coronal dimmings.

  15. XMM-Newton Observations of AGN Iron Line Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Reeves

    2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    XMM-Newton observations of type I AGN are presented. The properties of the iron K emission line are reviewed, the majority of AGN observed by XMM-Newton show narrow, unresolved (by XMM) iron lines at 6.4 keV from cold matter that must originate far from the inner accretion disc, perhaps in the putative torus or outer broad line region. The strength of this narrow line appears to decrease with luminosity, implying a reduction in the covering fraction of this material in the more luminous quasars. Few examples of the broad, relativistic iron line profile have been found by XMM-Newton, although in MCG -6-30-15, the extreme breadth of the broad line component may imply a Kerr metric for the central black hole. Generally, relativistic Fe K line profiles are not required in a number of other Seyfert 1 X-ray spectra.

  16. Some Observations on Energy Efficiency and Capital Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenney, W. F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SO~ffi OBSERVATIONS ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CAPITAL COST William F. Kenney Exxon Chemical Company Florham Park, ABSTRACT The usual expectation in the process indus tries is that improved energy efficiency requires increased investment..., ACS Symposium Series ~. (3) Exxon Chemical Internal Studies. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author is grateful to Exxon Chemical for permission to publish this study. Particular thanks go to A. P. Durso and W. J. O'Brien of the Central Engineering...

  17. Applicability of radar observations to the prediction of storm runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Odell Monroe

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of Depaverne. (Yiembe~ 1967 (Yonwh) (Yea ) ABSTRACT Rainfall-runoff relaL'ronships fox 18 storms over the Little Nashita River basin in Oklahoma are studied in order to develop a method for predicting storm losses based on weather-radar observational..., for the use of their computer facilities. Credit is due Mr. M. A. Hartman, Chief Research Engineer, Agricultural Research Service, Chickasha, Oklahoma, for his assistance in obtaining treamflow and rainfall data from records maintained by the Agricultural...

  18. Solar ALMA Observations - A new view of our host star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Brajsa, Roman; Barta, Miroslav; Shimojo, Masumi; Hales, Antonio; Yagoubov, Pavel; Hudson, Hugh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALMA provides the necessary spatial, temporal and spectral resolution to explore central questions in contemporary solar physics with potentially far-reaching implications for stellar atmospheres and plasma physics. It can uniquely constraint the thermal and magnetic field structure in the solar chromosphere with measurements that are highly complementary to simultaneous observations with other ground-based and space-borne instruments. Here, we highlight selected science cases.

  19. Observable Majoron Emission in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z Berezhiani; A Yu Smirnov; J W F Valle

    1992-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a class of simplest Majoron models where neutrino- majoron couplings can be in the range $g \\sim 10^{-5}-10^{-3}$ leading to the observability of neutrinoless double beta decay with majoron emission. The majoron is a singlet of the electroweak gauge symmetry, thus avoiding conflict with the LEP data on Z decay, which rules out the triplet and doublet majoron models.

  20. Fitting Dynamical Models to Observations of Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic ingredients of models for the internal dynamics of globular clusters are reviewed, with an emphasis on the description of equilibrium configurations. The development of progressive complexity in the models is traced, concentrating on the inclusion of velocity anisotropy, rotation, and integrals of motion other than energy. Applications to observations of extragalactic globulars and to combined radial-velocity and proper-motion datasets are discussed.

  1. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-B RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Zhu, W. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here, we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 {+-} 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L{sub bb}=2.0{sub -0.7}{sup +2.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}{approx}0.0036 E-dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1{sigma} upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect either pulsar, setting 3{sigma} upper limits on their blackbody temperatures of 48 and 56 eV, respectively. Despite the similarities in rotational properties, these sources are significantly cooler than all but one of the XINSs, which we attribute to the two groups having been born with different magnetic fields and hence evolving differently.

  2. ISO observations of spirals: modelling the FIR emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Bianchi; Paul B. Alton; Jonathan I. Davies

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO observations at 200 micron have modified our view of the dust component in spiral galaxies. For a sample of seven resolved spirals we have retrieved a mean temperature of 20K, about 10K lower than previous estimates based on IRAS data at shorter wavelengths. Because of the steep dependence of far-infrared emission on the dust temperature, the dust masses inferred from ISO fluxes are a factor of 10 higher than those derived from IRAS data only, leading to gas-to-dust ratios close to the value observed in the Galaxy. The scale-length of the 200 micron emission is larger than for the IRAS 100 micron emission, with colder dust at larger distances from the galactic centre, as expected if the interstellar radiation field is the main source of dust heating. The 200 micron scale-length is also larger than the optical, for all the galaxies in the sample. This suggests that the dust distribution is more extended than that of the stars.A model of the dust heating is needed to derive the parameters of the dust distribution from the FIR emission. Therefore, we have adapted an existing radiative transfer code to deal with dust emission. Simulated maps of the temperature distribution within the dust disk and of the dust emission at any wavelength can be produced. The stellar spectral energy distribution is derived from observations in the ultraviolet, optical and near infrared. The parameters of the dust distribution (scale-lengths and optical depth) are chosen to reproduce the observed characteristics of the FIR emission, i.e. the shape of the spectrum, the flux and the spatial distribution. We describe the application of the model to one of the galaxies in the sample, NGC 6946.

  3. ROSAT Observations of the Flare Star CC Eri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Pan; C. Jordan

    1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The flare/spotted spectroscopic binary star CC Eri was observed with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) on the X-ray satellite ROSAT on 1990 July 9-11 and 1992 January 26-27. During the observations, the source was variable on time scales from a few minutes to several hours, with the X-ray (0.2-2 keV) luminosity in the range $\\sim 2.5-6.8\\times 10^{29} erg s^{-1}$. An X-ray flare-like event, which has a one hour characteristic rise time and a two hour decay time, was observed from CC Eri on 1990 July 10 16:14-21:34 (UT). The X-ray spectrum of the source can be described by current thermal plasma codes with two temperature components or with a continuous temperature distribution. The spectral results show that plasma at $Te\\sim 10^{7}$ K exists in the corona of CC Eri. The variations in the observed source flux and spectra can be reproduced by a flare, adopting a magnetic reconnection model. Comparisons with an unheated model, late in the flare, suggest that the area and volume of the flare are substantially larger than in a solar two ribbon flare, while the electron pressure is similar. The emission measure and temperature of the non-flaring emission, interpreted as the average corona, lead to an electron pressure similar to that in a well-developed solar active region. Rotational modulation of a spot related active region requires an unphysically large X-ray flux in a concentrated area.

  4. EUV emission lines and diagnostics observed with Hinode/EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna; H. E. Mason; K. P. Dere; E. Landi; M. Landini; G. A. Doschek; C. M. Brown; J. L. Culhane; L. K. Harra; T. Watanabe; H. Hara

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Quiet Sun and active region spectra from the Hinode/EIS instrument are presented, and the strongest lines from different temperature regions discussed. A list of emission lines recommended to be included in EIS observation studies is presented based on analysis of blending and diagnostic potential using the CHIANTI atomic database. In addition we identify the most useful density diagnostics from the ions covered by EIS.

  5. Extraplanar Dust in Spiral Galaxies: Observations and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent optical and submillimeter observations have begun to probe the existence of dust grains in the halos of spiral galaxies. I review our own work in this area which employs high-resolution optical images of edge-on spiral galaxies to trace high-z dust in absorption against the background stellar light of the galaxies. We have found that a substantial fraction of such galaxies (>50%) show extensive webs of dust-bearing clouds to heights z>2 kpc. Extraplanar dust in galaxies is statistically correlated with extraplanar diffuse ionized gas, though there is no evidence for a direct, physical relationship between these two phases of the high-z interstellar medium. The dense high-z clouds individually have masses estimated to be >10^5} to 10^6 solar masses. The detailed properties of the observed dust structures suggest the clouds seen in our images may represent the dense phase of a multiphase ISM at high-z. Such dense clouds can have an important effect on the observed light distribution in spiral galaxies. I discuss the effects such high-z dust can have on quantitative measures of the vertical structure of stars and ionized gas in edge-on systems.

  6. Lunar occultation observation of ? Sgr: A progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jatmiko, A. T. P. [Bosscha Observatory, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Puannandra, G. P.; Hapsari, R. D.; Putri, R. A.; Arifin, Z. M.; Haans, G. K.; Hadiputrawan, I. P. W. [Bosscha Observatory, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia and Astronomy Study Program, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lunar Occultation (LO) is an event where limb of the Moon passing over a particular heavenly bodies such as stars, asteroids, or planets. In other words, during the event, stars, asteroids and planets are occulted by the Moon. When occulted objects contact the lunar limb, there will be a diffraction fringe(s) which can be measured photometrically, until the signal vanishes into noise. This event will give us a valuable information about binarities (of stars) and/or angular diameters estimation (of stars, planets, asteroids) in milliarcsecond resolution, by fitting with theoretical LO pattern. CCDs are common for LO observation because of its fast read out, and recently are developed for sub-meter class telescope. In this paper, our LO observation attempt of ? Sgr and its progress report are presented. The observation was conducted on July 30{sup th}, 2012 at Bosscha Observatory, Indonesia, using 45cm f/12 GOTO telescope combined with ST-9 XE CCD camera and Bessel B filter. We used drift-scan method to obtain light curve of the star as it was disappearing behind Moon's dark limb. Our goal is to detect binarity (or multiplicity) of this particular object.

  7. Observation of incomplete fusion reactions at l < l {sub crit}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Abhishek, E-mail: abhishekyadav117@gmail.com; Sharma, Vijay R., E-mail: abhishekyadav117@gmail.com; Singh, Devendra P., E-mail: abhishekyadav117@gmail.com; Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R. [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh (UP) - 202 002 (India); Singh, Pushpendra P. [GSI-Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bala, Indu; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P. [NP-Group: Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi - 110 067 (India); Sharma, M. K. [Department of Physics, S. V. College, Aligarh- 202 001 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the presence of incomplete fusion at low energies i.e. 4-7MeV/nucleon and also to study its dependence on various entrance-channel parameters, the two type of measurements (i) excitation function for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb, and (ii) forward recoil ranges for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb systems have been performed. The experimentally measured excitation functions have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus decay using statistical model code PACE4. Analysis of data suggests the production of xn/px)n-channels via complete fusion, as these are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, while, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of ?-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones, which has been attributed due to the incomplete fusion processes. Further, the incomplete fusion events observed in case of forward recoil range measurements have been explained on the basis of the breakup fusion model, where these events may be attributed to the fusion of {sup 8}Be and/or {sup 4}He from {sup 12}C projectile to the target nucleus. In the present work, the SUMRULE model calculations are found to highly underestimate the observed incomplete fusion cross-sections which indicate that the l-values lower than l {sub crit} (limit of complete fusion) significantly contribute to the incomplete fusion reactions.

  8. Observation of Dirac Monopoles in a Synthetic Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Ray; E. Ruokokoski; S. Kandel; M. Möttönen; D. S. Hall

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic monopoles --- particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles --- have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin-ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3. Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in both experiments and matching numerical simulations, at the termini of vortex lines within the condensate. By directly imaging such a vortex line, the presence of a monopole may be discerned from the experimental data alone. These real-space images provide conclusive and long-awaited experimental evidence of the existence of Dirac monopoles. Our result provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe and manipulate these quantum-mechanical entities in a controlled environment.

  9. Observational constraints on holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing, 400065 (China); Setare, M.R., E-mail: lvjianbo819@163.com, E-mail: msaridak@phys.uoa.gr, E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Department of Science of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use observational data from Type Ia Supernovae (SN), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and observational Hubble data (OHD), and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, to constrain the cosmological scenario of holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant. We consider both flat and non-flat background geometry, and we present the corresponding constraints and contour-plots of the model parameters. We conclude that the scenario is compatible with observations. In 1? we find ?{sub ?0} = 0.72{sup +0.03}{sub ?0.03}, ?{sub k0} = ?0.0013{sup +0.0130}{sub ?0.0040}, c = 0.80{sup +0.19}{sub ?0.14} and ?{sub G}?G'/G = ?0.0025{sup +0.0080}{sub ?0.0050}, while for the present value of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter we obtain w{sub 0} = ?1.04{sup +0.15}{sub ?0.20}.

  10. Observation of the $\\Xi_b^0$ Baryon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussey, Peter; /Glasgow U.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of the heavy baryonic state {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0} is reported by the CDF Collaboration. A new decay mode of the established state {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} is also observed. In both cases the decay into a {Xi}{sub c} plus a charged pion is seen, with an equivalent statistical significance of above 6.8{sigma}. The quark model of elementary particles is well established and has a impressive history of success in its account of hadronic states. Nevertheless, it is important to continue to test it by searching for hitherto unobserved particles that are predicted to exist, both to provide continued confirmation of the quark model, and to provide a background for the possible discovery of unusual types of particle. In this presentation we report the first observation, by the CDF Collaboration, of a new baryonic state, the {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0}. This consists of a bsu quark combination and fills an important gap in the set of baryons containing a b quark.

  11. Disk Evolution in Young Binaries: from Observations to Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -L. Monin; C. J. Clarke; L. Prato; C. McCabe

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of a binary system surrounded by disks is the most common outcome of stellar formation. Hence studying and understanding the formation and the evolution of binary systems and associated disks is a cornerstone of star formation science. Moreover, since the components within binary systems are coeval and the sizes of their disks are fixed by the tidal truncation of their companion, binary systems provide an ideal "laboratory" in which to study disk evolution under well defined boundary conditions. In this paper, we review observations of several inner disk diagnostics in multiple systems, including hydrogen emission lines (indicative of ongoing accretion), $K-L$ and $K-N$ color excesses (evidence of warm inner disks), and polarization (indicative of the relative orientations of the disks around each component). We examine to what degree these properties are correlated within binary systems and how this degree of correlation depends on parameters such as separation and binary mass ratio. These findings will be interpreted both in terms of models that treat each disk as an isolated reservoir and those in which the disks are subject to re-supply from some form of circumbinary reservoir, the observational evidence for which we will also critically review. The planet forming potential of multiple star systems is discussed in terms of the relative lifetimes of disks around single stars, binary primaries and binary secondaries. Finally, we summarize several potentially revealing observational problems and future projects that could provide further insight into disk evolution in the coming decade

  12. Faraday Rotation Observations of Magnetic Fields in galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracy E. Clarke

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of magnetic fields in the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies has been revealed through several different observational techniques. These fields may be dynamically important in clusters as they will provide additional pressure support to the intracluster medium as well as inhibit transport mechanisms such as thermal conduction. Here, we review the current observational state of Faraday rotation measure studies of the cluster fields. The fields are generally found to be a few to 10 microG in non-cooling core clusters and ordered on scales of 10-20 kpc. Studies of sources at large impact parameters show that the magnetic fields extend from cluster cores to radii of at least 500 kpc. In central regions of cooling core systems the field strengths are often somewhat higher (10-40 microG) and appear to be ordered on smaller scales of a few to 10 kpc. We also review some of the recent work on interpreting Faraday rotation measure observations through theory and numerical simulations. These techniques allow us to build up a much more detailed view of the strength and topology of the fields.

  13. Suzaku observations of AGN and synergy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kataoka, Jun [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Takahashi, Tad [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Kanagawa, 229-8510 (Japan); Madejski, Greg [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University (United States)

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

  14. Suzaku Observations of AGN and Synergy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kataoka, Jun; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.; Takahashi, Tad; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

  15. Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Theory vs. Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Cumming

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    I review our theoretical understanding of thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars, concentrating on comparisons to observations. Sequences of regular Type I X-ray bursts from GS 1826-24 and 4U 1820-30 are very well described by the theory. I discuss recent work which attempts to use the observed burst properties in these sources to constrain the composition of the accreted material. For GS 1826-24, variations in the burst energetics with accretion rate indicate that the accreted material has solar metallicity; for 4U 1820-30, future observations should constrain the hydrogen fraction, testing evolutionary models. I briefly discuss the global bursting behavior of burst sources, which continues to be a major puzzle. Finally, I turn to superbursts, which naturally fit into the picture as unstable carbon ignition in a thick layer of heavy elements. I present new time-dependent models of the cooling tails of superbursts, and discuss the various interactions between superbursts and normal Type I bursts, and what can be learned from them.

  16. Thermonuclear supernova models, and observations of Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bravo; C. Badenes; D. Garcia-Senz

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we review the present state of theoretical models of thermonuclear supernovae, and compare their predicitions with the constraints derived from observations of Type Ia supernovae. The diversity of explosion mechanisms usually found in one-dimensional simulations is a direct consequence of the impossibility to resolve the flame structure under the assumption of spherical symmetry. Spherically symmetric models have been successful in explaining many of the observational features of Type Ia supernovae, but they rely on two kinds of empirical models: one that describes the behaviour of the flame on the scales unresolved by the code, and another that takes account of the evolution of the flame shape. In contrast, three-dimensional simulations are able to compute the flame shape in a self-consistent way, but they still need a model for the propagation of the flame in the scales unresolved by the code. Furthermore, in three dimensions the number of degrees of freedom of the initial configuration of the white dwarf at runaway is much larger than in one dimension. Recent simulations have shown that the sensitivity of the explosion output to the initial conditions can be extremely large. New paradigms of thermonuclear supernovae have emerged from this situation, as the Pulsating Reverse Detonation. The resolution of all these issues must rely on the predictions of observational properties of the models, and their comparison with current Type Ia supernova data, including X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants.

  17. Dust properties inside molecular clouds from coreshine modeling and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Charlène; Juvela, Mika; Paladini, Roberta; Lallement, Rosine; Marshall, D J; Andersen, Morten; Bacmann, Aurore; Mcgee, Peregrine M; Montier, Ludovic; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Pelkonen, V -M; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Steinacker, Jürgen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Using observations to deduce dust properties, grain size distribution, and physical conditions in molecular clouds is a highly degenerate problem. Aims. The coreshine phenomenon, a scattering process at 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m that dominates absorption, has revealed its ability to explore the densest parts of clouds. We want to use this effect to constrain the dust parameters. The goal is to investigate to what extent grain growth (at constant dust mass) inside molecular clouds is able to explain the coreshine observations. We aim to find dust models that can explain a sample of Spitzer coreshine data. We also look at the consistency with near-infrared data we obtained for a few clouds. Methods. We selected four regions with a very high occurrence of coreshine cases: Taurus-Perseus, Cepheus, Chameleon and L183/L134. We built a grid of dust models and investigated the key parameters to reproduce the general trend of surface bright- nesses and intensity ratios of both coreshine and near-infrared observation...

  18. The Mystery Deepens: Spitzer Observations of Cool White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukremin Kilic; Ted von Hippel; Fergal Mullally; William T. Reach; Marc J. Kuchner; D. E. Winget; Adam Burrows

    2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 4.5$\\mu$m and 8$\\mu$m photometric observations of 18 cool white dwarfs obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our observations demonstrate that four white dwarfs with T_eff< 6000 K show slightly depressed mid-infrared fluxes relative to white dwarf models. In addition, another white dwarf with a peculiar optical and near-infrared spectral energy distribution (LHS 1126) is found to display significant flux deficits in Spitzer observations. These mid-infrared flux deficits are not predicted by the current white dwarf models including collision induced absorption due to molecular hydrogen. We postulate that either the collision induced absorption calculations are incomplete or there are other unrecognized physical processes occuring in cool white dwarf atmospheres. The spectral energy distribution of LHS 1126 surprisingly fits a Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum in the infrared, mimicking a hot white dwarf with effective temperature well in excess of 10$^5$ K. This implies that the source of this flux deficit is probably not molecular absorption but some other process.

  19. OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL FLARE PLASMA WITH THE EUV VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Doschek, George A. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mariska, John T. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the defining characteristics of a solar flare is the impulsive formation of very high temperature plasma. The properties of the thermal emission are not well understood, however, and the analysis of solar flare observations is often predicated on the assumption that the flare plasma is isothermal. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides spectrally resolved observations of emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures (e.g., Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and allow for thermal flare plasma to be studied in detail. In this paper we describe a method for computing the differential emission measure distribution in a flare using EVE observations and apply it to several representative events. We find that in all phases of the flare the differential emission measure distribution is broad. Comparisons of EVE spectra with calculations based on parameters derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites soft X-ray fluxes indicate that the isothermal approximation is generally a poor representation of the thermal structure of a flare.

  20. Observability of the General Relativistic Precession of Periastra in Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres Jordan; Gaspar A. Bakos

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The general relativistic precession rate of periastra in close-in exoplanets can be orders of magnitude larger than the magnitude of the same effect for Mercury. The realization that some of the close-in exoplanets have significant eccentricities raises the possibility that this precession might be detectable. We explore in this work the observability of the periastra precession using radial velocity and transit light curve observations. Our analysis is independent of the source of precession, which can also have significant contributions due to additional planets and tidal deformations. We find that precession of the periastra of the magnitude expected from general relativity can be detectable in timescales of <~ 10 years with current observational capabilities by measuring the change in the primary transit duration or in the time difference between primary and secondary transits. Radial velocity curves alone would be able to detect this precession for super-massive, close-in exoplanets orbiting inactive stars if they have ~100 datapoints at each of two epochs separated by ~20 years. We show that the contribution to the precession by tidal deformations may dominate the total precession in cases where the relativistic precession is detectable. Studies of transit durations with Kepler might need to take into account effects arising from the general relativistic and tidal induced precession of periastra for systems containing close-in, eccentric exoplanets. Such studies may be able to detect additional planets with masses comparable to that of Earth by detecting secular variations in the transit duration induced by the changing longitude of periastron.