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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast

2

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve, a total of approximately 2 million barrels, and

3

Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit,...

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashless low-sulfur fuel Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blendstocks for Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel in PADD III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17... markets for low ... Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Transportation...

5

Central Appalachia: Production potential of low-sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect

The vast preponderance of eastern US low sulfur and 1.2-lbs SO{sub 2}/MMBtu compliance coal comes from a relatively small area composed of 14 counties located in eastern Kentucky, southern West Virginia and western Virginia. These 14 counties accounted for 68% of all Central Appalachian coal production in 1989 as well as 85% of all compliance coal shipped to electric utilities from this region. A property-by-property analysis of total production potential in 10 of the 14 counties (Floyd, Knott, Letcher, Harlan, Martin and Pike in Kentucky and Boone, Kanawha, Logan and Mingo in West Virginia) resulted in the following estimates of active and yet to be developed properties: (1) total salable reserves for all sulfur levels were 5.9 billion tons and (2) 1.2-lbs. SO{sub 2}/MMBtu compliance'' reserves totaled 2.38 billion tons. This potential supply of compliance coal is adequate to meet the expanded utility demand expected under acid rain for the next 20 years. Beyond 2010, compliance supplies will begin to reach depletion levels in some areas of the study region. A review of the cost structure for all active mines was used to categorize the cost structure for developing potential supplies. FOB cash costs for all active mines in the ten counties ranged from $15 per ton to $35 per ton and the median mine cost was about $22 per ton. A total of 47 companies with the ability to produce and ship coal from owned or leased reserves are active in the ten-county region. Identified development and expansion projects controlled by active companies are capable of expanding the region's current production level by over 30 million tons per year over the next twenty years. Beyond this period the issue of reserve depletion for coal of all sulfur levels in the ten county region will become a pressing issue. 11 figs., 12 tabs.

Watkins, J. (Hill and Associates, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cost-benefit analysis of ultra-low sulfur jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of aviation has spurred increased study of its environmental impacts and the possible mitigation thereof. One emissions reduction option is the introduction of an Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) jet fuel standard for ...

Kuhn, Stephen (Stephen Richard)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reserves and potential supply of low-sulfur Appalachian coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project has two objectives. The first is to develop and test a methodology for determining economically mineable reserves of low-sulfur Appalachian coal. The second is to appraise the potential supply response to a very large increase in demand for low-sulfur Appalachian coal. The reserve determination procedure developed in the project applies criteria similar to those employed by mining engineers in assessing the commercial feasibility of mining properties. The procedure is relatively easy to apply, could be used to develop reserve estimates for a large sample of mining blocks for under $500,000, and produces reserve estimates very different from those produced from the criteria that have been used by the United States Bureau of Mines: with the more rigorous method developed in this project surface mineable reserves are much larger and deep mineable reserves are less than with the Bureau of Mines method. The appraisal of potential low-sulfur coal supply response assessed excess capacity, coal mining company outlook on reserves, and coal quality requirements. The appraisal concluded that ample coal meeting most buyers' requirements will probably be available in the near or long term at a price under $45 in 1984 dollars. However, coal quality requirements may prove a constraint for some buyers, and an upward surge in prices would probably occur in the event of legislation imposing requirements leading to greatly increased low-sulfur coal demand. 14 refs., 24 figs., 15 tabs.

Hughes, W.R.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost and equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost gas instead of continuing to burn low-sulfur fuel oil, a report said. Switching to liquefied natural who switch from gasoline-powered vehicles to ones fueled by compressed natural gas could save as much

9

Update on Transition to Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On November 8, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator signed a direct final rule that will shift the retail compliance date for offering ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) for highway use from September 1, 2006, to October 15, 2006. The change will allow more time for retail outlets and terminals to comply with the new 15 parts per million (ppm) sulfur standard, providing time for entities in the diesel fuel distribution system to flush higher sulfur fuel out of the system during the transition. Terminals will have until September 1, 2006, to complete their transitions to ULSD. The previous deadline was July 15, 2006.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Adequacy of low-sulfur coal supplies for meeting acid rain requirements  

SciTech Connect

As we have shown, acid rain legislation would create a large demand for low-sulfur bituminous coals. These coals are primarily found in Central Appalachia and in parts of the West, and would displace much of the highersulfur coal production now coming from the Midwest and Northern Appalachia. The magnitude of the related shifts in coal production are potentially huge. Previously, it has been assumed that these shifts in demands could be met by the industry. This paper has tried to highlight possible difficulties in actually meeting such demands. In the near-term, these difficulties concern the ability of the industry to develop mines and of the transportation industry to ship the coal. In the longer-term, questions can be raised regarding the amount, the quality, and the mineability of low-sulfur bituminous coal reserves. These potential difficulties in coal supply could affect attainment of the legislative goals. If not addressed and resolved in a timely fashion, the results could be a higher cost to meeting legislative goals and/or a longer time required to meet them.

Klein, D.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP mercury control In low Sulfur eaStern bItumInouS coal flue GaS Background Full-scale field testing has demonstrated the effectiveness of activated carbon injection (ACI) as a mercury-specific control technology for certain coal-fired power plants, depending on the plant's coal feedstock and existing air pollution control device configuration. In a typical configuration, powdered activated carbon (PAC) is injected downstream of the plant's air heater and upstream of the existing particulate control device - either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter (FF). The PAC adsorbs the mercury from the combustion flue gas and is subsequently captured along with the fly ash in the ESP or FF. ACI can have some negative side

12

Process for producing low-sulfur boiler fuel by hydrotreatment of solvent deashed SRC  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In this invention, a process is disclosed characterized by heating a slurry of coal in the presence of a process-derived recycle solvent and passing same to a dissolver zone, separating the resultant gases and liquid/solid products therefrom, vacuum distilling the liquid/solids products, separating the portions of the liquid/solids vacuum distillation effluent into a solid ash, unconverted coal particles and SRC material having a boiling point above 850.degree. F. and subjecting same to a critical solvent deashing step to provide an ash-free SRC product. The lighter liquid products from the vacuum distillation possess a boiling point below 850.degree. F. and are passed through a distillation tower, from which recycled solvent is recovered in addition to light distillate boiling below 400.degree. F. (overhead). The ash-free SRC product in accompanyment with at least a portion of the process derived solvent is passed in combination to a hydrotreating zone containing a hydrogenation catalyst and in the presence of hydrogen is hydroprocessed to produce a desulfurized and denitrogenized low-sulfur, low-ash boiler fuel and a process derived recycle solvent which is recycled to slurry the coal in the beginning of the process before heating.

Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The effects of gas-to-oil rate in ultra low sulfur diesel hydrotreating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrotreating has become a critical refining process as fuel sulfur specifications are tightened around the world. Recently, refiners in the United States have been learning how to optimize the performance of ultra low sulfur diesel (ulsd) hydrotreaters. The gas-to-oil feed rate ratio is known to be an important variable in this respect. It is well known that the gas-to-oil rate must be kept high enough to maintain the desired hydrogen partial pressure through the hydrotreating reactor, and to minimize the inhibiting effect of hydrogen sulfide. A lesser-known effect is the effect of gas-to-oil rate on the vaporliquid equilibrium in the reactor. Changing the gas-to-oil rate alters the distribution of reactants between vapor and liquid in a way that changes the relative reaction rates of different sulfur compounds. This paper presents some pilot plant data and analysis showing this effect of phase equilibrium in deep diesel desulfurization. The effect can be modeled using the FryeMosby equation, which accounts for the effects of feed vaporization and phase equilibrium on the reaction rates of individual sulfur compounds in a trickle bed hydrotreater.

George Hoekstra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Particle size distributions from heavy-duty diesel engine operated on low-sulfur marine fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particulate matter (PM) emission characteristics of a four-stroke diesel engine were investigated while operating on low-sulfur marine gas oil. PM size distributions appeared to be unimodal (accumulation mode) with fairly constant count median diameter (CMD) of 5565nm for all test modes at maximum engine speed. The slightly bigger CMD of around 76nm for unimodal particle size distributions at 1080rpm at medium- and high-load conditions was observed. The bimodal size distribution was registered only at very low load with nuclei CMD being below 15nm, accumulation CMD of around 82nm and percentage of nanoparticles of around 65%. The study of primary dilution air temperature (PDT) effect revealed a significant reduction in total particle number for all operating conditions when PDT was increased from 30C to 400C. This also had an effect on particle CMD values and is believed to be due to evaporation of sulfuric acid with bound water and certain organic fractions that were formed during dilution process (at PDT=30C). At very low load intermediate speed conditions, the heating of dilution air had a very little effect on the nucleation mode, which could suggest that it primarily consists of heavy hydrocarbons associated with lubrication oil.

Sergey Ushakov; Harald Valland; Jrgen B. Nielsen; Erik Hennie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Alaska has 4. 0 trillion tons of low-sulfur coal: Is there a future for this resource  

SciTech Connect

The demand for and use of low-sulfur coal may increase because of concern with acid rain. Alaska's low-sulfur coal resources can only be described as enormous: 4.0 trillion tons of hypothetical onshore coal. Mean total sulfur content is 0.34% (range 0.06-6.6%, n = 262) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. There are 50 coal fields in Alaska; the bulk of the resources are in six major fields or regions: Nenana, Cook Inlet, Matanuska, Chignik-Herendeen Bay, North Slope, and Bering River. For comparison, Carboniferous coals in the Appalachian region and Interior Province have a mean total sulfur content of 2.3% (range 0.1-19.0%, n = 5,497) with a mean apparent rank of high-volatile A bituminous coal, and Rocky Mountain and northern Great Plains Cretaceous and Tertiary coals have a mean total sulfur content of 0.86% (range 0.02-19.0%, n = 2,754) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. Alaskan coal has two-fifths the total sulfur of western US coals and one-sixth that of Carboniferous US coals. Even though Alaska has large resources of low-sulfur coal, these resources have not been developed because of (1) remote locations and little infrastructure, (2) inhospitable climate, and (3) long distances to potential markets. These resources will not be used in the near future unless there are some major, and probably violent, changes in the world energy picture.

Stricker, G.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ULTRA-LOW SULFUR REDUCTION EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE/DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-BOARD FUEL SULFUR TRAP  

SciTech Connect

Honeywell is actively working on a 3-year program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an ''on-vehicle'' desulfurization fuel filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NO{sub x} adsorbers. The NO{sub x} adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and ''2007-Rule'' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters will also be examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. It is anticipated that the technology developed for heavy-duty applications will be applicable to light-duty as well. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consists of four phases. Phase I will focus on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II we will concentrate on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III will study life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV will focus on efficacy and life testing and component integration. The project team will include a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Mack Trucks Inc.), a filter recycler (American Wastes Industries), and a low-sulfur fuel supplier (Equilon, a joint venture between Shell and Texaco).

Ron Rohrbach; Gary Zulauf; Tim Gavin

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 3: SOx/NOx/Hg Removal for Low Sulfur Coal  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxycombustion technology. The objective of Task 3 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning low sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was to conduct an experimental investigation and to develop a novel process for simultaneously removal of SOx and NOx from power plants that would operate on low sulfur coal without the need for wet-FGD & SCRs. A novel purification process operating at high pressures and ambient temperatures was developed. Activated carbon??s catalytic and adsorbent capabilities are used to oxidize the sulfur and nitrous oxides to SO{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} species, which are adsorbed on the activated carbon and removed from the gas phase. Activated carbon is regenerated by water wash followed by drying. The development effort commenced with the screening of commercially available activated carbon materials for their capability to remove SO{sub 2}. A bench-unit operating in batch mode was constructed to conduct an experimental investigation of simultaneous SOx and NOx removal from a simulated oxyfuel flue gas mixture. Optimal operating conditions and the capacity of the activated carbon to remove the contaminants were identified. The process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx. In the longevity tests performed on a batch unit, the retention capacity could be maintained at high level over 20 cycles. This process was able to effectively remove up to 4000 ppm SOx from the simulated feeds corresponding to oxyfuel flue gas from high sulfur coal plants. A dual bed continuous unit with five times the capacity of the batch unit was constructed to test continuous operation and longevity. Full-automation was implemented to enable continuous operation (24/7) with minimum operator supervision. Continuous run was carried out for 40 days. Very high SOx (>99.9%) and NOx (98%) removal efficiencies were also achieved in a continuous unit. However, the retention capacity of carbon beds for SOx and NOx was decreased from ~20 hours to ~10 hours over a 40 day period of operation, which was in contrast to the results obtained in a batch unit. These contradictory results indicate the need for optimization of adsorption-regeneration cycle to maintain long term activity of activated carbon material at a higher level and thus minimize the capital cost of the system. In summary, the activated carbon process exceeded performance targets for SOx and NOx removal efficiencies and it was found to be suitable for power plants burning both low and high sulfur coals. More efforts are needed to optimize the system performance.

Monica Zanfir; Rahul Solunke; Minish Shah

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Adsorptive desulfurization of low sulfur diesel fuel using palladium containing mesoporous silica synthesized via a novel in-situ approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, a novel in-situ synthesis route was applied for preparation of an adsorbent, i.e. palladium containing MCM-41. At first, a hydrophobic palladium precursor was added to the ethanolic micellar solution followed by vacuum distillation of ethanol which decreases the hydrophobic characteristic of the solution. Distillation caused diffusion of hydrophobic palladium precursor into the hydrophobic core of the micelles. Then, tetraethyl orthosilicate was added to the above solution and the silicate spices arranged around the palladium containing micelles. The XRD, N2 physisorption and TEM studies revealed that 4wt.% palladium loading was achieved without considerable loss of pore ordering. H2-TPR showed that the palladium nanoparticles were accessible for hydrogen molecules. Adsorptive desulfurization of low sulfur diesel fuel was then investigated using synthesized samples. The effect of three valuable parameters, i.e., temperature (25, 75, 150 and 200C), concentration of palladium (2, 4 and 5wt.%) and feed flow rate (0.3 and 1mL/min) were tested using a fixed-bed flowing device. The highest sulfur break through adsorption capacity and total sulfur adsorption capacity obtained at 200C, 0.3mL/min of feed flow rate and 4wt.% of palladium concentration were 1.67 and 2.35mg sulfur/g adsorbent, respectively.

Mohammad Teymouri; Abdolraouf Samadi-Maybodi; Amir Vahid; Aliakbar Miranbeigi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The structure and reactivity of a low-sulfur lacustrine oil shale (Colorado U.S.A.) compared with those of a high-sulfur marine oil shale (Julia Creek, Queensland, Australia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oil shales from two different continents (Australia and North America) of different ages (100 and 40millionyears) and origins (one marine, one lacustrine) have been reacted in the range 355425C under H2 or N2 for 1 or 5h with or without the addition of catalyst. The shales differed in S content, and the nature of the mineral matter, but both had high atomic H/C ratios. The overall reactivity of the two shales was similar and high yields of soluble products could be obtained under relatively mild conditions with only small CO2 yields, but the temperature dependence of reactivity and the effect of potential catalysts differed markedly. Increasing the temperature and time led to increases in conversion but of different extents. Substituting H2 for N2 led to a large increase to conversion for the lower-atomic-H/C ratio marine oil shale. The \\{CH2Cl2\\} solubles from the marine oil shale showed a larger range of compounds than those from the lacustrine oil shale which resembled the \\{CH2Cl2\\} solubles from torbanite, a coal-like material derived from lacustrine algae.

Mohammad W. Amer; Marc Marshall; Yi Fei; W. Roy Jackson; Martin L. Gorbaty; Peter J. Cassidy; Alan L. Chaffee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ultra-Low Sulfur diesel Update & Future Light Duty Diesel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MILLION BBL PER DAY ULSD DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM INVENTORY 50% CONVERTED TO ULSD CONVERSIONS PROCEEDING ON SCHEDULE RETAIL INVENTORY IS BEING CONVERTED BY...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not prevent manufacturers of heavy-duty diesel engines from meeting new particulate emissions standards for 1994 and later model years, 1 the Clean Air Act Amend- ments of 1990 (CAAA90) require refiners to reduce the sulfur content of on-highway diesel fuel from current average levels of 0.30 percent by weight to no more than 0.05 percent by weight. The new standard, which goes into effect October 1, 1993, also requires that on-highway diesel fuel have a minimum cetane index of 40 or a maximum aromatic content of 35 percent by volume. 2 (See list of terms and definitions on the fol- lowing page.) This provision is designed to prevent any future rises in aromatics levels. 3 Since the direct mea- surement of aromatics is complex, a minimum cetane

22

A graphene foam electrode with high sulfur loading for flexible and high energy Li-S batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have attracted great attention as next-generation high specific energy density storage devices. However, the low sulfur loading in the cathode for Li-S battery greatly offsets its advantage in high energy density and limits the practical applications of such battery concepts. Flexible energy storage devices are also becoming increasingly important for future applications but are limited by the lack of suitable lightweight electrode materials with robust electrochemical performance under cyclic mechanical strain. Here, we proposed an effective strategy to obtain flexible Li-S battery electrodes with high energy density, high power density, and long cyclic life by adopting graphene foam-based electrodes. Graphene foam can provide a highly electrically conductive network, robust mechanical support and sufficient space for a high sulfur loading. The sulfur loading in graphene foam-based electrodes can be tuned from 3.3 to 10.1mgcm?2. The electrode with 10.1mgcm?2 sulfur loading could deliver an extremely high areal capacity of 13.4mAhcm?2, much higher than the commonly reported Li-S electrodes and commercially used lithium cobalt oxide cathode with a value of ~34mAhcm?2. Meanwhile, the high sulfur-loaded electrodes retain a high rate performance with reversible capacities higher than 450mAhg?1 under a large current density of 6Ag?1 and preserve stable cycling performance with ~0.07% capacity decay per cycle over 1000 cycles. These impressive results indicate that such electrodes could enable high performance, fast-charging, and flexible Li-S batteries that show stable performance over extended charge/discharge cycling.

Guangmin Zhou; Lu Li; Chaoqun Ma; Shaogang Wang; Ying Shi; Nikhil Koratkar; Wencai Ren; Feng Li; Hui-Ming Cheng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

MHUG process for production of low sulfur and low aromatic diesel fuel. [Medium-pressure Hydro UpGrading  

SciTech Connect

A new hydro-upgrading process operated under medium pressure has been developed to reduce the sulfur and the aromatics content in light cycle oil (LCO). Two catalysts were used in series in this technology. The commercial RN-1 catalyst, which is known as having high activity in hydrodenitrogenation, desulfurization and aromatic saturation, was chosen as the first catalyst. The second one was a nickel-tungsten zeolite catalyst, named RT-5, which was developed by RIPP specially for hydrogenolysis of naphthenic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The pilot plant tests showed that high quality diesel oil with aromatics content less than 20 v% and sulfur content less than 0.05 wt% could be produced from various LCO/straight-run-gas-oil (SRGO) blended feedstocks under hydrogen partial pressure of 6.4 MPa. The reaction temperature and overall space velocity (S.V.) varied in the range of 350--380 C and 0.6--1.2 h[sup [minus]1], respectively, depending on the properties of the feedstocks to be processed and the upgrading depth required. Several examples presented also illustrated that this technology could be used to prepare catalytic reforming feedstock as well, which is in urgent need in China. A life test operated in relatively high severity for 3,000 hr. indicated that the catalysts possessed excellent stability. A commercial demonstration unit has been running well since the last Oct 1.

Shi, Yu Lin; Shi, Jian Wen; Zhang, Xin Wei; Shi, Ya Hua; Li, Da Dong (SINOPEC, Beijing (China). Research Inst. of Petroleum Processing)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hydrodesulfurization of Fluid Catalytic Cracking Decant Oils for the Production of Low-sulfur Needle Coke Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Needle coke, produced by the delayed coking of fluid catalytic cracking decant oils, is the primary filler used in the production of graphite electrodes. The (more)

Wincek, Ronald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-Sulfur...FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTORS, COMBUSTION...MAY FLUE GAS DES S E...1971 ). High-sulfur...was brief. Natural gas became...overdependent on natural gas and oil to...elevated pressure with a downward...coals of high ash-fusion...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...amounts of coal, because...Director-Mineral Re-sources...of Gas from Coal through a...on coals of high ash-fusion temperature...per ton of high-sulfur coal burned. Absorp-tion...particulate matter as well as...capable of remov-ing up to...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No. 2 Distillate No. 4 Fuel a Total Distillate and Kerosene No. 2 Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Distillate Low-Sulfur High-Sulfur Total United States January...

29

Con Edison: Endless Storm King Dispute Adds to Its Troubles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...elsewhere. * Concentrating 42 oil-fired base-load generating...the alarm. If high-sulfur oil or coal were generally used...expenditures for low-sulfur fuel oil imported from the Middle East...Circuit and thus began a legal marathon-the total legal expenses by...

Luther J. Carter

1974-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Policy Act transportation rate study: Interim report on coal transportation  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to examine changes in domestic coal distribution and railroad coal transportation rates since enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90). From 1988 through 1993, the demand for low-sulfur coal increased, as a the 1995 deadline for compliance with Phase 1 of CAAA90 approached. The shift toward low-sulfur coal came sooner than had been generally expected because many electric utilities switched early from high-sulfur coal to ``compliance`` (very low-sulfur) coal. They did so to accumulate emissions allowances that could be used to meet the stricter Phase 2 requirements. Thus, the demand for compliance coal increased the most. The report describes coal distribution and sulfur content, railroad coal transportation and transportation rates, and electric utility contract coal transportation trends from 1979 to 1993 including national trends, regional comparisons, distribution patterns and regional profiles. 14 figs., 76 tabs.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

NETL: News Release - Florida Demo Tames High Sulfur Coal: Delivers Power at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 11, 2005 March 11, 2005 Florida Demo Tames High Sulfur Coal: Delivers Power at Very Low Emissions Shows that New Technology Cuts Pollutants to Fractions of Federal Clean Air Limits JACKSONVILLE, FL - Recent tests with one of the nation's mid- to high-sulfur coals have further verified that a new electric generation technology in its first large-scale utility demonstration here is one of the world's cleanest coal-based power plants. This city's municipal utility JEA logged the achievement at its Northside Generating Station using Illinois No. 6 coal in a 300 megawatt demonstration of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, which is the largest application yet of the new form in the United States. It almost triples the size of a previous demonstration and scales up the technology to the sizes preferred for adding new plants and replacing old ones, also called repowering.

32

Petroleum Coke: A Viable Fuel for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; buy sulfur dioxide credits on the open market; install FGD; or switch to clean coal technology such as circulating fluidized bed combustion and gasification. Current trends in utility modernization are to utilize new clean coal technologies..., such as fluidized bed combustion or gasification, and install FGD technology. Regardless of which modernization method is used, it will feature high-sulfur fuel capability. In summary, public utilities are looking at low-sulfur fuel as a means to comply...

Dymond, R. E.

33

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990?  

SciTech Connect

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Clean coal technology and emissions trading: Is there a future for high-sulfur coal under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect

The near-term and long-term fate of high-sulfur coal is linked to utility compliance plans, the evolution of emission allowance trading, state and federal regulation, and technological innovation. All of these factors will play an implicit role in the demand for high-sulfur coal. This paper will explore the potential impact that emissions trading will have on high-sulfur coal utilization by electric utilities. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Florida CFB demo plant yields low emissions on variety of coals  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has reported results of tests conducted at Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA)'s Northside power plant using mid-to-low-sulfur coal, which indicate the facility is one of the cleanest burning coal-fired power plants in the world. A part of DOE's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, the JEA project is a repowering demonstration of the operating and environmental performance of Foster Wheeler's utility-scale circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFB) technology on a range of high-sulfur coals and blends of coal and high-sulfur petroleum coke. The 300 MW demonstration unit has a non-demonstration 300 MW twin unit.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Dynamic accident modeling for high-sulfur natural gas gathering station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dynamic accident modeling for a gas gathering station is implemented to prevent high-sulfur natural gas leakage and develop equipment inspection strategy. The progress of abnormal event occurring in the gas gathering station is modeled by the combination of fault tree and event sequence diagram, based on accident causal chain theory, i.e. the progress is depicted as sequential failure of safety barriers, then, the occurrence probability of the consequence of abnormal event is predicted. Consequences of abnormal events are divided into accidents and accident precursors which include incidents, near misses and so on. The Bayesian theory updates failure probability of safety barrier when a new observation (i.e. accident precursors or accidents data) arrives. Bayesian network then correspondingly updates failure probabilities of basic events of the safety barriers with the ability of abductive reasoning. Consequence occurrence probability is also updated. The results show that occurrence probability trend of different consequences and failure probability trend of safety barriers and basic events of the safety barriers can be obtained using this method. In addition, the critical basic events which play an important role in accidents occurrence are also identified. All of these provide useful information for the maintenance and inspection of the gas gathering station.

Qinglei Tan; Guoming Chen; Lei Zhang; Jianmin Fu; Zemin Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

In order to account for ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) regulations related to Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90), ultra- low-sulfur diesel is differentiated from other...

38

Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Residential Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use/ Product: Residential - Distillate Fuel Oil Residential - No. 1 Residential - No. 2 Residential - Kerosene Commercial - Distillate Fuel Oil Commercial - No. 1 Distillate Commercial - No. 2 Distillate Commercial - No. 2 Fuel Oil Commercial - Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Commercial - Low Sulfur Diesel Commercial - High Sulfur Diesel Commercial - No. 4 Fuel Oil Commercial - Residual Fuel Oil Commercial - Kerosene Industrial - Distillate Fuel Oil Industrial - No. 1 Distillate Industrial - No. 2 Distillate Industrial - No. 2 Fuel Oil Industrial - Low Sulfur Diesel Industrial - High Sulfur Diesel Industrial - No. 4 Fuel Oil Industrial - Residual Fuel Oil Industrial - Kerosene Farm - Distillate Fuel Oil Farm - Diesel Farm - Other Distillate Farm - Kerosene Electric Power - Distillate Fuel Oil Electric Power - Residual Fuel Oil Oil Company Use - Distillate Fuel Oil Oil Company Use - Residual Fuel Oil Total Transportation - Distillate Fuel Oil Total Transportation - Residual Fuel Oil Railroad Use - Distillate Fuel Oil Vessel Bunkering - Distillate Fuel Oil Vessel Bunkering - Residual Fuel Oil On-Highway - No. 2 Diesel Military - Distillate Fuel Oil Military - Diesel Military - Other Distillate Military - Residual Fuel Oil Off-Highway - Distillate Fuel Oil Off-Highway - Distillate F.O., Construction Off-Highway - Distillate F.O., Non-Construction All Other - Distillate Fuel Oil All Other - Residual Fuel Oil All Other - Kerosene Period:

39

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No. 2 Distillate Prices by Sales Type" No. 2 Distillate Prices by Sales Type" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","No. 2 Distillate",7,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Data 2","No. 2 Diesel Fuel",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Data 3","No. 2 Diesel Fuel, Ultra Low-Sulfur",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2007" ,"Data 4","No. 2 Diesel Fuel, Low-Sulfur",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Data 5","No. 2 Diesel Fuel, High-Sulfur",5,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994"

40

Coal-oil slurry preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumpable slurry of pulverized coal in a coal-derived hydrocarbon oil carrier which slurry is useful as a low-ash, low-sulfur clean fuel, is produced from a high sulfur-containing coal. The initial pulverized coal is separated by gravity differentiation into (1) a high density refuse fraction containing the major portion of non-coal mineral products and sulfur, (2) a lowest density fraction of low sulfur content and (3) a middlings fraction of intermediate sulfur and ash content. The refuse fraction (1) is gasified by partial combustion producing a crude gas product from which a hydrogen stream is separated for use in hydrogenative liquefaction of the middlings fraction (3). The lowest density fraction (2) is mixed with the liquefied coal product to provide the desired fuel slurry. Preferably there is also separately recovered from the coal liquefaction LPG and pipeline gas.

Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Combustion of high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes in a rotary kiln combustor with an advanced internal air distributor  

SciTech Connect

Fluid bed combustors have received extensive testing with both high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes. Rotary kilns are effective and popular devices for waste combustion. The Angelo Rotary Furnace{trademark} has been developed to improve the operation of rotary pyrolyzer/combustor systems through enhanced air distribution, which in this process is defined as staged, swirled combustion air injection. Fourteen of these new furnaces have been installed worldwide. Two units in Thailand, designed for rice hull feed with occasional lignite feed, have been recently started up. An older unit in Pennsylvania is being upgraded with a new, more advanced air distribution system for a series of tests this fall in which inexpensive high-sulfur coal and anthracite wastes will be fired with limestone. The purposes of these tests are to determine the burning characteristics of these two fuels in this system, to discover the Ca/S ratios necessary for operation of a rotary kiln combusting these fuels, and to observe the gas-borne emissions from the furnace. An extensive preliminary design study will be performed on a commercial installation for combustion of anthracite wastes. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Cobb, J.T. Jr. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA)); Ahn, Y.K. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (USA)); Angelo, J.F. (Universal Energy International, Inc., Little Rock, AR (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

Amrhein, G.T.

1994-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3]. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).

Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

year of 2008, there were slight increases in capacity for most downstream units. Hydrotreating capacity continues to grow as the demand for low sulfur product expands. Coking...

48

Shell. The Evolution of Movement Continues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Focus of presentation is on emergence of future diesel fuel technologires and fule properties compare to ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel properties.

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

diesel. Qualifying vehicles include compressed natural gas vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, vehicles operating on biodiesel or ultra low sulfur...

50

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for 2006 and 2007 are model results and may differ slightly from official EIA data reports." " Sources: 2006 and 2007 imported low sulfur light crude oil price: Energy...

51

Biodiesel Effects on Diesel Particle Filter Performance: Milestone Report  

SciTech Connect

Research results on the performance of biodiesel and biodiesel blends with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and a diesel particle filter (DPF).

Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R.; Ireland, J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxice Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2000/1111 2000/1111 Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal- Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment August 1998 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center Morgantown, WV/Pittsburgh, PA 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or respon- sibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

54

Power Generation and the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and organic chemical production. Oil Low-sulfur oils are a necessary alternative to gas. However, the sources of oils of low-sulfur content are located...Pacific North- west or utilities in the Missouri Basin area will find it profitable...

Rolf Eliassen

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Power Gas and Combined Cycles: Clean Power from Fossil Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gas has such a low heating value that it cannot...from residual fuel oil (the relatively...Oil Residual fuel oil with a low sulfur...stations in Maryland, Connecticut, and New York-has...low-sulfur residual fuel oil is growing and its price is rising. Residual...

William D. Metz

1973-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

56

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Table 42. Refiner No. 2 Diesel Fuel Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month No. 2 Diesel Fuel Ultra Low-Sulfur Low-Sulfur High-Sulfur Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States September 2013 ............ 10,170.6 139,922.9 473.2 2,205.9 429.4 1,261.9 August 2013 .................. 10,581.0 142,352.7 505.6 2,944.3 189.4 2,428.4 September 2012 ............ 11,013.7 129,215.9 657.0 2,684.4 733.8 1,031.2 PAD District I September 2013 ............ 1,571.7 29,234.1 40.5 W W W August 2013 .................. 1,632.1 28,720.8 54.9 W W W

57

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene 7. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate Total Distillate and Kerosene No. 2 Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Distillate Ultra Low-Sulfur Low-Sulfur High-Sulfur United States January ............................... 2,354.4 3,157.1 29,853.1 103,450.6 21,755.5 2,492.0 157,551.2 164,090.7 February ............................. 1,814.0 2,018.0 25,136.2 106,471.7 21,319.9 2,811.8 155,739.6 160,468.8 March .................................. 1,051.9 1,252.1 19,550.3 105,117.4 20,815.2 2,354.6 147,837.5 150,848.8 April .................................... 582.4 669.0 12,196.2 108,885.0 20,140.2 2,161.3 143,382.7

58

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiner No. 2 Diesel Fuel Volumes by PAD District and State Refiner No. 2 Diesel Fuel Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month No. 2 Diesel Fuel Ultra Low-Sulfur Low-Sulfur High-Sulfur Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale United States January ................................. 11,914.5 104,546.6 4,183.1 15,517.3 1,198.3 1,385.1 February ............................... 12,374.3 100,750.4 3,769.0 14,266.9 1,521.6 1,840.1 March .................................... 12,435.2 104,913.7 3,177.6 15,977.5 1,376.8 1,456.7 April ...................................... 12,708.6 113,831.9 3,083.4 14,793.5 1,052.7 2,165.4 May ....................................... 11,989.7 116,423.9 3,214.0 13,907.3 879.2 2,514.6 June

59

Effect of sulfur on heavy duty diesel engine lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Diesel engine exhaust legislation has become quite onerous for heavy duty engines. Yet, these high thermal efficiency engines continue to meet lower exhaust particulate and NOx emissions limits, due to new engine designs and the complementary engine oil performance requirements of the API service categories. In addition, the EPA has mandated changes in on-highway diesel fuel to help meet particulate emissions regulations. On October 1, 1993, when the EPA outlawed high sulfur fuels for on-highway use, the development of the API CG-4 engine oil performance specification was already in progress. All the new diesel engine tests in the category were therefore designed to run with low (< 0.05% wt.) sulfur fuel. In some engine tests, this new fuel improved some lubricant performance characteristics and degraded others. An engine oil specification for low sulfur fuel brings new challenges to developing future specifications for diesel engine oils. Both higher and lower lubricant additive treat rate products, high performance single grade oils, and formulations to meet world-wide specifications become viable. This paper discusses the results of a diesel engine oil technology that performs well with the new, low sulfur fuel in both engine tests and in the field.

Hayden, T.E. [Texaco Fuels and Lubricants Research Dept., Beacon, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

pmm.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Table 47. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) Geographic Area Month Kerosene No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate Total Distillate and Kerosene No. 2 Fuel Oil No. 2 Diesel Fuel No. 2 Distillate Ultra Low-Sulfur Low-Sulfur High-Sulfur United States September 2013 .......... 1,015.7 425.1 4,615.7 142,955.5 1,552.8 443.8 149,567.9 151,155.6 August 2013 ................ 808.9 292.3 3,336.7 147,654.9 1,731.8 204.7 152,928.1 154,151.9 September 2012 .......... 968.1 425.7 3,783.2 138,334.3 3,577.7 813.4 146,508.6 148,022.2 PAD District I September 2013 .......... 253.2 W 4,474.1 34,936.4 327.1 4.6 39,742.2 40,198.6 August 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 8, April--June, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Northeast heating fuel market: Assessment and options  

SciTech Connect

In response to a Presidential request, this study examines how the distillate fuel oil market (and related energy markets) in the Northeast behaved in the winter of 1999-2000, explains the role played by residential, commercial, industrial, and electricity generation sector consumers in distillate fuel oil markets and describes how that role is influenced by the structure of tie energy markets in the Northeast. In addition, this report explores the potential for nonresidential users to move away from distillate fuel oil and how this might impact future prices, and discusses conversion of distillate fuel oil users to other fuels over the next 5 years. Because the President's and Secretary's request focused on converting factories and other large-volume users of mostly high-sulfur distillate fuel oil to other fuels, transportation sector use of low-sulfur distillate fuel oil is not examined here.

None

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

POC-SCALE TESTING OF AN ADVANCED FINE COAL DEWATERING EQUIPMENT/TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the UKCAER will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean-coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high-sulfur and low-sulfur clean coal. The Mayflower Plant processes coals from five different seams, thus the dewatering studies results could be generalized for most of the bituminous coals.

B.K. PAREKH; D. TAO; J.G. GROPPO

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

65

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 6, October--December, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 5, July--September 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 2, October--December 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of Basic Parameters for Packaging, Storage and Transportation of Biomass Material from Field to Biorefinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for biofuels primarily because it is a renewable _________________ This thesis follows the style of Biomass and Bioenergy. 2 and sustainable resource. Secondly, it has a low sulfur content and a positive impact on the environment[1]. Biomass energy...

Paliwal, Richa

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Life-Cycle Assessment Comparing Select Gas-to-Liquid Fuels...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with both conventional and ultra-low sulfur diesel, and FRFG motor fuels. * The UCF LCA develops a set of near-term (2006) and long-term (2015) scenarios to assess impacts...

74

Biodiesel Effects on the Operation of U.S. Light-Duty Tier 2 Engine and Aftertreatment Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Results of the NOx adsorber system with catalyst aged to useful life conditions (simulated 120k miles), comparing performance betweem B20 fuel blend and base ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel

75

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

increase ultra-low sulfur diesel demand this winter Reductions in the maximum sulfur content of heating fuels in five northeastern states will likely result in higher demand for...

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Resources Board has certified to reduce particulate matter emissions by at least 85% as compared to ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel. (Reference Connecticut General Statutes 14-164o...

77

Direct measurements of marine aerosols to examine the influence of biological activity, anthropogenic emissions, and secondary processing on particle chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specifications of Marine Fuels, edited by I.S. Organization,Specifications of Marine Fuels, edited by I.S. Organization,to combust low sulfur marine fuel instead of RO as they come

Gaston, Cassandra Jayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Department to Loan Emergency Fuel to Department of Defense...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

loan the Department of Defense ultra-low sulfur diesel from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) will begin drawing down stocks from the...

79

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Optimal Deployment Plan of Emission Reduction Technologies for TxDOT's Construction Equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District Yoakum District Dallas District Fort Worth District Corpus Christi District 8 Therefore, the primary target pollutant in this study is NOx. Typical NOx reduction technologies are ? Selective catalytic reduction, ? Lean NOx catalysts... Repower and Rebuild Exhaust Gas Recirculation Crankcase Emission Control Fuel Technologies Low-Sulfur and Ultra Low-Sulfur Diesel Natural Gas Biodiesel Hydrogen Fuel Additive Hydrogen Enrichment 17 Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment Technologies...

Bari, Muhammad Ehsanul

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification - Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect

A technical feasibility assessment was performed for retrofitting oxy-fuel technology to an existing power plant burning low sulfur PRB fuel and high sulfur bituminous fuel. The focus of this study was on the boiler/power generation island of a subcritical steam cycle power plant. The power plant performance in air and oxy-firing modes was estimated and modifications required for oxy-firing capabilities were identified. A 460 MWe (gross) reference subcritical PC power plant was modeled. The reference air-fired plant has a boiler efficiency (PRB/Bituminous) of 86.7%/89.3% and a plant net efficiency of 35.8/36.7%. Net efficiency for oxy-fuel firing including ASU/CPU duty is 25.6%/26.6% (PRB/Bituminous). The oxy-fuel flue gas recirculation flow to the boiler is 68%/72% (PRB/bituminous) of the flue gas (average O{sub 2} in feed gas is 27.4%/26.4%v (PRB/bituminous)). Maximum increase in tube wall temperature is less than 10ºF for oxy-fuel firing. For oxy-fuel firing, ammonia injected to the SCR was shut-off and the FGD is applied to remove SOx from the recycled primary gas stream and a portion of the SOx from the secondary stream for the high sulfur bituminous coal. Based on CFD simulations it was determined that at the furnace outlet compared to air-firing, SO{sub 3}/SO{sub 2} mole ratio is about the same, NOx ppmv level is about the same for PRB-firing and 2.5 times for bituminous-firing due to shutting off the OFA, and CO mole fraction is approximately double. A conceptual level cost estimate was performed for the incremental equipment and installation cost of the oxyfuel retrofit in the boiler island and steam system. The cost of the retrofit is estimated to be approximately 81 M$ for PRB low sulfur fuel and 84 M$ for bituminous high sulfur fuel.

Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

103.5 144.3 150.9 116.6 117.5 101.0 1983-2012 103.5 144.3 150.9 116.6 117.5 101.0 1983-2012 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 40,136.3 39,913.9 37,954.6 34,775.2 33,272.0 32,545.7 1983-2012 Propane (Consumer Grade) 3,263.4 2,672.2 3,671.1 3,871.2 4,457.3 5,556.4 1983-2012 Kerosene 139.7 46.0 39.8 30.3 27.1 21.0 1983-2012 No. 1 Distillate 161.0 102.0 100.9 107.8 108.9 108.5 1983-2012 No. 2 Distillate 24,345.6 20,801.6 17,757.7 15,767.1 13,802.1 12,536.7 1983-2012 No. 2 Diesel Fuel NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2012 Ultra Low-Sulfur 12,415.9 12,419.4 12,458.2 11,698.0 10,441.1 10,608.9 2007-2012 Low-Sulfur 7,720.2 6,037.6 3,392.4 3,186.1 2,579.3 1,185.4 1994-2012 High-Sulfur 3,419.6 1,403.5 1,028.3 448.8 402.0 427.5 1994-2012 No. 2 Fuel Oil 789.9 941.0 878.9 434.2 379.7 314.9

84

U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Aviation Gasoline 413.1 602.6 593.2 547.1 431.5 432.6 1983-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 26,119.1 27,197.0 28,168.9 27,226.7 25,645.0 27,379.5 1983-2013 Propane (Consumer Grade) 26,164.7 24,627.2 25,506.9 30,382.5 31,250.8 38,981.9 1983-2013 Kerosene 1,302.3 897.9 1,049.8 1,199.7 1,224.4 1,318.9 1983-2013 No. 1 Distillate 197.2 124.8 141.7 228.9 336.0 947.3 1983-2013 No. 2 Distillate 148,472.9 149,527.5 153,402.1 152,957.9 149,298.1 160,704.2 1983-2013 No. 2 Diesel Fuel NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2013 Ultra Low-Sulfur 140,589.9 143,645.5 145,899.9 142,352.7 139,922.9 151,092.7 2007-2013 Low-Sulfur 1,976.7 1,020.9 2,521.9 2,944.3 2,205.9 3,904.5 1994-2013 High-Sulfur

85

Coal combustion and cogeneration at New York Institute of Technology, Central Islip campus. Final report. [NYIT CI campus  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to study the technical and economic feasibility of conversion to coal with possible implementation of cogeneration at the central power plant of the New York Institute of Technology Central Islip (NYIT CI) campus. The existing facility contains five moderate pressure (155 psig) 60,000 pph boilers installed in 1953-1954 which were originally designed for coal firing. Among the several systems assessed, three potential projects were identified as having economic merit and conceptual designs for their implementation were developed. The final decision as to which should be pursued must await a final determination of environmental issues related to sulfur dioxide emissions and manufacturer recommendations on the ability to reconvert one of the existing boilers back to coal. The three projects, in order of economic merit, are as follows: (1) reconversion of one of the existing 60,000 pph stoker boilers back to firing coal; (2) installation of a new 60,000 pph stoker fired, high pressure coal boiler with a 2300 kW backpressure steam turbine, the turbine to provide some cogeneration capability. Compliance, low sulfur, coal is to be burned; (3) installation of a new 50,000 pph, low pressure, firetube, fluidized bed combustion (FBC), boiler burning high sulfur coal but including sulfur dioxide capture. The first two projects are predicated on the burning of a compliance, low sulfur, coal. This may be allowed under ''grandfather'' clauses in the regulations that permit such burning in boilers that once fired coal. If not permitted, the installation of the low pressure FBC boiler would be the only remaining viable coal conversion option. Though it has a smaller payback, it still provides significant savings to the college.

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

U.S. Total Refiner Petroleum Product Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Sales to End Users Motor Gasoline 2.345 2.775 1.888 2.301 3.050 3.154 1978-2012 Aviation Gasoline 2.849 3.273 2.442 3.028 3.803 3.971 1978-2012 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 2.165 3.052 1.704 2.201 3.054 3.104 1978-2012 Propane (Consumer Grade) 1.489 1.892 1.220 1.481 1.709 1.139 1976-2012 Kerosene 2.263 3.283 2.675 3.063 3.616 3.843 1978-2012 No. 1 Distillate 2.286 2.983 2.141 2.705 3.467 3.580 1978-2012 No. 2 Distillate 2.266 3.143 1.840 2.318 3.119 3.206 1978-2012 No. 2 Diesel Fuel 2.267 3.150 1.834 2.314 3.117 3.202 1978-2012 Ultra Low Sulfur 2.310 3.134 1.857 2.336 3.139 3.212 2007-2012 Low Sulfur 2.285 3.209 1.795 2.243 3.034 3.128 2007-2012 High Sulfur 2.066 3.049 1.683 2.251 3.086 3.169 2007-2012

87

High-Sulfur Coal for Generating Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...made historically by heating bitumi-nous coal in...heart of the anthracite district only about 5 years ago...energy, wind, and geothermal steam and brines, will...15.7 Nuclear 3.1 Geothermal Negligible 1973, use...home and commercial heating, transporta-tion...

James T. Dunham; Carl Rampacek; T. A. Henrie

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate the use of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from pulverized-coal utility boilers using medium- to high-sulfur US coal. The prototype SCR facility, built in and around the ductwork of Plant Crist Unit 5, consisted of three large SCR reactor units (Reactors A, B, and C), each with a design capacity of 5,000 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) of flue gas, and six smaller reactors (Reactors D through J), each with a design capacity of 400 scfm of flue gas. The three large reactors contained commercially available SCR catalysts as offered by SCR catalyst suppliers. These reactors were coupled with small-scale air preheaters to evaluate (1) the long-term effects of SCR reaction chemistry on air preheater deposit formation and (2) the impact of these deposits on the performance of air preheaters. The small reactors were used to test additional varieties of commercially available catalysts. The demonstration project was organized into three phases: (1) Permitting, Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) Preparation, and Preliminary Engineering; (2) Detail Design Engineering and Construction; and (3) Operation, Testing, Disposition, and Final Report Preparation. Section 2 discusses the planned and actual EMP monitoring for gaseous, aqueous, and solid streams over the course of the SCR demonstration project; Section 3 summarizes sampling and analytical methods and discusses exceptions from the methods specified in the EMP; Section 4 presents and discusses the gas stream monitoring results; Section 5 presents and discusses the aqueous stream monitoring results; Section 6 presents and discusses the solid stream monitoring results; Section 7 discusses EMP-related quality assurance/quality control activities performed during the demonstration project; Section 8 summarizes compliance monitoring reporting activities; and Section 9 presents conclusions based on the EMP monitoring results.

NONE

1996-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Dependence of liquefaction behavior on coal characteristics. Part VI. Relationship of liquefaction behavior of a set of high sulfur coals to chemical structural characteristics. Final technical report, March 1981 to February 1984  

SciTech Connect

The initial aim of this research was to use empirical mathematical relationships to formulate a better understanding of the processes involved in the liquefaction of a set of medium rank high sulfur coals. In all, just over 50 structural parameters and yields of product classes were determined. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the empirical relationships between the various properties, a number of relatively complex statistical procedures and tests were applied to the data, mostly selected from the field of multivariate analysis. These can be broken down into two groups. The first group included grouping techniques such as non-linear mapping, hierarchical and tree clustering, and linear discriminant analyses. These techniques were utilized in determining if more than one statistical population was present in the data set; it was concluded that there was not. The second group of techniques included factor analysis and stepwise multivariate linear regressions. Linear discriminant analyses were able to show that five distinct groups of coals were represented in the data set. However only seven of the properties seemed to follow this trend. The chemical property that appeared to follow the trend most closely was the aromaticity, where a series of five parallel straight lines was observed for a plot of f/sub a/ versus carbon content. The factor patterns for each of the product classes indicated that although each of the individual product classes tended to load on factors defined by specific chemical properties, the yields of the broader product classes, such as total conversion to liquids + gases and conversion to asphaltenes, tended to load largely on factors defined by rank. The variance explained and the communalities tended to be relatively low. Evidently important sources of variance have still to be found.

Neill, P. H.; Given, P. H.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

EVALUATION OF AEROSOL EMISSIONS DOWNSTREAM OF AN AMMONIA-BASED SO2 SCRUBBER  

SciTech Connect

Depending on the size and type of boiler, the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments required specific reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. To meet these requirements, SO{sub 2} reduction strategies have included installing scrubbing technology, switching to a more expensive low-sulfur coal, or purchasing SO{sub 2} allowances. It is expected that over the next 10 years there will be an increase in the price of low-sulfur coals, but that higher-sulfur coal costs will remain the same. Technologies must be strongly considered that allow the use of high-sulfur fuels while at the same time meeting current and future SO{sub 2} emission limits. One such technology is the ammonia based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) (NH{sub 3}-based FGD) system manufactured by Marsulex Environmental Technologies (MET). The MET scrubber is a patented NH{sub 3}-based FGD process that efficiently converts SO{sub 2} (>95%) into a fertilizer product, ammonium sulfate ([NH{sub 4}]{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). A point of concern for the MET technology, as well as other FGD systems, is the emission of sulfuric acid/SO{sub 3} aerosols that could result in increased opacity at the stack. This is a direct result of firing high-sulfur fuels that naturally generate more SO{sub 3} than do low-sulfur coals. SO{sub 3} is formed during the coal combustion process. SO{sub 3} is converted to gaseous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by homogeneous condensation, leading to a submicron acid fume that is very difficult to capture in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The condensed acid can also combine with the fly ash in the duct and scale the duct wall, potentially resulting in corrosion of both metallic and nonmetallic surfaces. Therefore, SO{sub 3} in flue gas can have a significant impact on the performance of coal-fired utility boilers, air heaters, and ESPs. In addition to corrosion problems, excess SO{sub 3} emissions can result in plume opacity problems. Thus the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was contracted by MET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the potential of a wet ESP for reducing SO{sub 3} emissions. The work consisted of pilot-scale tests using the EERC's slagging furnace system (SFS) to determine the effectiveness of a wet ESP to control SO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol emissions in conjunction with a dry ESP and MET's NH{sub 3}-based FGD. Because these compounds are in the form of fine particles, it is speculated that a relatively small, highly efficient wet ESP following the MET scrubber would remove these fine aerosol particles. The performance target for the wet ESP was a particulate mass collection efficiency of >90%; this level of performance would likely ensure a stack opacity of <10%.

Dennis L. Laudal

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: To understand the inventory situation, we must look the balance between demand and supply that drives inventories up or down. First consider demand. Most of the remaining charts deal with total distillate demand. Total distillate demand includes both diesel and heating oil. These are similar products physically, and prior to the low sulfur requirements for on-road diesel fuel, were used interchangeably. But even today, low sulfur diesel can be used in the heating oil market, but low sulfur requirements keep heating oil from being used in the on-road transportation sector. The seasonal increases and decreases in stocks stem from the seasonal demand in heating oil shown as the bottom red line. Heating oil demand increases by more than 50 percent from its low point to its high

92

Microsoft Word - BingQuestionFive0923.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Timing of Startups of the Low-Sulfur Timing of Startups of the Low-Sulfur and RFS Programs September 2002 ii Energy Information Administration/Time of Startups Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Oil and Gas of the Energy Information Administration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler@eia.doe.gov), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Joanne Shore (202/586-4677, joanne.shore@eia.doe.gov), Team Leader, Petroleum Division 1 Energy Information Administration/Time of Startups Timing of Startups of the Low-Sulfur and RFS Programs On June 17, 2002, Senator Jeff Bingaman, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested (Appendix A) that the Energy Information

93

FAQs for Survey Forms 802 and 812  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 and 812 2 and 812 Is the EIA product called "distillate fuel oil 15 ppm sulfur and under" (EIA product Code 465) intended to be the same as ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel? Yes. While the product name gives a specific sulfur range, the intent was to capture all of the ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuel even in cases where the sulfur content may exceed 15 ppm. Examples of diesel fuel with sulfur content exceeding 15 ppm that would be reported to EIA as "distillate fuel oil 15 ppm sulfur and under" include fuel with sulfur content greater than 15 ppm but within test tolerance, and fuel with sulfur content greater than 15 ppm during transitions or other periods when EPA regulations allow such fuel to be sold as ultra-low-sulfur diesel. Who should report Code 1 in Part 6?

94

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

SciTech Connect

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel, Low-Sulfur Prices - Sales to End Users " Diesel, Low-Sulfur Prices - Sales to End Users " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","No. 2 Diesel, Low-Sulfur Prices - Sales to End Users ",9,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_dist_a_epd2dm10_pta_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_dist_a_epd2dm10_pta_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

96

A review of existing models and methods to estimate employment effects of pollution control policies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to provide information about existing models and methods used to estimate coal mining employment impacts of pollution control policies. The EPA is currently assessing the consequences of various alternative policies to reduce air pollution. One important potential consequence of these policies is that coal mining employment may decline or shift from low-sulfur to high-sulfur coal producing regions. The EPA requires models that can estimate the magnitude and cost of these employment changes at the local level. This paper contains descriptions and evaluations of three models and methods currently used to estimate the size and cost of coal mining employment changes. The first model reviewed is the Coal and Electric Utilities Model (CEUM), a well established, general purpose model that has been used by the EPA and other groups to simulate air pollution control policies. The second model reviewed is the Advanced Utility Simulation Model (AUSM), which was developed for the EPA specifically to analyze the impacts of air pollution control policies. Finally, the methodology used by Arthur D. Little, Inc. to estimate the costs of alternative air pollution control policies for the Consolidated Coal Company is discussed. These descriptions and evaluations are based on information obtained from published reports and from draft documentation of the models provided by the EPA. 12 refs., 1 fig.

Darwin, R.F.; Nesse, R.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Lithiumsulfur batteries: Influence of C-rate, amount of electrolyte and sulfur loading on cycle performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the past four years major improvement of the lithium sulfur battery technology has been reported. Novel carbon cathode materials offer high sulfur loading, sulfur utilization and cycle stability. An often neglected aspect is that sulfur loading and amount of electrolyte strongly impact the performance. In this paper, we demonstrate how the amount of electrolyte, sulfur loading, lithium excess and cycling rate influences the cycle stability and sulfur utilization. We chose vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNT) as model system with a constant areal loading of carbon. For a high reproducibility, decreased weight of current collector and good mechanical adhesion of the VA-CNTs we present a layer transfer technique that enables a light-weight sulfur cathode. The sulfur loading of the cathode was adjusted from 20 to 80wt.-%. Keeping the total amount of electrolyte constant and varying the C-rate, we are able to demonstrate that the capacity degradation is reduced for high rates, high amount of electrolyte and low sulfur loading. In addition idle periods in the cycling regiment and lower rates result in an increased degradation. We attribute this to the redox-reaction between reactive lithium and polysulfides that correlates with the cycling time, rather than cycle number.

Jan Brckner; Sren Thieme; Hannah Tamara Grossmann; Susanne Drfler; Holger Althues; Stefan Kaskel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Sulfur in the Changuinola peat deposit, Panama, as an indicator of the environments of deposition of peat and coal  

SciTech Connect

The sulfur (S) content of coal is often used to infer aspects of paleoclimate, trophic state, and proximity to marine influence, of the mire in which it was deposited. In this study, the S content of peat in a large back-barrier mire complex on the Caribbean coast of Panama is related to climatic, biological, and tectonic factors of the depositional environment. The S content is in proportion to the degree of humidification of the peat, and both are independent of the pH of the groundwater. The distribution of forms of organic and inorganic sulfur in the tropical peats are found to be comparable to published values for temperate and subtropical peats, despite differences in vegetation and climate.The distribution of high-sulfur peats in the eastern part of the deposit and low-sulfur peats in the western part, and the SE-NW transgression parallel to the trend of the coastline, reflects the regional structural trend of coseismic subsidence greatest to the southeast.

Phillips, S.; Bustin, R.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74{mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultrafine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the following: Bibliography; Petroleum Market Model abstract; Data quality; Estimation methodologies (includes refinery investment recovery thresholds, gas plant models, chemical industry demand for methanol, estimation of refinery fixed costs, estimation of distribution costs, estimation of taxes gasoline specifications, estimation of gasoline market shares, estimation of low-sulfur diesel market shares, low-sulfur diesel specifications, estimation of regional conversion coefficients, estimation of SO{sub 2} allowance equations, unfinished oil imports methodology, product pipeline capacities and tariffs, cogeneration methodology, natural gas plant fuel consumption, and Alaskan crude oil exports); Matrix generator documentation; Historical data processing; and Biofuels supply submodule.

NONE

1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Status of coal ash corrosion resistant materials test program  

SciTech Connect

In November of 1998, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) began development of a system to permit testing of several advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam conditions of 1100 F and higher in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B and W, and First Energy's Ohio Edison jointly fund the project. CONSOL Energy Company is also participating as an advisor. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. The coal-ash corrosion resistant materials test program will provide full scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater and reheater tube materials. These newer materials may be capable of operating at higher steam temperatures while resisting external/fire-side corrosion. For high sulfur coal applications, this is a key issue for advanced cycle pulverized coal-fired plants. Fireside corrosion is also a critical issue for many existing plants. Previous testing of high temperature materials in the United States has been based primarily on using laboratory test coupons. The test coupons did not operate at conditions representative of a high sulfur coal-fired boiler. Testing outside of the United States has been with low sulfur coal or natural gas firing and has not addressed corrosion issues. This test program takes place in an actual operating boiler and is expected to confirm the performance of these materials with high sulfur coal. The system consists of three identical sections, each containing multiple pieces of twelve different materials. They are cooled by reheater steam, and are located just above the furnace exit in Ohio Edison's Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. After one year of operation, the first section will be removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation. The second and third sections will operate for three and five years respectively prior to removal and evaluation. The objective is to determine how well each material resists corrosion at different operating temperatures and over different time periods and provide characteristic data. Selection of the test materials, system engineering, fabrication, installation and startup of this system is now completed and data acquisition is in progress. This paper gives an overview of the program and its objectives, explains the system, describes section fabrication, identifies the materials selected, and describes ORNL's experience in fabricating four of the advanced materials.

McDonald, D.K.; Meisenhelter, D.K.; Sikka, V.K.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Table 16. U.S. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 71.1 77.5 78.8 79.6 75.7 66.7 a Includes low-sulfur diesel fuel only. b All end-user sales not included in the other end-user categories shown,...

105

Table 16. U.S. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 66.6 71.5 74.5 75.7 71.4 61.6 a Includes low-sulfur diesel fuel only. b All end-user sales not included in the other end-user categories shown,...

106

Oil quality in deep-water settings: Concerns, perceptions, observations, and reality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...between high- and low-sulfur diesel was about 4.8 centsgal...about 4.1 million bbl of diesel is consumed on a daily basis...The EPA has established new diesel standards for 2006, requiring...ppm), whereas the European markets have established 10 ppm sulfur...

B. J. Katz; V. D. Robison

107

Process for converting coal into liquid fuel and metallurgical coke  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering coal liquids and producing metallurgical coke utilizes low ash, low sulfur coal as a parent for a coal char formed by pyrolysis with a volatile content of less than 8%. The char is briquetted and heated in an inert gas over a prescribed heat history to yield a high strength briquette with less than 2% volatile content.

Wolfe, Richard A. (Abingdon, VA); Im, Chang J. (Abingdon, VA); Wright, Robert E. (Bristol, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Strip-Mining: House, Senate Gird for Renewed Debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than half the nation's coal. Superimposed on these...nation's low-sulfur coal lies rela-tively close...unit trains" of 100 coal cars and more are already...in March that strip-mining, which began in earnest...million acres, mostly in Appalachia, only half of which...

Robert Gillette

1973-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fundamental and Applied Research in Agriculture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than half the nation's coal. Superimposed on these...nation's low-sulfur coal lies rela-tively close...unit trains" of 100 coal cars and more are already...in March that strip-mining, which began in earnest...million acres, mostly in Appalachia, only half of which...

Richard Levins

1973-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Central Appalachia: Coal industry profile  

SciTech Connect

Central Appalachia, the most complex and diverse coal-producing region in the United States, is also the principal source of very low sulfur coal in the East. This report provides detailed profiles of companies and facilities responsible for about 90% of the area's production, conveying a unique view of the aggregate industry as well as its many parts.

McMahan, R.L.; Kendall, L.K. (Resource Data International, Inc., Boulder, CO (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Table 16. U.S. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

58.8 64.9 67.0 67.7 63.6 54.6 Dash (-) No data reported. a Includes low-sulfur diesel fuel only. b All end-user sales not included in the other end-user categories shown,...

112

Table 16. U.S. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 60.5 64.5 68.5 69.4 65.4 55.2 a Includes low-sulfur diesel fuel only. b All end-user sales not included in the other end-user categories shown,...

113

Table 16. U.S. No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.6 56.2 59.3 60.4 56.2 45.4 a Includes low-sulfur diesel fuel only. b All end-user sales not included in the other end-user categories shown,...

114

THE FINAL SERIES OF OILS TESTED AS A POTENTIAL SOLUTION TO THE GALVESTON FERRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two other diesel engines that are used for auxiliary power generation, and none of those dieselDOT) began using an ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, Texas Low Emission Diesel (TxLED), in all of its diesel manufacturer, ElectroMotive Diesels (EMD), with one exception. This unapproved oil contained zinc

Texas at Austin, University of

115

Selective Separation of Thiols from a Model Fuel by Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These fossil fuels typically contain sulfur compounds on the order of a few percent. ... The authors have found that sulfur-loaded coals adsorb heavy metals in aqueous solutions. ... methods for fuel oils in relation to demand of low-sulfur fuel oils for air pollution control. ...

Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 13371352, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/1337/2014/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a medium- speed diesel engine on low-sulfur marine gas oil (fuel sul- fur content 0.1 % by weight and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, 95616, USA 2NOAA Earth System Research Pacific Marine Environment Laboratory, Seattle, Washington, 98115, USA Correspondence to: C. D. Cappa

117

Growing Together Columbia University's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In addition, all construction equipment use air pollution control devices and Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD will revitalize the four former industrial blocks from 125th/129th to 133rd Street between Broadway and 12th, into an environmentally sustainable and publicly accessible center for academic and civic life woven into the fabric

Yang, Junfeng

118

EIS-0086: Conversion to Coal, New England Power Company, Salem Harbor Generating Station Units 1, 2, and 3 Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Units I, 2, and 3 of the Salem Harbor Generating Station from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

119

EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

120

Influence of boric acid additive size on green lubricant performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of these were automotive lubricants-engine oils and transmission fluids-whereas...P. Turgis, and S. Lamouri1996A general approach to discontinuous transfer films...Method to improve lubricity of low-sulfur diesel and gasoline fuelsUS Patent no. 6783561...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices (no minal do llars per un it) Petro leum (dollars per ba rrel) Imported Low Sulfur Light Crude Oil Price 13 . . 99.57 61.66 103.38 130.77 155.58 178.49 199.90 4.6% Imported...

122

Wood Gas Processing To Generate Pure Hydrogen Suitable for PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wood Gas Processing To Generate Pure Hydrogen Suitable for PEM Fuel Cells ... A temperature profile along the three reactors was set, attempting to optimize the overall CO conversion rate. ... Low GHSV, low sulfur loads in the feed gas (see Table 7), and the approach of temperature optimization enabled high overall conversion rates. ...

Silvester Fail; Nicolas Diaz; Florian Benedikt; Michael Kraussler; Julian Hinteregger; Klaus Bosch; Marius Hackel; Reinhard Rauch; Hermann Hofbauer

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report studies the removal of sulfur by oxidative interaction of various cupric salts with coal and also considers the possibility of removing organic sulfur by the selective interaction of supercritical ethanol with the organic coal matrix. Either one of these methods could potentially be used to pretreat coals before burning. The primary purpose of these studies is to ascertain the nature of the chemical reactions occurring, the chemical composition of the resultant products, and information on possible reaction mechanisms. This information should allow prediction of reasonable reaction conditions for the removal of organosulfur compound from coal.

Olesik, S.V.; Pekay, L.A.; Larkins, W. Jr. [comps.

1992-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report studies the removal of sulfur by oxidative interaction of various cupric salts with coal and also considers the possibility of removing organic sulfur by the selective interaction of supercritical ethanol with the organic coal matrix. Either one of these methods could potentially be used to pretreat coals before burning. The primary purpose of these studies is to ascertain the nature of the chemical reactions occurring, the chemical composition of the resultant products, and information on possible reaction mechanisms. This information should allow prediction of reasonable reaction conditions for the removal of organosulfur compound from coal.

Olesik, S.V.; Pekay, L.A.; Larkins, W. Jr. (comps.)

1992-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect

The work completed this past quarter has centered around the further study and characterization of the selective desulfurization of coal through the oxidative interaction of aqueous copper chloride. The reaction of the CuCl{sub 2} with the particular model compounds is conducted at a series of reaction times and reaction temperatures. The reaction times studied were 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. The reaction temperatures studied were 50, 130, 210, and 295{degree}C. After the reaction, the organic compounds were extracted with methylene chloride. These products were then analyzed via GC/IRD/MS and SFC/SCD (sulfur chemiluminescence detector). Model Coal Compounds reacted include: tetrahydrothiophene, methyl p-tolyl sulfide, cyclohexyl mercaptan, and thiophenol. At 130{degree}C, in addition to these compounds reacting, reactions were also detected for phenyl sulfide and benzo(b)thiophene. 14 figs.

Olesik, S. (comp.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal  

SciTech Connect

Coal Reaction Study: The results of the reaction of aqueous cupric chloride with Illinois {number sign}6 coal are listed on page 21. These results indicate that the oxidative desulfurization of coal with cupric chloride is more complex and less effective than previously reported. Although almost all the pyritic and sulfate sulfur are removed from the coal, the organic sulfur is actually reported to have increased. This may be due to an actual increase in the organic sulfur through a side reaction of the pyrite, or it may be caused by inaccuracy of the ASTM method when large proportions of chloro substituents are present. The amount of chlorine added to the coal (from 0 to 3.18%) is quite large and counterproductive. Most importantly, the amount of non-combustible ash has increased from 15.48 to 51.21%, most likely in the form of copper. This will dramatically decrease both the efficiency of combustion in terms of altering the heat capacity of the coal as well as decrease the amount of energy produced per ton of coal. As a result, it is quite evident that this method of desulfurization needs some modification prior to further exploitation.

Olesik, S. (comp.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to carry out an experimental program to enable development and design of near zero emissions (NZE) CO{sub 2} processing unit (CPU) for oxy-combustion plants burning high and low sulfur coals and to perform commercial viability assessment. The NZE CPU was proposed to produce high purity CO{sub 2} from the oxycombustion flue gas, to achieve > 95% CO{sub 2} capture rate and to achieve near zero atmospheric emissions of criteria pollutants. Two SOx/NOx removal technologies were proposed depending on the SOx levels in the flue gas. The activated carbon process was proposed for power plants burning low sulfur coal and the sulfuric acid process was proposed for power plants burning high sulfur coal. For plants burning high sulfur coal, the sulfuric acid process would convert SOx and NOx in to commercial grade sulfuric and nitric acid by-products, thus reducing operating costs associated with SOx/NOx removal. For plants burning low sulfur coal, investment in separate FGD and SCR equipment for producing high purity CO{sub 2} would not be needed. To achieve high CO{sub 2} capture rates, a hybrid process that combines cold box and VPSA (vacuum pressure swing adsorption) was proposed. In the proposed hybrid process, up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in the cold box vent stream would be recovered by CO{sub 2} VPSA and then it would be recycled and mixed with the flue gas stream upstream of the compressor. The overall recovery from the process will be > 95%. The activated carbon process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx, thus exceeding the performance targets of >99% and >95%, respectively. The process was also found to be suitable for power plants burning both low and high sulfur coals. Sulfuric acid process did not meet the performance expectations. Although it could achieve high SOx (>99%) and NOx (>90%) removal efficiencies, it could not produce by-product sulfuric and nitric acids that meet the commercial product specifications. The sulfuric acid will have to be disposed of by neutralization, thus lowering the value of the technology to same level as that of the activated carbon process. Therefore, it was decided to discontinue any further efforts on sulfuric acid process. Because of encouraging results on the activated carbon process, it was decided to add a new subtask on testing this process in a dual bed continuous unit. A 40 days long continuous operation test confirmed the excellent SOx/NOx removal efficiencies achieved in the batch operation. This test also indicated the need for further efforts on optimization of adsorption-regeneration cycle to maintain long term activity of activated carbon material at a higher level. The VPSA process was tested in a pilot unit. It achieved CO{sub 2} recovery of > 95% and CO{sub 2} purity of >80% (by vol.) from simulated cold box feed streams. The overall CO{sub 2} recovery from the cold box VPSA hybrid process was projected to be >99% for plants with low air ingress (2%) and >97% for plants with high air ingress (10%). Economic analysis was performed to assess value of the NZE CPU. The advantage of NZE CPU over conventional CPU is only apparent when CO{sub 2} capture and avoided costs are compared. For greenfield plants, cost of avoided CO{sub 2} and cost of captured CO{sub 2} are generally about 11-14% lower using the NZE CPU compared to using a conventional CPU. For older plants with high air intrusion, the cost of avoided CO{sub 2} and capture CO{sub 2} are about 18-24% lower using the NZE CPU. Lower capture costs for NZE CPU are due to lower capital investment in FGD/SCR and higher CO{sub 2} capture efficiency. In summary, as a result of this project, we now have developed one technology option for NZE CPU based on the activated carbon process and coldbox-VPSA hybrid process. This technology is projected to work for both low and high sulfur coal plants. The NZE CPU technology is projected to achieve near zero stack emissions

Minish Shah; Nich Degenstein; Monica Zanfir; Rahul Solunke; Ravi Kumar; Jennifer Bugayong; Ken Burgers

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Integrated Dry NO sub x /SO sub 2 Emissions Control System baseline test report, November 11--December 15, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The DOE sponsored Integrated Dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System program, which is a Clean Coal Technology Ill demonstration, is being conducted by Public Service Company of Colorado. The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, which is a 100 MWe, down-fired utility boiler burning a low sulfur western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate 70 percent reductions in NO{sub x} and S0{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NO{sub x} burners with overfire air; (2) urea injection for additional NO{sub x} removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. The effectiveness of the integrated system on a high sulfur coal will also be tested. This report documents the first baseline test results conducted during the program. The baseline tests were conducted with the original burners and auxiliary equipment and represent the unmodified boiler emissions. The burner design of Arapahoe Unit 4 results in relatively high NO{sub x} levels ranging from 740 to 850 ppM (corrected to 3% O{sub 2}, dry) over the load range. Excess air level was the primary factor influencing NO{sub x} emissions. During normal boiler operations, there was a wide range in NO{sub x} emissions, due to the variations of excess air, boiler load and other, secondary parameters. SO{sub 2} emissions ranged from 350 to 600 ppM (corrected to 3% O{sub 2}, dry) and reflected variations in the coal sulfur content.

Shiomoto, G.H.; Smith, R.A.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The use of PFBC ashes to ameliorate acid conditions: An equilibrium and greenhouse study  

SciTech Connect

Pilot-scale development at the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MW{sub th} circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, has demonstrated the advantages of pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Commercial scale deployment of the technology at the Lakeland Utilities MacIntosh Unit No. 4 has been proposed. Development of uses for the ashes from PFBC systems is being actively pursued as part of commercial demonstration of PFBC technologies. Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), conducted a laboratory scale investigation of the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as an amendment for acidic soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. Ashes were collected from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coals. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following: (1) PFBC fly ash (Karhula-low S fly ash) and ag-lime (CaCO{sub 3}) were used as amendments attempting to ameliorate acid spoil conditions. These materials were found to be effective acid mine spoil amendments. (2) The greenhouse study demonstrated that PFBC ash and/or bed ash amended spoils resulted in similar seed germination numbers as compared to the ag-lime amended spoils. (3) The greenhouse study also demonstrated that PFBC fly ash and/or bed ash amended spoils resulted in comparable plant productivity to the ag-lime amended spoils. In fact, all amendments resulted in statistically the same levels of plant production for each plant species.

Brown, T.H.; Bland, A.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Examination of utility Phase 1 compliance choices and state reactions to Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990  

SciTech Connect

Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 is imposing new limitations on the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (N{sub x}) from electric power plants. The act requires utilities to develop compliance plans to reduce these emissions, and indications are that these plans will dramatically alter traditional operating procedures. A key provision of the SO{sub 2} control program deaned in Title IV is the creation of a system of emission allowances, with utilities having the option of complying by adjusting system emissions and allowance holdings. A compilation of SO{sub 2} compliance activities by the 110 utility plants affected by Phase I is summarized in this report. These compliance plans are presented in a tabular form, correlated with age, capacity, and power pool data. A large number of the Phase I units (46%) have chosen to blend or switch to lower sulfur coals. This choice primarily is in response to (1) prices of low-sulfur coal and (2) the need to maintain SO{sub 2} control flexibility because of uncertain future environmental regulations (e.g., air toxics, carbon dioxide) and compliance prices. The report also discusses the responses of state legislatures and public utility commissions to the compliance requirements in Title IV. Most states have taken negligible action regarding the regulatory treatment of allowances and compliance activities. To protect mine employment, states producing high-sulfur coal have enacted regulations encouraging continued use of that coal, but for the most part, this response has had little effect on utility compliance choices.

Bailey, K.A.; Elliott, T.J.; Carlson, L.J.; South, D.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

In-plant testing of a novel coal cleaning circuit using advanced technologies. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

A circuit comprised of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies was evaluated in an operating preparation plant to determine circuit performance and to compare the performance with current technologies used to treat -16 mesh fine coal. The circuit integrated a Floatex hydrosizer, a Falcon enhanced gravity concentrator and a Jameson flotation cell. A Packed-Column was used to provide additional reductions in the pyritic sulfur and ash contents by treatment of the Floatex-Falcon-Jameson circuit product. For a low sulfur Illinois No. 5 coal, the pyritic sulfur content was reduced from 0.67% to 0.34% at a combustible recovery of 93.2%. The ash content was decreased from 27.6% to 5.84%, which equates to an organic efficiency of 95% according to gravity-based washability data. The separation performance achieved on a high sulfur Illinois No. 5 coal resulted in the rejection of 72.7% of the pyritic sulfur and 82.3% of the ash-forming material at a recovery of 8 1 %. Subsequent pulverization of the cleaned product and retreatment in a Falcon concentrator and Packed-Column resulted in overall circuit ash and pyritic sulfur rejections of 89% and 93%, respectively, which yielded a pyritic sulfur content reduction from 2.43% to 0.30%. This separation reduced the sulfur dioxide emission rating of an Illinois No. 5 coal from 6.21 to 1.75 lbs SO{sub 2}/MBTU, which is Phase I compliance coal. A comparison of the results obtained from the Floatex-Falcon-Jameson circuit with those of the existing circuit revealed that the novel fine coal circuit provides 10% to 20% improvement in mass yield to the concentrate while rejecting greater amounts of ash and pyritic sulfur.

Honaker, R.Q. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Reed, S.; Mohanty, M.K.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Leaching of elements from bottom ash, economizer fly ash, and fly ash from two coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assess how elements leach from several types of coal combustion products (CCPs) and to better understand possible risks from CCP use or disposal, coal ashes were sampled from two bituminous-coal-fired power plants. One plant located in Ohio burns high-sulfur (about 3.9%) Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal from the Monongahela Group of the Central Appalachian Basin; the other in New Mexico burns low-sulfur (about 0.76%) Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation coal from the San Juan Basin, Colorado Plateau. The sampled \\{CCPs\\} from the Ohio plant were bottom ash (BA), economizer fly ash (EFA), and fly ash (FA); the sampled \\{CCPs\\} from the New Mexico plant were BA, mixed FA/EFA, FA, and cyclone-separated coarse and fine fractions of a FA/EFA and FA blend. Subsamples of each ash were leached using the long-term leaching (60-day duration) component of the synthetic groundwater leaching procedure (SGLP) or the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP, 18-hour duration). These ashes were all alkaline. Leachate concentrations and leachabilities of the elements from the \\{CCPs\\} were similar between corresponding CCP types (BA, EFA, and FA) from each plant. The leachabilities of most elements were lowest in BA (least leachable) and increased from EFA to FA (most leachable). Ca and Sr were leached more from EFA than from either BA or FA. Leachability of most elements also increased as FA particle size decreased, possibly due in part to increasing specific surface areas. Several oxyanion-forming elements (As, Mo, Se, U, and V) leached more under SGLP than under TCLP; the opposite was true for most other elements analyzed.

Kevin B. Jones; Leslie F. Ruppert; Sharon M. Swanson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

McDonald, R.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MARKET ASSESSMENT AND TECHNICAL FEASIBILITY STUDY OF PRESSURIZED FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION ASH USE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler International, Inc. and the US Department of Energy, has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC ashes. Ashes from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot-scale circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, combusting (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coal, and ash from the AEP's high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at WR1. The technical feasibility study examined the use of PFBC ash in construction-related applications, including its use as a cementing material in concrete and use in cement manufacturing, fill and embankment materials, soil stabilization agent, and use in synthetic aggregate production. Testing was also conducted to determine the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as a soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following conclusions. PFBC ash does not meet the chemical requirements as a pozzolan for cement replacement. However, it does appear that potential may exist for its use in cement production as a pozzolan and/or as a set retardant. PFBC ash shows relatively high strength development, low expansion, and low permeability properties that make its use in fills and embankments promising. Testing has also indicated that PFBC ash, when mixed with low amounts of lime, develops high strengths, suitable for soil stabilization applications and synthetic aggregate production. Synthetic aggregate produced from PFBC ash is capable of meeting ASTM/AASHTO specifications for many construction applications. The residual calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in the PFE3C ash has been shown to be of value in making PFBC ash a suitable soil amendment for acidic and sodic problem soils and mine spoils. In conclusion, PFBC ash represents a viable material for use in currently established applications for conventional coal combustion ashes. As such, PFBC ash should be viewed as a valuable resource, and commercial opportunities for these materials should be explored for planned PFBC installations.

A.E. Bland; T.H. Brown

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

EIA - AEO2010 - Factors affecting the relationship betwen crude oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Factors affecting the relationship betweeen crude oil and natural gas prices Factors affecting the relationship betweeen crude oil and natural gas prices Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Factors affecting the relationship between crude oil and natural gas prices Background Over the 1995-2005 period, crude oil prices and U.S. natural gas prices tended to move together, which supported the conclusion that the markets for the two commodities were connected. Figure 26 illustrates the fairly stable ratio over that period between the price of low-sulfur light crude oil at Cushing, Oklahoma, and the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub on an energy-equivalent basis. Figure 26. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil prices to natural gas prices on an energy-equivalent basis, 1995-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo

136

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Data Collection Procedures Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, retail on-highway diesel prices are collected by telephone and fax from a sample of approximately 350 retail diesel outlets, including truck stops and service stations. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all on-highway diesel sold be ULSD by December 1, 2010 (September 1, 2006 in California). In January 2007, the weekly on-highway diesel price survey began collecting diesel prices for low sulfur diesel (LSD) which contains between 15 and 500 parts-per-million sulfur and ULSD separately. Prior to January 2007, EIA collected the price of on-highway fuel without distinguishing the sulfur

137

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mandates for low-sulfur heating oil in the Northeast Mandates for low-sulfur heating oil in the Northeast During 2010, Connecticut [40], Maine [41], New Jersey [42], and New York [43] passed legislation to reduce the maximum allowable sulfur content of heating oil sold in their markets. Pennsylvania proposed a similar law, but it was not approved. Connecticut and Maine will begin regulating maximum sulfur content by mid-2011, with Connecticut reducing the maximum to 50 parts per million (ppm) and Maine reducing the maximum to 15 ppm. The Connecticut law includes a second reduction to 15 ppm in 2014. Connecticut and Maine also put in place requirements for 2-percent biodiesel content in heating oil, starting in mid-2011. The New Jersey legislation reduces the maximum sulfur content to 500 ppm in 2014 and includes a second reduction

138

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PHILLIPS PETROLEUM, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHILLIPS PETROLEUM, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF PHILLIPS PETROLEUM, INC. FOR AN ADVANCED WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE SOLICITAION NO. DE-PS26-00NT40718 W(A)-01-001, CH-1054 The Petitioner, Phillips Petroleum (Phillips), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Improved Process for Desulfurizing Diesel Fuel to Produce Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel". The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to investigate and develop an improved process for desulfurizing diesel fuel to produce ultra low sulfur diesel to meet the 15 part per million (ppm) cap on sulfur in on-road diesel fuels proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on May 18, 2000. Phillips has been selected to receive an award under the subject solicitation; the

139

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Complete Fill of Northeast Home to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE), through its agent DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation seeking commercial storage contracts for the remaining 350,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate needed to complete the fill of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m., August 31, 2011. Earlier this year, DOE sold its entire inventory of heating oil stocks with plans to replace it with cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. New storage contracts were awarded in August 2011 for 650,000 barrels, and awards from this solicitation will complete the fill of the one million

140

Articles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 449 Low-Sulfur Diesel: Requirements and Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1993 Distillate Fuel Oil Outlook for Winter 1993-94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 Propane Outlook for Winter 1993-1994 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 A Comparison of Selected EIA-782 Data with Other Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 The Economics of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Review of the 1992-1993 Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 Changes to Form EIA-782C "Monthly Report of Petroleum Products

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Articles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 449 Low-Sulfur Diesel: Requirements and Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1993 Distillate Fuel Oil Outlook for Winter 1993-94 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 Propane Outlook for Winter 1993-1994 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1993 A Comparison of Selected EIA-782 Data with Other Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 The Economics of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Review of the 1992-1993 Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Season . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 1993 Changes to Form EIA-782C "Monthly Report of Petroleum Products

142

Central Appalachia: Coal mine productivity and expansion  

SciTech Connect

Coal mine productivity is a key determinant of coal prices and vice versa. This report, focusing on supplies of very low sulfur coal in the eastern United States, presents alternative scenarios of how the price-productivity relationship may evolve in response to growing utility demand. It also documents the next tier of projects where the coal industry is prepared to expand capacity. 19 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Suboleski, S.C.; Frantz, R.L.; Ramani, R.V.; Rao, G.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Mining Engineering Section); Price, J.P. (Resource Dynamics Corp., Vienna, VA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Role of coal in the world and Asia  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the changing role of coal in the world and in Asia. Particular attention is given to the rapidly growing demand for coal in electricity generation, the importance of China as a producer and consumer of coal, and the growing environmental challenge to coal. Attention is given to the increasing importance of low sulfur coal and Clean Coal Technologies in reducing the environmental impacts of coal burning.

Johnson, C.J.; Li, B.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

SteamCoal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These two coals represent the two main types of non-lignite coals currently used in the U.S.: a medium-sulfur eastern bituminous coal and a low-sulfur western sub-bituminous coal. ... At a commercial scale, this would likely mean that there could be a roughly 3-fold decrease in the size of the gasifier compared to the case of dry mixing coal and the regenerated calcium oxide. ...

Nicholas S. Siefert; Dushyant Shekhawat; Shawn Litster; David A. Berry

2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effects of Fuel Sulfur Content and Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on PM Emitted from Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work aims at the particle number concentrations and size distributions, sulfate and trace metals emitted from a diesel engine fueled with three different sulfur content fuels, operating with and without DOC. ... Figure 2. Sulfate emission rate and fuel consumption as a function of sulfur content at engine speed of 2690 rpm. ... Thus, the use of low metal fuels and lubricating oil is as important to the environment and human health as low sulfur fuels, especially for engines with after-treatment devices. ...

Hong Zhao; Yunshan Ge; Xiaochen Wang; Jianwei Tan; Aijuan Wang; Kewei You

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Empirical Study of the Stability of Biodiesel and Biodiesel Blends: Milestone Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to develop a database that supports specific proposals for a stability test and specification for biodiesel and biodiesel blends. B100 samples from 19 biodiesel producers were obtained in December of 2005 and January of 2006 and tested for stability. Eight of these samples were then selected for additional study, including long-term storage tests and blending at 5% and 20% with a number of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels.

McCormick, R. L.; Westbrook, S. R.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reaction Profiles during Exhaust-Assisted Reforming of Diesel Engine Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction Profiles during Exhaust-Assisted Reforming of Diesel Engine Fuels ... The reforming efficiency was dependent on the fuel type and followed the general trend of bioethanol > rapeseed methyl ester > low-sulfur diesel fuel. ... The use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in diesel engines reduces nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions but results in an increased release of smoke and particulate matter (PM), as well as higher fuel consumption. ...

A. Tsolakis; A. Megaritis; S. E. Golunski

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

151

Composition and properties of coals from the Yurty coal occurrence  

SciTech Connect

Coals from the Yurty coal occurrence were studied. It was found that the samples were brown non-coking coals with low sulfur contents (to 1%) and high yields of volatile substances. The high heat value of coals was 20.6-27.7 MJ/kg. The humic acid content varied from 5.45 to 77.62%. The mineral matter mainly consisted of kaolinite, a-quartz, and microcline. The concentration of toxic elements did not reach hazardous values.

N.G. Vyazova; L.N. Belonogova; V.P. Latyshev; E.A. Pisar'kova [Irkutsk State University, Irkutsk (Russia). Research Institute of Oil and Coal Chemistry and Synthesis

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Sorbent Injection for Small  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas URS Group and their test team will evaluate sorbent injection for mercury control on sites with low-SCA ESPs, burning low sulfur Eastern bituminous coals. Full-scale tests will be performed at Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 to evaluate sorbent injection performance across a cold-side ESP/wet FGD and a cold-side ESP with a dual NH3/SO3 flue gas conditioning system, respectively. Short-term parametric tests on Units 1 and 2 will provide data on the effect of sorbent injection rate on mercury removal and ash/FGD byproduct composition. Tests on Unit 2 will also evaluate the effect of dual-flue gas conditioning on sorbent injection performance. Results from a one-month injection test on Unit 1 will provide insight to the long-term performance and variability of this process as well as any effects on plant operations. The goals of the long-term testing are to obtain sufficient operational data on removal efficiency over time, effects on the ESP and balance of plant equipment, and on injection equipment operation to prove process viability.

153

CPR Meeting Production and Conditioning of High Sulfur Biogas for Fuel Cell„Preliminary Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Capture by a Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process Jim Zhou, Howard Meyer, and Ben Bikson Nov. 13, 2009 DE-FE0000646 Project Management Plan 2 Project Management Plan 2 Outline  Introduction of GTI and PoroGen  Introduction of Membrane Contactor Technology  Details of the Project  Summary Project Management Plan 3 Project Management Plan 3 Gas Technology Institute > Contract Research > Program Management > Technical Services > Education and Training > Over 1,000 patents > Nearly 500 products commercialized Solving Important Energy Challenges via: Project Management Plan 4 Project Management Plan 4 Facilities & Staff > Main Facility: 18-Acre Campus

154

Bioprocessing of High-sulfur Crudes Via Appliaction of Critical Fluid Biocatalysis  

SciTech Connect

This experimental research project investigated protein-based biocatalysis in supercritical fluid solvents as an integrated process approach to catalyze the removal of sulfur atoms from crude oils and fuels. The work focused on the oxidation of model sulfur-containing compounds in supercritical reaction media and included three major tasks: microbiological induction experiments, proteincatalyzed biooxidation in supercritical solvents, and a work-in-kind cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA). This work demonstrated that the biooxidation reaction could be improved by an order-of-magnitude by carrying out the reaction in emulsions in supercritical fluids.

Ginosar, Daniel Michael; Bala, Greg Alan; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Stanescue, Marina A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Effect of Iron Species and Calcium Hydroxide on High-Sulfur Petroleum Coke CO2 Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of iron species on petroleum coke CO2 gasification was studied in the present work. The effects of the temperature (11731673 K), the catalyst types, catalyst loading (ranging from 0 to 5 wt %), and composition during the gasification of ...

Zhi-jie Zhou; Qi-jing Hu; Xin Liu; Guang-suo Yu; Fu-chen Wang

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Short-Term Fates of High Sulfur Inputs in Northern California Vineyard Soils  

SciTech Connect

The widespread application of elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}) to vineyards may have ecosystem effects at multiple scales. We evaluated the short-term fates of applied S{sup 0} in a Napa Valley vineyard; we determined changes in soil sulfur (S) speciation (measured by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy), soil pH, extractable sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), and total S to evaluate changes in acidity and soil S within the vineyard over time. Surface soil samples were collected immediately prior to and following two applications of S{sup 0} (6.7 kg S{sup 0} ha{sup -1}), with weekly collections in the 2 weeks between applications and following the last application. XANES spectra indicated that the majority of soil S persists in the +6 oxidation state and that S{sup 0} oxidizes within 7 days following application. Soil pH and extractable SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} measurements taken at 30 min after S{sup 0} application revealed generation of acidity and an increase in extractable SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, but by 12 days after application, soil pH increased to approximately pre-application levels. These data suggest that the major consequence of reactive S applications in vineyards may be the accumulation of soil SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and organic S during the growing season, which can be mobilized during storm events during the dormant (wet) season. In spatially-extensive winegrowing regions where these applications are made by hundreds of individual farmers each year, it will be important to understand the long-term implications of this perturbation to the regional S cycle.

E Hinckley; S Fendorf; P Matson

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Simulation and modeling of atmospheric fluidized bed combustors for high sulfur coals  

SciTech Connect

The principal issues in modeling atmospheric fluidized bed combustors (AFBC) are described using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) - Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) steady state AFBC model as an example. Comparisons are made between model predictions of boiler performance with experimental data from the TVA 20 MW(e) AFBC pilot plant data. Recent FBC models are briefly reviewed and compared with the ORNL-TVA model. The paper also describes the ongoing effort at TVA on transient modeling of AFBC and presents some preliminary results from the TVA AFBC transient model.

Krishnan, R.P.; Daw, C.S.; Byrd, J.; Zielke, R.; Wells, J.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect

Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect

Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Decemer 2011 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Neutron Imaging of Diesel Particulate Filters  

SciTech Connect

This article presents nondestructive neutron computed tomography (nCT) measurements of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) as a method to measure ash and soot loading in the filters. Uncatalyzed and unwashcoated 200cpsi cordierite DPFs exposed to 100% biodiesel (B100) exhaust and conventional ultra low sulfur 2007 certification diesel (ULSD) exhaust at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP) are compared to a brand new (never exposed) filter. Precise structural information about the substrate as well as an attempt to quantify soot and ash loading in the channel of the DPF illustrates the potential strength of the neutron imaging technique.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin; Schillinger, Burkhard [FRM-II, Technische Universitaet Munchen; Schulz, Michael [FRM-II, Technische Universitaet Munchen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coal quality and estimated coal resources in the proposed Colville Mining District, central North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Colville Mining District (CMD) encompasses 27,340 mi{sup 2} (70,800 km{sup 2}) in the central part of the North Slope. Known coal deposits within the proposed district range from Mississippian to Tertiary in age. Available information indicates that neither Mississippian and Tertiary coals in the CMD constitute a significant resource because they are excessively deep, thin, or high in ash content; however, considerable amount of low-sulfur Cretaceous coal is present. The paper briefly describes the geology and quality of these coal reserves. Difficult conditions will restrict mining of these coals in the near future.

Stricker, G.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Clough, J.G. [Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Characteristics of SME Biodiesel-Fueled Diesel Particle Emissions and the Kinetics of Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In general it is reported that biodiesel has a less adverse effect on human health than petroleum-based diesel fuel. ... The engine used in this study was a 1996 John Deere T04045TF250, which is a medium-duty, off-highway, direct-injection, 4 cylinder, 4 cycle, turbocharged diesel engine. ... These fuels were compared with a low-sulfur, petroleum #2 diesel fuel in a Caterpillar 3304, prechamber, 75 kW diesel engine, operated over heavy- and light-duty transient test cycles developed by the United States Bureau of Mines. ...

Heejung Jung; David B. Kittelson; Michael R. Zachariah

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Onboard Measurements of Nanoparticles from a SCR-Equipped Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Onboard Measurements of Nanoparticles from a SCR-Equipped Marine Diesel Engine ... Measurements were conducted on one of the ships four main 12 600 kW mediumspeed diesel engines which use low sulfur marine residual fuel and have a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system for NOX abatement. ... A general pattern in the nanoparticles emitted is that there was an initial peak in mass and number concentration at start-up and before reaching the open-sea (Figure 1). ...

sa M. Hallquist; Erik Fridell; Jonathan Westerlund; Mattias Hallquist

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A. [University of Porto, Oporto (Portugal). Center of Geology

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Cold Temperature and Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Speciated Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Diesel Trucks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions testing was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (?7 and 22 C) operating on two fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel and 20% soy biodiesel blend) over three driving cycles: cold start, warm start and heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving cycle. ... Different 2007+ aftertreatment technologies involving catalyst regeneration led to significant modifications of VOC emissions that were compound-specific and highly dependent on test conditions. ... However, emissions of other toxic partial combustion products such as carbonyls were not reduced in the modern diesel vehicles tested. ...

Ingrid J. George; Michael D. Hays; Richard Snow; James Faircloth; Barbara J. George; Thomas Long; Richard W. Baldauf

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

Impact of Sugarcane Renewable Fuel on In-Use Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions from a Marine Vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-use emissions aboard a Stalwart class vessel, the T/S State of Michigan, were measured from a four-stroke marine diesel generator operating on two fuels: ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and ULSD mixed with Amyris renewable diesel (S33; 33% by volume) produced from sugarcane feedstocks with 67% by volume ULSD. ... A model 6V92TA Detroit Diesel Corporation diesel engine (9.0 L) was fueled on blends of 10, 20, 30 and 40% soydiesel-diesel fuel. ... Fueling with biodiesel/diesel fuel blends reduced particulate matter (PM), total hydrocarbons (THC) and CO, while increasing NOx. ...

Nicholas R. Gysel; Robert L. Russell; William A. Welch; David R. Cocker; III; Sujit Ghosh

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Identification of the selective corrosion existing at the seam weld of electric resistance-welded pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The selective corrosion existing at the seam weld of high frequency electric resistance welded pipes of carbon steel with low sulfur content in electrolyte solutions is revealed by localized electrochemical measurements. The seam weld, mainly consisted of ferrite, has more negative open circuit potential and higher anodic dissolution current density than the base metal consisting ferrite and pearlite. Between the seam weld and the base metal, there is a galvanic coupling effect accelerating the dissolution kinetics of the seam weld such that V-shaped corrosion groove preferentially occurs at the seam weld.

S.J. Luo; R. Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Providing solutions to energy and environmental programs. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The goals of WRI`s jointly sponsored research program are to: (1) increase the production of US and western energy resources--low-sulfur coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) enhance the competitiveness of US and western energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) reduce the nation`s dependence upon foreign energy supplies and strengthen the US and regional economies; and (4) minimize the impact of energy production and utilization on the environment. A summary of appropriations, obligations and expenditures is given, then a summary of objectives and accomplishments for the 21 tasks being supported is presented.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 September 2013 Appendix D Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

171

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Appendix C Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy

172

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type, and PAD District No. 2 Diesel Fuel Prices by Sulfur Content, Sales Type, and PAD District (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Month Ultra Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Commercial/ Institutional Consumers Industrial Consumers Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Average Commercial/ Institutional Consumers Industrial Consumers Through Retail Outlets Other End Users a Average United States January ............................. 167.8 171.0 177.6 172.4 173.8 151.7 163.5 175.2 178.9 173.5 173.5 150.9 February ........................... 151.7 156.5 166.0 155.3 160.2 136.0 148.9 155.6 167.1 163.3 160.1 135.9 March ................................ 149.4 151.1 156.9 152.4 153.9 134.9 144.6 151.4 158.3 155.9

173

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Extraction, separation, and analysis of high sulfur coal. Technical progress report No. 13, June 22, 1990--October 15, 1990  

SciTech Connect

Coal Reaction Study: The results of the reaction of aqueous cupric chloride with Illinois {number_sign}6 coal are listed on page 21. These results indicate that the oxidative desulfurization of coal with cupric chloride is more complex and less effective than previously reported. Although almost all the pyritic and sulfate sulfur are removed from the coal, the organic sulfur is actually reported to have increased. This may be due to an actual increase in the organic sulfur through a side reaction of the pyrite, or it may be caused by inaccuracy of the ASTM method when large proportions of chloro substituents are present. The amount of chlorine added to the coal (from 0 to 3.18%) is quite large and counterproductive. Most importantly, the amount of non-combustible ash has increased from 15.48 to 51.21%, most likely in the form of copper. This will dramatically decrease both the efficiency of combustion in terms of altering the heat capacity of the coal as well as decrease the amount of energy produced per ton of coal. As a result, it is quite evident that this method of desulfurization needs some modification prior to further exploitation.

Olesik, S. [comp.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Chemical looping combustion of high-sulfur coal with NiFe2O4-combined oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of coal has gained increasing attention as a novel combustion technology for its attractive advantage in the...2. In relative to the single metal oxide-based oxygen carrier (OC),...

Baowen Wang; Gan Xiao; Xiaoyong Song

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithiumsulfur batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lithiumsulfur (LiS) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91wt% as the high energy density cathode material for LiS battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400500nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970mAhg?1 and an average columbic efficiency>96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density LiS batteries.

Ya Liu; Jinxin Guo; Jun Zhang; Qingmei Su; Gaohui Du

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Production of High-Hydrogen Content Coal-Derived Liquids [Part 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project has been to evaluate and compare the effect of the intrinsic differences between cobalt (Co) and iron (Fe) catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis using coal-derived syngas. Crude oil, especially heavy, high-sulfur crude, is no longer the appropriate source for the additional, or marginal, amounts of middle-distillate fuels needed to meet growing US and world demand for diesel and jet fuels. Only about 1/3 of the marginal crude oil barrel can be made into diesel and jet fuels. The remaining 2/3 contributes further to global surpluses of by-products. FT can produce these needed marginal, low-sulfur middle-distillate fuels more efficiently, with less environmental impact, and from abundant US domestic resources. Cobalt FT catalyst is more efficient, and less expensive overall, than iron FT catalyst. Mechanisms of cobalt FT catalyst functioning, and poisoning, have been elucidated. Each of these primary findings is amplified by several secondary findings, and these are presented, and verified in detail. The most effective step the United States can take to begin building toward improved long-term national energy security, and to reduce dependence, over time, on imported crude oil from unfriendly and increasingly unstable areas of the world, is to begin producing additional, or marginal amounts of, middle-distillate-type fuels, such as ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and jet fuel (not gasoline) from US domestic resources other than petroleum. FT synthesis of these middle distillate fuels offers the advantage of being able to use abundant and affordable US coal and biomass as the primary feedstocks. Use of the cobalt FT catalyst system has been shown conclusively to be more effective and less expensive than the use of iron FT catalyst with syngas derived from coal, or from coal and biomass combined. This finding is demonstrated in detail for the initial case of a relatively small FT plant of about 2000 barrels per day based upon coal and biomass. The primary feature of such a plant, in the current situation in which no commercial FT plants are operating in the US, is that it requires a relatively modest capital investment, meaning that such a plant could actually be built, operated, and replicated in the near term. This is in contrast to the several-billion dollar investment, and accompanying risk, that would be required for a plant of more than an order of magnitude greater capacity, which has been referred to in the technical literature on fuel production as the capacity required to be considered "commercial-scale." The effects of more than ten different potential poisons for cobalt FT catalyst have been studied extensively and in detail using laboratory continuous-stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) and bottled laboratory syngas "spiked" with precisely controlled amounts of the poisons, typically at the levels of 10s or 100s of parts per billion. This data set has been generated and interpreted by world-renowned experts on FT catalysis at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and has enabled unprecedented insight regarding the many molecular-scale mechanisms that can play a role in the "poisoning" of cobalt FT catalyst.

Stephen Bergin

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Accelerating Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions From vehicles on the road to the energy that powers them, Oak Ridge National Laboratory innovations are advancing American transportation. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is making an impact on everyday America by enhancing transportation choices and quality of life. Through strong collaborative partnerships with industry, ORNL research and development efforts are helping accelerate the deployment of a new generation of energy efficient vehicles powered by domestic, renewable, clean energy. EPA ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel rule ORNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory co-led a comprehensive research and test program to determine the effects of diesel fuel sulfur on emissions and emission control (catalyst) technology. In the course of this program, involving

179

2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop … December 13, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Portland Workshop December 13, 2011 Steve Oxley Deputy Chairman Wyoming Public Service Commission 2 There are two kinds of congestion Type 1: Competitive access to least-cost energy, many sellers vying to serve lucrative markets. Type 2: "Real" physical congestion - characterized by the inability to transmit all available generation. (Type 2a: We can expect the cumulative effect of new EPA rules to make a significant difference on where and how much* congestion we will see. * probably more of each 3 Wyoming is an energy and electron exporting state We are concerned with Type II congestion. We are energy rich, with high quality wind, natural gas and low sulfur coal resources, but . .

180

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Addendum to Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets 1 May 11, 2012 ADDENDUM Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets Additional Information on Jones Act Vessels' Potential Role in Northeast Refinery Closures The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recent report exploring the potential impacts of reductions in refinery activity in the Northeast on petroleum product markets in that region pointed out that, if Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery shuts down, waterborne movements from the Gulf Coast could be an important route for alternative supplies to help replace lost volumes in the short term, particularly for ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD). Because this route would involve

182

SR/OIAF/2001-01 The Transition  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 The Transition to Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel: Effects on Prices and Supply May 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information

183

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Oxy-Combustion Boiler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development Project No.: DE-NT0005262 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Foster Wheeler Oxy-combustion CFD Graphic The objectives of this Foster Wheeler Corporation-managed program are to assess the corrosion characteristics of oxy-combustion relative to air-fired combustion; identify the corrosion mechanisms involved; and determine the effects of oxy-combustion on conventional boiler tube materials, conventional protective coatings, and alternative materials and coatings when operating with high to low sulfur coals. The program involves the prediction of oxy-combustion gas compositions by computational fluid dynamic calculations, exposure of coupons of boiler materials and coverings coated with coal ash deposit to simulated oxy-combustion gases in electric

184

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY Using Energy Wisely Increasing Energy Conservation and Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Energy Wisely Using Energy Wisely Increasing Energy Conservation and Efficiency The Department of Energy has installed two low-sulfur light bulbs as a test at its Forrestal Building headquar- ters in Washington, D.C. The two golf ball-sized bulbs, like those on the opposite page, are at each end of a 240-foot, 10-inch-wide reflective plastic "light pipe." U.S. DEPARTMENTOF ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENTOF ENERGY E nergy efficiency is the ability to use less energy to produce the same amount of lighting, heating, transportation, and other energy services. For a family or business, conserving energy means lower energy bills. For the country as a whole, greater en- ergy efficiency helps us make the most of U.S. energy resources, reduces energy shortages, lowers our reliance on energy

185

District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13, 2012 13, 2012 CFO Silent Auction Kiosk Visit a kiosk to bid on the Powerpedia silent auction to benefit the CFC on December 6th. November 13, 2012 Sidewalk Sale Come to a DOE Sidewalk Sale to benefit the CFC. November 9, 2012 Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery As part of the government-wide response and recovery effort for Hurricane Sandy and the Nor'easter, the Energy Department is providing the Department of Defense with additional ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in response to a request from the State of Connecticut. November 9, 2012 EIA Chili Cook-Off Join the DOE chili cook-off to benefit the CFC. November 8, 2012 Evaluation Report: IG-0877

186

2001 IG Report WEB Ver..pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress October 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001 Inspector General's Message Inspector General Testifies on Top 10 Management Challenges Management Challenges and Significant Accomplishments Reports Statistical Data Page 1 Page 1 Page 3 Page 31 Page 35 DOE/IG-0022 April 2001 Did You Know? "The Department of Energy has installed two low-sulfur light bulbs as a test at its Forrestal building headquarters in Washington, D.C." (See front cover) Source: National Energy Policy, Report of the National Energy Policy Group, May 2001. 43 Dear Secretary Abraham: I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. The Report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the 6-month period ending March 31, 2001. The Inspector General Act, as amended, requires you to forward

187

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Procedures, Methodology, and Coefficients of Variation Procedures, Methodology, and Coefficients of Variation Diesel Fuel Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, cash self-serve on-highway diesel prices (including taxes) are collected from a sample of approximately 400 retail diesel outlets in the continental U.S. The sample includes a combination of truck stops and service stations that sell on-highway diesel fuel. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The prices are collected via telephone, fax, email, or the internet from participating outlets. All collected prices are subjected to automated edit checks during data collection and data processing. Data flagged by the edits are verified with the respondents. Imputation is used for companies

188

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2012 November 9, 2012 Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery As part of the government-wide response and recovery effort for Hurricane Sandy and the Nor'easter, the Energy Department is providing the Department of Defense with additional ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in response to a request from the State of Connecticut. November 2, 2012 Energy Department to Loan Emergency Fuel to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy Response Release from Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Provide Additional Source of Diesel for Emergency Response in New York/New Jersey Area August 31, 2012 Energy Department Advances Research on Methane Hydrates - the World's

189

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Data Collection Procedures Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, cash self-serve on-highway diesel prices (including taxes) are collected from a sample of approximately 400 retail diesel outlets in the continental U.S. The sample includes a combination of truck stops and service stations that sell on-highway diesel fuel. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The prices are collected via telephone, fax, email, or the internet from participating outlets. All collected prices are subjected to automated edit checks during data collection and data processing. Data flagged by the edits are verified with the respondents. Imputation is used for companies that cannot be contacted and for reported prices that are extreme outliers.

190

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Index (click to jump links) Coal Production and Prices Coal Mining Labor Productivity Coal Consumption Coal Production and Prices Emissions Caps Lead to More Use of Low-Sulfur Coal From Western Mines Continued improvements in mine productivity (which have averaged 5.9 percent per year since 1980) are projected to cause falling real minemouth prices throughout the forecast relative to historical levels. Higher electricity demand and lower prices, in turn, are projected to yield increasing coal demand, but the demand is subject to the overall sulfur emissions cap in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which encourages progressively greater reliance on the lowest sulfur coals (from Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and Utah). Figure 106. Coal production by region, 1970-2025 (million short tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

191

Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

available in PDF available in PDF Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets Release date: December 23, 2011 Summary Reduction in refining activity in the Northeast, as reflected in recently announced plans to idle over 50% of the regional refining capacity, is likely to impact supplies of petroleum products. The transition period as supply sources shift could be problematic for Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD), gasoline, and jet fuel supplies. Prolonged uncertainty over the coming months with regard to the disposition and operation of important logistical assets such as pipelines, ports and storage would compound adjustment challenges. Reduced short-term product supply flexibility due to longer delivery times and potential transportation bottlenecks for sources

192

No Slide Title  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Summer Fuels Outlook Guy Caruso Administrator, Energy Information Administration 2006 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook Conference April 11, 2006 Washington, DC Several Key Factors Drive the Short-Term Fuels Forecast 1) Rising world oil consumption; 2) Low global surplus production capacity and tight crude oil supply relative to demand; 3) Supply concerns in international oil markets (such as in Nigeria, Iraq, and Iran); 4) The challenges of:  Stricter sulfur standards under the Tier 2 Gasoline program;  MTBE phase-out;  A shift to ultra low sulfur diesel. All these factors contribute to higher prices for petroleum products, particularly in the coming months. World Oil Consumption Growth Slowed in 2005; Projected to Increase in 2006-2007 Source: EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2006

193

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Diesel fuel is bascially the same product as home heating oil. The primary difference is that diesel has a lower sulfur content. When heating oil is in short supply, low sulfur diesel fuel can be diverted to heating oil supply. Thus, diesel fuel prices rise with heating heating oil prices. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. But prices in the Northeast jumped dramatically in the third week of January. Diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent, between January 17 and February 7. While EIA does not have

194

Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery November 9, 2012 - 7:15pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the government-wide response and recovery effort for Hurricane Sandy and the Nor'easter, the Energy Department is providing the Department of Defense with additional ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in response to a request from the State of Connecticut. The Energy Department will be loaning diesel fuel to the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), who in turn will provide emergency loans to fuel distributors in Connecticut to address fuel

195

DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253 barrels Today's sale was the first held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the current 1,984,253-barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. Contracts for the heating oil will be executed upon final payment to DOE; final payment is required no later than

196

DOE_SECA Poster__(FOR RELEASE).ai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subir Roychoudhur Subir Roychoudhur y WATER-NEUTRAL DIESEL REFORMING www.precision-combustion.com Clean Power Solutions for the 21st Century ® Precision Combustion, Inc . * Up to 3 kW th CSR operation * 500 hr operation at S/C of 3.0 with low sulfur fuel without coke formation * Product composition in good agreement with thermodynamic predicition * Fuels tested:n-C12 and Synfuel S-8 Performance Summary * Both direct anode recycle & condensation approach demonstrated for water neutral operation * Pros/Cons of AGR and Condensation Approaches characterized Condensation Approach: Water Neutrality Fuel sulfur converted to H 2 S in ATR and sorbed in sulfur trap (included in hardware shown above). Condensation Approach: Water Recovery - - - Low Pressure Drop Nozzle: Temp Profile

197

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Alternative and Advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative and Advanced Fuels Clean Diesel Fuels Argonne researchers (from left) Steve McConnell, Henry Ng, Forrest Jehlik, Geoff Amman and Mike Kern are shown with samples of ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, a cleaner-burning diesel fuel used in the Opel Astra. The VW Jetta TDI runs on a clean diesel fuel derived from coal. Alternative and advanced fuels are critical to reducing our country's dependence on foreign oil and improving air quality. To promote and stimulate alternative and renewable fuel research, the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard has made it a requirement to increase the production of ethanol and advanced biofuels to 36 billion gallons by 2022. Public concern over mobile sources of air pollution provides an additional incentive to produce fuels that generate fewer emissions and increase

198

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY HONEYWELL, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HONEYWELL, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND HONEYWELL, INC., FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE- FC26-02NT41219; W(A)-02-022, CH-1105 The Petitioner, Honeywell, Inc. (Honeywell), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Ultra-Low Sulfur Reduction Emission Control Device." The purpose of the cooperative agreement is to develop a filter which can remove sulfur in diesel fuel and be used as an "on-board" device to protect and allow post combustion devices to meet new clean air emission standards. Specifically, the objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a proof of concept for an on-vehicle desulfurization filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of this component into the vehicle fuel train will reduce the adverse effects

199

Definition: Diesel fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel fuel Diesel fuel Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Diesel fuel A liquid fuel produced from petroleum; used in diesel engines.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Diesel oil and Gazole (fuel) redirect here. Sometimes "diesel oil" is used to mean lubricating oil for diesel engines. Diesel fuel in general is any liquid fuel used in diesel engines. The most common is a specific fractional distillate of petroleum fuel oil, but alternatives that are not derived from petroleum, such as biodiesel, biomass to liquid (BTL) or gas to liquid (GTL) diesel, are increasingly being developed and adopted. To distinguish these types, petroleum-derived diesel is increasingly called petrodiesel. Ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) is a standard for defining diesel fuel with substantially lowered sulfur contents. As of 2007, almost

200

DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 18, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that new contracts have been awarded for commercial storage of 650,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate (ULSD) for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Awards were made to two companies for storage in New England--Hess Corporation in Groton, CT for 400,000 barrels, and Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA for 250,000 barrels. The procurement was conducted by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA Energy), acting as the agent for DOE. Acquisition of storage services for an additional 350,000 barrels is planned to complete the establishment of a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: News Release - DOE Study Raises Estimates of Coalbed Methane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 16, 2002 December 16, 2002 DOE Study Raises Estimates of Coalbed Methane Potential in Powder River Basin Actual Production Will Hinge on Water Disposal Method WASHINGTON, DC - The Powder River Basin, a vast region of high plains in Wyoming and Montana known for producing low-sulfur coal, is also becoming a primary source of America's fastest growing natural gas resource, coalbed methane. Now, a new Department of Energy report projects that the region may hold more coalbed methane than previously estimated but the amount that will actually be produced will depend largely on the choice of the water disposal method. MORE INFO Download report [7.35MB PDF] The study, Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study, was prepared by Advanced Resources International of

202

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Prices AEO 2011 Prices Energy Prices AEO 2011 Prices Mkt trends Market Trends World oil prices in AEO2011, defined in terms of the average price of low-sulfur, light crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma, span a broad range that reflects the inherent volatility and uncertainty of world oil prices (Figure 52). The AEO2011 price paths are not intended to reflect absolute bounds for future oil prices, but rather to allow analysis of the implications of world oil market conditions that differ from those assumed in the AEO2011 Reference case. The Reference case assumes a continuation of current trends in terms of economic access to non-OPEC resources, the OPEC market share of world production, and global economic growth. See more figure data Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary XLS

203

NETL: LabNotes - May 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Gain New Insight into Activating Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Researchers Gain New Insight into Activating Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts An array of model Fischer-Tropsch catalyst particles. The image on the left shows an array of model Fischer-Tropsch catalyst particles, as seen using a special scan- ning tunneling microscope at NETL. The image on the right is an enlargement of the surface of one of these particles showing a regular array of closely packed oxygen atoms, which appear as small circular ‘bumps’ in the images. The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process is a set of chemical reactions that historically has been used to produce a petroleum substitute from coal, natural gas, or biomass by nations looking for an alternative to importing it. The F-T process has received intermittent attention as a source of low-sulfur diesel fuel whenever the cost of petroleum gets sufficiently

204

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Terminal Operator Location (Thousand Barrels) Hess Corp. Groton, CT 500*

205

Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Price Outlook for Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 Tancred Lidderdale and Aileen Bohn (1) Contents * Summary * Introduction * Reformulated Gasoline Demand * Oxygenate Demand * Logistics o Interstate Movements and Storage o Local Distribution o Phase 2 RFG Logistics o Possible Opt-Ins to the RFG Program o State Low Sulfur, Low RVP Gasoline Initiatives o NAAQS o Tier 2 Gasoline * RFG Production Options o Toxic Air Pollutants (TAP) Reduction o Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Reduction o Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Reduction o Summary of RFG Production Options * Costs of Reformulated Gasoline o Phase 1 RFG Price Premium o California Clean Gasoline Price Premium o Phase 2 RFG Price Premium o Reduced Fuel Economy

206

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Special Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Special Topics Special Topics International Energy Outlook 2006 World Oil Prices in IEO2006 World Oil Prices, 1980-2030: Comparison of IRAC and Average Price of Imported Low-Sulfur, Light Crude Oil (ILSLCO) to U.S. Refiners (2004 Dollars per Barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In previous IEOs, the world crude oil price was defined on the basis of the average imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil to the United States (IRAC), which represented the weighted average of all imported crude oil. Historically, the IRAC price has tended to be a few dollars less than the widely cited prices of premium crudes, such as West Texas Intermediate (WTI) and Brent, which refiners generally prefer for their low viscosity

207

FE Petroleum Reserves News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Petroleum Reserves News Petroleum Reserves News FE Petroleum Reserves News RSS March 14, 2011 DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve The Department of Energy, through its agent, DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation for new contracts to store two million barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in New York Harbor and New England. February 10, 2011 DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks The U.S. Department of Energy today has awarded contracts to four companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 1,000,000 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage sites in Groton and New Haven, CT. February 3, 2011 DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three

208

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels- Pennsylvania State University Background In this congressionally directed project, the Earth and Mineral Science (EMS) Energy Institute at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) focuses on the development of fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents to support the production of electricity from anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) via solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). PSU will use the fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents developed under this work to transform and clean ADG and ULSD into a syngas stream suitable as a feedstock for SOFCs. This project is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), whose mission is to advance energy options to fuel

209

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 19020 of 31,917 results. 11 - 19020 of 31,917 results. Download Security, Emergency Planning & Safety Records http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/security-emergency-planning-safety-records-0 Article DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that new contracts have been awarded for commercial storage of 650,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. http://energy.gov/fe/articles/doe-awards-storage-contracts-northeast-home-heating-oil-reserve Article DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks The U.S. Department of Energy today has awarded contracts to four companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 1,000,000 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage sites in Groton and New

210

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 International Energy Module The NEMS International Energy Module (IEM) simulates the interaction between U.S. and global petroleum markets. It uses assumptions of economic growth and expectations of future U.S. and world crude-like liquids production and consumption to estimate the effects of changes in U.S. liquid fuels markets on the international petroleum market. For each year of the forecast, the NEMS IEM computes oil prices, provides a supply curve of world crude-like liquids, generates a worldwide oil supply- demand balance with regional detail, and computes quantities of crude oil and light and heavy petroleum products imported into the United States by export region. Changes in the oil price (WTI), which is defined as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered to Cushing, Oklahoma in

211

Pacific Biodiesel: Renewable and Sustainable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Meeting April 20-21, 2011 Pacific Biodiesel, Inc. Kelly King, VP Renewable and Sustainable The Pacific Biodiesel Ohana  A fuel for any diesel engine  Non-toxic and Biodegradable  Non-flammable  100% renewable / recycled  Superior lubrication  Low emissions  Ultra Low Sulfur (15 ppm)  Meets or exceeds ASTM D6751 What is Biodiesel? What biodiesel is not: * Biodiesel is not vegetable oil that has simply been filtered * Biodiesel is not a fuel that requires costly modifications to your diesel engine * Biodiesel itself does not contain any fossil fuel product (although it can be mixed with petroleum diesel at any percentage rate) * Biodiesel does not involve gasification, micro-waves or pyrolysis * Not made from starchy feedstock (ethanol)

212

Solids precipitation and polymerization of asphaltenes in coal-derived liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The precipitation and removal of particulate solids from coal-derived liquids by adding a process-derived anti-solvent liquid fraction and continuing the precipitation process at a temperature above the melting point of the mixed liquids for sufficient time to allow the asphaltenes to polymerize and solids to settle at atmospheric pressure conditions. The resulting clarified light hydrocarbon overflow liquid contains less than about 0.02 W % ash and is suitable as turbine fuel or as boiler fuel for burning without particulate emission control equipment. An underflow liquid fraction containing less than about 0.1 W % solids along with low sulfur and nitrogen concentrations is suitable as a boiler fuel with emission control equipment.

Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

Yavorsky, Paul M. (Monongahela, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Drive cycle analysis of butanol/diesel blends in a light-duty vehicle.  

SciTech Connect

The potential exists to displace a portion of the petroleum diesel demand with butanol and positively impact engine-out particulate matter. As a preliminary investigation, 20% and 40% by volume blends of butanol with ultra low sulfur diesel fuel were operated in a 1999 Mercedes Benz C220 turbo diesel vehicle (Euro III compliant). Cold and hot start urban as well as highway drive cycle tests were performed for the two blends of butanol and compared to diesel fuel. In addition, 35 MPH and 55 MPH steady-state tests were conducted under varying road loads for the two fuel blends. Exhaust gas emissions, fuel consumption, and intake and exhaust temperatures were acquired for each test condition. Filter smoke numbers were also acquired during the steady-state tests.

Miers, S. A.; Carlson, R. W.; McConnell, S. S.; Ng, H. K.; Wallner, T.; LeFeber, J.; Energy Systems; Esper Images Video & Multimedia

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Crude oil from the Zaburun'e field  

SciTech Connect

In order to work up recommendations for the directions to be taken in processing oil from the new Zaburun'e field in the Ural-Volga interfluvial district, a complete, unified program was used to investigate oil samples taken from depths of 905-913 and 895-903 meters from the Lower Cretaceous deposits. Density, viscosity, medium-resin content, flash point, and other processing-relevant properties were derived. The hydrocarbon group composition was assessed. Fractions distilling below 350/sup 0/C consisted mainly of high-energy isoparaffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons. Characteristics of the diesel fuel cuts were derived. All cuts had low-temperature properties and cloud points below minus 60/sup 0/C. Lube stocks were analyzed and showed high viscosity indices, low solid points, and low sulfur contents. Straight-run resids were also evaluated.

Dorogochinskaya, V.A.; Shul'zhenko, E.D.; Varshaver, V.P.; Khabibulina, R.K.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Important Norwegian crude assays updated  

SciTech Connect

New assays on two important Norwegian North Sea crude oils, Statfjord and Gullfaks, are presented. Both are high-quality, low-sulfur crudes that will yield a full range of good-quality products. All assay data came from industry-standard test procedures. The Statfjord field is the largest in the North Sea. Production started in 1979. Statfjord is a typical North Sea crude, produced from three separate platforms and three separate loading buoys with interconnecting lines. Current production is about 700,000 b/d. Gullfaks is produced from a large field in Block 34/10 of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea production area. Gullfaks crude oil is more biodegraded than other crudes from the region. Biodegradation has removed most of the waxy normal paraffins, resulting in a heavier, more naphthenic and aromatic crude.

Corbett, R.A

1990-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect

Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL] [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluation of pitches and cokes from solvent-extracted coal materials  

SciTech Connect

Three initial coal-extracted (C-E) samples were received from the West Virginia University (WVU) Chemical Engineering Department. Two samples had been hydrogenated to obtain pitches that satisfy Theological requirements. One of the hydrogenated (HC-E) samples had been extracted by toluene to remove ash and higher molecular weight aromatic compounds. We were unable to measure the softening point and viscosity of the non-hydro treated solid extract sample, Positive characteristics in the HC-E materials were softening points of 113-119{degrees}C, low sulfur and ash. The oxygen and nitrogen content of the HC-E samples may limit future usage in premium carbon and graphite products. Coking values were similar to petroleum pitches. Laboratory anode testing indicates that in combination with standard coal-tar pitch, the HC-E material can be used as a binder pitch.

McHenry, E.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power  

SciTech Connect

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power (SOFC APU) development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14318. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner development leading to successful demonstration of the SOFC APU objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant SOFC APU Milestones: Demonstrated: Operation meeting SOFC APU requirements on commercial Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel. SOFC systems operating on dry CPOX reformate. Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC APU system without inert gas purge. Developed: Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. Demonstrated efficient SOFC output power conditioning. Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods.

Vesely, Charles John-Paul [Cummins Power Generation; Fuchs, Benjamin S. [Cummins Power Generation; Booten, Chuck W. [Protonex Technology, LLC

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nebraska city station emdash hot to cold esp conversion  

SciTech Connect

Omaha Public Power District's Nebraska City Unit 1, is a 585 MW net coal fueled power plant which burns low-sulfur Powder River Basin coal. The unit was originally designed and constructed with a fully enclosed hot-side rigid frame electrostatic precipitator. However, the original precipitator was unable to reliably and continuously maintain stack opacity and particulate emissions levels while operating at high loads. Therefore the hot-side precipitator was modified internally and converted to cold-side operation. The unit's four regenerative air heaters were relocated to an area underneath the boiler backpass and the ductwork was modified extensively. In addition, significant internal precipitator modifications were made. This paper describes the conversion design, construction, and resulting performance improvements.

Duncan, B.L.; Ferguson, A.W.; Wicina, R.C. (Black and Veatch Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Campbell, D.B.; Kotan, R.M.; Roth, K.A. (Omaha Public Power District, NE (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Sub-bituminous coal handling problems solved with bunker liner retrofit  

SciTech Connect

After switching to low-sulfur sub-bituminous coal, Northern States Power Co. (NSP) experience several fires and an explosion in the coal storage bunkers of its two-unit, 384-MW Riverside plant located in Minneapolis, Minn. The most recent incident occurred in November 1993 when a blast rocked Unit 7`s coal storage bunker. The spontaneous combustion explosion was touched off when coal dust from the dust collection system was being conveyed back into the bunker and came into contact with hot coal. Reaction to the incident was swift and NSP management established a task force known as ``Operation Cease Fire`` to investigate the situation and develop a solution to eliminate fires and explosions at all of its coal-fired plants. This article describes the problems found in the coal handling systems and the steps taken to correct them.

Steppling, K.P.; McAtee, K.L.; Huggins, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Improve reformer operation with trace sulfur removal  

SciTech Connect

Modern bimetallic reforming catalysts typically have feed specifications for sulfur of 0.5 to 1 wppm in the reformer naphtha carge. Sulfur in the raw naphtha is reduced to this level by naphtha hydrotreating. While most naphtha hydrotreating operations can usually obtain these levels without substantial problems. It is difficult to obtain levels much below 0.5 to 1 wppm with this process. Revamp of a constrained existing hydrotreater to reduce product sulfur slightly can be extremely costly typically entailing replacement or addition of a new reactor. At Engelhard the authors demonstrated that if the last traces of sulfur remaining from hydrotreating can be removed, the resulting ultra-low sulfur feed greatly improves the reformer operation and provides substantial economic benefit to the refiner. Removal of the remaining trace sulfur is accomplished in a simple manner with a special adsorbent bed, without adding complexity to the reforming operation.

McClung, R.G.; Novak, W.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Environmental Decision-Making Using Life Cycle Impact Assessment and Stochastic Multiattribute Decision Analysis: A Case Study on Alternative Transportation Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ecological Science and Engineering, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, and Golisano Institute of Sustainability, Rochester Institute of Technology, 111 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, New York 14623 ... For example, the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005 and Executive Order 13423 require state and federal fleets to have vehicles capable of using alternative fuelsalthough there are few guidelines for assessing the systemic environmental impact of alternative fuel technologies (26, 27). ... This case study is limited to life cycle air emissions for the fuel alternatives: gasoline (GAS), low-sulfur diesel (LSD), 100% soy-biodiesel (BD100), electric vehicle (EV), and 85% corn-based ethanol (EtOH). ...

Kristin Rogers; Thomas P. Seager

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Maintenance and operation of the US Alternative Fuel Center  

SciTech Connect

The Alternative Fuels Utilization Program (AFUP) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has investigated the possibilities and limitations of expanded scope of fuel alternatives and replacement means for transportation fuels from alternative sources. Under the AFUP, the Alternative Fuel Center (AFC) was created to solve problems in the DOE programs that were grappling with the utilization of shale oil and coal liquids for transportation fuels. This report covers the first year at the 3-year contract. The principal objective was to assist the AFUP in accomplishing its general goals with two new fuel initiatives selected for tasks in the project year: (1) Production of low-sulfur, low-olefin catalytically cracked gasoline blendstock; and (2) production of low-reactivity/low-emission gasoline. Supporting goals included maintaining equipment in good working order, performing reformulated gasoline tests, and meeting the needs of other government agencies and industries for fuel research involving custom processing, blending, or analysis of experimental fuels.

Erwin, J.; Ferrill, J.L.; Hetrick, D.L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Energy Department to Loan Emergency Fuel to Department of Defense as Part  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Loan Emergency Fuel to Department of Defense to Loan Emergency Fuel to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy Response Energy Department to Loan Emergency Fuel to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy Response November 2, 2012 - 5:13pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the government-wide response and recovery effort for Hurricane Sandy, President Obama declared that Hurricane Sandy has created a severe energy supply interruption and directed the Energy Department to loan the Department of Defense ultra-low sulfur diesel from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) will begin drawing down stocks from the heating oil reserve terminal in Groton, Connecticut as early as tomorrow. The fuel, which will be distributed to state, local and federal responders in the New York/New

229

Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Vehicles Audi A3 Diesel vehicles may be making a comeback. Diesel engines are more powerful and fuel-efficient than similar-sized gasoline engines (about 30-35% more fuel efficient). Plus, today's diesel vehicles are much improved over diesels of the past. Better Performance Improved fuel injection and electronic engine control technologies have Increased power Improved acceleration Increased efficiency New engine designs, along with noise- and vibration-damping technologies, have made them quieter and smoother. Cold-weather starting has been improved also. Cleaner Mercedes ML320 BlueTEC Today's diesels must meet the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Advances in engine technologies, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, and improved exhaust treatment have made this possible.

230

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Public Service's Four Corners Station with APFBC Arizona Public Service's Four Corners Station with APFBC FBC Repower APFBC AES Greenidge APFBC Dan River FBC, APFBC Four Corners CHIPPS H.F. Lee Products Summary Sheldon Summary APFBC Sheldon GFBCC Sheldon APFBC L.V. Sutton Contents: Summary Existing Units Considered for Repowering Dresser-Rand Turbomachinery Considered Phased-Construction Approach Plant Layout Performance Environmental Characteristics Cost Click on picture to enlarge The host site for this repowering evaluation is the Arizona Public Service Company's Four Corners steam generating station, shown in the photo to the right. The Four Corners station is a mine-mouth, low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired electric generating station located near Fruitland, New Mexico, about 15 miles southwest of Farmington, New Mexico.

231

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy, through its agent, DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation for new contracts to store two million barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in New York Harbor and New England. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m. EDT on March 29, 2011. Of the U.S. households that use heating oil to heat their homes, 69% reside in the Northeast. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve was established by the Energy Policy Act of 2000 to provide an emergency buffer that can supplement commercial fuel supplies in the event of an actual or imminent severe supply disruption. The Reserve can provide supplemental supplies for

232

PEMEX selects the H-Oil{reg_sign} process for their hydrodesulfurization residue complex at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery  

SciTech Connect

Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has selected the H-Oil Process for the conversion and upgrading of a blend of Maya and Isthmus vacuum residua at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery. The 8,450 metric ton/day (50,000 bpsd) H-Oil Plant will produce a low sulfur (0.8 wt%) fuel oil, diesel, naphtha, and LPG. The H-Oil Plant will be a key component of the Hydrodesulfurization Residue (HDR) Complex which will be located at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Tula, State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The project is part of PEMEX`s Ecology Projects currently underway in Mexico. This paper describes the HDR Complex and the design basis of the H-Oil Plant and provides the current status of this project.

Wisdom, L.I.; Colyar, J.J. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 12. Spot Prices of Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel, Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel, and Propane, 2012 to Present (Dollars per Gallon) Year / Product Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 No. 2 Distillate Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel New York Harbor ................ 3.080 3.223 3.302 3.242 2.987 2.710 2.921 3.179 3.229 3.236 3.180 3.070 U.S. Gulf Coast ................... 3.034 3.178 3.270 3.217 2.947 2.667 2.879 3.143 3.186 3.157 2.997 2.960 Los Angeles ........................ 3.088 3.242 3.384 3.252 3.007 2.654 2.854 3.225 3.299 3.226 3.071 2.971 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel U.S. Gulf Coast ..................... 3.087 3.207 3.256 3.226 2.974 2.678 2.892 3.156 3.191 3.111 2.960 2.940 Propane Mont Belvieu ......................... 1.294 1.220 1.261 1.196 0.954 0.788 0.874 0.901 0.910 0.962 0.890 0.797 2013 No. 2 Distillate

235

A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources  

SciTech Connect

In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Feature - Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Fleet at Argonne is Getting Greener Vehicle Fleet at Argonne is Getting Greener Argonne's electric vehicle fleet Argonne Fleet electric vehicles from E-Ride Industries At Argonne National Laboratory, new environmentally friendly vehicles have been leased through a partnership with the Government Services Administration (GSA). Argonne manager John Surdey manages the fleet of 135 cars, buses and trucks used at the Laboratory. When he first took over as fleet manager, Surdey saw the high cost of labor and parts for maintaining the aging Agency owned gasoline-fueled vehicle fleet. He wanted to find a way to reduce the overhead while cutting the fleet's carbon footprint. Since many of the vehicles at the lab are used in stop-and-go fashion, they get terrible gas mileage: 7-8 mpg. Switching to a new GSA leased vehicle fleet that uses E-85 fuel, Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel and Hybrid Electric vehicles saves fuel, parts, labor and is easier on the environment.

237

EIA - AEO2010 - World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 World oil prices and production trends in AEO2010 In AEO2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or “sweet”) crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. EIA makes projections of future supply and demand for “total liquids,” which includes conventional petroleum liquids—such as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gain—in addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil. World oil prices can be influenced by a multitude of factors. Some tend to be short term, such as movements in exchange rates, financial markets, and weather, and some are longer term, such as expectations concerning future demand and production decisions by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2009, the interaction of market factors led prompt month contracts (contracts for the nearest traded month) for crude oil to rise relatively steadily from a January average of $41.68 per barrel to a December average of $74.47 per barrel [38].

238

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Cleanup Syngas Cleanup Syngas Contaminant Removal and Conditioning Raw synthesis gas (syngas) from the high temperature gas cooling (HTGC) system needs to be cleaned to remove contaminants including fine particulates, sulfur, ammonia, chlorides, mercury, and other trace heavy metals to meet environmental emission regulations, as well as to protect downstream processes. In the case of carbon sequestration, carbon dioxide (CO2) is also removed. Depending on the application, syngas may need to be conditioned to adjust the hydrogen-to-carbon monoxide (H2-to-CO) ratio to meet downstream process requirement. In applications where very low sulfur (<10 ppmv) syngas is required, converting carbonyl sulfide (COS) to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) before sulfur removal may also be needed. Typical cleanup and conditioning processes include cyclone and filters for bulk particulates removal; wet scrubbing to remove fine particulates, ammonia and chlorides; solid absorbents for mercury and trace heavy metal removal; water gas shift (WGS) for H2-to-CO ratio adjustment; catalytic hydrolysis for converting COS to H2S; and acid gas removal (AGR) for extracting sulfur-bearing gases and CO2 removal.

239

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Petroleum supply, consumption, and prices in four cases, 2020 and 2035 8. Petroleum supply, consumption, and prices in four cases, 2020 and 2035 2020 2035 Projection 2010 Reference Low EUR High EUR High TRR Reference Low EUR High EUR High TRR Low-sulfur light crude oil price (2010 dollars per barrel) 79 127 128 125 122 145 147 143 140 Total U.S. production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids (million barrels per day) 7.5 9.6 8.8 10.3 11.6 9.0 8.1 10.0 11.8 Tight oil 0.4 1.2 0.9 1.5 2.2 1.2 0.7 1.7 2.8 Natural gas plant liquids 2.1 2.9 2.6 3.1 3.6 3.0 2.7 3.3 4.0 Other U.S. crude oil 5.1 5.5 5.3 5.6 5.7 4.8 4.8 4.9 5.0 Tight oil share of total U.S. crude oil and NGPL production (percent) 5 12 10 15 19 14 9 17 23 U.S. net import share of petroleum product supplied (percent) 50 37 41 34 27 36 41 32 24

240

NETL: Control Technology: ElectroCore Separator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ElectroCore Separator ElectroCore Separator LSR Technologies and its subcontractors designed and installed a 8,500 m3/hr (5,000 acfm) Advanced ElectroCore system and a dry sulfur scrubber to test it using an exhaust gas slipstream at Alabama Power Company's Gaston Steam Plant. Shakedown is scheduled for August 15, 2001. The exhaust gas will be from Unit #4 of a 270 MWe sub-critical, pulverized coal boiler burning a low-sulfur bituminous coal. The Advanced ElectroCore system will consist of a conventional upstream ESP, a dry SO2 scrubber, a particle precharger and an Advanced ElectroCore separator. Particle concentrations and size distributions will be measured at the ESP inlet, at the dry scrubber outlet and at the ElectroCore outlet. The concentration of 12 common HAPs will be measured at these locations as well. For purposes of project organization and monitoring, the work will be divided into nine (9) tasks described below.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition  

SciTech Connect

Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effect of Unburned Methyl Esters on the NOx Conversion of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Engine and flow reactor experiments were conducted to determine the impact of biodiesel relative to ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) on inhibition of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction over an Fe-zeolite catalyst. Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts have the ability to adsorb and store unburned hydrocarbons (HC) at temperatures below 300 C. These stored HCs inhibit or block NO{sub x}-ammonia reaction sites at low temperatures. Although biodiesel is not a hydrocarbon, similar effects are anticipated for unburned biodiesel and its organic combustion products. Flow reactor experiments indicate that in the absence of exposure to HC or B100, NO{sub x} conversion begins at between 100 and 200 C. When exposure to unburned fuel occurs at higher temperatures (250-400 C), the catalyst is able to adsorb a greater mass of biodiesel than of ULSD. Experiments show that when the catalyst is masked with ULSD, NO{sub x} conversion is inhibited until it is heated to 400 C. However, when masked with biodiesel, NO{sub x} conversion is observed to begin at temperatures as low as 200 C. Engine test results also show low-temperature recovery from HC storage. Engine tests indicate that, overall, the SCR system has a faster recovery from HC masking with biodiesel. This is at least partially due to a reduction in exhaust HCs, and thus total HC exposure with biodiesel.

Williams, A.; Ratcliff, M.; Pedersen, D.; McCormick, R.; Cavataio, G.; Ura, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ULSD and B20 Hydrocarbon Impacts on EGR Cooler Performance and Degradation  

SciTech Connect

Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has emerged as an important issue in diesel engine development. Uncertainty about the level of impact that fuel chemistry may have upon this issue has resulted in a need to investigate the cooler fouling process with emerging non-traditional fuel sources to gage their impact on the process. This study reports experiments using both ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel (B20) at elevated exhaust hydrocarbon conditions to investigate the EGR cooler fouling process. The results show that there is little difference between the degradation in cooler effectiveness for ULSD and B20 at identical conditions. At lower coolant temperatures, B20 exhibits elevated organic fractions in the deposits compared with ULSD, but this does not appear to lead to incremental performance degradation under the conditions studied. Comparisons with a previous study conducted at low HC levels shows that the presence of increased volatiles in the deposit does not impact the degradation in effectiveness significantly. Moreover, the effectiveness loss divided by the deposit mass gain for both low- and high-HC conditions seems to indicate that the HC fraction in the deposit does not significantly alter the overall thermal properties of the deposit layer.

Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Estimates of central Appalachian coal reserves by cost of production and sulfur content  

SciTech Connect

This study provides information on the quantity, quality, and production costs for all minable coal reserves in the major coal-producing counties of central Appalachia, a region that contains the large majority of low-sulfur and compliance coal reserves in the eastern US. Presently, the best source of detailed reserve information in the Appalachian region is the estimates produced by the mining and land holding companies that control the reserves. The authors have been able to obtain overall reserve estimates based on the detailed geological and engineering studies conducted by these companies. In areas where this information does not exist, the authors have relied on published estimates of reserves and modified these estimates based on known conditions on surrounding properties. This reserve information has been combined with data on coal quality and mining costs to produce cost curves for all minable coal reserves by sulfur content. Results to date indicate that most of the major coal-producing counties in central Appalachia will be able to increase production levels significantly on a sustainable basis for at least the next 20 years, without major real increases in coal prices.

Watkins, J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Low temperature pyrolysis of coal or oil shale in the presence of calcium compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal pyrolysis technique or process is described in which particulate coal is pyrolyzed in the presence of about 5 to 21 wt. % of a calcium compound selected from calcium oxide, calcined (hydrate) dolomite, or calcined calcium hydrate to produce a high quality hydrocarbon liquid and a combustible product gas which are characterized by low sulfur content. The pyrolysis is achieved by heating the coal-calcium compound mixture at a relatively slow rate at a temperature of about 450.degree. to 700.degree. C. over a duration of about 10 to 60 minutes in a fixed or moving bed reactor. The gas exhibits an increased yield in hydrogen and C.sub.1 -C.sub.8 hydrocarbons and a reduction in H.sub.2 S over gas obtainable by pyrolyzing cola without the calcium compound. The liquid product obtained is of a sufficient quality to permit its use directly as a fuel and has a reduced sulfur and oxygen content which inhibits polymerization during storage.

Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Apparatus for magnetic separation of paramagnetic and diamagnetic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods and apparatus for segregating paramagnetic from diamagnetic particles in particulate material and, in particular, to the open gradient magnetic separation of ash producing components and pyritic sulfur from coal. The apparatus includes a vertical cylinder and a rotatable vertical screw positioned within the cylinder, the screw having a helical blade angled downwardly and outwardly from the axis. Rotation of the vertical screw causes denser particles, which in the case of coal include pyritic sulfur and ash, which are paramagnetic, to migrate to the outside of the screw, and less dense particles, such as the low sulfur organic portion of the coal, which are diamagnetic, to migrate towards the center of the screw. A vibration mechanism attached to the screw causes the screw to vibrate during rotation, agitating and thereby accommodating further segregation of the particles. An open gradient magnetic field is applied circumferentially along the entire length of the screw by a superconducting quadropole magnet. The open gradient magnetic field further segregates the paramagnetic particles from the diamagnetic particles. The paramagnetic particles may then be directed from the cylinder into a first storage bin, and the diamagnetic particles, which are suitable for relatively clean combustion, may be directed into a second storage bin.

Doctor, Richard D. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Plume opacity investigation at a stoker-fired power generating station  

SciTech Connect

A public utility contacted the Conoco Coal Research Division through Consolidation Coal Company and requested technical assistance in determining the cause of a high plume opacity at one of their stoker-fired power generating stations. The sporadic occurrence of a high opacity plume (>20%) had been reported for several years. Although the utility was burning low sulfur coal, sulfuric acid mist had been suspected as the cause of the plume opacity; therefore, anhydrous ammonia had been injected into the flue gas at the ESP inlet plenums to control the plume opacity with some degree of success. However, for the last two years, the high plume opacity has occurred more frequently. The possible causes of the high plume opacity investigated were: 1) organic species emissions, 2) particulate mass loading, 3) particle size distribution, and 4) sulfuric acid emissions. The investigation included detailed sampling inside the boiler, stack, and plume areas. It was determined that the major cause of the high plume opacity was submicron particle growth at the stack exit due to sulfuric acid/water condensation. The larger particles more efficiently scattered light which resulted in the visible plume at the stack exit. The organic emissions and particulate mass loading in the stack flue gas had minimal effect on the high plume opacity. The fly ash size distribution would also have had minimal effect if the sulfuric acid had not been present.

Lewis, G.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Small-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) system for heat and power in remote areas  

SciTech Connect

Demand for heating and electric power has steadily increased in remote areas. The use of locally available fuel to achieve self sufficiency has become an important objective. Energy demands may require steam generation for district heating, power generation and process consumption. In addition, the steam generation unit can also be required to burn waste that includes MSW and sewage sludge. To meet these demands, new systems must be installed that use local fuel. This paper describes a lower cost CFBC for use in remote areas. With the support of DOE METC, in late summer 1994, DONLEE performed a test burn at its 10 MM btu/hr pilot CFBC using subbituminous coal from Wyoming. The Wyoming coal`s sulfur dioxide emissions were very low due to the low sulfur content of the Wyoming coal and the excellent efficiency at temperatures as low as 1,500 F thereby indicating no limestone addition was needed for sulfur capture. The CFBC testing indicated emissions met all of the environmental requirements, both Federal and state. These requirements include: particulates, SO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, opacity, chlorinated dioxins/furans, etc. The unit can be fabricated in modules, making the installation easier and less expensive for use in remote areas. The design is highly reliable and can be fully automated thereby requiring limited staffing.

Stuart, J.M.; Korenberg, J. [DONLEE Technologies Inc., York, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project  

SciTech Connect

Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of acid rain electronic data reports  

SciTech Connect

Entergy Corporation is a Phase II utility with a fossil generation base composed primarily of natural gas and low sulfur coal. This paper presents an analysis of a large Phase II utility`s continuous emissions monitoring data reported to EPA under Title IV Acid Rain. Electric utilities currently report hourly emissions of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, fuel use, and generation through electronic data reports to EPA. This paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the data reported to EPA as determined through an analysis of 1995 data. Emissions reported by this company under acid rain for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} are very different from emissions reported to state agencies for annual emission inventory purposes in past years and will represent a significant break with historic trends. A comparison of emissions has been made of 1995 emissions reported under Electronic Data Reports to the emissions that would have been reported using emission factors and fuel data in past years. In addition, the paper examines the impacts of 40 CFR Part 75 Acid Rain requirements such as missing data substitution and monitor bias adjustments. Measurement system errors including stack flow measurement and false NO{sub x}Lb/MMBtu readings at very low loads are discussed. This paper describes the implications for public policy, compliance, emissions inventories, and business decisions of Part 75 acid rain monitoring and reporting requirements.

Schott, J. [Entergy Corp., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Lots of data, how do we use it? Strengths and inaccuracies of utility acid rain electronic data reports  

SciTech Connect

Entergy Corporation is a Phase II utility with a fossil generation base composed primarily natural gas and low sulfur coal. This paper presents an analysis of a large Phase II utility`s continuous emissions monitoring data reported to EPA under Title IV Acid Rain. Electric utilities currently report hourly emissions of NOx, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, fuel use, and generation through electronic data reports to EPA. This paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the data reported to EPA as determined through an analysis of 1995 data. Emissions reported by this company tinder acid rain for SO{sub 2} and NOx are very different from emissions reported to state agencies for annual emission inventory purposes in past years and will represent a significant break with historic trends. A comparison of emissions has been made of 1995 emissions reported under Electronic Data Reports to the emissions that would have been reported using emission factors and fuel data in past years. In addition, the paper examines the impacts of 40 CFR Part 75 Acid Rain requirements such as missing data substitution and monitor bias adjustments. Measurement system errors including stack flow measurement and false NOx Lb/MMBtu readings at very low loads are discussed. This paper describes the implications for public policy, compliance, emissions inventories, and business decisions of Part 75 acid rain monitoring and reporting requirements.

Schott, J. [Entergy Corporation, Beaumont, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

An approach to optimal planning for SO[sub 2] emission compliance  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act of 1990 mandated limits on the sulfur dioxide emission of coal-burning units by 1995 (Phase 1) and 2000 (Phase 2). The evaluation of options for economically complying with these limits is complicated by uncertainties in a number of key variables such as the price of emission allowances, the price premiums to be paid for low sulfur coal and other costs associate with viable, unit-specific compliance options: installing scrubbers, switching to lower sulfur coal and taking no compliance action. The problem is further complicated by the fact that minimum cost compliance options for individual units can only be determined as the units are committed and dispatched over time taking into account planned and expected forced outages. A method is proposed for solving this combined planning-operation optimization problem over a time horizon of interest using a fast unit commitment and dispatch heuristic. The method is applied to a large utility wit 26 coal burning units subject to the provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act. Representative runs indicate that the method generally converges to optimal solutions in 30 minutes or less on a personal computer. Thus, the planner can quickly explore the impacts of various assumptions regarding the prices of emission allowances, fuel premiums etc. upon optimal compliance options for individual units.

Manetsch, T.J. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Production and blast-furnace smelting of boron-alloyed iron-ore pellets  

SciTech Connect

Industrial test data are presented regarding the production (at Sokolovsk-Sarbaisk mining and enrichment enterprise) and blast-furnace smelting (at Magnitogorsk metallurgical works) of boron-alloyed iron-ore pellets (500000 t). It is shown that, thanks to the presence of boron, the compressive strength of the roasted pellets is increased by 18.5%, while the strength in reduction is doubled; the limestone consumption is reduced by 11%, the bentonite consumption is halved, and the dust content of the gases in the last section of the roasting machines is reduced by 20%. In blast-furnace smelting, the yield of low-sulfur (<0.02%) hot metal is increased from 65-70 to 85.1% and the furnace productivity from 2.17-2.20 to 2.27 t/(m{sup 3} day); coke consumption is reduced by 3-8 kg/t of hot metal. The plasticity and stamping properties of 08IO auto-industry steel are improved by microadditions of boron.

A.A. Akberdin; A.S. Kim [Abishev Chemicometallurgical Institute, Abishev (Kazakhstan)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Wilsonville Advanced Coal-Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Topical report No. 5. 6000 TPD SRC-I demonstration plant support  

SciTech Connect

Initially, the Wilsonville facility consisted of a single stage (thermal) process, also known as the SRC-I process. The original plant has been expanded to become an advanced two-stage coal liquefaction facility. A Critical Solvent Deashing (CDS) unit was installed in 1978 and a second stage catalytic hydrogenation (HTR) unit was installed in 1981. The principal product of the first stage is a low sulfur solid fuel. The reaction product is deashed by the CSD unit using a proprietary process developed by the Kerr-McGee Corporation. The hydrotreater, or the second stage, was installed primarily for further enhancement of product properties, process flexibility, and overall hydrogen utilization efficiency. In the decoupled mode of operation, the HTR unit has no direct effect on the SRC unit. This operating mode is called the non-integrated two-stage liquefaction (NTSL) process. From 17 October 1981 to 14 October 1982, the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, was operated partly in support of the 6000 TPD-I demonstration plant design effort undertaken by ICRC. The ICRC support tests and operations performed were: Run 235 with Kentucky 9 (Fies) coal; Run 240 with Illinois 6 (Burning Star) coal; CSD unit second stage variability study; CSD unit continuous ash removal system study; SRC solidification test; wastewater sampling operation; and residual fuel oil blending operation.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fluidized-bed combustion: effectiveness of an SO/sub 2/ control technology for industrial boilers. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) boilers have developed rapidly over recent years and are now offered commercially in several different configurations. SO/sub 2/ reduction levels of 90% and above have been achieved by coal-fired AFBC boilers in the industrial size category. Based on the data available, industrial FBC NOx emissions have been consistently below 0.5 lb/million Btu. PM emissions of less than 0.5 lb/million Btu have been routinely achieved with fabric filters. AFBC boiler system costs were compared with costs for a conventional boiler equipped with an FGD system and with costs for a conventional boiler using low-sulfur compliance coal. The conclusions drawn from the economic analyses are that (1) studied cost difference between AFBC Technology, conventional boiler/FGD systems, and compliance coal combustion are projected to be small over the SO/sub 2/ emission range of 1.7 to 0.8 lb/million Btu and SO/sub 2/ reduction range of 65 to 90%, and (2) that cost competitiveness among these technologies is not expected to change significantly as the emission limitations change over this range. Absolute economic competitiveness among these options will be sensitive to site-specific parameters and decided on a case-by-case basis.

Aul, E.F.; Owen, M.L.; Jones, A.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

300 Area steam plant replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Steam to support process operations and facility heating is currently produced by a centralized oil-fired plant located in the 300 Area and piped to approximately 26 facilities in the 300 Area. This plant was constructed during the 1940s and, because of tis age, is not efficient, requires a relatively large operating and maintenance staff, and is not reliable. The US Department of Energy is proposing an energy conservation measure for a number of buildings in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. This action includes replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing new natural gas pipelines to provide a fuel source for many of these units and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. A new steel-sided building would be constructed in the 300 Area in a previously disturbed area at least 400 m (one-quarter mile) from the Columbia River, or an existing 300 Area building would be modified and used. This Environmental Assessment evaluates alternatives to the proposed actions. Alternatives considered are: (1) the no action alternative; (2) use of alternative fuels, such as low-sulfur diesel oil; (3) construction of a new central steam plant, piping and ancillary systems; (4) upgrade of the existing central steam plant and ancillary systems; and (5) alternative routing of the gas distribution pipeline that is a part of the proposed action. A biological survey and culture resource review and survey were also conducted.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Determining chemical cleaning requirements for Detroit Edison Belle River Unit No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Detroit Edison's Belle river Power Plant is a two unit coal-fired installation. The drum type boilers are Carolina type and burn pulverized low sulfur western coal. Both units have a normal boiler operating pressure of 2700 psi, are rated at 650 MW net, with a boiler operating volume of 125,000 gallons. The boilers were pre-operationally chemically cleaned during start up in 1984 (Unit 1) and 1985 (Unit 2), to remove millscale and the preservative coatings. Following the vendor recommendation to chemically clean when the tube deposit weight reaches 25 g/ft{sup 2} (as determined by the solvent removal method). However, a review of tube deposit test results form Belle River Unit 1 indicated that the type of deposit found was markedly different in appearance and physical nature than deposits typically found in other Company boilers. This paper reports that based on this difference, and the conservatism of the published limit, a comprehensive evaluation of the need to chemically clean the Belle River boilers was undertaken.

Sonntag, D.J.; Palmer, R.E. (Technical and Engineering Services, Detroit Edison Co. (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Caustic washing for refining of direct coal liquefaction products  

SciTech Connect

Extensive research and development sponsored by the U.S. DOE/PETC over the past two decades has resulted in dramatic improvements in the quality of direct coal liquefaction products. High-quality coal-derived distillates are obtainable from catalytic two-stage liquefaction (TSL) processes, such as those developed at the Wilsonville, AL pilot plant and the Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc. (HTI) pilot plant and bench units. The products of the Wilsonville and HTI TSL operations are suitable as high quality feedstocks for producing transportation fuels in a refinery. These products have important quality advantages over crude petroleum: they are distillates boiling below about 700{degrees}F and are thus virtually free of resid and metals, and they have very low sulfur contents and low nitrogen contents. The coal liquids have carbon and hydrogen contents and Watson characterization factors within the range of crude petroleums. However, relative to crude petroleum, the crude coal products have elevated oxygen contents. This report describes the removal of phenols from coal liquids by caustic washing, and the the recovery of the cresylic acid by-product.

Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States); Zhou, P. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

NETL: News Release - Richardson Announces New Initiative for "Ultra Clean"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 4, 2000 February 4, 2000 Richardson Announces New Initiative for "Ultra Clean" Fuels, Improved Tailpipe Emission Controls Research Effort Follows Proposed New EPA Auto Emission Standards, Looks to Even Cleaner Fuels, Better Pollution Control Devices Six weeks after President Clinton announced the toughest standards ever for reducing air pollutants from auto tailpipes, the U.S. Department of Energy today kicked off a major new research effort targeting $75 million to develop new ways to produce ultra clean fuels and better pollution control devices for tomorrow's cars and trucks. "Driving now accounts for 30 percent of the total air pollution in the United States," said Energy Secretary Bill Richardson. "This initiative points to the day when Americans will breathe cleaner air not only because we supported tougher regulations but also because we invested in better technologies. In addition, if we can develop a low-sulfur, high-performance diesel fuel, we can take an important step toward dramatically improving fuel economy while we cut air pollution."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST  

SciTech Connect

The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Engineer, design, construct, test, and evaluate a pressurized fluidized-bed pilot plant using high-sulfur coal for production of electric power. Phase III: pilot-plant construction. Quarterly report, June 1-August 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Technical progress during the period June 1 through August 31, 1980 included the following activities: The PSD permit approval was obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency. The building permit was obtained from the Borough of Wood-Ridge. Installation designs incorporating modifications to the Total Energy System, Gas Turbine, Free Power Turbine and Waste Heat Boiler are in an advanced stage. Procurement has been initiated on all long lead material. The upper and lower PFB Vessel fabrication was started. Quotations for the Substructure Construction (Bid Package No. 1) are under review in preparation for issuing a purchase order in October 1980. Request for quotation on Structural Steelwork have been issued to potential bidders. Groundbreaking ceremonies took place on June 30, 1980 with the Assistant Secretary of the Department of Energy presiding and the Governor of New Jersey, a Congressional delegation and State Commissioner of Energy and Environment, Borough Officials among other dignitaries in attendance.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions  

SciTech Connect

A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg{sup 0}. Concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg0 oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg{sup 0} oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg{sup 0} oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg{sup 0} oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH{sub 3} injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Chun W. Lee; Shannon D. Serre; Yongxin Zhao; Sung Jun Lee; Thomas W. Hastings [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Diesel and biodiesel exhaust particle effects on rat alveolar macrophages with in vitro exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combustion emissions from diesel engines emit particulate matter which deposits within the lungs. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) encounter the particles and attempt to engulf the particles. Emissions particles from diesel combustion engines have been found to contain diverse biologically active components including metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons which cause adverse health effects. However little is known about AM response to particles from the incorporation of biodiesel. The objective of this study was to examine the toxicity in Wistar Kyoto rat AM of biodiesel blend (B20) and low sulfur petroleum diesel (PDEP) exhaust particles. Particles were independently suspended in media at a range of 1500?gmL?1. Results indicated B20 and PDEP initiated a dose dependent increase of inflammatory signals from AM after exposure. After 24h exposure to B20 and PDEP gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) increased. B20 exposure resulted in elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release at lower particle concentrations compared to PDEP. B20 and PDEP demonstrated similar affinity for sequestration of PGE2 at high concentrations, suggesting detection is not impaired. Our data suggests PGE2 release from AM is dependent on the chemical composition of the particles. Particle analysis including measurements of metals and ions indicate B20 contains more of select metals than PDEP. Other particle components generally reduced by 20% with 20% incorporation of biodiesel into original diesel. This study shows AM exposure to B20 results in increased production of PGE2 in vitro relative to diesel.

Laya Bhavaraju; Jonathan Shannahan; Aaron William; Robert McCormick; John McGee; Urmila Kodavanti; Michael Madden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effect of E85 on RCCI Performance and Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine - SAE World Congress  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the effect of E85 on load expansion and FTP modal point emissions indices under reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) operation on a light-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine. A General Motors (GM) 1.9L four-cylinder diesel engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline or E85. Controlling the fuel reactivity in-cylinder by the adjustment of the ratio of premixed low-reactivity fuel (gasoline or E85) to direct injected high reactivity fuel (diesel fuel) has been shown to extend the operating range of high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) compared to the use of a single fuel alone as in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) or premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The effect of E85 on the Ad-hoc federal test procedure (FTP) modal points is explored along with the effect of load expansion through the light-duty diesel speed operating range. The Ad-hoc FTP modal points of 1500 rpm, 1.0bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP); 1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP; 2000rpm, 2.0bar BMEP; 2300rpm, 4.2bar BMEP; and 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP were explored. Previous results with 96 RON unleaded test gasoline (UTG-96) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) showed that with stock hardware, the 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP modal point was not obtainable due to excessive cylinder pressure rise rate and unstable combustion both with and without the use of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency and emissions performance of RCCI operation with E85 and ULSD is explored and compared against conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI operation with UTG 96 and ULSD.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The changing structure of the US coal industry: An update, July 1993  

SciTech Connect

Section 205(a)(2) of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 requires the Administrator of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to carry out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program that will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information relevant to energy resources, reserves, production, demand, technology, and related economic and statistical information. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of changes in the structure of the US coal industry between 1976 and 1991. The structural elements examined include the number of mines, average mine size, the size distribution of mines, and the size distribution of coal firms. The report measures changes in the market shares of the largest coal producers at the national level and in various regions. The Central Appalachian low-sulfur coal market is given special attention, and the market for coal reserves is examined. A history of mergers in the coal industry is presented, and changes in the proportions of US coal output that are produced by various types of companies, including foreign-controlled firms, are described. Finally, the impact of post-1991 mergers on the structure of the industry is estimated. The legislation that created the EIA vested the organization with an element of statutory independence. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high-quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of deliberations by both public and private decisionmakers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Upgrading low-rank coals using the liquids from coal (LFC) process  

SciTech Connect

Three unmistakable trends characterize national and international coal markets today that help to explain coal`s continuing and, in some cases, increasing share of the world`s energy mix: the downward trend in coal prices is primarily influenced by an excess of increasing supply relative to increasing demand. Associated with this trend are the availability of capital to expand coal supplies when prices become firm and the role of coal exports in international trade, especially for developing nations; the global trend toward reducing the transportation cost component relative to the market, preserves or enhances the producer`s profit margins in the face of lower prices. The strong influence of transportation costs is due to the geographic relationships between coal producers and coal users. The trend toward upgrading low grade coals, including subbituminous and lignite coals, that have favorable environmental characteristics, such as low sulfur, compensates in some measure for decreasing coal prices and helps to reduce transportation costs. The upgrading of low grade coal includes a variety of precombustion clean coal technologies, such as deep coal cleaning. Also included in this grouping are the coal drying and mild pyrolysis (or mild gasification) technologies that remove most of the moisture and a substantial portion of the volatile matter, including organic sulfur, while producing two or more saleable coproducts with considerable added value. SGI International`s Liquids From Coal (LFC) process falls into this category. In the following sections, the LFC process is described and the coproducts of the mild pyrolysis are characterized. Since the process can be applied widely to low rank coals all around the world, the characteristics of coproducts from three different regions around the Pacific Rim-the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, the Beluga Field in Alaska near the Cook Inlet, and the Bukit Asam region in south Sumatra, Indonesia - are compared.

Nickell, R.E.; Hoften, S.A. van

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

The role of combustion diagnostics in coal quality impact and NO{sub x} emissions field test programs  

SciTech Connect

Many utilities are examining low sulfur coal or coal blending options to comply with the Clean Air Act Amendment SO{sub 2} emission limits. Test burns have been conducted with the more promising candidate coals to characterize the potential impact of a change in coal quality on boiler operation and performance. Utilities are also under considerable pressure to evaluate NO{sub x} control options and develop a compliance plan to meet strict NO{sub x} regulations, particularly in high population density metropolitan areas on the Eastern seaboard. Field test programs have been conducted to characterize baseline NO{sub x} emissions, evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction potential of combustion modifications, and assess the potential of combustion tuning as an alternative to burner replacement. Coal quality impacts (slagging, fouling, heat absorption, ash removal) and NO{sub x} emissions are both strongly dependent upon the coal combustion process and site-specific boiler firing practices. Non-uniform combustion in the burner region can result in adverse ash deposition characteristics, carbon carryover problems, high furnace exit gas temperatures, and NO{sub x}emission characteristics that are not representative of the coal or the combustion equipment. Advanced combustion diagnostic test procedures have been developed to evaluate and improve burner zone combustion uniformity, even in cases where the coal flow to the individual burners may be non-uniform. The paper outlines a very practical solving approach to identifying combustion related problems that affect ash deposition and NO{sub x} emissions. The benefits of using advanced diagnostic instrumentation to identify problems and tune combustion conditions is illustrated using test data from recent quality field test programs.

Thompson, R.E. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Dyas, B. [New England Power Company, Westborough, MA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Development of fireside performance indices - task 8. Topical report, March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the Fireside Performance Indices (FPI) research project at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was to develop a series of indices to reliably predict the fireside performance of subbituminous coals in utility boilers. Individual utilities must respond quickly and effectively to changing fuel markets because of competition within the U.S. coal-fired power industry. Spot-market purchases of coal have become commonplace. The economics associated with sulfur emissions control have caused many utilities to use Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coals. The PRB coals usually provide a lower-cost, medium-heating-value, low-sulfur fuel option. Although these coals possess similar overall or bulk compositional properties, their fireside performance characteristics vary considerably within a given boiler. Consequently, bulk compositional parameters and, hence, conventional indices such as the base-to-acid ratio, stagging factor, and fouling factor are inappropriate for predicting the fireside performance of PRB coals. The development of the computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) and chemical fractionation methods, however, has enabled a more thorough characterization of the inorganic constituents of PRB, coals that contribute to the following adverse operational effects: stagging, fouling, opacity, erosion and poor grindability, slag tapping, and sootblower performance. Eight predictive indices have been developed based primarily on CCSEM and chemical fractionation analysis parameters to predict the propensity of a given coal or coal blend to cause operational problems. The indices were formulated using bench-, pilot-, and full-scale combustion testing data from previous research projects combined with bench-scale data from this project to identify the primary coal inorganic properties that cause ash-related problems in utility boilers.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sulfur and ash in Paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000  

SciTech Connect

When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short toms of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plans region. This is more than 30% of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more F or Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5% sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6% ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short toms of >26% of the total US coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill future energy needs.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Coal in National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA): framework geology and resources  

SciTech Connect

The North Slope of Alaska contains huge resources of coal, much of which lies within NPRA. The main coal-bearing units, the Corwin and Chandler Formations of the Nanushuk Group (Lower and Upper Cretaceous), underlie about 20,000 mi/sup 2/ (51,800 km/sup 2/) of NPRA. They contain low-sulfur, low-ash, and probable coking-quality coal in gently dipping beds as thick as 20 ft (6.1 m) within stratigraphic intervals as thick as 4500 ft (1370 m). Lesser coal potential occurs in other Upper Cretaceous units and in Lower Mississippian and Tertiary strata. The river-dominated Corwin and Umiat deltas controlled the distribution of Nanushuk Group coal-forming environments. Most organic deposits formed on delta plains; fewer formed in alluvial plain or delta-front environments. Most NPRA coal beds are expected to be lenticular and irregular, as they probably accumulated in interdistributary basins, infilled bays, or inland flood basins, whereas some blanket beds may have formed on broad, slowly sinking, delta lobes. The major controls of coal rank and degree of deformation were depth of burial and subsequent tectonism. Nanushuk Group coal resources in NPRA are estimated to be as much as 2.75 trillion short tons. This value is the sum of 1.42 trillion short tons of near-surface (< 500 ft or 150 m of overburden) bituminous coal, 1.25 trillion short tons of near-surface subbituminous coal, and 0.08 trillion shorts tons of more deeply buried subbituminous coal. These estimates indicate that the North Slope may contain as much as one-third of the United States coal potential.

Sable, E.G.; Stricker, G.D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sulfur and ash in paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000  

SciTech Connect

When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short tons of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region. This is more than 30 percent of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more Fort Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5 percent sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6 percent ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short tons or >26 percent of the total U.S. coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill our future energy needs.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Production Scale-Up or Activated Carbons for Ultracapacitors  

SciTech Connect

Transportation use accounts for 67% of the petroleum consumption in the US. Electric and hybrid vehicles are promising technologies for decreasing our dependence on petroleum, and this is the objective of the FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Inexpensive and efficient energy storage devices are needed for electric and hybrid vehicle to be economically viable, and ultracapacitors are a leading energy storage technology being investigated by the FreedomCAR program. The most important parameter in determining the power and energy density of a carbon-based ultracapacitor is the amount of surface area accessible to the electrolyte, which is primarily determined by the pore size distribution. The major problems with current carbons are that their pore size distribution is not optimized for liquid electrolytes and the best carbons are very expensive. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) has developed methods to prepare porous carbons with tunable pore size distributions from inexpensive carbohydrate based precursors. The use of low-cost feedstocks and processing steps greatly lowers the production costs. During this project with the assistance of Maxwell Technologies, we found that an impurity was limiting the performance of our carbon and the major impurity found was sulfur. A new carbon with low sulfur content was made and found that the performance of the carbon was greatly improved. We also scaled-up the process to pre-production levels and we are currently able to produce 0.25 tons/year of activated carbon. We could easily double this amount by purchasing a second rotary kiln. More importantly, we are working with MeadWestvaco on a Joint Development Agreement to scale-up the process to produce hundreds of tons of high quality, inexpensive carbon per year based on our processes.

Dr. Steven D. Dietz

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control systems: Advanced retractable injection lance SNCR test report. NOELL ARIL test period: April 20, 1995--December 21, 1995; DPSC test period: August 16--26, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, a 100 MWe down-fired utility boiler burning a low-sulfur western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emission through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the third phase of SNCR tests, where an additional injection location was installed to increase the low-load NOx removal performance. The new injectors consist of a pair of retractable in-furnace lances which were designed to provide a high degree of load following flexibility through on-line adjustments of the injection angle. With the new lances, NOx removals in excess of 35% are achievable at the same load and HN{sub 3} slip limit. At loads of 43 to 60 MWe, NOx removals with the lances range from 37--52%. At loads greater than 60 MWe, the wall-injection location is more efficient, and at loads of 70 to 100 MWe, NOx removals range from 37--41%. The coal mill-in-service pattern was found to have a large effect on both NOx removal and NH{sub 3} slip for injection at the new lance location. At 60 MWe, the NOx removal at the 10 ppm NH{sub 3} slip limit ranges from 28--52% depending on the mill-in-service pattern. Biasing the coal mills to provide uniform combustion conditions ahead of the injection location was found to be the best option for improving SNCR system performance under these conditions.

Muzio, L.J.; Smith, R.A. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States)] [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Hunt, T. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)] [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Experimental and theoretical study on the characteristics of vacuum residue gasification in an entrained-flow gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

About 200,000 bpd (barrel/day) vacuum residue oil is produced from oil refineries in Korea. These are supplied to use asphalt, high sulfur fuel oil, and upgrading residue hydro-desulfurization units. High sulfur ...

Young-Chan Choi; Jae-Goo Lee; Sang-Jun Yoon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18%. The performance goal of 70/40 reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18%.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective, the following goals were established for the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Project: Provide sufficient quantity of products for full-scale test burns; Develop data for the design of future commercial plants; Demonstrate plant and process performance; Provide capital and O&M cost data; and Support future LFC{trademark} technology licensing efforts. Each of these goals has been met and exceeded. The plant has been in operation for nearly 5 years, during which the LFC{trademark} process has been demonstrated and refined. Fuels were made, successfully burned, and a commercial-scale plant is now under contract for design and construction.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

BASELINE MEMBRANE SELECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN SDE  

SciTech Connect

Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In FY05 and FY06, testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) explored a low temperature fuel cell design concept for the SDE. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint that are crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. A key component of the SDE is the ion conductive membrane through which protons produced at anode migrate to the cathode and react to produce hydrogen. An ideal membrane for the SDE should have both low ionic resistivity and low sulfur dioxide transport. These features allow the electrolyzer to perform at high currents with low potentials, along with preventing contamination of both the hydrogen output and poisoning of the catalysts involved. Another key component is the electrocatalyst material used for the anode and cathode. Good electrocatalysts should be chemically stable and have a low overpotential for the desired electrochemical reactions. This report summarizes results from activities to evaluate commercial and experimental membranes for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for sulfur dioxide transport as a function of acid strength including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated poly-etherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membranes. Experimental membranes from the sulfonated diels-alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) and modified Nafion{reg_sign} 117 were evaluated for SO{sub 2} transport as well. These membranes exhibited reduced transport coefficient for SO{sub 2} transport without the loss in ionic conductivity. The use of Nafion{reg_sign} with EW 1100 is recommended for the present SDE testing due to the limited data regarding chemical and mechanical stability of experimental membranes. Development of new composite membranes by incorporating metal particles or by forming multilayers between PFSA membranes and hydrocarbon membranes will provide methods that will meet the SDE targets (SO{sub 2} transport reduction by a factor of 100) while decreasing catalyst layer delamination and membrane resistivity.

Colon-Mercado, H; David Hobbs, D

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Co-combustion of refuse derived fuel and coal in a cyclone furnace at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, C. P. Crane Station  

SciTech Connect

A co-combustion demonstration burn of coal and fluff refuse-derived fuel (RDF) was conducted by Teledyne National and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. This utility has two B and W cyclone furnaces capable of generating 400 MW. The facility is under a prohibition order to convert from No. 6 oil to coal; as a result, it was desirable to demonstrate that RDF, which has a low sulfur content, can be burned in combination with coals containing up to 2% sulfur, thus reducing overall sulfur emissions without deleterious effects. Each furnace consists of four cyclones capable of generating 1,360,000 pounds per hour steam. The tertiary air inlet of one of the cyclones was modified with an adapter to permit fluff RDF to be pneumatically blown into the cyclone. At the same time, coal was fed into the cyclone furnace through the normal coal feeding duct, where it entered the burning chamber tangentially and mixed with the RDF during the burning process. Secondary shredded fluff RDF was prepared by the Baltimore County Resource Recovery Facility. The RDF was discharged into a receiving station consisting of a belt conveyor discharging into a lump breaker, which in turn, fed the RDF into a pneumatic line through an air-lock feeder. A total of 2316 tons were burned at an average rate of 5.6 tons per hour. The average heat replacement by RDF for the cyclone was 25%, based on Btu input for a period of forty days. The range of RDF burned was from 3 to 10 tons per hour, or 7 to 63% heat replacement. The average analysis of the RDF (39 samples) for moisture, ash, heat (HHV) and sulfur content were 18.9%, 13.4%, 6296 Btu/lb and 0.26% respectively. RDF used in the test was secondary shredded through 1-1/2 inch grates producing the particle size distribution of from 2 inches to .187 inches. Findings to date after inspection of the boiler and superheater indicate satisfactory results with no deleterious effects from the RDF.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Effect of hydrogen addition on criteria and greenhouse gas emissions for a marine diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrogen remains an attractive alternative fuel to petroleum and a number of investigators claim that adding hydrogen to the air intake manifold of a diesel engine will reduce criteria emissions and diesel fuel consumption. Such claims are appealing when trying to simultaneously reduce petroleum consumption, greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. The goal of this research was to measure the change in criteria emissions (CO, NOx, and PM2.5) and greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), using standard test methods for a wide range of hydrogen addition rates. A two-stroke Detroit Diesel Corporation 12V-71TI marine diesel engine was mounted on an engine dynamometer and tested at three out of the four loads specified in the ISO 8178-4 E3 emission test cycle and at idle. The engine operated on CARB ultra-low sulfur #2 diesel with hydrogen added at flow rates of 0, 22 and 220 SLPM. As compared with the base case without hydrogen, measurements showed that hydrogen injection at 22 and 220 SLPM had negligible influence on the overall carbon dioxide specific emission, EF CO 2 . However, in examining data at each load the data revealed that at idle EF CO 2 was reduced by 21% at 22 SLPM (6.9% of the added fuel energy was from hydrogen) and 37.3% at 220 SLPM (103.1% of the added fuel energy was from hydrogen). At all other loads, the influence of added hydrogen was insignificant. Specific emissions for nitrogen oxides, EF NO x , and fine particulate matters, EF PM 2.5 , showed a trade-off relationship at idle. At idle, EF NO x was reduced by 28% and 41% with increasing hydrogen flow rates, whilst EF PM 2.5 increased by 41% and 86% respectively. For other engine loads, EF NO x and EF PM 2.5 did not change significantly with varying hydrogen flow rates. One of the main reasons for the greater impact of hydrogen at idle is that the contribution of hydrogen to the total fuel energy is much higher at idle as compared to the other loads. The final examination in this paper was the system energy balance when hydrogen is produced by an on-board electrolysis unit. An analysis at 75% engine load showed that hydrogen production increased the overall equivalent fuel consumption by 2.6% at 22 SLPM and 17.7% at 220 SLPM.

Hansheng Pan; Sam Pournazeri; Marko Princevac; J. Wayne Miller; Shankar Mahalingam; M. Yusuf Khan; Varalakshmi Jayaram; William A. Welch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

MULTIPLE POLLUTANT REMOVAL USING THE CONDENSING HEAT EXCHANGER  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) system is a new concept whereby a Teflon covered condensing heat exchanger is adapted to remove certain flue gas constituents, both particulate and gaseous, while recovering low level heat. The pollutant removal performance and durability of this device is the subject of a USDOE sponsored program to develop this technology. The program was conducted under contract to the United States Department of Energy?s Fossil Energy Technology Center (DOE-FETC) and was supported by the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) within the Ohio Department of Development, the Electric Power Research Institute?s Environmental Control Technology Center (EPRI-ECTC) and Babcock and Wilcox - a McDermott Company (B&W). This report covers the results of the first phase of this program. This Phase I project has been a two year effort. Phase I includes two experimental tasks. One task dealt principally with the pollutant removal capabilities of the IFGT at a scale of about 1.2MWt. The other task studied the durability of the Teflon covering to withstand the rigors of abrasive wear by fly ash emitted as a result of coal combustion. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The coals tested included high, medium and low-sulfur coals. The flue gas pollutants studied included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was investigated. These test results demonstrated that the IFGT system is an effective device for both acid gas absorption and fine particulate collection. Although soda ash was shown to be the most effective reagent for acid gas absorption, comparative cost analyses suggested that magnesium enhanced lime was the most promising avenue for future study. The durability of the Teflon covered heat exchanger tubes was studied on a pilot-scale single- stage condensing heat exchanger (CHX ). This device was operated under typical coal-fired flue gas conditions on a continuous basis for a period of approximately 10 months. Data from the test indicate that virtually no decrease in Teflon thickness was observed for the coating on the first two rows of heat exchanger tubes, even at high inlet particulate loadings. Evidence of wear was present only at the microscopic level, and even then was very minor in severity.

B.J. JANKURA; G.A. KUDLAC; R.T. BAILEY

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Fundamental Consideration on NOx Adsorber Technology for DI Diesel Application  

SciTech Connect

Diesel engines are far more efficient than gasoline engines of comparable size, and emit less greenhouse gases that have been implicated in global warming. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15 ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same low emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulation. Achieving such low emissions cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOx and particulate matter (PM) aftertreatment control devices. There is a widespread consensus that NOx adsorbers and particulate filter are required in order for diesel engines to meet the 2007 emissions regulations for NOx and PM. In this paper, the key exhaust characteristics from an advanced diesel engine are reviewed. Development of the NOx adsorber technology is discussed. Spectroscopic techniques are applied to understand the underlying chemical reactions over the catalyst surface during NOx trapping and regeneration periods. In-situ surface probes are useful in providing not only thermodynamic and kinetics information required for model development but also a fundamental understanding of storage capacity and degradation mechanisms. The distribution of various nitration/sulfation species is related to surface basicity. Surface displacement reactions of carbonates also play roles in affecting the trapping capability of NOx adsorbers. When ultralow-S fuel is used as a reductant during the regeneration, sulfur induced performance degradation is still observed in an aged catalyst. Other possible sources related to catalyst deactivation include incomplete reduction of surface nitration, coke formation derived from incomplete hydrocarbon burning, and lubricant formulations. Sulfur management and the direction of future work for the successful implementation of such integrated engine and aftertreatment technology are discussed. SAE Paper SAE-2002-01-2889 {copyright} 2002 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

Fang, Howard L.; Huang, Shyan C.; Yu, Robert C. (Cummins, Inc.); Wan, C. Z. (Engelhard Corp.); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A summary of SNCR applications to two coal-fired wet bottom boilers  

SciTech Connect

In response to NO{sub x} reductions mandated under Title I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), Public Service Electric & Gas and Atlantic Electric of New Jersey evaluated Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for NO{sub x} control under separate programs at Mercer Station and B.L. England Station, respectively. Mercer Station is comprised of twin 321 MW Foster Wheeler coal-fired wet bottom boilers, with natural gas capability up to 100% load. B.L. England Station has three units, two of which are cyclone boilers of 136 MW and 163 MW. These furnace designs are of particular interest in that nominally 23,000 MW of cyclone boiler capacity and 6,900 MW of wall- or turbo-fired wet bottom boiler capacity will be faced with NO{sub x} reductions to be mandated under Title IV - Phase II for Group II boilers. Both stations evaluated Nalco Fuel Tech`s SNCR system using a portable test skid, with urea as the reducing chemical. The Mercer Unit 2 demonstration was performed with a low sulfur coal (nominally 0.8%), while the B.L. England Unit 1 demonstration utilized a medium sulfur coal (nominally 2.4%), and also re-injects fly ash back into the cyclones for ultimate collection and removal as slag. To address concerns over potential Ljungstrom air heater fouling, due to reactions between ammonia and SO{sub 3} in the air heater, and fly ash salability at Mercer Station, both sites targeted no greater than 5-10 ppmv ammonia emissions at the economizer exit. At Mercer Unit 2, air heater fouling was only experienced during system start-up when the ammonia emissions at the economizer exit were estimated at levels approaching 60 ppmv. B.L. England Unit 1, however, experienced frequent fouling of the air heater. NO{sub x} reductions achieved at both sites ranged between 30%-40% from nominal baseline NO{sub x} levels of 1.1-1.6 lb/MMBtu. Each site is currently undergoing installation of commercial SNCR systems.

Himes, R.; Hubbard, D.; West, Z. [Carnot, Tustin, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Emissions and fuel economy of a vehicle with a spark-ignition, direct-injection engine : Mitsubishi Legnum GDI{trademark}.  

SciTech Connect

A 1997 Mitsubishi Legnum station wagon with a 150-hp, 1.8-L, spark-ignition, direct-injection (SIDI) engine was tested for emissions by using the FTP-75, HWFET, SC03, and US06 test cycles and four different fuels. The purpose of the tests was to obtain fuel-economy and emissions data on SIDI vehicles and to compare the measurements obtained with those of a port-fuel-injection (PFI) vehicle. The PFI vehicle chosen for the comparison was a 1995 Dodge Neon, which meets the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) emissions goals of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) less than 0.125 g/mi, carbon monoxide (CO) less than 1.7 g/mi, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} ) less than 0.2 g/mi, and particulate matter (PM) less than 0.01 g/mi. The Mitsubishi was manufactured for sale in Japan and was not certified to meet current US emissions regulations. Results show that the SIDI vehicle can provide up to 24% better fuel economy than the PFI vehicle does, with correspondingly lower greenhouse gas emissions. The SIDI vehicle as designed does not meet the PNGV goals for NMHC or NO{sub x} emissions, but it does meet the goal for CO emissions. Meeting the goal for PM emissions appears to be contingent upon using low-sulfur fuel and an oxidation catalyst. One reason for the difficulty in meeting the NMHC and NO{sub x} goals is the slow (200 s) warm-up of the catalyst. Catalyst warm-up time is primarily a matter of design. The SIDI engine produces more NMHC and NO{sub x} than the PFI engine does, which puts a greater burden on the catalyst to meet the emissions goals than is the case with the PFI engine. Oxidation of NMHC is aided by unconsumed oxygen in the exhaust when the SIDI engine operates in stratified-charge mode, but the same unconsumed oxygen inhibits chemical reduction of NO{sub x} . Thus, meeting the NO{sub x} emissions goal is likely to be the greatest challenge for the SIDI engine.

Cole, R. L.; Poola, R. B.; Sekar, R.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

main challenge is distributing the product. ULSD moves through the same pipelines and tanks as other petroleum products, including those with very high sulfur content, such as...

292

Analysis of power generation processes using petcoke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Petroleum coke or petcoke, a refinery byproduct, has generally been considered as an unusable byproduct because of its high sulfur content. However energy industries now (more)

Jayakumar, Ramkumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

inventory of heating fuels, including heating oil (high-sulfur distillate fuel) and propane, plunged to near historical low levels at the end of March 2003. Preliminary March...

294

Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ports. Emissions from marine engines and fuel sulfur contentuse of high sulfur fuels in marine engines. This researchto lower sulfur fuels such as marine distillate oil (MDO)

Jayaram, Varalakshmi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant  

SciTech Connect

In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2001 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE HELD AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, N.Y., APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2001.  

SciTech Connect

BNL is proud to acknowledge all of our 2001 sponsors, with their help and support this has correctly become an oilheat industry conference. It is quite gratifying to see an industry come together to help support an activity like the technology conference, for the benefit of the industry as a whole and to celebrate the beginning of the National Oilheat Research Alliance. This meeting is the fourteenth oil heat industry technology conference to be held since 1984 and the first under a new name, NORA, the National Oilheat research Alliance, and the very first in the new century. The conference is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Program. The Oilheat Research Program at BNL is under the newly assigned program management at the Office of Power Technology within the US DOE. The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation. Seventeen technical presentations will be made during the two-day program, all related to oil-heat technology and equipment, these will cover a range of research, developmental, and demonstration activities being conducted within the United States and Europe, including: (1) High-flow Fan Atomization Burner (HFAB) Development and Field Trials; (2) Field Test of the Flame Quality Monitor; (3) NORA/DOE/ BNL Oilheat Five-Year Research Plan; (4) US Department of Energy's Building Cooling Heating and Power for Buildings Program; (5) NORA Education Committee Report; (6) Marketing Oil Heat in Europe: A study in contrasts; (7) Diagnosing Burner Problems with Recorded Data ''The solution to any problem is obvious.. . once it is found''; (8) Variable Firing Rate Oil Burner Using Pulse Fuel Flow Control; (9) Oil-Fired Hydronic Heating Appliances with Reduced Electric Power Consumption and Battery Backup; (10) Peep Into The Nozzle Using Computational Fluid Dynamics; (11) Results of a Parametric Investigation of Spray Characteristics Using a HFAB Type Atomizer; (12) Progression and Improvements in the Design of Blue-flame Oil Burners; (13) Biodiesel as a Heating Oil Blend Stock; (14) Lab Tests of Biodiesel Blends in Residential Heating Equipment; (15) Alternative Fuel Oils and the Effect of Selected Properties in Combustion; (16) New York State Premium Low-Sulfur Heating Fuel Marketplace Demonstration; and (17)The Need for a New Fuel Oil Stability Specification.

MCDONALD, R.J.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

FISCAL YEAR 2006 REPORT ON ELECTROLYZER COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In FY05, testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) explored a low temperature fuel cell design concept for the SDE. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small volumetric footprint that is crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. A key component of the SDE is the ion conductive membrane through which protons produced at anode migrate to the cathode and react to produce hydrogen. An ideal membrane for the SDE should have both low ionic resistivity and low sulfur dioxide transport. These features allow the electrolyzer to perform at high currents with low potentials, along with preventing contamination of both the hydrogen output and poisoning of the catalysts involved. Another key component is the electrocatalyst material used for the anode and cathode. Good electrocatalysts should be chemically stable and low overpotential for the desired electrochemical reactions. This report summarizes results from activities to evaluate different membrane and electrocatalyst materials for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for ionic resistance and sulfur dioxide transport including perfluorinated sulfonic acid, sulfonated poly-etherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole membranes. Of these membrane types, the poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membrane, Celtec-L, exhibited the best combination of characteristics for use in an SDE. Testing examined the activity and stability of platinum and palladium as electrocatalyst for the SDE in sulfuric acid solutions. Cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry revealed that platinum provided better catalytic activity with much lower potentials and higher currents than palladium. Testing also showed that the catalyst activity is strongly influenced by concentration of the sulfuric acid. Various cell configurations were examined with respect to the deposition of electrocatalyst and use of conductive carbon materials such as carbon cloth and carbon paper. Findings from these evaluations and the results of the membrane and electrocatalyst testing, we prepared three different membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for electrolyzer testing. The first MEA consisted of a Nafion{reg_sign} membrane with platinum electrocatalyst deposited on carbon cloths, which were heat pressed onto the membrane, an assembly identical to those used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The second MEA also used a Nafion membrane with the electrocatalysts deposited directly onto the membrane. The third MEA proved similar to the second but utilized a PBI membrane in place of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane. Tailor of the membrane and catalysts properties for the SDE system was concluded as a required step for the technology to move forward. It was also recommended the evaluation of the tested and new developed materials at conditions closer to the SDE operating conditions and for longer period of time.

Colon-Mercado, H; David Hobbs, D; Daryl Coleman, D; Amy Ekechukwu, A

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

299

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

Turgut Gur

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Use of Ion Chromatography in the Evaluation of Densified Refuse-Derived Fuel as a Potential Alternative Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Department of Chemistry, University...pollutants during combustion. The binder-enhanced...high-sulfur coal decrease when...for sulfurrich coal as a fuel and...Department of Chemistry, University...pollutants during combustion. T h e binder-enhanced...high-sulfur coal decrease when......

Jen-Fon Jen; Kenneth E. Daugherty; James G. Tarter

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIS-0004: Coal Loan Guarantee Program (P.L. 94-163)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to address the potential impacts of implementing the Coal Loan Guarantee Program to encourage the production of low and high sulfur coal by small underground coal producers.

302

Analysis of power generation processes using petcoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum coke or petcoke, a refinery byproduct, has generally been considered as an unusable byproduct because of its high sulfur content. However energy industries now view petcoke as a potential feedstock for power generation because it has...

Jayakumar, Ramkumar

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

THE USE OF FERRIC SULFATE - ACID MEDIA FOR THE DESULFURIZATION OF MODEL COMPOUNDS OF COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 (W.Va. ) Sulfate Organic Ash (%) Coal (ref. 32) Total Sin slag or bottom ash, coal gasification or liquefaction asthe Sulfur and Ash Content of High-Sulfur Coals by Peroxide-

Clary, Lloyd R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

barrels, heating oil (high-sulfur distillate fuel) dropped by 3.4 million barrels, and propane declined by 4.1 million barrels. Of course, with crude oil refinery inputs at their...

305

Adsorption and Ultrasound-Assisted Sorbent Regeneration  

SciTech Connect

This work was conducted for the department of Energy. In this work, we developed a class of new sorbents that were highly sulfur selective and had high sulfur capacities. The study consisted of two sections. Development of the new sorbents is described in Section 1, and Section was a fundamental study, conducted for a better understanding for desulfurization of jet fuels. More details of the results are given blow separately for the two sections.

Yuhe Wang; Liping Ma; Ralph T. Yang

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Environmental Control Technologies - NOx Control Technologies Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology for the Control of NOx Emissions from High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers - Project Brief [PDF-247KB] Southern Company Services, Pensacola, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Innovative Clean Coal Technologies (ICCT) Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers Volume 1, Final Report [PDF-29MB] (Oct 1996) Volume 2, Appendices A-N [PDF-20.2MB] (Oct 1996) Volume 3, Appendices O-T [PDF-17.9MB] (Oct 1996) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Demonstration Of Selective Catalytic Reduction For The Control Of NOx Emissions From High-Sulfur Coal-Fired Boilers, Project Performance Summary [PDF-1.1MB] (Nov 2002)

309

EIS-0282: McIntosh Unit 4 TCFB Demonstration Project, Clean Coal Technology Program, Lakeland, Florida (also see EIS-0304)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The proposed project, selected under DOEs Clean Coal Technology Program, would demonstrate both Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) and Topped PCFB technologies. The proposed project would involve the construction and operation of a nominal 238 MWe (megawatts of electric power) combined-cycle power plant designed to burn a range of low- to high-sulfur coals.

310

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

311

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-specification ash generated from the combustion of high- sulfure coal. The coal combustion products used of the project indicate that high-carbon coal ash can be successfully used in porous base course applications is a Research Associate at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

312

Sulfur-induced greenhouse warming on early Mars Sarah Stewart Johnson,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 500 mbar CO2 with varying abundances of H2O and sulfur volatiles (H2S and SO2 mixing ratios of 10?3Sulfur-induced greenhouse warming on early Mars Sarah Stewart Johnson,1 Michael A. Mischna,2 melting model, we obtain a high sulfur solubility, approximately 1400 ppm, in Martian mantle melts. We

Zuber, Maria

313

The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. Kemmerer Mine coal blending facility  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Company`s Kemmerer Mine recently completed a new coal processing facility for blending the mine`s low, medium, and high sulfur coals to meet the needs of our customers. This article will discuss the geology; mining and market conditions that led to the need for this facility; design considerations; the construction; and the system`s controls and performance.

Mulhall, K.; Crank, G. [Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co., Kemmerer, WY (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g. organic and medical waste, drying, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Response to Comment on Environmental Implications on the Oxygenation of Gasoline with Ethanol in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motor vehicle population in the MAMC has a model-year distribution typical of developing countries:? Old cars (unequipped with any emissions control technology) make up a great portion of the total population. ... Recently, Mexico's economic stability and lower inflation rates have prompted motor vehicle dealers to lower their down payments and interest rates, thus making it feasible for low income people (e.g., those that own an old car) to buy a new one. ... We have reported recently that TWC performance in brand new vehicles deteriorates considerably after 60?000 km, either because of defective TWC materials or because of the high sulfur content of Mexican gasoline (8). ...

I. Schifter; M. Vera; L. Daz; E. Guzmn; F. Ramos; E. Lpez-Salinas

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project was to produce a feedstock from preparation plant fines from an Illinois (IL) coal that is ideal for a slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow coal gasifier. The high-sulfur content and high-Btu value of IL coals are Particularly advantageous in such a gasifier; preliminary-calculations indicate that the increased cost of removing sulfur from the gas from a high-sulfur coal is more than offset b the increased revenue from the sale of the elemental sulfur; additionally the high-Btu IL coal concentrates more energy into the slurry of a given coal to water ratio. The Btu is--higher not only because of the hither Btu value of the coal but also because IL coal requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal, i.e., as little as 30--35% water may be used for IL coal as compared to approximately 45% for most western coals. During the contract extension, additional coal testing was completed confirming the fact that coal concentrates can be made from plant waste under a variety of flotation conditions 33 tests were conducted, yielding an average of 13326 Btu with 9.6% ash while recovering 86.0%-Of the energy value.

Ehrlinger, H.P. III [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Lytle, J.M.; Frost, R.R.; Lizzio, A.A.; Kohlenberger, L.B.; Brewer, K.K. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)]|[DESTEC Energy (United States)]|[Williams Technologies, Inc. (United States)]|[Illinois Coal Association (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Effects of dilution conditions on diesel particle size distribution and filter mass measurements in case of marine fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Particle emission characteristics were studied from heavy-duty diesel engine operating on fuels with sulfur levels relevant to marine operation, i.e. 0.05% S and 3% S respectively. Effects of primary dilution temperature (PDT) and primary dilution ratio (PDR) were investigated together with effect of filter media and time of filter conditioning. PDT increase was found slowing down nucleation rate due to increase of saturation vapor pressures of volatile species. In turn, increasing PDR reduces partial pressure of exhaust species and hence weakens both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. All these effects are amplified by high sulfur content in marine fuels which increases available amount of nucleation-prone vapor-phase semivolatile compounds. At the same time, water condensation artifact was observed at PDR=3. No filter type was found to be overwhelmingly superior as certain positive and/or negative measurement artifacts are inherently associated with all filter materials. The filter conditioning time was also found to cause substantial PM mass variation, as control over VOC take up from (or lost to) laboratory air and hydration of sulfuric acid is required. The standard 24hour conditioning time was found insufficient to reach complete PM mass equilibrium, so longer time is required when measuring from high-sulfur fuels.

Sergey Ushakov; Harald Valland; Jrgen B. Nielsen; Erik Hennie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Molecular cloning and sequence of the thdF gene involved in the thiophene and furan oxidation by Escherichia coli  

SciTech Connect

Since sulfur dioxide emission from burning high sulfur coals is a major contributor to acid rain, it is important to develop bacteria which are capable of efficiently removing the sulfur from coal before combustion. Inorganic sulfur can be removed from coal by certain strains of Thiobacillus or Sulfolobus; however the organic sulfur remains intransigent. Since high sulfur Illinois coals typically contain 60% to 70% of their sulfur in the form of the heterocyclic thiophene ring we have started to investigate the biodegradation of derivatives of thiophene and the corresponding oxygen heterocycle, furan. Our previous work resulted in the isolation of a triple mutant, NAR30, capable of oxidizing a range of furan and thiophene derivatives. However, NAR30 does not completely degrade thiophenes or furans and its oxidation of these compounds is slow and inefficient. We decided to clone the thd genes both in order to increase the efficiency of degradation and to investigate the nature of the reactions involved. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Alam, K.Y.; Clark, D.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

EIS-0282: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

282: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact 282: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0282: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project, Lakeland, Florida The proposed project, selected under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program, would demonstrate both Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) and Topped PCFB technologies. The proposed project would involve the construction and operation of a nominal 238 MWe (megawatts of electric power) combined-cycle power plant designed to burn a range of low- to high-sulfur coals. DOE/EIS-0282, Department of Energy, Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project, Lakeland, Florida (March

323

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Full- Scale Testing of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD Full-Scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control in Wet FGD The goal of this project is to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The two specific objectives of this project are 1) ninety percent (90%) total mercury removal and 2) costs below 1/4 to 1/2 of today's commercially available activated carbon mercury removal technologies. Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc's (B&W/MTI's) will demonstrate their wet scrubbing mercury removal technology (which uses very small amounts of a liquid reagent to achieve increased mercury removal) at two locations burning high-sulfur Ohio bituminous coal: 1) Michigan South Central Power Agency's (MSCPA) 55 MWe Endicott Station located in Litchfield, Michigan and 2) Cinergy's 1300 MWe Zimmer Station located near Cincinnati, Ohio.

324

Option A: This is a Sample Cover Title Without a Photo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the An Overview of the Overview of the An Overview of the Ultrasupercritical Boiler Ultrasupercritical Boiler Materials Development Materials Development Program Program Walt Mohn Walt Mohn Babcock & Wilcox Company Babcock & Wilcox Company Barberton, OH Barberton, OH 2 2 Goals of the USC Materials Consortium Goals of the USC Materials Consortium Identify advanced materials that achieve Identify advanced materials that achieve cost competitive, environmentally cost competitive, environmentally acceptable coal based electric power acceptable coal based electric power generation that includes the use of high generation that includes the use of high sulfur coals. sulfur coals. Enable domestic boiler manufacturers to Enable domestic boiler manufacturers to globally compete for the construction and globally compete for the construction and

325

NETL: Emissions Characterization - Adv. Low-NOx Burner Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization Advanced Low-NOx Burner Emissions Characterization The goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive, high-quality database characterizing PM2.5 emissions from utility plants firing high sulfur coals. The specific objectives are to: 1) develop and test an ultra low-NOx pulverized coal burner for plug-in retrofit applications without boiler wall tube modifications, 2) assess the impact of low-NOx PC burner operation on NOx and PM2.5 emissions, and 3) provide high-quality data to ensure that future PM2.5 regulations are based on good scientific information. The work will be performed in the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF), a 100 million Btu/hr near-full-scale facility located at the Alliance Research Center. Related Papers and Publications:

326

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processing of Fresh Feed Input Processing of Fresh Feed Input Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Catalytic Cracking The refining process of breaking down the larger, heavier, and more complex hydrocarbon molecules into simpler and lighter molecules. Catalytic cracking is accomplished by the use of a catalytic agent and is an effective process for increasing the yield of gasoline from crude oil. Catalytic cracking processes fresh feeds and recycled feeds. Catalytic Hydrocracking A refining process that uses hydrogen and catalysts with relatively low temperatures and high pressures for converting middle boiling or residual material to high-octane gasoline, reformer charge stock, jet fuel, and/or high grade fuel oil. The process uses one or more catalysts, depending upon product output, and can handle high sulfur feedstocks without prior desulfurization.

327

EIS-0282: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0282: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project, Lakeland, Florida The proposed project, selected under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program, would demonstrate both Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) and Topped PCFB technologies. The proposed project would involve the construction and operation of a nominal 238 MWe (megawatts of electric power) combined-cycle power plant designed to burn a range of low- to high-sulfur coals. DOE/EIS-0282, Department of Energy, Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project, Lakeland, Florida (March

328

Distillate Stocks are Low - Especially on the East Coast  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Distillate stocks are normally built during the summer for use during the winter as shown by the normal band. Currently, stocks are very low for this time of year. This graph shows East Coast inventories, which at the end of August, were well below the normal band (over 9 million barrels or 19% below the low end of the band). The East Coast is about 31% lower than its 10-year average level for this time of year. We focus on the East Coast (PADD 1 ) because this a region in which heating oil is a major winter fuel. Furthermore, the East Coast consumes almost 2/3 of the nation's heating oil (high sulfur distillate). December 1999 was the turning point. Stocks were well within the normal range through November 1999, but in December, they dropped below the

329

Distillate Stocks on the East Coast Were Very Low Entering Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: So, what happened last winter? At last year's SHOPP conference, my renowned colleague, Joanne Shore, warned of the potential for high prices. At this time last year, distillate stocks were very low. This graph shows East Coast inventories, which at the end of July 2000, were well below the normal band. We focus on the East Coast (PADD 1) because this is a region in which heating oil is a major winter fuel. Furthermore, the East Coast consumes almost 2/3 of the nation's heating oil (high sulfur distillate). East Coast stocks were well below normal last year from July through December, but then actually increased in January, when they typically decline. In fact, the increase was only the 2nd time East Coast distillate stocks have increased in January since EIA has kept PADD level data (1981)!

330

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Near-Zero Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Project No.: DE-NT0005341 Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment. Praxair Inc. will develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing coal-fired power plants retrofit with oxy-combustion technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and mercury (Hg) will be reduced by at least 99 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions will be reduced by greater than 90 percent without the need for wet flue gas desulfurization and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Two separate processes are proposed depending on the sulfur content of the coal. For high-sulfur coal, SO2 and NOx will be recovered as product sulfuric acid and nitric acid, respectively, and Hg will be recovered as

331

Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Future work to characterize flue gas simulations typically derived from low and high sulfur bituminous coal are being performed in a stepwise manner, to avoid the constant interruptions in testing that occur when leaks in the system are generated during temperature transitions. Specifically, chlorine concentration vs. mercury oxidation correlations will be developed for each catalyst. The contributions of temperature are also being investigated. SO2 oxidation is also being investigated for each test condition.

Thomas K. Gale

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Use of phosphate materials as ameliorants for acid mine drainage. Volume 1. The use of rock phosphate (apatite) for the amelioration of acid mine drainage from the mining of coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Acid mine drainage is the primary environmental problem facing the high sulfur coal mining industry in West Virginia, parts of western Pennsylvania, Ohio, western Kentucky and Illinois. Earlier experiments conducted by these investigators have shown that phosphate rock could be used to reduce the acidity of the waste to acceptable levels. Thus, it is believed that addition of phosphatic clays would not only reduce the acidity but also would add phosphate as a plant nutrient. In addition, it would improve the physical and chemical properties of these soils. Therefore, it was the specific objective of the research to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of both rock phosphate and phosphatic clay slurries in ameliorating the acidity produced from waste materials through bench scale and small field scale experiments and to test the effectiveness of phosphatic clays as a topical additive to mine soils.

Renton, J.J.; Stiller, A.H.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study  

SciTech Connect

Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation and demonstration of the chemically active fluid bed. Final report May 75-Jul 81  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of the operation of a 17-MW Chemically Active Fluid Bed (CAFB) demonstration unit, retrofitted to a natural gas boiler. The CAFB process gasifies high-sulfur, high-metals-content liquid and solid fuels. Residual oil, lignite, and bituminous coal were gasified separately or together between November 1979 and June 1981. Design and operational areas where upgrading would be beneficial were identified. Continuous monitors were used to measure boiler flue gas emissions of SO2, NOx, CO, oxygen, CO2, and opacity. Periodic manual emission tests were conducted for particulate, SO2, and NOx, using EPA reference methods. Emissions of these three criteria pollutants were generally lower than New Source Performance Standards for utility boilers, although occasionally excessive particulate and SO2 emissions were observed. NOx emissions were consistently lower than those from natural gas combustion. Results of detailed chemical analyses and biological assays are reported.

Sommer, R.E.; Werner, A.S.; Kowszun, Z.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Combustion of Illinois coals and chars with natural gas. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Combined combustion of coal and natural gas offers advantages compared to burning coal or natural gas alone. For example, low volatile coals (or chars) derived from treatment or gasification processes can be of limited use due to their poor flammability characteristics. However, the use of natural gas in conjunction with the solid fuel can provide the necessary ``volatiles`` to enhance the combustion. Also, natural gas provides a clean cofiring fuel source which can enhance the usefulness of coals with high sulfur content. Addition of natural gas may reduce SO{sub x} emissions through increased sulfur retention in the ash and reduce NO{sub x} emissions by varying local stoichiometry and temperature levels. This research program addresses the contributions and the mechanisms of cofiring natural gas with Illinois coal through studies of particle ignition, burning rates and ash characterization.

Buckius, R.O.; Peters, J.E.; Krier, H. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

City of Springfield's CWLP Dallman 4 earns Power's highest honor  

SciTech Connect

City Water, Light and Power (CWLP), the municipal utilities agency of the City of Springfield, Illinois, determined that coal-fired generation was its best alternative for providing long-term reliable and economic electricity to the city's residents. For negotiating an unprecedented agreement with the Sierra Club that allowed the project to move forward, for choosing the latest in coal-fired technology and air quality control systems as the foundation for the city's comprehensive energy policy, and for assembling a tightly integrated team that completed the project well before the contractual dealing and under budget, CWLP's Dallman 4 is awarded Power magazine's 2009 Plant of the Year award. The 200 MW net Dallman unit 4 removes 99% SIO{sub 2}, 95% of the NOx formed when burning high sulfur Illinois coal, as well as 90% of the mercury in the stack gas. The unit is 34% more efficient than the Lakeside units it replaced. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Peltier, R.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project. Final report, March 1, 1994--March 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Demonstration Plant was the first utility-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor to operate in combined-cycle mode in the US. The 45-year old pulverized coal plant was repowered with PFBC components in order to demonstrate that PFBC combined-cycle technology is an economic, reliable, and environmentally superior alternative to conventional technology in using high-sulfur coal to generate electricity. The three-year demonstration period started on February 28, 1991 and terminated on February 28, 1994. The fourth year of testing started on March 1, 1994 and terminated on March 30, 1995. This report reviews the experience of the 70-MW(e), Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant during the fourth year of operation.

Bauer, D.A.; Hoffman, J.D.; Marrocco, M.; Mudd, M.J.; Reinhart, W.P.; Stogran, H.K. [American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

User converts gas boiler to fluidized bed to save $1. 5M  

SciTech Connect

Retrofitting a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) system may allow Clayton Foods Inc. to reduce its annual fuel bill by $1.5 million when the system comes on line in 1986. The system will burn low-grade, high-sulfur coal instead of natural gas, and should pay back the $4.1 million investment in under five years. The dual bed design separates the chemical processes of combustion and desulfurization into two chambers, which allows smaller-sized combustors that achieve high efficiencies in less time than conventional, single-bed fluidized bed boilers. Possible limitations prevent other manufacturers from making the dual-bed system. The Wormser unit is the only retrofit application of this technology in an industrial setting.

Springer, N.

1985-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Gasifier feed: Tailor-made from Illinois coals. Interim final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project is to produce a feedstock from preparation plant fines from an Illinois coal that is ideal for a slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow coal gasifier. The high sulfur content and high Btu value of Illinois coals are particularly advantageous in such a gasifier; preliminary calculations indicate that the increased cost of removing sulfur from the gas from a high sulfur coal is more than offset by the increased revenue from the sale of the elemental sulfur; additionally the high Btu Illinois coal concentrates more energy into the slurry of a given coal to water ratio. The Btu is higher not only because of the higher Btu value of the coal but also because Illinois coal requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal, i.e., as little as 30--35% water may be used for Illinois coal as compared to approximately 45% for most western coals. Destec Energy, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dow Chemical Company, will provide guidelines and test compatibility of the slurries developed for gasification feedstock. Williams Technologies, Inc., will provide their expertise in long distance slurry pumping, and test selected products for viscosity, pumpability, and handleability. The Illinois State Geological Survey will study methods for producing clean coal/water slurries from preparation plant wastes including the concentration of pyritic sulfur into the coal slurry to increase the revenue from elemental sulfur produced during gasification operations, and decrease the pyritic sulfur content of the waste streams. ISGS will also test the gasification reactivity of the coals.

Ehrlinger, H.P. III; Lytle, J.; Frost, R.R.; Lizzio, A.; Kohlenberger, L.; Brewer, K. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sulfate formation in oil-fired power plant plumes. Volume 1. Parameters affecting primary sulfate emissions and a model for predicting emissions and plume opacity. Final report  

SciTech Connect

High sulfuric acid emissions with concomitant acid smuts and plume opacity concerns at oil fired utility boilers has been associated with combustion of high sulfur-, high vanadium-containing fuel. The purpose of this program was to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the formation of flue gas H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and metal sulfates (MSO/sub 4/) and to determine the extent by which operating and controls parameters as well as the composition of the fuel affected those emissions. More than 200 flue gas measurements were made at a number of oil fired units and one coal fired unit, providing emissions levels of SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, MSO/sub 4/, total suspended particulate, and NO/sub x/. Parameters shown to significantly affect H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions were furnace O/sub 2/ level, sulfur and vanadium content of the fuel, the amount of corrosion inhibitor added to the oil, power level, and the composition of the fly ash. Correlations were developed which related the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions at oil fired units with the parameters above; predictions of emissions appear to be accurate to within +-25%. Based on limited data from the literature, the correlations were extended to include a means for predicting plume opacity and in-stack opacity. Recommendations for controlling the levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MSO/sub 4/ emissions as well as maintaining utility units in compliance with opacity regulations were made. Future research needs were indicated, including more studies relating H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ levels in flue gas with plume opacity and emissions studies at coal fired units. 85 references, 27 figures, 23 tables.

Dietz, R.N.; Wieser, R.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Stabilization of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to determine the rates of reactions involving partially sulfided dolomite and oxygen, which is needed for the design of the reactor system for the stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals. To achieve this objective, samples of partially sulfided dolomite were reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions in a fluidized-bed reactor. The effect of external diffusion was eliminated by using small quantities of the sorbent and maintaining a high flow rate of the reactant gas. The reacted sorbents were analyzed to determine the extent of conversion as a function of operating variables including sorbent particle size, reaction temperature and pressure, and oxygen concentration. The results of sulfation tests indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increasing temperature, increasing oxygen partial pressure, and decreasing sorbent particle size. The rate of the sulfation reaction can be described by a diffuse interface model where both chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion control the reaction rate. The kinetic model of the sulfation reaction was used to determine the requirements for the reactor system, i.e., reactor size and operating conditions, for successful stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals (with in-bed desulfurization using calcium based sorbents). The results indicate that the rate of reaction is fast enough to allow essentially complete sulfation in reactors with acceptable dimensions. The optimum sulfation temperature appears to be around 800{degrees}C for high pressure as well as atmospheric stabilization of the spent sorbents.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Rue, D.M.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Oil gravity segregation in the Monterey formation, California  

SciTech Connect

The Monterey Formation is a fractured siliceous shale that is the principal reservoir and source rock for oil fields in the Santa Maria basin and the western Santa Barbara Channel. Monterey crudes in producing offshore fields are high-sulfur oils that range from 10[degrees] to 35[degrees] API. The oils in Monterey fractured reservoirs display a systematic increase in API gravity with increasing height above the oil-water contact. The rate of change in API gravity with depth in Monterey oil fields generally ranges from 0.5[degrees] to 1.2[degrees] API/100 ft. The oil-water contact usually occurs at an oil gravity of 10[degrees] API (the gravity at which the density of the oil and the water is equal). The maximum API gravity in a Monterey oil field is related to the level of thermal exposure experienced by the formation in the adjacent depocenter. Monterey oils are sourced by high-sulfur kerogens that generate heavy oils at low levels of thermal exposure, but generate progressively higher gravity oils at higher levels of thermal maturity. Comparison of the maximum API gravity found in 33 Monterey-sourced oil fields with the maximum temperature experienced by the Monterey Formation within three miles of the field (the most likely migration distance) suggests that a temperature of 260[degrees]F (127[degrees]C) is required to generate 20[degrees] API oil, and a temperature of 330[degrees]F (166[degrees]C) is required to generate 30[degrees] API oil.

Hornafius, J.S. (Mobil Exploration and Producing, Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - SCNR Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNCR Field Demonstration SNCR Field Demonstration American Electric Power (AEP), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, FuelTech, the Ohio Coal Development Office, and fourteen EPRI member utilities, performed a full-scale demonstration of a urea-based Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system at Cardinal Unit 1. Cardinal Unit 1 is a 600MWe opposed-wall dry bottom pulverized coal-fired boiler that began service in 1967. This unit burns eastern bituminous high-sulfur coal, (3.72%S). This unit was retrofitted with low NOx burners (LNB's) during its scheduled fall 1998 outage and the SNCR system was installed concurrently. SNCR is a post-combustion NOx control process developed to reduce NOx emissions from fossil-fuel combustion systems. SNCR processes involve the injection of a chemical containing nitrogen into the combustion products, where the temperature is in the range of 1600°F - 2200°F (870°C - 1205°C). In this temperature range, the chemical reacts selectively with NOx in the presence of oxygen, forming primarily nitrogen and water. Although a number of chemicals have been investigated and implemented for SNCR NOx reduction, urea and ammonia have been most widely used for full-scale applications.

352

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Supported-sorbent injection. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A new retrofitable, wastefree acid-rain control concept was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s high-sulfur coal-fired R.E. Burger generating station at the 2-MWe level. During the project, moistened {open_quotes}supported{close_quotes} sorbents, made from a combination of lime and vermiculite or perlite, were injected into a humidified 6,500-acfm flue-gas slipstream. After the sorbents reacted with the sulfur dioxide in the flue gas, they were removed from ductwork with a cyclone and baghouse. The $1.0 million project was co-funded by Sorbent Technologies Corporation, the Ohio Edison Company, and the Ohio Coal Development Office. The project included a preliminary bench-scale testing phase, construction of the pilot plant, parametric studies, numerous series of recycle tests, and a long-term run. The project proceeded as anticipated and achieved its expected results. This duct injection technology successfully demonstrated SO{sub 2}-removal rates of 80 to 90% using reasonable stoichiometric injection ratios (2:1 Ca:S) and approach temperatures (20-25F). Under similar conditions, dry injection of hydrated lime alone typically only achieves 40 to 50% SO{sub 2} removal. During the testing, no difficulties were encountered with deposits in the ductwork or with particulate control, which have been problems in tests of other duct-injection schemes.

Nelson, S. Jr.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Health Hazard Evaluation determination report HHE 81-000-113, Martin-Marietta Cement, Tulsa, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the United Cement, Lime, Gypsum and Allied Workers Union Local 421, an investigation was made of possible health hazards occurring from the burning of high sulfur coal which exposed workers to sulfur-dioxide, carbon-dioxide, and hydrogen-sulfide at Martin-Marietta Cement, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mail questionnaires were sent to employees prior to a hazard survey, and were followed up with medical interviews focusing on neurological symptoms, syncope, strokes, chest pain, and mucous membrane irritation. Environmental samples were collected for sulfur-dioxide, sulfates, sulfites, carbon-monoxide, nitrogen-dioxide, and hydrogen-sulfide, and measured predominately in work areas near the back end of the kiln. Eighteen of 29 questionnaire respondents and 20 of 21 interviewed workers reported mucous membrane irritation compatible with sulfur-dioxide exposure. The NIOSH recommended limit for sulfur-dioxide was 0.5ppm as a time weighted average. The authors conclude that a health hazard did exist at the time of the survey, and recommend that controls be implemented to minimize sulfur-dioxide exposure in the facility.

Sanderson, W.; Hodgson, M.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sulfur-deactivated steam reforming of gasified biomass  

SciTech Connect

The effect of hydrogen sulfide on the stream reforming of methane has been studied. Methane is the most difficult component to convert by steam reforming in the mixture of hydrocarbons, which is produced in biomass gasification. Two catalysts were subjected to hydrogen sulfide levels up to 300 ppm so as to study the effect of sulfur on their deactivation. These catalysts were the C11-9-061, from United Catalyst Inc., and the HTSR1, from Haldor Topsoee. The activation energy of the sulfur-deactivated steam-reforming reaction was calculated to be 280 and 260 kJ/mol, for each catalyst, respectively. The high values most probably originate from the fact that the degree of sulfur coverage of the nickel surface is close to 1 for these experiments. Even under these severe conditions, steam reforming of methane is possible without any carbon formation. The HTSR1 catalyst exhibits a very high sulfur-free activity, resulting in a performance in the presence of hydrogen sulfide higher than that for the C11-9-061 catalyst. By using the HTSR1 catalyst, the reactor temperature can be lowered by 60 C in order to reach comparable levels of conversion.

Koningen, J.; Sjoestroem, K. [Kungl Tekniska Hoegskolan, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Kungl Tekniska Hoegskolan, Stockholm (Sweden)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Shawnee Test Program. TVA Shawnee Test Facility. Final technical report, December 26, 1980-May 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Tests were conducted on train 100 (spray tower) at the Shawnee Test Facility between December 26, 1980, and May 30, 1981. Objectives were, respectively, to demonstrate the ability to operate a limestone scrubber on flue gas from high-sulfur coal using adipic acid slurry additive and forced oxidation long term without scale buildup at >90% SO/sub 2/ removal; to obtain factorial test data on a limestone spray tower system using forced oxidation and adipic acid; to evaluate the effect of changing spray header height and direction in a spray tower on SO/sub 2/ removal; and to determine if sodium thiosulfate is effective as a slurry additive to inhibit sulfate scale buildup. Operating conditions were determined wherein acceptable SO/sub 2/ removal (90 percent minimum) could be obtained over a three month period using limestone and adipic acid with forced oxidation. Quantitative relationships between spray header height, spray direction, and SO/sub 2/ removal were obtained for a spray tower having multi-level spray headers. Sodium thiosulfate added at a rate to maintain a 250 ppM level in the scrubber slurry under specific operating conditions was found to inhibit crystallization of sulfate from solution and to remove sulfate scale buildup already in place.

Barkley, J.B.; Garrison, F.C.; Runyan, R.A.; Wells, W.L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Assessment of the impacts on health due to the emissions of Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high content of sulfur. Estimation of external costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel electricity generation has been demonstrated to be a main source of atmospheric pollution. The necessity of finding out a balance between the costs of achieving a lower level of environmental and health injury and the benefits of providing electricity at a reasonable cost have lead to the process of estimating the external costs derived from these impacts and not included in the electricity prices as a quantitative measure of it that, even when there are large uncertainties involved, can be used by decision makers in the process of achieving a global sustainable development. The external costs of the electricity generation in three Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high sulfur content have been assessed. With that purpose a specific implementation of the Impact Pathways Methodology for atmospheric emissions was developed. Dispersion of atmospheric pollutants is modeled at local and regional scales in a detailed way. Health impacts include mortality and those morbidity effects that showed relation with the increment of selected pollutant concentration in national studies. The external cost assessed for the three plants was 40,588,309USDyr?1 (min./max.: 10,194,833/169,013,252), representing 1.06USDCentkWh?1. Costs derived from sulfur species (SO2 and sulfate aerosol) stand for 93% of the total costs.

L. Turts Carbonell; E. Meneses Ruiz; M. Snchez Gcita; J. Rivero Oliva; N. Daz Rivero

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly stringent US federal and state limits on mercury emissions form coal-fired power plants demand optimal mercury control technologies. This article summarises the successful removal of mercury emissions achieved with activated carbon injection and boiler bromide addition, technologies nearing commercial readiness, as well as several novel control concepts currently under development. It also discusses some of the issues standing in the way of confident performance and cost predictions. In testing conducted on western coal-fired units with fabric filters or TOXECON to date, ACI has generally achieved mercury removal rates > 90%. At units with ESPs, similar performance requires brominated ACI. Alternatively, units firing western coals can use boiler bromide addition to increase flue gas mercury oxidation and downstream capture in a wet scrubber, or to enhance mercury removal by ACI. At eastern bituminous fired units with ESPs, ACI is not as effective, largely due to SO{sub 3} resulting from the high sulfur content of the coal or the use of SO{sub 3} flue gas conditioning to improve ESP performance. 7 refs., 3 figs.

Chang, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Desulfurization of coal: enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development in viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions that otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidation for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful, this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal.

Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Coal upgrading program for Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic: Task 8.3. Topical report, October 1994--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Coal has been a major energy source in the Czech Republic given its large coal reserves, especially brown coal and lignite (almost 4000 million metric tons) and smaller reserves of hard, mainly bituminous, coal (over 800 million tons). Political changes since 1989 have led to the reassessment of the role of coal in the future economy as increasing environmental regulations affect the use of the high-sulfur and high-ash brown coal and lignite as well as the high-ash hard coal. Already, the production of brown coal has declined from 87 million metric tons per year in 1989 to 67 million metric tons in 1993 and is projected to decrease further to 50 million metric tons per year of brown coal by the year 2000. As a means of effectively utilizing its indigenous coal resources, the Czech Republic is upgrading various technologies, and these are available at different stages of development, demonstration, and commercialization. The purpose of this review is to provide a database of information on applicable technologies that reduce the impact of gaseous (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, volatile organic compounds) and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal in district and residential heating systems.

Young, B.C.; Musich, M.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mitsubishi FGD plants for lignite fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

In order to respond to the increasing electric energy demand for sustaining economic growth, construction of coal-fired thermal power plants worldwide is indispensable. As a countermeasure for environmental pollution which otherwise may reach a serious proportion from the operation of these plants, construction of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plants is being promoted. Among these power stations where lignite fuel is burnt, the FGD plants concerned have to be designed to cope with high gas volume and SO{sub x} concentration as well as violent fluctuations in their values caused by such features of lignite as high sulfur content, low calorific volume, and unstable properties. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) has received construction awards for a total of seven (7) FGD plants for lignite-fired boilers in succession starting from that for CEZ as, Czech Republic followed by those for EGAT, Thailand in 1993. All these plants are presently operating satisfactorily since successful completion of their performance tests in 1996. Further, a construction award of three (3) more FGD plants for lignite-fired boilers was received from ENDESA (Spain) in 1995 which are now being outfitted and scheduled to start commercial operation in 1998. In this paper, the authors discuss the outline design of FGD plants for lignite-fired boilers based on experience of FGD plants constructed since 1970 for heavy oil--as well as black coal-fired boilers, together with items confirmed from the operation and design guideline hereafter.

Kotake, Shinichiro; Okazoe, Kiyoshi; Iwashita, Koichiro; Yajima, Satoru

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Jointly Sponsored Research Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) program funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Under this program, which has been in place since Fiscal Year 1990, DOE makes approximately $2.5 million available each year to the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to fund projects that are of current interest to industry but which still involve significant risk, thus requiring some government contribution to offset the risk if the research is to move forward. The program guidelines require that at least 50% of the project funds originate from nonfederal sources. Projects funded under the JSRP often originate under a complementary base program, which funds higher-risk projects. The projects funded in Fiscal Year 1996 addressed a wide range of Fossil Energy interests, including hot-gas filters for advanced power systems; development of cleaner, more efficient processing technologies; development of environmental control technologies; development of environmental remediation and reuse technologies; development of improved analytical techniques; and development of a beneficiation technique to broaden the use of high-sulfur coal. Descriptions and status for each of the projects funded during the past fiscal year are included in Section A of this document, Statement of Technical Progress.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nanocomposite oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion of sulfur-contaminated synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion. We have previously demonstrated that the embedding of metal nanoparticles into a nanostructured ceramic matrix can result in unusually active and sinter-resistant nanocomposite oxygen carrier materials for CLC, which combine the high reactivity of metals with the high-temperature stability of ceramics. In the present study, we investigate the effect of H{sub 2}S in a typical coal-derived syngas on the stability and redox kinetics of Ni- and Cu-based nanostructured oxygen carriers. Both carriers show excellent structural stability and only mildly changed redox kinetics upon exposure to H{sub 2}S, despite a significant degree of sulfide formation. Surprisingly, partial sulfidation of the support results in a strong increase in oxygen carrier capacity in both cases because of the addition of a sulfide-sulfate cycle. Overall, the carriers show great potential for use in CLC of high-sulfur fuels. 21 refs., 13 figs. 1 tab.

Rahul D. Solunke; Goetz Veser [United States Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

Dennis Laudal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Sulfur-passivated nickel catalysts for carbon-free steam reforming of methane  

SciTech Connect

It has been observed that carbon-free steam reforming of methane can be obtained on a partly sulfur-passivated nickel catalyst under conditions which, without the presence of sulfur, would result in formation of whisker carbon. This effect has been studied by means of kinetic experiments and thermogravimetry. The kinetic data can be explained by simple blockage of the surface as reflected in the observed kinetic orders and activation energy. The studies of carbon formation confirm a threshold coverage of about 70% of full coverage below which the inhibition of carbon is not effective. Above this coverage, amorphous carbon structures may be formed at a very high carbon potentials. The retarding effect of sulfur on carbon formation is a dynamic phenomenon. Sulfur inhibits the rate of carbon formation more than the rate of the reforming reactions. The effects are explained by assuming that a large ensemble is involved in the nucleation of carbon, whereas the reforming reaction can proceed on the small ensembles left a high sulfur coverages. 6 figures, 6 tables.

Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Flue gas cleaning with ammonia reduces SO{sub 2} emission  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the technical and commercial development and basis for application in North America for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) of the AMASOX{reg_sign} (i.e. Ammonia Absorbs Sulfur Oxides) Process of Krupp Uhde (Germany) employing ammonia reagent. This process technology has been emerging slowly and stepwise over a twenty-year period in reaching the present stage of commercial applicability. The discussion herein considers the need for accommodating to and advantageously addressing the increasing number of applications with high and ultra-high flue-gas concentrations of SO{sub 2} at the boiler outlet accompanied by significant levels of other pollutants. Key measures in accomplishing this include use of important process innovations. This, as well, calls for the effective use, when applicable, of wet electrostatic precipitator mist-elimination means to gain low/minimum-opacity stack plume trailoff in wet scrubber use together with reduction of air toxics to low concentrations. With cost-effectiveness in electric utility service, detailed herein, superior to FGD processes commonly used to date in high-sulfur service, utilization of this technology is expanding. Important, potentially trend-setting types of powerplant applications of ammonia FGD are reviewed to identify foreseen market sectors and procurement trends that will at the same time serve to substantially broaden lowest-cost coal utilization.

Emish, G.J. [Krupp Wilputte Corp., Bridgeville, PA (United States); Schulte, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany); Ellison, W. [Ellison Consultants, Monrovia, MD (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Utilization of CFB fly ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

Disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler power plants. Recently, larger CFB boilers with generating capacities up to 300 MWe are currently being planned, resulting in increased volumes and disposal cost of ash by-product. Studies have shown that CFB ashes do not pose environmental concerns that should significantly limit their potential utilization. Many uses of CFB ash are being investigated by Foster Wheeler, which can provide more cost-effective ash management. Construction applications have been identified as one of the major uses for CFB ashes. Typically, CFB ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. However, CFB ashes can be used for other construction applications that require less stringent specifications including soil stabilization, road base, structural fill, and synthetic aggregate. In this study, potential construction applications were identified for fly ashes from several CFB boilers firing diverse fuels such as petroleum coke, refuse derived fuel (RDF) and coal. The compressive strength of hydrated fly ashes was measured in order to screen their potential for use in various construction applications. Based on the results of this work, the effects of both ash chemistry and carbon content on utilization potential were ascertained. Actual beneficial uses of ashes evaluated in this study are also discussed.

Conn, R.E.; Sellakumar, K.; Bland, A.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings  

SciTech Connect

Fireside corrosion, caused by liquid alkali-iron trisulfates, has been an obstacle to higher steam temperatures and to efficient utilization of high-sulfur coals. Tests simulating the environment in the superheater bank of a pulverized-coal-fired boiler were conducted on several promising new alloys and claddings. Alloys were exposed to a variety of synthetic ash and simulated flue gas compositions at 650 and 700{degrees}C for times ranging up to 800 hours. Included in the testing program were new high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, modified commercial alloys, lean stainless steels (modified Type 316) clad with high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, and intermetallic aluminides. Thickness loss measurements indicated that resistance to attach improved with increasing chromium level. Silicon and aluminum were also helpful in resisting attack, while molybdenum was detrimental to the resistance of the alloys to attack. Three different attack modes were observed on the alloys tested. Alloys with low resistance to attack exhibited uniform wastage, while pitting was observed in more resistant alloys. In addition to surface fluxing by molten alkali-iron trisulfates, subsurface sulfur penetration and intergranular attack also occurred.

Van Weele, S. (Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Fireside corrosion, caused by liquid alkali-iron trisulfates, has been an obstacle to higher steam temperatures and to efficient utilization of high-sulfur coals. Tests simulating the environment in the superheater bank of a pulverized-coal-fired boiler were conducted on several promising new alloys and claddings. Alloys were exposed to a variety of synthetic ash and simulated flue gas compositions at 650 and 700{degrees}C for times ranging up to 800 hours. Included in the testing program were new high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, modified commercial alloys, lean stainless steels (modified Type 316) clad with high-chromium/high-nickel alloys, and intermetallic aluminides. Thickness loss measurements indicated that resistance to attach improved with increasing chromium level. Silicon and aluminum were also helpful in resisting attack, while molybdenum was detrimental to the resistance of the alloys to attack. Three different attack modes were observed on the alloys tested. Alloys with low resistance to attack exhibited uniform wastage, while pitting was observed in more resistant alloys. In addition to surface fluxing by molten alkali-iron trisulfates, subsurface sulfur penetration and intergranular attack also occurred.

Van Weele, S. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Pinon Pine Power Project. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This annual report has been prepared to present the status of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a nominal 107 MWe (gross) coal-fired integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant addition to Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPCo) system. This project will also serve as a demonstration project cost-shared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and SPPCo under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The goal of the CCT Program is to demonstrate advanced coal utilization technologies that are energy efficient, reliable and able to achieve substantial reductions in emissions as compared with existing coal technologies. The Pinon Pine Power Project will demonstrate an IGCC system utilizing the Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) fluidized-bed gasification process operating in an air-blown mode with in-bed desulfurization and hot gas clean-up with a western bituminous coal as the design fuel. Testing will also be performed on a high-sulfur eastern coal. The Pinon Pine Power Project will be constructed and operated at SPPCo`s Tracy Power Station, an existing power generation facility located on a rural 724-acre plot approximately 17 miles east of Reno, NV. This new unit is designated as Tracy Unit No. 4.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hydrogenation of aromatics in synthetic crude distillates catalyzed by platinum supported in molecular sieves  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic hydrogenation of synthetic crude distillates from Canadian oil sands was carried out over platinum metal supported in pillared interlayered clay (PILC) and Y-zeolite. The molecular sieve supports were employed to modify the properties of dispersed platinum particles and improve their resistance to poisoning by sulfur. The objective was to reduce the distillate aromatic content to meet diesel emission control standards and cetane number requirements. Catalysts were prepared in a series of steps, and metal precursor was loaded using ion-exchange procedures. Characterization was done using X-ray diffraction, hydrogen chemisorption, and proton-induced X-ray emission elemental analysis. Catalytic hydrogenation reactions were carried out by processing distillate feedstocks both high (>100 ppm) and low (<10 ppm) in sulfur using a continuous-flow automated microreactor system. Experimental runs were performed to determine the reaction kinetics and Arrhenius parameters as a means of evaluating and comparing catalyst performance. Significant differences in catalyst activity were found. The Pt/Y-zeolite-alumina catalyst showed a much superior hydrogenation performance under conditions of high sulfur content. The extent of cracking and ring opening was also evaluated and was shown to be minimal under the operating conditions employed.

Kimbara, N.; Charland, J.P. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Wilson, M.F. [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)] [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Micronized coal-fired retrofit system for SO{sub x} reduction Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of a technical, financial and environmental assessment study for a project, which would have included a new TCS micronized coal-fired heating plant for the Produkcja I Hodowla Roslin Ogrodniczych (PHRO) Greenhouse Complex; Krzeszowice, Poland. Project site is about 20 miles west of Krakow, Poland. During the project study period, PHRO utilized 14 heavy oil-fired boilers to produce heat for its greenhouse facilities and also home heating to several adjacent apartment housing complexes. The boilers burn a high-sulfur content heavy crude oil, called mazute, The project study was conducted during a period extended from March 1996 through February 1997. For size orientation, the PHRO Greenhouse complex grows a variety of vegetables and flowers for the Southern Poland marketplace. The greenhouse area under glass is very large and equivalent to approximately 50 football fields, The new micronized coal fired boiler would have: (1) provided a significant portion of the heat for PHRO and a portion of the adjacent apartment housing complexes, (2) dramatically reduced sulfur dioxide air pollution emissions, while satisfying new Polish air regulations, and (3) provided attractive savings to PHRO, based on the quantity of displaced oil.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Crude oil to ethylene in one step  

SciTech Connect

Reports that the most important feature of the partial combustion cracking (PCC) process is its ability to convert heavy petroleum fractions to light olefins with minimum residue. Presents diagram of the PCC process; graph of feedstock cost vs. return on investment (ROI); and tables with average ethylene yields, cracking yields, and PCC vs. LPG and naphtha cracking. Finds that the 10% difference in capital between the PCC and the naphtha feed case is due mainly to the cost of the acid gas and sulfur handling sections required for the PCC, but not for a naphtha cracker. The very favorable ROI and ethylene costs are due to the relative difference in feedstock pricing. Sensitivity of ROI to changes in feedstock was also studied for the PCC cases. The ratio of cost of high-sulfur fuel oil (HSFO) to average crude price is used to indicate the substantial effect of feedstock price on the attractiveness of the project. Concludes that with HSFO at 85 to 100% of crude value, the PCC represents an excellent investment for future ethylene needs.

Kirk, R.O.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program Evaluation of the First Section Removed in November 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Reliant Energys Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

Dennis K. Mcdonald

376

Highly Attrition Resistant Zinc Oxide-Based Sorbents for H2S Removal by Spray Drying Technique  

SciTech Connect

Primary issues for the fluidized-bed/transport reactor process are high attrition resistant sorbent, its high sorption capacity and regenerability, durability, and cost. The overall objective of this project is the development of a superior attrition resistant zinc oxide-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Sorbents applicable to a fluidized-bed hot gas desulfurization process must have a high attrition resistance to withstand the fast solid circulation between a desulfurizer and a regenerator, fast kinetic reactions, and high sulfur sorption capacity. The oxidative regeneration of zinc-based sorbent usually initiated at greater than 600 C with highly exothermic nature causing deactivation of sorbent as well as complication of sulfidation process by side reaction. Focusing on solving the sorbent attrition and regenerability of zinc oxide-based sorbent, we have adapted multi-binder matrices and direct incorporation of regeneration promoter. The sorbent forming was done with a spray drying technique that is easily scalable to commercial quantity.

Ryu, C.K.; Lee, J.B.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, J.J.; Yi, C.K.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Characterization of fly ashes from circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boilers cofiring coal and petroleum coke  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry, mineralogy, morphology, and particle size distribution were investigated in fly ashes from the burning of Datong (ShanXi, China) bituminous coal and the cofiring of Mideast high-sulfur petroleum coke (PC) with 30:70 (cal %) and 50:50 (cal %) blends of Datong bituminous coal in two commercial CFBC boilers. With the exception of CaO, the amounts of major oxides in the fly ashes from cofiring PC and coal were close to those of the common coal fly ashes. The PC-coal fly ashes were enriched in Ni, V, and Mo, implying these trace elements were mainly derived from PC. Ni and V, along with several other elements, such as Cr, Cu, Se, Pb, U, Th, and possibly As and Cd, increased in content with a decrease in temperature of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The results of chemistry, mineralogy, and morphology studies suggested that the desulfurization rate of the CFBC boilers at current conditions was low, and the PC tends to coarsen the fly ash particles and increase the loss on ignition (LOI) values, making these fly ashes unsuitable for use as a cement additive or a mineral admixture in concrete. Further studies on the combustion status of the CFBC boilers are needed if we want to be able to increase the desulfurization rate and produce high-quality fly ashes for broader and full utilization. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Feihu Li; Jianping Zhai; Xiaoru Fu; Guanghong Sheng [Nanjing University, Nanjing (China). State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it will be the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. steel company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals f or such use.

Crelling, J.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

SciTech Connect

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 5. Appendix G. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix G, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Williamson, H.J.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Dunn, J.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 3. Appendices D and E. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendices D and E, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Minear, R.A.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Little, W.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 6. Appendix H. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix H, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes underlaboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Williamson, H.J.; Heinrich, D.L.; Grimshaw, T.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 7. Appendix I. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix 1, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Eklund, A.G.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Minear, R.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CANSOLV{reg_sign} system FGD: An alternative to limestone SO{sub 2} control in FBC  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the process chemistry, components, emissions, and by-products of the CANSOLV{reg_sign} System SO{sub 2} scrubbing technology, a regenerable process for economical, highly selective capture of SO{sub 2} from gas streams, with outlet SO{sub 2} concentration down to a few ppm if desired. In fluid bed combustors, the CANSOLV{reg_sign} System FGD process can be substituted for limestone injection, realizing significant cost savings. With CANSOLV{reg_sign} System Technology, the FGD by-product is pure, water saturated SO{sub 2} which can be used on site or sold as a commodity chemical or converted into sulfuric acid or sulfur. Since FGD costs with the CANSOLV{reg_sign} System process are only weakly sensitive to the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the feed gas, high sulfur low costs fuels including petroleum coke can be burned economically. Compared with limestone injection in FBC, the CANSOLV{reg_sign} System FGD process eliminates the need for limestone handling. Solid by-product volumes are very significantly reduced, simplifying both collection and disposal. Chemical consumption is essentially eliminated. The process generates a valuable by-product instead of a costly waste stream. Fuel costs can be minimized and significant operating cost savings can be expected. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Parisi, P.J.; Sarlis, J.N. [Cansolv Technologies Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

First-year's operation of a full-scale second-generation FBC in an industrial plant  

SciTech Connect

Data related to the operation of a two stage coal fired fluidized bed boiler installed for Iowa Beef Processors, Inc. Amarillo, Texas are presented. This steam generator, which has a rating of 70,000 lb/hr steam, 650 psig, is the large privately funded fluidized bed coal combustion installation in the United States. The facility includes a dual bed combustor, whereby the coal is burned in a lower bed containing steam tubes and sulfur dioxide is collected in an upper bed containing dolomite. Coal burns predominantly in the lower bed at relatively high temperatures while combustion is completed in the upper bed. The upper bed also improves sulfur capture by reacting with SO/sub 2/ generated in the freeboard, which would be difficult to capture in early designs for FBC packaged boilers. The two stage concept provides high combustion efficiency, low NO/sub X/ emissions, and high sulfur capture. The results of recent measurements of emissions of sulfur dioxide will be included in this presentation. 4 figures.

Baty, G.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 2. Appendices A through C. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report Appendices A through C, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Little, W.M.; Gibson, T.S.; Grimshaw, T.W.; Eklund, A.G.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 1. Final report. Report for June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, including 10 appendices, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Grimshaw, T.W.; Minear, R.A.; Eklund, A.G.; Little, W.M.; Dunn, J.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 4. Appendix F. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix F, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Eklund, A.G.; Grimshaw, T.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Assessment of fluidized-bed-combustion solid wastes for land disposal. Volume 8. Appendix J. Final report, June 1980-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

This report, Appendix J, gives results of: (1) an analysis of representative samples of fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) wastes, (2) an assessment of the characteristics of leachates generated from the wastes under laboratory and field (landfill) conditions, (3) a characterization of the attenuation of the leachates by earth materials that are typical of disposal settings, (4) development of a way to predict the leachate generation behavior of FBC wastes under landfill conditions on the basis of laboratory test results by establishing a rigorous statistical relationship between the laboratory and field-leaching results, and (5) assessment of the compatibility of commonly used landfill-liner materials with FBC waste leachates. FBC is an emerging energy technology that holds promise for both high efficiency of energy conversion and minimization of adverse air-quality impacts. A major advantage of FBC is that high-sulfur coal can be burned without the use of flue-gas desulfurization equipment to meet air-quality standards. The solid residues that are generated in an FBC unit are usually larger in volume and have different properties than the typical bottom ash from a conventional boiler.

Williamson, H.J.; South, R.C.; Grimshaw, T.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) an attractive option for NO{sub x} control in coal-fired power plants?  

SciTech Connect

Economics have been estimated for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on power plant boilers burning high sulfur bituminous coals. Costs are based on an SCR unit installed in the hot flue gas on the high-dust side of a 500 MW greenfield plant with a capacity factor of 65%. Uncontrolled NO{sub x} emissions are 1.0 lb/10{sup 6} Btu, with 80% removal of the inlet NO{sub x}. At a space velocity of 2,500/hr and a catalyst price of $370/ft{sup 3}, the total capital requirement is $55/kW. Recent improvements indicate that space velocity can be increased by about 30%, to about 3250/hr. Incorporating this value reduces total capital to about $50/kW. With a 4-year catalyst life, the levelized cost (on a current dollar basis) is 3.4 mills/kWh,m or $870/ton of NO{sub x} removed.

Baldwin, A.L.; Smith, D.N. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Mann, A.N.; McIlvried, H.G.; Rao, S.N. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

SRC-I naphtha octane study. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Octane numbers were measured by the engine method (RON and MON) and were calculated from gas chromatograms for eighteen gasoline samples comprising SRC-I and petroleum-derived raw gasoline, reformates, and selected blends of these materials. Conclusions derived from this work are: (1) Research and Motor Octane Numbers for blends of SRC-I liquids and of SRC-I liquids with petroleum gasoline components closely agree with the values calculated from linear combination of the measured RON and MON of the individual blend components. Although some interactions among the blend components were observed, these are not major and in all cases the 95% confidence interval of all of the individual points fall within the 95% confidence limits of linear blend correlation; (2) On the basis of octane numbers and blending characteristics, SRC-I straight run gasoline and SRC-I reformates are useful as blending components for the motor gasoline pool. In the case of the straight run gasoline, however, other factors such as its high sulfur content will impose a limitation to its direct use in the pool; and (3) Research Octane Numbers calculated from gas chromatograms agree closely with engine RON data for SRC-I gasolines. Accordingly, the GC method may be equally applicable to coal-derived and petroleum gasoline components.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Supercritical thermodynamics of sulfur and nitrogen species. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Significant opportunity exists for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) technology to coal processing, both for pretreatment of high sulfur coals, as well as liquefaction and treatment of coal liquids. Supercritical fluids are attractive solvents for a variety of coal processing applications because of their unusual solvating and mass transfer properties. Solubility studies have been carried out for a number of model coal and coal-liquid compounds, primarily in pure supercritical fluids. We have extended this database of model coal compound equilibria using modern techniques that have the advantage of being much more rapid than traditional techniques. Cosolvent effects on solubility have also been investigated over a variety of solvent properties. In addition, specific molecular interactions have been investigated through spectroscopic techniques. The resulting data has been used to develop a physical-chemical equation of state (EOS) model of SCF solutions with meaningful parameters. This equation of state model has been used to predict solubility behavior, which will permit the design and tailoring of SCF cosolvent systems for specific coal processing applications.

Eckert, C.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Reaction Engineering International (REI) managed a team of experts from University of Utah, Siemens Energy, Praxair, Vattenfall AB, Sandia National Laboratories, Brigham Young University (BYU) and Corrosion Management Ltd. to perform multi-scale experiments, coupled with mechanism development, process modeling and CFD modeling, for both applied and fundamental investigations. The primary objective of this program was to acquire data and develop tools to characterize and predict impacts of CO{sub 2} flue gas recycle and burner feed design on flame characteristics (burnout, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, mercury and fine particle emissions, heat transfer) and operational concerns (fouling, slagging and corrosion) inherent in the retrofit of existing coal-fired boilers for oxy-coal combustion. Experimental work was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Entrained Flow Reactor, the University of Utah Industrial Combustion Research Facility, and Brigham Young University. Process modeling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was performed at REI. Successful completion of the project objectives resulted in the following key deliverables: 1) Multi-scale test data from 0.1 kW bench-scale, 100 kW and 200 kW laboratory-scale, and 1 MW semi-industrial scale combustors that describe differences in flame characteristics, fouling, slagging and corrosion for coal combustion under air-firing and oxygen-firing conditions, including sensitivity to oxy-burner design and flue gas recycle composition. 2) Validated mechanisms developed from test data that describe fouling, slagging, waterwall corrosion, heat transfer, char burnout and sooting under coal oxy-combustion conditions. The mechanisms were presented in a form suitable for inclusion in CFD models or process models. 3) Principles to guide design of pilot-scale and full-scale coal oxy-firing systems and flue gas recycle configurations, such that boiler operational impacts from oxy-combustion retrofits are minimized. 4) Assessment of oxy-combustion impacts in two full-scale coal-fired utility boiler retrofits based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of air-fired and oxygen-fired operation. This research determined that it is technically feasible to retrofit the combustion system in an air-fired boiler for oxy-fired operation. The impacts of CO{sub 2} flue gas recycle and burner design on flame characteristics (burnout, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, mercury and fine particle emissions, heat transfer) and operational concerns (fouling, slagging and corrosion) were minimal, with the exception of high sulfur levels resulting from untreated flue gas recycle with medium and high-sulfur coals. This work focused on combustion in the radiant and convective sections of the boiler and did not address boiler system integration issues, plant efficiencies, impacts on downstream air pollution control devices, or CO{sub 2} capture and compression. The experimental data, oxy-firing system principles and oxy-combustion process mechanisms provided by this work can be used by electric utilities, boiler OEMs, equipment suppliers, design firms, software vendors, consultants and government agencies to assess retrofit applications of oxy-combustion technologies to existing boilers and to guide development of new designs.

Adams, Bradley; Davis, Kevin; Senior, Constance; Shim, Hong Shim; Otten, Brydger; Fry, Andrew; Wendt, Jost; Eddings, Eric; Paschedag, Alan; Shaddix, Christopher; Cox, William; Tree, Dale

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System  

SciTech Connect

On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new particulate filtration technologies. Major tasks during this period of the funded project's timeframe included: (1) Conducting pretests on a laboratory-scale simulated FBC system; (2) Completing detailed design of the bench-scale CFBC system; (3) Contracting potential bidders to fabricate of the component parts of CFBC system; (4) Assembling CFBC parts and integrating system; (5) Resolving problems identified during pretests; (6) Testing with available Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and co-firing of PRB coal with first wood pallet and then chicken wastes; and (7) Tuning of CFBC load. Following construction system and start-up of this 0.6 MW CFBC system, a variety of combustion tests using a wide range of fuels (high-sulfur coals, low-rank coals, MSW, agricultural waste, and RDF) under varying conditions were performed to analyze and monitor air pollutant emissions. Data for atmospheric pollutants and the methodologies required to reduce pollutant emissions were provided. Integration with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) slipstream unit did mimic the effect of flue gas composition, including trace metals, on the performance of the SCR catalyst to be investigated. In addition, the following activities were also conducted: (1) Developed advanced mercury oxidant and adsorption additives; (2) Performed laboratory-scale tests on oxygen-fuel combustion and chemical looping combustion; and (3) Conducted statistical analysis of mercury emissions in a full-scale CFBC system.

Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C. The body of this report compares these for all of the samples in the test section. The 'Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program' is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100 F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 29 months of operation. The second section was removed in August of 2003. Its evaluation has been completed and is the subject of this report. The final section remains in service and is expected to be removed in the spring of 2005. This paper describes the program; its importance, the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system, materials utilized, and experience to date. This report briefly reviews the results of the evaluation of the first section and then presents the results of the evaluation of the second section.

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project - honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. Most experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. Future work to characterize flue gas simulations typically derived from low and high sulfur bituminous coal will be performed in a stepwise manner, to avoid the constant interruptions in testing that occur when leaks in the system are generated during temperature transitions. Specifically, chlorine concentration vs. mercury oxidation graph will be developed for each catalyst. The contributions of temperature and later sulfur will be investigated after this is complete. Also, last quarter's tests showed a potential linear relationship between SO3 conversion and mercury oxidation. As a result, SO3 samples will be taken more frequently to investigate each catalyst's ability to selectively oxidize mercury.

Alex J. Berry; Thomas K. Gale

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1993--March 27, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE and the first two phases of the program are underway. To achieve the objectives of the program, a team of researchers was assembled. Phase I activities are focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water slurry fuels (MCWSFS) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. Phase II research and development activities will continue to focus on industrial boiler retrofit technologies by addressing emissions control and precombustion (i.e., slagging combustion and/or gasification) strategies for the utilization of high ash, high sulfur coals. Phase III activities will examine coal-based fuel combustion systems that cofire wastes. Each phase includes an engineering cost analysis and technology assessment. The activities and status of Phases I and II are described below. The objective in Phase I is to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWSF or DMC. This will be achieved through a program consisting of the following five tasks: (1) Coal Beneficiation and Preparation; (2) Combustion Performance Evaluation; (3) Engineering Design; (4) Engineering and Economic Analysis; and (5) Final Report/Submission of Design Package.

Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Sharifi, R.; Shepard, J.F.; Scaroni, A.W.; Hogg, R.; Chander, S.; Cho, H.; Ityokumbul, M.T.; Klima, M.S. [and others

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks  

SciTech Connect

The kerogen types and pyrolysis kinetics of several Chinese carbonate source rocks are studied in this paper. Samples involved are from Proterozoic to Neogene, including marine and lacustrine environments. Their TOC range from 0.15% to 1.69%. The carbonate contents are more than 80% except the Paleozoic Pingliang marl, Shanganning Basin. The maturations range from immature to late stage of oil generation. The Green River calcareous shale and Ghareb marl, Jordan are included for comparison. The study of kerogen types is based on analyses of kerogens including: optical method, elemental analysis, infrared spectrum, rock eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and C-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. The results of the study shows that most of the kerogens studied belong to type 1 or sapropelic type 2 (2a), while the kerogens from Triassic Qinglong limestone (restricted by), Jiangsu and Neogene Guantao limestone (small fault lacustrine), Shandong belong to mixed type 2 (2b). The study of pyrolysis kinetics is based on standard Rock Eval information (5 C/min.), a two-stage first order reaction model and optimization method which has been confirmed to be a simple, practical and effective method by a previous study. The current study reveals that different kerogen types have their own kinetic characteristics. Generally, kinetics parameters of type 1 and type 2a kerogens are greater than those of type 2b. However, high-sulfur type 1 and type 2a kerogens, such as those from Ghareb marl, Jordan, and Proterozoic kerogen, North China have relatively low kinetics parameters. The study also shows that kerogens with similar hydrocarbon potential (HI) and elemental composition (atomic H/C, O/C) may have very different kinetic processes.

Zhang, Youcheng (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography); Shisheng Hao (Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Geosciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-sulfur low-sulfur high-sulfur" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Assessment of the corrosivity of crude fractions from varying feedstock  

SciTech Connect

Crude corrosivity is becoming a critical issue because of frequent variation of feedstock based on spot market opportunities and high sulfur and naphthenic acid content of low cost crudes. The choice of remediation methods (blending, inhibition, upgrading, and/or process changes) depends on accurate prediction of the corrosivity of these crudes. This paper presents the results of autoclave and flow loop runs conducted to assess the corrosivity of Middle East, Shengli, and Bachequero-13 crudes fractions on several materials used in refinery construction. Autoclave tests were conducted in vacuum heater feed line (VHFL) and Asphalt`s fractions from each crude and in atmospheric gas oil (AGO) and heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) from the Bachequero-13. Flow loop tests were conducted only on the VHFL`s of each crude. As expected, the test results showed a major increase in corrosion rate with increasing temperature. Corrosion rates were generally less than 10 mpy for all materials at up to 300 C. At 400 C, corrosion rates on the low Cr steels (0 to 5 Cr) were generally around 100 mpy. For the Middle East and Shengli oils, the asphalt`s were more corrosive than the VHFL cuts. Only slight differences were found in the corrosivity of these two oils. By comparison, the Bachequero-13 fractions were generally more corrosive than those from the Shengli or the Middle Eastern crudes. At 200 ft/s (67 m/s), the corrosion rates of the carbon steel specimens were high in the Middle Eastern fraction compared to the Bachequero-13 and Shengli fractions.

Tebbal, S.; Kane, R.D. [CLI International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Yamada, Kazuo [Japan Energy Corp., Okayama (Japan)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Blending high sulfer coal with refuse derived fuel to make SO{sub 2} compliant slurry fuels  

SciTech Connect

The need for a better method of disposing of the international community`s garbage hardly needs emphasizing. In 1993, the United States alone generated approximately 207 million ton per year of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), with 62% landfilled, 220/6 recycled, and 16% combusted for energy recovery. Despite strenuous efforts to make these disposal methods meet present needs, the cost of disposal is rising dramatically. Concurrently, the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have severely restricted the SO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired boilers. Medium and high sulfur coals will not comply with the Phase II CAAA regulation limit of 1.2 lb SO{sub 2}/MM Btu, without advanced coal cleaning technologies or flue gas desulfurization, including the majority of the North Dakota lignite reserves. Utility power plants have attempted to burn refuse derived fuel (RDF), a heterogeneous solid fuel produced from MSW, with coal in utility scale boilers (generally referred to as co-firing). Co-firing of RDF with coal has been attempted in sixteen different boilers, five commercially. While lower SO{sub 2} emissions provided the impetus, co-firing RDF with coal suffered from several disadvantages including increased solids handling, increased excess air requirements, higher HCI, CO, NO{sub x} and chlorinated organic emissions, increased slag formation in the boiler, and higher fly ash resistivity. Currently, only two of the sixteen boilers are still regularly used to co-fire RDF. The overall objective of this research program was to assess the feasibility of blending RDF with lignite coal to form SO{sub 2} Compliant slurry fuels using EnerTech`s SlurryCarb{trademark} process. In particular, the objective was to overcome the difficulties of conventional co-firing. Blended slurry fuels were produced with the Energy & Environmental Research Center`s (EERC) bench-scale autoclave and were combusted in a pressurized fluidized-bed reactor (PFBR).

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Anderson, C. [Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Results of rapid pyrolysis experiments using eastern US oil shale in the Livermore solid-recycle retort  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has operated a 2-ton/day pilot-scale solid-recycle system for the study of oil shale retorting under rapid-pyrolysis conditions. Results of processing eastern US New Albany oil shale are presented and compared with results obtained previously using two western US Green River oil shales. The retort consists of a cascading mixer and plug-flow soak-tank pyrolyzer with an air lift pipe and cascading-bed combustor. In the solid-recycle system, spent shale leaving the pyrolyzer is burned in the lift and cascading-bed combustor and then returned to the retort to heat the incoming raw shale. In laboratory experiments, when raw shale is rapidly heated in a fluidized bed of sand, oil yields above those of Fischer assay are obtained. In the present experiments, hot-recycled shale is used as the heat-carrying media, resulting in oil yields comparable to those obtained from Fischer assay. The distribution and composition of solid, oil, and gas throughout the recycle system is reported for the three shales studied. The distribution of sulfur and nitrogen during processing Green River oil shale has been the focus of environmental studies at LLNL. Eastern oil shale contains 5 to 10 times more sulfur and approximately the same amount of nitrogen as western oil shale. The high sulfur content coupled with low carbonate mineral concentrations results in significant sulfur releases in the combustor-gas, compared with trace releases for western shale. Iron oxide in the recycled solid was found to effectively scrub H/sub 2/S from the pyrolysis gas for both western and eastern shales. From 0.4 to 3% of the raw shale nitrogen is released as NO/sub x/ in the combustor-gas for western shale. Releases for New Albany shale are one-tenth these levels. 8 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

Cena, R.J.; Taylor, R.W.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Economic and environmental benefits of advanced FGD technology  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, the U. S. Department of Energy selected Pure Air to build and operate an advanced flue gas desulfurization system under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal 2 Technology Demonstration Program. The objective of this project was to demonstrate that an advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system could be built and operated to comply with the impending requirements of the Clean Air Act at a cost of one-half of conventional AFGD systems that were then operating in the U.S. A second objective was to minimize/eliminate secondary solid and liquid by-product disposal problems from the AFGD system. These objectives were achieved by using the following strategies: reducing capital and operating costs by utilizing the most advanced technology features; producing and marketing commercial by-products; reducing the cost per ton of SO{sub 2} removed by achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and high system availability. Pure Air, in collaboration with Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO), which is the host utility for this project, commenced construction of this advanced AFGD system at NIPSCO`s Bailly station, located approximately 60 miles southeast of Chicago, in April 1990. The Bailly power station generates 528 MW of power from two boilers fired with high-sulfur (3 to 4 percent) Illinois Basin coals. The advanced AFGD system was constructed ahead of schedule and under budget and commenced operation in June 1992. It has completed its first year of operation with results achieving or exceeding project objectives. This chapter will summarize the design features included in this project to achieve the project objectives and strategies and the operating results achieved to date.

Conley, R.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Development of a new FGD process that converts sulfur dioxide to salable ammonium phosphate fertilizer  

SciTech Connect

Rich mineral resources have enabled Chinese coal output and energy consumption to rank second and third in the world, respectively. In 1992, up to 70 percent of the country`s electric power was generated by the combustion of some 300 million tons of coal. Although the average sulfur content level in Chinese coals is only about 0.8 percent, the share of high- sulfur coals with 2 percent or more sulfur content is as high as 18 percent. As a result, air pollution accompanied by acid rain now occurs over most of the country, especially in southwestern China. Currently, the area comprising Guangdong, Guangxi, the Sichuan Basin, and the greater part of Gueizhou, where the sulfur content in coal is between 2 and 7 percent and the average pH values of rain water are between 4 and 5 per annum, has become one of the three biggest acid rain-affected areas in the world. In 1992, the national installed coal-fired electricity generation capacity exceeded 100,000 MWe. By the year 2000, it is expected to reach as much as 200,000 MWe, according to a new scheduled program. Environmental pollution caused by large-scale coal combustion is a very important issue that needs to be considered in the implementation of the program. To ensure that the effects of coal-fired power generation on the environment can be properly controlled in the near future, TPRI (Thermal Power Research Institute), the sole thermal power engineering research institution within the Ministry of Electric Power Industry (MOEPI), has conducted a long-term research program to develop sulfur emission control technologies suitable to the special conditions prevalent in China since the early 1970s. The details are summarized. The objective of this chapter is to describe the fundamental concept and major pilot test results and present an economic evaluation of a new process combining flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and ammonium phosphate fertilizer production.

Ji-lu Chen

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this 24 month project is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor with sulfur capture by calcium oxide sorbent injection into the combustor. This sulfur capture process consists of two steps: Capture of sulfur with calcined calcium oxide followed by impact of the reacted sulfur-calcium particles on the liquid slag lining the combustor. The sulfur bearing slag must be removed within several minutes from the combustor to prevent re-evolution of the sulfur from the slag. To accomplish this requires slag mass flow rates in the range of several 100 lb/hr. To study this two step process in the combustor, two groups of tests are being implemented. In the first group, calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum, or plaster of Paris, was injected in the combustor to determine sulfur evolution from slag. In the second group, the entire process is tested with limestone and/or calcium hydrate injected into the combustor. This entire effort consists of a series of up to 16 parametric tests in a 20 MMtu/hr slagging, air cooled, cyclone combustor. During the present quarterly reporting period ending September 30,1996, three tests in this project were implemented, bringing the total tests to 5. In addition, a total of 10 test days were completed during this quarter on the parallel project that utilizes the same 20 MMtu/hr combustor. The results of that project, especially those related to improved slagging performance, have a direct bearing on this project in assuring proper operation at the high slag flow rates that may be necessary to achieve high sulfur retention in slag.

Zauderer, B.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project has investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests were conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit was used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months each at three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998; at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, in November 1999; and at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, in January 2001. Results of testing at each of the three sites were reported in previous technical notes. At Site 1, catalysts were tested only as powders dispersed in sand bed reactors. At Sites 2 and 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand and in commercially available forms such as extruded pellets and coated honeycomb structures. This final report summarizes and presents results from all three sites, for the various catalyst forms tested. Field testing was supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results are also summarized and discussed in this report.

Unknown

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine  

SciTech Connect

This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of the catalytic bed.

Tom Barton

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

Opacity reduction using hydrated lime injection  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this investigation is to study the effects of injecting dry hydrated lime into flue gas to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) concentrations and consequently stack opacity at the University of Missouri, Columbia power plant. Burning of high sulfur coal (approx. 4% by weight) at the power plant resulted in opacity violations. The opacity problem was due to sulfuric acid mist (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) forming at the stack from high SO{sub 3} concentrations. As a result of light scattering by the mist, a visible plume leaves the stack. Therefore, reducing high concentrations of SO{sub 3} reduces the sulfuric acid mist and consequently the opacity problem. The current hydrated lime injection system has reduced the opacity to acceptable limits. To reduce SO{sub 3} concentrations, dry hydrated lime is injected into the flue gas upstream of a particulate collection device (baghouse) and downstream of the induced draft fan. The lime is periodically injected into the flue via a pneumatic piping system. The hydrated lime is transported down the flue and deposited on the filter bags in the baghouse. As the hydrated lime is deposited on the bags a filter cake is established. The reaction between the SO{sub 3} and the hydrated lime takes place on the filter bags. The hydrated lime injection system has resulted in at least 95% reduction in the SO{sub 3} concentration. Low capital equipment requirements and operating cost coupled with easy installation and maintenance makes the system very attractive to industries with similar problems. This paper documents the hydrated lime injection system and tests the effectiveness of the system on SO{sub 3} removal and subsequent opacity reduction. Measurements Of SO{sub 3} concentrations, flue gas velocities, and temperatures have been performed at the duct work and baghouse. A complete analysis of the hydrated lime injection system is provided.

Wolf, D.E.; Seaba, J.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. [Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States); Beittel, R. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Pinon pine project. Annual report, January 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This annual report has been prepared to present the status of the Pinon Pine Project, a nominal 107 MWe (gross) coal-fired integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant addition to Sierra Pacific Power Company`s (SPPCo) system. This project will also serve as a demonstration project cost-shared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and SPPCo under DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program. The goal of the CCT Program is to demonstrate advanced coal utilization technologies that are energy efficient, reliable and able to achieve substantial reductions in emissions as compared with existing coal technologies. The Pinon Pine Project will demonstrate an IGCC system utilizing the Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) fluidized-bed gasification process operating in an air-blown mode with in-bed desulfurization and hot gas clean-up with a western bituminous coal as the design fuel. Testing will also be performed on a high-sulfur eastern coal. The Pinon Pine Project will be constructed and operated at SPPCo`s Tracy Power Station, an existing power generation facility located on a rural 724-acre plot approximately 17 miles east of Reno, NV. This new unit will be designated as Tracy Unit No. 4. SPPCo, the project participant, has contracted with the Foster Wheeler USA Corporation (FW USA) for the overall project management, engineering, procurement and construction of the project. FW USA in turn has subcontracted with The M.W. Kellogg Company (MWK) for the engineering and procurement of key components for the Gasifier Island.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) system integration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to design, construct, shakedown and operate an integrated MCL test circuit to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), to test process conditions aimed at lower costs, and to deliver product coal. These objectives were met by the procurement, construction, and operation of the integrated test circuit. Shakedown and a 63-test process matrix resulted in the production of about 3,700 pounds of treated coal. Product MCL coal may be used to displace oil in some turbine and diesel engines and may be used in the retrofit of oil-fired boilers. Two high sulfur, high ash coals and one medium sulfur, high ash coal representative of the Eastern United States coal production were processed: Pittsburgh No. 8 (Powhatan No. 6 mine), Kentucky No. 9, and Pittsburgh No. 8 (Blacksville No. 2 mine). Although mild kiln operating conditions (325 to 415{degree}C and 1 to 2.3 hours residence time) and low caustic to coal ratios (1:1 to 3:1) were used, the combination of continuous operation and rigorous exclusion of air from the system allowed the production of MCL coal that had product sulfur content was well below NSPS standards, very low carbonate production, very little volatile losses, and low alkali retention by the product MCL coal. Optimization testing resulted in a product coal containing 0.2 to 0.4 percent sulfur (0.26 to 0.6 lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu) and 0.15 to 0.5 percent ash with more than 90 percent organic sulfur removal, {approximately}95 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from run-of-mine coal, {approximately}91 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from precleaned process feed coal, and with heat content of about 14,000 Btu per pound.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy?s Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles? Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

McDonald, D.K.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer  

SciTech Connect

A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A modified release analysis procedure using advanced froth flotation mechanisms: Technical report, March 1, 1996-May 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies indicate that the optimum separation performances achieved by multiple stage cleaning using various column flotation technologies and single stage cleaning using a Packed-Flotation Column are superior to the performance achieved by the traditional release procedure, especially in terms of pyritic sulfur rejection. This superior performance is believed to be the result of the advanced flotation mechanisms provided by column flotation technologies. Thus, the objective of this study is to develop a suitable process utilizing the advanced froth flotation mechanisms to characterize the true flotation response of a coal sample. Work in this reporting period concentrated on developing a modified coal flotation characterization procedure, termed as Advanced Flotation Washability (AFW) technique. The new apparatus used for this procedure is essentially a batch operated packed-column device equipped with a controlled wash water system. Several experiments were conducted using the AFW technique on a relatively high sulfur, -100 mesh Illinois No. 5 run-of-mine coal sample collected from a local coal preparation plant. Similar coal characterization experiments were also conducted using the traditional release and tree analysis procedures. The best performance curve generated using the AFW technique was found to be superior to the optimum curve produced by the traditional procedures. For example, at a combustible recovery of 80%, a 19% improvement in the reduction of the pyritic sulfur content was achieved by the AFW method while the ash reduction was also enhanced by 4%. Several tests are on-going to solidify the AFW procedure and verify the above finding by conducting Anova analyses to evaluate the repeatability of the AFW method and the statistical significance of the difference in the performance achieved from the traditional and modified coal characterization procedures.

Honaker, R.Q., Mohanty, M.K. [Southern Illinois Univ., Department of Mining Engineering, Carbondale, IL (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Great lakes fluidized-bed combustion. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program was conducted to design, construct, and operate an industrial fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boiler demonstration plant with a capacity of 50,000 lb/h steam. The following were the objectives of the program: (1) to extend the fluidized bed boiler design by employing natural circulation cooling; (2) to design, build, operate, test, and demonstrate a fluidized bed boiler that could burn high sulfur coal in an environmentally acceptable manner; and (3) to obtain sufficient data for industry to make an objective appraisal of fluidized bed coal burning boilers. Following a five-year design, development, and construction effort, the demonstration plant was first operated in June of 1981. Initial operation identified several equipment and operating problems, particularly in the areas of the fuel preparation and fuel feed systems. Unit operation and availability steadily improved, culminating in a 30-day continuous run ending in May 1982. Following shutdown, major problem areas such as bed tube failures were addressed by C-E and rectified prior to the start of the test program. Shakedown/testing operation commenced on August 12, 1983. The objectives for the test program were to establish the unit operating conditions required to optimize SO/sub 2/ removal and combustion efficiency for different operating modes, and to evaluate the long-term performance of components which are essential for reliable FBC operation. A total of 23 tests were run from February 16, 1984 to April 19, 1984. The test results demonstrated that FBC is an environmentally and commercially sound technology. Specificially, the required sulfur removal, low NO/sub x//CO emissions and high combustion efficiencies can be readily achieved. This report identifies the effects of recycle, excess air, Ca/S mole ratio, and overfire air on combustion efficiency, boiler efficiency, and emissions. 6 refs., 97 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planets remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energys GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

420

Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development  

SciTech Connect

Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO{sub 2} level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to two year) data. The test program details and data are presented herein.

Michael Gagliano; Andrew Seltzer; Hans Agarwal; Archie Robertson; Lun Wang

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development  

SciTech Connect

Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO2 level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to two year) data. The test program details and data are presented herein.

Gagliano, Michael; Seltzer, Andrew; Agarwal, Hans; Robertson, Archie; Wang, Lun

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

NOXSO: A no-waste emission control technology  

SciTech Connect

The NOXSO Process is a dry, regenerable flue gas treatment system that simultaneously removes 90% of the SO{sub 2} and 70-90 % of the NO{sub x} from flue gas generated from the combustion of coal. The process has been successfully tested at small scale (0.017 MW) on high sulfur coal (2.5%) at the TVA Shawnee Steam Plant. The test results are contained in two U.S. Department of Energy reports. Tests of a NOXSO Process Development Unit (PDU, 0.75MW) were conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) under a cooperative research agreement between NOXSO and the Department of Energy (DOE). Testing in the adsorber was done by continuously feeding a batch of sorbent into a fluidized bed adsorber and collecting the spent sorbent from the adsorber overflow. Regeneration took place in a separate batch reactor. The test results were reported by Yeh et al. in 1987, and by Haslbeck et al. in 1988. A Life-Cycle Test Unit (LCTU, 0.06MW) was built at the PETC in 1988 to test the NOXSO Process in an integrated,