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1

The effect of desiccation on UMTRA Project radon barrier materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater standards (40 CFR 192) require that Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project remedial action designs meet low numerical limits for contaminants contained in water or vapors exiting the disposal cell embankments. To meet the standards, a cover of compacted, fine-grained soil is placed over UMTRA Project embankments. One of the functions of this cover is to limit infiltration into the disposal cell . The hydraulic conductivity of this infiltration barrier must be low in order to reduce the resultant seepage from the base of the cell to the extent necessary to comply with the proposed EPA groundwater standards. Another function of this cover is to limit the emission of radon gas. The air permeability of the cover must be low in order to reduce radon emissions to comply with EPA standards. Fine-grained soils exposed to evaporation will dry. Continued exposure will cause shrinking that, if allowed to continue, will eventually result in the development of cracks. The results of the cracking could be an increase in the hydraulic conductivity and an increase in the air permeability. This could then allow additional infiltration and increased radon emissions. Cracking of the radon barrier has been noted at one UMTRA Project location. The potential for cracking of the radon barrier during construction has been addressed by requiring moistening of previously compacted surfaces prior to placing additional lifts. The efficacy of these treatments has not been verified. The potential for cracking after construction of the cover is completed has also not been examined. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential for cracking of the radon barrier both during construction and after completion of the cover. The effect of shrinkage cracking on the performance of the radon barrier will also be examined.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Analysis of infiltration through a clay radon barrier at an UMTRA disposal cell. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An infiltration study was initiated in January 1988 to assess the percent saturation in, and infiltration through, clay radon barriers of typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. Predicting infiltration through the radon barrier is necessary to evaluate whether the disposal cell will comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards (40 CFR 192). The groundwater standards require demonstrating that tailings seepage will not cause background concentrations or maximum concentration limits (MCLs) to be exceeded at the downgradient edge of the disposal facility (the point of compliance, or POC). This demonstration generally consists of incorporating the predicted seepage flux and the concentration of the specific hazardous constituents into a contaminant transport model, and predicting the resultant concentrations at the POC. The infiltration study consisted of a field investigation to evaluate moisture conditions in the radon barrier of the completed Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project disposal cell and previously completed UMTRA Project disposal cells at Clive, Utah, and Burrell, Pennsylvania. Coring was conducted to measure percent saturation profiles in the radon barriers at these disposal cells. In addition, a detailed investigation of the Shiprock radon barrier was conducted to establish the effects of meteorological stresses on moisture conditions in the filter layer and radon barrier. The Shiprock infiltration study was also intended to characterize hydraulic gradients and operational unsaturated hydraulic conductivities in the radon barrier.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings: an overview of the technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, has developed an asphalt emulsion cover system to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. The system has been field tested at Grand Junction, Colorado. Results from laboratory and field tests indicate that this system is effective in reducing radon release to near-background levels (<2.5 pCi m/sup -2/s/sup -1/) and has the properties required for long-term effectiveness and stability. Engineering specifications have been developed, and analysis indicates that asphalt emulsion covers are cost-competitive with other cover systems. This report summarizes the technology for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. 59 references, 45 figures, 36 tables.

Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, D.A.; Dunning, R.L.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Highly porous aerogels of very low permeability *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we firstly investigate the way the pores are created in silica gel during gelation. Then we show that the solid particle arrangement acts on the geometrical pore characteristics (pore volume and pore size distribution). According to the pore size value, the permeability of gels is quite low even if the value of the gel porosity exceeds 95%. Analogous properties can be extended to silica aerogels for which now the solvent is replaced by air. Consequently, and according to their low permeability, light weight aerogels exhibit very striking response to mechanical stresses. Here we report unusual experiments allowing us to estimate the mechanical properties of aerogels thanks to their low value of the average pore size. Moreover, one demonstrates that aerogels may be densified at room temperature using an external isostatic pressure. In that case, the pore size may be tailored with respect to the nature and the characteristics of the starting aerogel. The evolution of the textural properties such as the mean pore size and the specific surface area of these tailored aerogels is investigated as a function of isostatic pressure. 1.

J. Phalippou; T. Woignier; R. Sempéré; P. Dieudonné

5

Organic solvent alteration of hydraulic properties of sedimentary rocks of low permeability: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the current literature on hydrophysical interactions of organic solutes with sedimentary rocks of low permeability is presented. The motivation was the premise that low permeability rocks may act as secondary (aquifer) barriers for the containment of hazardous organic wastes, thus preventing these wastes from contaminating the groundwater. However, this premise may be incorrect if organic wastes can affect the hydraulic conductivity of these rocks. The results indicate that very little work has been done concerning interactions of organics with consolidated subsurface materials. Available information on three related topics was summarized: the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of clays, case studies concerning the interactions of organic compounds with clays and sedimentary rocks, and the effect of shales on inorganic transport. These studies give an indication of some research areas that need to be explored with regard to the effect of organic compounds on the hydrophysical properties of sedimentary rocks; these research needs are briefly summarized. 42 refs.

Sklarew, D.S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Laboratory measurement of water imbibition into low-permeability welded tuff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

repository. As water infiltrates down from the ground surface through the fracture network, some water mayLaboratory measurement of water imbibition into low-permeability welded tuff M.Q. Hu*, P. Persoff accurately water imbibi- tion and vapor condensation into welded tuff of low permeability. Automatically

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

7

On Damage Propagation in a Soft Low-Permeability Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this presentation, we develop a mathematical model of fluid flow with changing formation properties. The modification of formation permeability is caused by development of a connected system of fractures. As the fluids are injected or withdrawn from the reservoir, the balance between the pore pressure and the geostatic formation stresses is destroyed. If the strength of the rock is not sufficient to accommodate such an imbalance, the cementing bonds between the rock grains become broken. Such a process is called damage propagation. The micromechanics and the basic mathematical model of damage propagation have been studied in [7]. The theory was further developed in [3], where new nonlocal damage propagation model has been studied. In [2] this theory has been enhanced by incorporation of the coupling between damage propagation and fluid flow. As it has been described above, the forced fluid flow causes changes in the rock properties including formation permeability. At the same time, changing permeability facilitates fluid flow and, therefore, enhances damage propagation. One of the principle concepts introduced in [3] and [2] is the characterization of damage by a dimensionless ratio of the number of broken bonds to the number of bonds in pristine rock per unit volume. It turns out, that the resulting mathematical model consist of a system of two nonlinear parabolic equations. As it has been shown in [6] using modeling of micromechanical properties of sedimentary rocks, at increasing stress the broken bonds coalesce into a system of cracks surrounding practically intact matrix blocks. These blocks have some characteristic size and a regular geometry. The initial microcracks expand, interact with each other, coalesce and form bigger fractures, etc. Therefore, as the damage is accumulated, the growing system of connected fractures determines the permeability of the reservoir rock. Significant oil deposits are stored in low-permeability soft rock reservoirs such as shales, chalks and diatomites [9, 10]. The permeability of the pristine formation matrix in such reservoirs is so low that oil production was impossible until hydraulic fracturing was applied. For development of correct production policy, it is very significant to adequately understand and predict how fast and to what extend the initial damage induced by drilling and hydrofracturing will propagate into the reservoir. The importance of fractures for rock flow properties is a well-established and recognized fact [4, 9, 5]. Different conceptual models have been developed [8]. In this study, we propose a damage propagation model based on a combination of the model of double-porosity and double-permeability medium [4] and a modification of the model of damage propagation developed in [2].

Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Barenblatt, G.I.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

8

Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The petroleum engineering literature clearly shows that large proppant volumes and concentrations are required to effectively stimulate low-permeability gas sands. To pump large proppant concentrations, one must use a viscous fluid. However, many...

Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

L-FVM for Unsteady Seepage Flow in Low Permeability Coalbed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significant feature of coalbed in China is the low permeability. A new unsteady seepage flow model isdeveloped for the low permeability coalbed by considering the startup pressure gradient and methane desorption effect.Since the complexity of the problem, a new method which we call it ''L-FVM'' is developed, based on comparing the normal numerical calculation methods and comprehension research on FVM. The results show that L-FVM has the same precission but higher calculating velocity than normal FVM. This result is very important for monitoring the area pressure drawdown in coalbed methane engineering

Liu, Y. W.; Su, Z. L. [Key Laboratory of Environment Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Niu, C. C.; Cai, Q.; Li, H. S. [Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100048 (China); Zhao, P. H.; Zhou, X. H.; Lu, Q. [Coalbed Methane Ltd. Company, Petrochina, Beijing 100028 (China)

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airflow induced by pumping tests in unconfined aquifer with a low-permeability cap Jiu Jimmy Jiao1 October 2009. [1] Most analytical and numerical models developed to analyze pumping test data focus on saturated flow below the water table. Traditionally the soil above the initial water table prior to pumping

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

12

Scaling of Counter-Current Imbibition Process in Low-Permeability Porous Media, TR-121  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project presents the recent work on imaging imbibition in low permeability porous media (diatomite) with X-ray completed tomography. The viscosity ratio between nonwetting and wetting fluids is varied over several orders of magnitude yielding different levels of imbibition performance. Also performed is mathematical analysis of counter-current imbibition processes and development of a modified scaling group incorporating the mobility ratio. This modified group is physically based and appears to improve scaling accuracy of countercurrent imbibition significantly.

Kvoscek, A.R.; Zhou, D.; Jia, L.; Kamath, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work compares the performance of two alternative flow models for the simulation of thermal-hydraulic coupled processes in low permeable porous media: non-isothermal Richards and two-phase flow concepts. Both models take vaporization processes into account: however, the Richards model neglects dynamic pressure variations and bulk flow of the gaseous phase. For the comparison of the two approaches first published data from a laboratory experiment is studied involving thermally driven moisture flow in a partially saturated bentonite sample. Then a benchmark test of longer-term thermal-hydraulic behavior in the engineered barrier system of a geological nuclear waste repository is analyzed (DECOVALEX project). It was found that both models can be used to reproduce the vaporization process if the intrinsic permeability is relative high. However, when a thermal-hydraulic coupled problem has the same low intrinsic permeability for both the liquid and the gas phase, only the two-phase flow approach provides reasonable results.

Wang, W.; Rutqvist, J.; Gorke, U.-J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kolditz, O.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Effect of Acid Additives on Carbonate Rock Wettability and Spent Acid Recovery in Low Permeability Gas Carbonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spent acid retention in the near-wellbore region causes reduction of relative permeability to gas and eventually curtailed gas production. In low-permeability gas carbonate reservoirs, capillary forces are the key parameters that affect the trapping...

Saneifar, Mehrnoosh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

15

Water Injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 1: Hydrofracture Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we model water injection through a growing vertical hydrofracture penetrating a low-permeability reservoir. The results are useful in oilfield waterflood applications and in liquid waste disposal through reinjection. Using Duhamel's principle, we extend the Gordeyev and Entov (1997) self-similar 2D solution of pressure diffusion from a growing fracture to the case of variable injection pressure. The flow of water injected into a low-permeability rock is almost perpendicular to the fracture for a time sufficiently long to be of practical interest. We revisit Carter's model of 1D fluid injection (Howard and Fast, 1957) and extend it to the case of variable injection pressure. We express the cumulative injection through the injection pressure and effective fracture area. Maintaining fluid injection above a reasonable minimal value leads inevitably to fracture growth regardless of the injector design and the injection policy. The average rate of fracture growth can be predicted from early injection. A smart injection controller that can prevent rapid fracture growth is needed.

Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitriy B.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

Sattler, A.R.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fluid flow through very low permeability materials: A concern in the geological isolation of waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geological isolation of waste usually involves the selection of sites where very low permeability materials exist, but there are few earth materials that are truly impermeable. Regulatory concerns for the containment of radioactive material extend for geologic periods of time (i.e., 10,000 years or more), and it becomes nearly impossible to ``assure`` the behavior of the site for such long periods of time. Experience at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) shows that very slow movements of fluid can take place through materials that may, in fact, have no intrinsic permeability in their undisturbed condition. Conventional hydrologic models may not be appropriate to describe flow, may provide modeling results that could be in significant variance with reality, and may not be easy to defend during the compliance process. Additionally, the very small volumes of fluid and very slow flow rates involved are difficult to observe, measure, and quantify. The WIPP disposal horizon is excavated 655 m below the surface in bedded salt of Permian age. Salt has some unique properties, but similar hydrologic problems can be expected in site investigations were other relatively impermeable beds occur, and especially in deep sites where significant overburden and confining pressures may be encountered. Innovative techniques developed during the investigations at the WIPP may find utility when investigating other disposal sites. Ongoing work at the WIPP is expected to continue to advance understanding of flow through very low permeability materials. The study of flow under these conditions will become increasingly important as additional waste disposal sites are designed that require assurance of their safety for geological periods of time.

Deal, D.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Home Safety: Radon Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. However, with proper equipment, radon is easy to detect... poten- tial for radon (Fig. 1), homes in Texas have been found to have radon levels that exceed U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations. Every home is susceptible to a radon gas problem. Health/cancer risks Radon produces...

Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of Cost-Effective Low-Permeability Ceramic and Refractory Components for Aluminum Melting and Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent review by the U.S. Advanced Ceramics Association, the Aluminum Association, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (DOE/OIT) described the status of advanced ceramics for aluminum processing, including monolithics, composites, and coatings. The report observed that monolithic ceramics (particularly oxides) have attractive properties such as resistance to heat, corrosion, thermal shock, abrasion, and erosion [1]. However, even after the developments of the past 25 years, there are two key barriers to commercialization: reliability and cost-effectiveness. Industry research is therefore focused on eliminating these barriers. Ceramic coatings have likewise undergone significant development and a variety of processes have been demonstrated for applying coatings to substrates. Some processes, such as thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines, exhibit sufficient reliability and service life for routine commercial use. Worldwide, aluminum melting and molten metal handling consumes about 506,000 tons of refractory materials annually. Refractory compositions for handling molten aluminum are generally based on dense fused cast silica or mullite. The microstructural texture is extremely important because an interlocking mass of coarser grains must be bonded together by smaller grains in order to achieve adequate strength. At the same time, well-distributed microscopic pores and cracks are needed to deflect cracks and prevent spalling and thermal shock damage [2]. The focus of this project was to develop and validate new classes of cost-effective, low-permeability ceramic and refractory components for handling molten aluminum in both smelting and casting environments. The primary goal was to develop improved coatings and functionally graded materials that will possess superior combinations of properties, including resistance to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting. When these materials are successfully deployed in aluminum smelting and casting operations, their superior performance and durability will give end users marked improvements in uptime, defect reduction, scrap/rework costs, and overall energy savings resulting from higher productivity and yield. The implementation of results of this program will result in energy savings of 30 trillion Btu/year by 2020. For this Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) project, riser tube used in the low-pressure die (LPD) casting of aluminum was selected as the refractory component for improvement. In this LPD process, a pressurized system is used to transport aluminum metal through refractory tubes (riser tubes) into wheel molds. It is important for the tubes to remain airtight because otherwise, the pressurized system will fail. Generally, defects such as porosity in the tube or cracks generated by reaction of the tube material with molten aluminum lead to tube failure, making the tube incapable of maintaining the pressure difference required for normal casting operation. Therefore, the primary objective of the project was to develop a riser tube that is not only resistant to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting, but is also less permeable, so as to achieve longer service life. Currently, the dense-fused silica (DFS) riser tube supplied by Pyrotek lasts for only 7 days before undergoing failure. The following approach was employed to achieve the goal: (1) Develop materials and methods for sealing surface porosity in thermal-shock-resistant ceramic refractories; (2) Develop new ceramic coatings for extreme service in molten aluminum operations, with particular emphasis on coatings based on highly stable oxide phases; (3) Develop new monolithic refractories designed for lower-permeability applications using controlled porosity gradients and particle size distributions; (4) Optimize refractory formulations to minimize wetting by molten aluminum, and characterize erosion, corrosion, and spallation rates under realistic service conditions; and (5) Scale up the processing methods to full-sized components and perform field testi

Kadolkar, Puja [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Oil recovery enhancement from fractured, low permeability reservoirs. Annual report 1990--1991, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joint funding by the Department of Energy and the State of Texas has Permitted a three year, multi-disciplinary investigation to enhance oil recovery from a dual porosity, fractured, low matrix permeability oil reservoir to be initiated. The Austin Chalk producing horizon trending thru the median of Texas has been identified as the candidate for analysis. Ultimate primary recovery of oil from the Austin Chalk is very low because of two major technological problems. The commercial oil producing rate is based on the wellbore encountering a significant number of natural fractures. The prediction of the location and frequency of natural fractures at any particular region in the subsurface is problematical at this time, unless extensive and expensive seismic work is conducted. A major portion of the oil remains in the low permeability matrix blocks after depletion because there are no methods currently available to the industry to mobilize this bypassed oil. The following multi-faceted study is aimed to develop new methods to increase oil and gas recovery from the Austin Chalk producing trend. These methods may involve new geological and geophysical interpretation methods, improved ways to study production decline curves or the application of a new enhanced oil recovery technique. The efforts for the second year may be summarized as one of coalescing the initial concepts developed during the initial phase to more in depth analyses. Accomplishments are predicting natural fractures; relating recovery to well-log signatures; development of the EOR imbibition process; mathematical modeling; and field test.

Poston, S.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Water injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 2: Control Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Part 1, we have demonstrated the inevitable growth of the fluid injection hydrofractures in low-permeability rocks. Thus, a smart controller that manages fluid injection in the presence of hydrofracture extension is highly desirable. Such a controller will be an essential part of automated waterflood project surveillance and control. Here we design an optimal injection controller using methods of optimal control theory. The controller inputs are the history of the injection pressure and the cumulative injection, along with the fracture size. The output parameter is the injection pressure and the control objective is the injection rate. We demonstrate that the optimal injection pressure depends not only on the instantaneous measurements, but it is determined by the whole history of the injection and of the fracture area growth. We show the controller robustness when the inputs are delayed and noisy and when the fracture undergoes abrupt extensions. Finally, we propose a procedure that allows estimation of the hydrofracture size at no additional cost.

Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Vertical interference pressure testing across a low-permeability zone with unsteady crossflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing analytical models for interpreting vertical interference pressure tests across the low permeability zone in a three-layered reservoir usually assume transient radial flow in the high permeability layers and pseudo-steady vertical crossflow in the intervening tight zone. The neglect of vertical flow in the high permeability layers, and the neglect of radial flow in the tight layer, requires the permeability contrast between these layers to be large. However, when this assumption is satisfied, it is also very likely that the pressure diffusivity in the tight layer is much smaller than that in the high permeability layers. Thus, to be consistent, the flow across the tight layer must be treated as an unsteady diffusive process driven by the transient pressure changes occurring in the high permeability layers. In this paper, the authors extend the analysis by replacing their pseudo-steady crossflow assumption with unsteady crossflow and interpret the crossflow response in terms of near- and far-boundary flow response functions for the tight zone. The inclusion of unsteady crossflow requires one additional dimensionless parameter and results in a set of governing equations that are different from, but are similar to, the equations of the dual-porosity dual-permeability model with unsteady interporosity flow.

Wijesinghe, A.M.; Kececioglu, I.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Determination of hydraulic conductivities of low permeability materials in the Sierra Ladrones Formation, Albuquerque basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low permeability materials in the Sierra Ladrones Formation were sampled and analyzed to determine their hydraulic conductivities using the falling head centrifugation method (fc) as described by Nimmo et al. (1991). The method is similar to the traditional falling head method, only it uses greatly increased centrifugal forces, allowing measurements to make in a relatively short amount of time. Using these measurements, variations in saturated hydraulic conductivities between different sediment types were analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Sampling resulted in useable data chiefly from the clay and silt facies of the formation. The range of conductivities determined are representative of brown and red clays, and silts which make up the overbank deposits of this region. Hydraulic conductivities for these overbank fines were found to range from approximately log K = {minus}9 m/s to log K = {minus}7 m/s. The upper measurement limit of the centrifuge apparatus was determined to be approximately 1.43 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m/s and the lower limit was approximately 7.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m/s.

Planert, C.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Radon detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP Low Permeability Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

Mark E. Willis; Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

RADON: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uranium nine atmospheres. HASL-220 63 \\2t-W. A S R C :U. Radon flask monitor. HASL-330 17 p.. 08/-/77. ABSTRACT: Aof radon daughters. HASL-325 RADON WORKSHOP: FEBRUARY 1977.

Lepman, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

RADON: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

p. , 1971. Rodgers, J. C. Radon progeny exposure measurementH. , Abner, C. H. A new radon progeny personnel dosimeter.in buildings due to radon progeny. HEALTH PHYS. 3112): 119-

Lepman, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

Borns, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Surface barriers: Problems, solutions, and future needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of designing a surface barrier for a remediation project can be an enormously challenging task. There is a widely held misconception that surface barrier technology is well developed and works as expected. In fact, the technology is largely unproved and experimental, particularly in terms of long-term performance. The most difficult problem with surface barriers is to provide a long-term barrier to infiltration of water. The materials that have traditionally been considered for the hydraulic barrier within surface barrier systems are low-permeability compacted soil, geomembranes, and the geosynthetic clay liner (GCL). Data are presented to suggest that low-permeability compacted soil is often a poor choice of materials. Unless the compacted soil liner is buried under a very thick layer of protective soil or covered by a geomembrane, the low-permeability, clay-rich, compacted soil is likely to desiccate and lose its low hydraulic conductivity. Differential settlement of a compacted soil liner from uneven compression of underlying waste or other causes is almost certain to produce cracks within the soil liner. Geomembranes do not suffer as much from these problems, but their design life is, at best, a few centuries, The GCL, which contains a thin layer of bentonite, is much better able to resist damage from freezing/thawing, desiccation, and differential settlement than compacted soil liners. The technology of the GCL, which is particularly well suited for arid sites, is reviewed in some detail in this paper because of its technical attributes in surface-barrier applications. Published case histories of the performance of surface barriers are summarized.

Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

Ronald C. Surdam

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Montana Radon Control Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Radon Control Act regulates the emission of radon, the gaseous decay products of uranium or thorium. The Act addresses operator certification of radon-producing facilities, testing and...

34

Permeation Dispersal of Treatment Agents for In Situ Remediation in Low Permeability Media: 1. Field Studies in Unconfined Test Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) are common contaminants of concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and industrial sites across the US and abroad. These contaminants of concern are present in source areas and in soil and ground water plumes as dissolved or sorbed phase constituents as well as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). These DNAPL compounds can be released to the environment through a variety of means including leaks in storage tanks and transfer lines, spills during transportation, and land treatment of wastes. When DNAPL compounds are present in low permeability media (LPM) like silt and clay layers or deposits, there are major challenges with assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective in situ remediation technologies. This report describes a field demonstration that was conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) Clean Test Site (CTS) to evaluate the feasibility of permeation and dispersal of reagents into LPM. Various reagents and tracers were injected at seven test cells primarily to evaluate the feasibility of delivery, but also to evaluate the effects of the injected reagents on LPM. The various reagents and tracers were injected at the PORTS CTS using a multi-port injection system (MPIS) developed and provided by Hayward Baker Environmental, Inc.

Siegrist, R.L.; Smuin, D.R.; Korte, N.E.; Greene, D.W.; Pickering, D.A.; Lowe, K.S.; Strong-Gunderson, J.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

RADON: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is detenined by gamma spectrometry of the charcoaldaughters in air using gamma spectrometry. N U a . INSTRUM.is subjected to gamma-ray spectrometry. The radon luantitr

Lepman, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Fractured gas well analysis: evaluation of in situ reservoir properties of low permeability gas wells stimulated by finite conductivity hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTURED GAS WELL ANALYSIS - EVALUATION OF IN SITU RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF LOW PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS STIMULATED BY FINITE CONDUCTIVITY HYDRAULIC FRACTURES A Thesis by CHARLES ADOIZA MAKOJU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQ1... BY FINITE CONDUCTIVITY HYDRAULIC FRACTURES A Thesis by CHARLES ADOIZA MAKOJU Approved as to style and content by: C a~ an o ommsttee Member Member em er Hea o Department December 1978 ABSTRACT FRACTURED GAS HELL ANALYSIS - EVALUATION OF IN SITU...

Makoju, Charles Adoiza

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon can be a non negligible component of the background. In order to reduce the radon level in the gas mixture, it has been necessary first to cover the NEMO 3 detector with an airtight tent and then to install a radon-free air factory. With the use of sensitive radon detectors, the level of radon at the exit of the factory and inside the tent is continuously controlled. These radon levels are discussed within the NEMO 3 context.

Nachab, A. [Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, BP 120, Le Haut Vigneau, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Soil Insulation For Barrier Layer Protection In Landfill Covers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landfill covers are designed to isolate waste from the environment by incorporating low-permeability barrier layers. The barrier layer minimizes and controls gas escaping from the waste and the amount of infiltrating moisture available for leachate generation. Barrier layers are typically designed and constructed of a thick layer of compacted fine-grain native soil material or a manufactured geosynthetic clay liner. The barrier layer must be protected from frost damage. Freezing of a compacted soil layer has been shown to cause quick and irreversible degradation. Large increases in permeability have been demonstrated in compacted clay barriers subjected to a minimum number of freezing and thawing cycles. Design methods to protect the barrier layer from frost damage have not been addressed in the research literature. A design procedure is addressed in this paper that determines the thickness of soil required to protect a barrier layer. The procedure is based on sitespecific temperature ...

Gregory Smith Roy

39

Radon: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RADON PROGENY AS AN EXPERIMENTAL TOOL FOR DOSIMETRY OF NANOAEROSOLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurement of Unattached Radon Progeny Deposited in theApte, M.G. 2005 Radon progeny as a potential experimentalfraction of radon progeny, Journal of Nanoparticles

Ruzer, Lev S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biointrusion test plan for the Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Prototype  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a testing and monitoring plan for the biological component of the prototype barrier slated for construction at the Hanford Site. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system. It is designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. The features of the barrier include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, covered with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype barrier over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions. Plants and animals will play a significant role in the hydrologic and water and wind erosion characteristics of the prototype barrier. Studies on the biological component of the prototype barrier will include work on the initial revegetation of the surface, continued monitoring of the developing plant community, rooting depth and dispersion in the context of biointrusion potential, the role of plants in the hydrology of the surface and toe regions of the barrier, the role of plants in stabilizing the surface against water and wind erosion, and the role of burrowing animals in the hydrology and water and wind erosion of the barrier.

Link, S.O.; Cadwell, L.L.; Brandt, C.A.; Downs, J.L.; Rossi, R.E.; Gee, G.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Passive environmental radon detector study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three stages at which the ambient air concentrations of radon-222 are monitored around the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites: before, during, and after construction. Pre-remedial-action measurements are taken for approximately 1 year. Monitoring is conducted during the entire duration of construction, and post-remedial-action monitoring is performed for approximately 1 year. Currently, the UMTRA Project uses Radtrak{reg_sign} brand alpha-track radon detectors for these environmental measurements. The purposes of radon monitoring around the UMTRA sites are (1) to determine background values around the site and pre-remedial-action conditions, (2) to control construction activities and monitor off-site releases, and (3) to compare post-remedial-action concentrations with pre-remedial-action values to demonstrate that radon concentrations have been reduced to approximately background levels. The Technical Assistance Contractor to the DOE for the UMTRA Project evaluated the performance of four different types of passive environmental radon detectors under both controlled laboratory conditions and field conditions at an unremediated UMTRA site. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy and precision of four different passive, timeintegrating, environmental radon detectors in an effort to determine which brand of detector is best suited to measure environmental outdoor radon concentrations for the UMTRA Project. Voluntary manufacturer participation in the study was solicited by placing an advertisement in the Commerce Business Daily. All manufacturers participating in the study supplied the detectors and analysis free of charge.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Passive environmental radon detector study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three stages at which the ambient air concentrations of radon-222 are monitored around the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites: before, during, and after construction. Pre-remedial-action measurements are taken for approximately 1 year. Monitoring is conducted during the entire duration of construction, and post-remedial-action monitoring is performed for approximately 1 year. Currently, the UMTRA Project uses Radtrak[reg sign] brand alpha-track radon detectors for these environmental measurements. The purposes of radon monitoring around the UMTRA sites are (1) to determine background values around the site and pre-remedial-action conditions, (2) to control construction activities and monitor off-site releases, and (3) to compare post-remedial-action concentrations with pre-remedial-action values to demonstrate that radon concentrations have been reduced to approximately background levels. The Technical Assistance Contractor to the DOE for the UMTRA Project evaluated the performance of four different types of passive environmental radon detectors under both controlled laboratory conditions and field conditions at an unremediated UMTRA site. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy and precision of four different passive, timeintegrating, environmental radon detectors in an effort to determine which brand of detector is best suited to measure environmental outdoor radon concentrations for the UMTRA Project. Voluntary manufacturer participation in the study was solicited by placing an advertisement in the Commerce Business Daily. All manufacturers participating in the study supplied the detectors and analysis free of charge.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A RESIDENTIAL RADON DAUGHTER MONITOR BASED ON ALPHA SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

send , "Measurement of Radon Progeny Concentration in Air bymeasuring concentrations of radon progeny i n indoor a i r .

Nazaroff, William W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of radon and radon progeny from indoor air, inMeeting on Radon-Radon Progeny Measurements, Report 520/5-August 1983. Radon - Radon Progeny Measurements, proceedings

Nero, A.V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Simulation of the Steady-State Transport of Radon from Oil into Houses with Basements under Constant Negative Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Indoor Radon and Radon Progeny Concentration, LBL-19726,airborne short-lived radon progeny attach to the internalsimply radon daughters, or radon progeny, are solid metals

de Oliveira Loureiro, Celso

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

SUMMER TO SUMMER VARIATIONS IN INDOOR RADON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor radon concentrations show a strong dependence on weather. winter tends to be associated with higher than average indoor radon, and summer with lower than average. However, in northern Virginia, the summer of 1988 was wetter than the summer of 1987. Consequently, the regional indoor radon during the summer of 1988 was about 30 % higher than during the summer of 1987, and indoor radon during the summer of 1988 actually exceeded the indoor radon level of the 1987-88 winter. Evidently care must be taken when attempting to estimate regional indoor radon concentrations, and homesite risk estimates should rely on long-term measurement intervals. Key word index: summer precipitation, soil capping, alpha-track radon monitors, home heating system, radon and radon progeny,

Paul Dibenenetto; Douglas G. Mose; George W. Mushrush

49

Preliminary Study of Radioactive Waste Package Made of High-Strength and Ultra Low-Permeability Concrete for Geological Disposal of TRU Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been developing a radioactive waste package made of high-strength and ultra low-permeability concrete (HSULPC) for geological disposal of TRU wastes, which is expected to be much more impervious to water than conventional concrete. In this study, basic data for the HSULPC regarding its the impervious character and the thermodynamics during cement hydration were obtained through water permeability measurements using cold isostatic pressing (CIP) and adiabatic concrete hydration experiments, respectively. Then, a prediction tool to find concrete package construction conditions to avoid thermal cracking was developed, which could deal with coupled calculations of cement hydration, heat transfer, stress, and cracking. The developed tool was applied to HSULPC hydration on a small-scale cylindrical model to examine whether there was any effect on cracking which depended on the ratio of concrete cylinder thickness to its inner diameter. The results were compared to experiments. For concrete with a compressive strength of 200MPa, the water permeability coefficient was 4 x 10{sup 19} m/s. Dependences of activation energy and frequency factor on degree of cement hydration had a sharp peaking due to the nucleation rate-determining step, and a gradual increase region due to the diffusion rate-determining step. From analyses of the small-scale cylindrical model, dependences of the maximum principal stress on the radius were obtained. When the ratio of the concrete thickness to the heater diameter was around 1, the risk of cracking was predicted to be minimized. These numerical predictions from the developed tool were verified by experiments.

Matsuo, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Asano, E.; Takei, A.; Shibuya, K.; Katagiri, M.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON. TRANSFORM AND DOUBLE BEAMFORMING: A CURVELET. TRANSFORM PERSPECTIVE. M V DE ...

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Radon Progeny Deposition Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly Rn-222) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of Pb-210 on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

V. E. Guiseppe; S. R. Elliott; A. Hime; K. Rielage; S. Westerdale

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

RADON 131 7. ANALYTICAL METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the analytical methods that are available for detecting, measuring, and/or monitoring radon and its progeny. The intent is not to provide an exhaustive list of analytical methods. Rather, the intention is to identify well-established methods that are used as the standard methods of analysis. Many of the analytical methods used for environmental samples are the methods approved by federal agencies and organizations such as EPA and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Other methods presented in this chapter are those that are approved by groups such as the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) and the American Public Health Association (APHA). Additionally, analytical methods are included that modify previously used methods to obtain lower detection limits and/or to improve accuracy and precision. 7.1 BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS Table 7-1 lists various methods used to detect radon progeny in biological samples. Since the half-life of radon is short, its measurement in biological samples, such as serum, urine, blood, etc., is not practical. Measurements of the longer lived radon progeny 210 Pb and 210 Po in biological samples may be used as an indication of radon exposure; however, ingestion of these isotopes from food and drinking water or direct exposure from other environmental media are considered the primary sources of exposure for these

unknown authors

53

Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

Langner, G.H. Jr.

1993-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Journal of Hazardous Materials 132 (2006) 98110 Assessment of environmental radon hazard using human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rights reserved. Keywords: Radon; Radon progeny; Human respiratory tract; Dose conversion coefficient

Yu, K.N.

56

Silica Fume as a Radon Retardant from Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and tracheobronchial deposition of radon progeny can lead to lung cancers. Aggregates (granite) are known-made indoor environments, mainly due to poor ventilation. Radon decays to form radon progeny. While most of the radon gas inhaled will be exhaled, the radon progeny will adhere to the respiratory tract. It is now

Yu, K.N.

57

Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Abstract: The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon in the LSM (Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, depth of 4800 m w.e.), investigates the neutrinoless double beta decay (20) of various nuclei [1]. The observation of such a process will give us fundamental

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

58

Protocols for radon and radon decay product measurements in homes (revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides a technical discussion of the guidelines presented in EPA's Citizen's Guide to Radon and Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon. In addition, general procedural recommendations are included for measurement services. For example, recommendations are provided for topics such as client interview, measurement procedures, quality assurance, standard operating procedures, providing test results and information to consumers. The document supersedes EPA's Indoor Radon and Radon Decay Product Measurement Protocols (EPA 520-1-89-009).

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

atmospheric radon concentration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The present author has kept observation for concentrations of atmospheric radon, radon progeny and thoron progeny for several years at the campus of Fukushima Medical...

60

Radon measurement in schools: Revised edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides school administrators and facilities managers with instructions on how to test for the presence of radon. The findings from EPA's comprehensive studies of radon measurements in schools have been incorporated into these recommendations. The report supersedes Radon Measurements in Schools- An Interim Report (EPA 520/1-89-010). However, it does not invalidate tests in the process of being conducted under the interim report.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radon Concern in the Hickory Aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Hickory Aquifer's groundwater poses health risks for residents in the area. Radon is a natural, radioactive gas that may be found indoors in air or drinking water. Radon is the decay product of radium, so radon indi- rectly reflects the presence... of radium. Radon in groundwater occurs from the decay of radium both within the aquifer host rock and in the groundwater itself. It does not react chemically with either, however, because it is a noble or inert gas. About 1 percent to 2 percent...

Crawford, Amanda

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

PASSIVE RADON PROGENY DOSIMETERS: FEASIBILITY STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon progeny measurements can improve dose estimates based on radon gas measurements alone. The airborne activity-size distribution ratio affects the available dose rate per unit radon. Measurements of surface deposited alpha activity and radon concentration can be used in a semi-empirical model to estimate the equilibrium ratio, the free fraction and airborne dose rate. Since residential atmospheres are dynamic, several measurement approaches, including electret ion chamber and track registration techniques, are being studied to develop passive, integrating detectors. Preliminary tests show good correlation between surface deposited activity or energy, airborne progeny concentrations and dose rate. Tests are underway to assess the performance in other home environments.

Daniel J. Steck; David Harrison; Said Rahman; Rad Elec Inc

63

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

64

Articles Intercomparison of Retrospective Radon Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We performed both a laboratory and a field intercompanison of two novel glass-based retrospective radon detectors previously used in major radon case-control studies performed in Missouri and Iowa. The new detectors estimate retrospective residential radon exposure from the accumulation of a long-lived radon decay product, 210Pb, in glass. The detectors use track registration material in direct contact with glass surfaces to measure the a-emission of a 210Pb-decay product, 210Po. The detector's track density generation rate (tracks per square centimeter per hour) is proportional to the sur6ce a-activity. In the absence of other strong sources of a-emission in the glass, the implanted surface a-activity should be proportional to the accumulated 210Po, and hence to the cumulative radon gas exposure. The goals of the intercomparison were to a) perform collocated measurements using two different glass-based retrospective radon detectors in a controlled laboratory environment to compare their relative response to implanted polonium in the absence of environmental variation, b) perform collocated measurements using two different retrospective radon progeny detectors in a variety of residential settings to compare their detection of glass-implanted polonium activities, and c) examne the correlation between track density rates and contemporary radon gas concentrations. The laboratory results suggested that the materials

R. William Field; Daniel J. Steck; Mary Ann Parkhurst; Judy A. Mahaffey; Michael C. R. Alavanja

65

Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Waste Management Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission#12;#12;Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual'nat the average annual l'elease of radon-222 from the disposal sites to t.he atmosp~1er0 by residuai radioactive

66

Modeled atmospheric radon concentrations from uranium mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium mining and milling operations result in the release of radon from numerous sources of various types and strengths. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act, is assessing the health impact of air emissions of radon from underground uranium mines. In this case, the radon emissions may impact workers and residents in the mine vicinity. To aid in this assessment, the EPA needs to know how mine releases can affect the radon concentrations at populated locations. To obtain this type of information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory used the radon emissions, release characteristics and local meterological conditions for a number of mines to model incremental radon concentrations. Long-term, average, incremental radon concentrations were computed based on the best available information on release rates, plume rise parameters, number and locations of vents, and local dispersion climatology. Calculations are made for a model mine, individual mines, and multiple mines. Our approach was to start with a general case and then consider specific cases for comparison. A model underground uranium mine was used to provide definition of the order of magnitude of typical impacts. Then computations were made for specific mines using the best mine-specific information available for each mine. These case study results are expressed as predicted incremental radon concentration contours plotted on maps with local population data from a previous study. Finally, the effect of possible overlap of radon releases from nearby mines was studied by calculating cumulative radon concentrations for multiple mines in a region with many mines. The dispersion model, modeling assumptions, data sources, computational procedures, and results are documented in this report. 7 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

Droppo, J.G.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

AN ADVANCED E-PERM SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CONCENTRATIONS OF RADON GAS, RADON PROGENY, EQUILIBRIUM RATIO AND UNATTACHED RADON PROGENY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to the decay products of radon, is well known and documented in the literature. The USEPA has set a primary standard for radon progeny exposure for the general public at 0.02 WL with a corresponding derived limit of 4 pCi/L for radon gas, assuming an equilibrium ratio of 50%. Because radon gas measurement is simpler and less expensive, more than 90 % of all the currently performed radon measurements in the US, measure radon gas and estimate the actual health risk via the assumed equilibrium factor for a residential structure. However, with increased concerns of radon related exposures in building with high air circulation rates (schools and commercial buildings) the 50 % equilibrium ratio assumption may not allow for proper characterization of the true exposure from radon measurements. In these cases a more rigorous characterization by direct measurements of radon decay products may be useful follow-up measurement after initial radon measurements have identified a potential concern. This paper describes a configuration radon and radon decay product measurement devices that can simultaneously measure radon and its decay products as well as provide an indication of the relative ratio of attached to unattached decay products. This unique combination of devices has numerous applications for designers of complex remediation systems and environmental consultants who have the responsibility of providing cost effective

Paul Ph. D. Stieff; Rick Stieff; Lorin Stieff

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

SEASONAL VARIABILITY AND BILEVEL DISTRIBUTION OF RADON AND RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS IN 200 NEW JBRSEY HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To provide data necessaw to perform a health risk assessment of the radon problem in New Jersey, concurrent radon and radon progeny measurements were made in 200 homes on two lowest floors in two different seasons. The homes were divided into categories based on their substructure, heat distribution system, and the degree of air flow between the basement and first floor levels. Specific conversion factors (equilibrium coefficients, inter-floor radon ratios, inter-season radon ratios) were determined for each house type. Basement equilibrium coefficients were generally lower in the winter than in the non-winter season. First floor equilibrium coefficients were higher than basement values. First floor to'basement radon ratios were higher for forced air houses than for houses with hot water or electric heat distribution systems and the ratios for both types of houses were higher in the winter than in the non-heating season. The winter to non-winter ratio for first floors is

Keith B- Miller; Robert A. Hchaverv M-s; Camp Dresser; Udee Inc

69

CURRENT STATE OF THE ART IN MEASURING ENVIRONMENTAL RADON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the US EPA, radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers and the second leading cause overall. Data from several epidemiological studies show definitive evidence of the association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer. In the past 30 years, emphasis has been on measuring radon rather than radon progeny concentrations because of the simplicity, convenience and cost effectiveness of radon measuring instruments and methods. Using an equilibrium ratio between radon and radon progeny of 0.4-0.5, radon concentration measurements can be converted to working level and to exposure in working level month. In recent years, over 1 million short-term measurements for radon were made annually using grab sampling, integrating and continuous radon devices. As a result of these short-term measurements more than 800,000 residences with elevated radon levels were identified and were mitigated successfully. This paper will emphasize the current development of different instruments and methods, their sensitivities, practicality and cost effectiveness for making short-term measurements of environmental radon. More than 99 % of indoor measurements involve radon only. Radon progeny, used mostly in research and diagnostics, will not be discussed.

A. C. George; N. Bredhoff

70

Laboratory evaluation of performance and durability of polymer grouts for subsurface hydraulic/diffusion barriers. Informal report, October 1993--May 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminated soils, buried waste and leaking underground storage tanks pose a threat to the environment through contaminant transport. One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier. Subsurface barriers increase the performance of waste disposal sites by providing a low permeability layer that can reduce percolation water migration into the waste site, minimize surface transport of contaminants, and reduce migration of volatile species. Also, a barrier can be constructed to envelop the site or plume completely, there by containing the contaminants and the potential leakage. Portland cement grout curtains have been used for barriers around waste sites. However, large castings of hydraulic cements result invariably in cracking due to shrinkage, thermal stresses induced by the hydration reactions, and wet-dry cycling prevalent at and sites. Therefore, improved, low permeability, high integrity materials are under investigation by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Technology Development, Integrated Demonstrations and Programs. The binders chosen for characterization include: an acrylic, a vinylester styrene, bitumen, a polyester styrene, furfuryl alcohol, and sulfur polymer cement. These materials cover broad ranges of chemical and physical durability, performance, viscosity, and cost. This report details the results of laboratory formulation, testing, and characterization of several innovative polymer grouts. An appendix containing a database of the barrier materials is at the end of this report.

Heiser, J.H.; Milian, L.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Regulatory issues and assumptions associated with barriers in the vadose zone surrounding buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier that consists of a wall of low permeability material. The barrier material should be compatible with soil and waste conditions specific to the site and have as low an effective diffusivity as is reasonably achievable to minimize or inhibit transport of moisture and contaminants. This report addresses the regulatory issues associated with the use of non-traditional organic polymer barriers as well as the use of soil-bentonite or cement-bentonite mixtures for such barriers, considering barriers constructed from these latter materials to be a regulatory baseline. The regulatory issues fall into two categories. The first category consists of issues associated with the acceptability of such barriers to the EPA as a method for achieving site or performanceimprovement. The second category encompasses those regulatory issues concerning health, safety and the environment which must be addressed regarding barrier installation and performance, especially if non-traditional materials are to be used.

Siskind, B.; Heiser, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ris-R-1201(EN) Radon Transport Modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a numerical computer model of soil-gas and radon trans- port in porous media. It can be used, for example radon exhalation from building materials such as concrete. The finite-volume model is a technical

73

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different Ambient Environments K . N . Y Inhaled progeny of 222Rn (radon progeny) are the most important source of irradiation of the human-, urban-, and marine-influenced aerosols. The ASDs of attached radon progeny for all three studied ambient

Yu, K.N.

74

The relation of seismic activity and radon concentration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radon, which is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation, reaches to surface as gas or dissolved form in the ground water. Emanation of radon can has a profile is disposed to increasing or decreasing depending on the effects of meteorological events or crust movements. In this work, the radon concentration in soil gas, which is transported from soil to AlphaGUARD, is continuously measured in Mytilene (Greece). A graph of radon concentration is prepared for comparison with simultaneous earthquake data. As a consequence of comparison, we determined that the radon concentration indicates anomalies before the earthquakes.

Kulali, Feride, E-mail: feridekulali@gmail.com, E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr; Akkurt, ?skender, E-mail: feridekulali@gmail.com, E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr [Suleyman Demirel University, Science and Art Faculty, Isparta-Turkey (Turkey); Vogiannis, Efstratios, E-mail: svog@env.aegean.gr [Department of Environmental Studies, University of the Aegean,Mytilene (Greece)

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Childhood leukaemia and indoor radon concentration 1 Ecological Association between Indoor Radon Concentration and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the risk associated with natural radiation exposure still needs to be documented. Natural irradiation and food) (Sugier and Hubert, 2002). Radon is the second greatest source of exposure to ionising radiation

Boyer, Edmond

76

Systematic grid-wise radon concentration measurements and first radon map in Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic study of the indoor airborne radon concentration in the central part of the Nicosia district was conducted, using high-sensitivity active radon portable detectors of the type "RADIM3A". From a total of 108 measurements in 54 grids of 1 km^2 area each, the overall mean value is 20.6 \\pm 13.2 Bq m^-3 (A.M.\\pm S.D.). That is almost twice less than the corresponding average worldwide value. The radon concentration levels in drinking water were also measured in 24 sites of the residential district, using the high-sensitivity radon detector of the type "RADIM3W". The mean value obtained from these measurements is 243.8 \\pm 224.8 mBq L^-1, which is relatively low compared to the corresponding internationally accepted level. The associated annual effective dose rates to each measurement were also calculated and compared to the corresponding worldwide values. From the geographical coordinates of the measuring sites and the corresponding radon concentration values, the digital radon map of the central part of the Nicosia district was constructed for the first time, by means of the ArcMap software package.

G. Theodoulou; H. Tsertos; Y. Parpottas

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Systematic grid-wise radon concentration measurements and first radon map in Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic study of the indoor airborne radon concentration in the central part of the Nicosia district was conducted, using high-sensitivity active radon portable detectors of the type "RADIM3A". From a total of 108 measurements in 54 grids of 1 km^2 area each, the overall mean value is 20.6 \\pm 13.2 Bq m^-3 (A.M.\\pm S.D.). That is almost twice less than the corresponding average worldwide value. The radon concentration levels in drinking water were also measured in 24 sites of the residential district, using the high-sensitivity radon detector of the type "RADIM3W". The mean value obtained from these measurements is 243.8 \\pm 224.8 mBq L^-1, which is relatively low compared to the corresponding internationally accepted level. The associated annual effective dose rates to each measurement were also calculated and compared to the corresponding worldwide values. From the geographical coordinates of the measuring sites and the corresponding radon concentration values, the digital radon map of the central part...

Theodoulou, G; Parpottas, Y; 10.1016/j.radmeas.2012.03.019

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A NEW ELECTROSTATIC RADON PROGENY COLLECTION METHOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method for collecting radon progeny was investigated that reduces particle concentration including radon progeny in indoor air without air movement. The LECA (for bge Electrostatically Charged-) system uses a high voltage source to charge the collector surfaces (e.g., furniture pieces were used) once they have been electrically isolated from ground by teflon film. When a piece was touched by the high voltage lead its entire surface immediately become charged to about 60 % of the line voltage regardless of its material makeup. By limiting the current to 250 ua no sparking or shock sensation was experienced when touching the charged wire or collector surfaces. Progeny collection efficiencies were measured for collector areas from 8.6 to 5 1.8 m2 and voltages from 2.5 to 9 KV in an 82 m3 test-room. The optimum LECA configuration tested reduced all particulate in the test-room including both the attached and unattached progeny by about 92%. BACKGROUND Lung cancer, the priiciple radon health effect, is not caused by the radon gas itself but by its progeny, especially by the smaller unattached progeny particles that can penetrate into the deep respiratory tract. Several researchers have investigated methods of reducing progeny in indoor air but most methods tried have been unsuccessful because of their inability to remove enough of those more hazardous unattached progeny.

John C. Dempsey; Rad Elec Inc; Darold M. Wobschall

79

Environmental Radioactivity 56 (2001) 327340 Radon progeny dose conversion coefficients for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 56 (2001) 327­340 Radon progeny dose conversion coefficients; Dose conversion coefficients; Scaling factors; Radon progeny 1. Introduction Epidemiological studies cancer associated with exposure to radon progeny (Lubin, 1988). More recently, Lubin et al (1994

Yu, K.N.

80

Radon Transport Into a Single-Family House with a Basement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in most exposed to radon progeny at an annual rate uraniumto prevent how- entry of radon progeny, and the short allows

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Radon release and dispersion from an open pit uranium mine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radon-222 flux from representative sections of the United Nuclear St. Anthony open-pit mine complex was measured. The collected radon was adsorbed on activated charcoal and the radon activity was measured by gamma spectroscopy. System design, calibration, and the procedure to determine radon flux density (pCi/m/sup 2/.s) are described. A continuous series of radon flux densities were measured over a 5-month period at a control point in the mine. The average flux density at the control point was 1.9 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. A close correlation between radon flux density variations and changes in barometric pressure was observed by a comparison of meteorological data and average daily radon flux density measured at the control point. The release rate from each section of the mine was calculated from the average radon flux density and the area of the section, as determined from enlarged aerial photographs. The average radon flux density for eight locations over the ore-bearing section was 7.3 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average flux density for four locations over undisturbed topsoil was 0.17 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average Ra-226 content of ten samples taken from the ore-bearing region was 102 pCi/g ore. The ratio of radon flux density to radium content (specific flux) was 0.072. The release rate from the entire St. Anthony open pit was determined to be 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ pCi/s. This rate is comparable to the natural release of radon from one square mile of undisturbed topsoil. 16 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

Kisieleski, W.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008 W.J. Llope Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 is "radiation" and the other is "radon." Radioactive elements, by their very nature, seek stability by decaying the outside and cause damage to cells and DNA, potentially causing cancer. Also, naturally occurring Uranium

Llope, William J.

84

acute radon progeny: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acute radon progeny First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A Radon Progeny Deposition Model...

85

active radon progeny: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radon progeny First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Retrospective radon progeny measurements...

86

LONG-TERM DETERMINATION OF AIRBORNE RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS USING LR 115 DETECTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LONG-TERM DETERMINATION OF AIRBORNE RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS USING LR 115 DETECTORS dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e. 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, but not the radon (222 Rn) gas itself. Accordingly, long-term measure- ments of the concentrations of radon progeny

Yu, K.N.

87

ARE RADON GAS MEASUREMENTS ADEQUATE FOR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES AND CASE CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Jacobi model to calculate the radon progeny concentrations in a room by varying the attachment rate It is now well established that the short-lived radon progeny contributes about half of the total exposure is not attributed to the radon gas itself, but instead to its short-lived progeny. Exposure to radon progeny

Yu, K.N.

88

BEHAVIOR OF RADON PROGENY NEAR OUTDOOR SURFACES IN CONTRASTING TERRAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal legislation expresses a long-term goal of reducing indoor radon to levels comparable to those outdoors. A thorough understanding of the behavior of radon and its progeny in the outdoor environment is therefore important We report near-surface measurements of radon, attached-to-aerosol progeny, and unattachcd-toaerosol progeny in the contrasting environments of the forested hill country of Oak Ridge, TN and the desert sands of White Sands National Monument, NM. Vertical progeny gradients are greater at White Sands due to a smoother terrain, and dose levels tend to be lower due to lower radon flux from the gypsum sand. Both sites show a significant diurnal variation of dose rate with a maximum occurring usually in the early morning. Correlation of dose rate variation with radon variation is surprisingly small suggesting the importance of other factors such as progeny deposition and aerosol concentration in controlling outdoor dose.

S. D. Schery; P. T. Wasiolek; Y. Li

89

Indoor radon and radon decay-product measurement-device protocols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report provides information, recommendations and technological guidance for anyone providing measurement services using 15 radon decay product measurement methods. The EPA has evaluated these techniques and found them to be satisfactory. These protocols provide method-specific procedures that can be used as the basis for standard operating procedures.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Puncture detecting barrier materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

National radon database documentation. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: Years 5 and 6. Final report 1986-1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Radon Database has been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to distribute information collected in two recently completed radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys, Years 1 to 6; and The National Residential Radon Survey. The goals of the state radon surveys were twofold. Some measure of the distribution of radon levels among residences was desired for major geographic areas within each state and for each state as a whole. In addition, it was desired that each state survey would be able to identify areas of potentially high residential radon concentrations (hot spots) in the state, enabling the state to focus its attention on areas where indoor radon concentrations might pose a greater health threat. The document discusses year 5, 1990-91. The areas surveyed are: Arkansas; Illinois; Maryland; Eastern Cherokee Nation; Mississippi; Texas; and Washington.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

INTERIM BARRIER AT HANFORDS TY FARM TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An innovative interim surface barrier was constructed as a demonstration project at the Hanford Site's TY Tank Farm. The purpose of the demonstration barrier is to stop rainwater and snowmelt from entering the soils within the tank farm and driving contamination from past leaks and spills toward the ground water. The interim barrier was constructed using a modified asphalt material with very low permeability developed by MatCon{reg_sign}. Approximately 2,400 cubic yards of fill material were added to the tank farm to create a sloped surface that will gravity drain precipitation to collection points where it will be routed through buried drain lines to an evapotranspiration basin adjacent to the farm. The evapotranspiration basin is a lined basin with a network of perforated drain lines covered with soil and planted with native grasses. The evapotranspiration concept was selected because it prevents the runoff from percolating into the soil column and also avoids potential monitoring and maintenance issues associated with standing water in a traditional evaporation pond. Because of issues associated with using standard excavation and earth moving equipment in the farm a number of alternate construction approaches were utilized to perform excavations and prepare the site for the modified asphalt.

PARKER DL; HOLM MJ; HENDERSON JC; LOBER RW

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MEASUREMENT OF RADON-22O(THORON) IN HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon-222 (also known as radon) is a relatively long-lived isotope of radon and originates from uranium present in the earth's crust. Radon-220 (also known as thoron) is a short-lived isotope of radon and originates from thorium present in the earth's crust. these gases are compared. Fundamental properties and health hazards of On the average, the thoron contribution to the total dose to the lungs is in the range of 10 % to 15 % of that from radon. In homes with elevated levels of radon progeny concentration there is no corresponding elevation of thoron progeny levels, making the contribution from thoron progeny quite insignificant. However, there are certain situations where thoron measurements are important. hey are: 1) areas rich in thorium, 2) thorium refineries and 3) while measuring soil gas concentrations. Thoron can interfere in certain flow-through radon monitors, by causing an additional signal. If the total signal is interpreted as due to radon, such monitors overestimate the radon levels. A large (18 liter) double filter unit used to measure the thoron gas concentration in a low radon basement gave 0.5 pCi/ ~ of thoron and the corresponding level for radon was 1.5 pCi/L. 1 Some radon testchambers use soil gas as a source of radon.-Several measurements were also carried out in one such chamber, and the levels were-below 0.5 pCi/L irrespective of the levels of radon, indicating an insignificant contribution to the flow-through radon monitors. Key words: radon, thoron, radon progeny, and thoron progeny.

J. Dempsey; Rad Elec Inc

95

RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W.W. Nazaroff, Radon in Energy-Efficient Houses, LawrenceStudies, pp. 18- 23 in Energy Efficient Buildings Program,AMD ITS DAUCHTERS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINCS A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMD ITS DAUCHTERS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINCS A.V. Nero,W.W. Nazaroff, Radon in Energy-Efficient Houses, LawrenceStudies, pp. 18- 23 in Energy Efficient Buildings Program,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

au radon dans: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 161 A Radon Progeny Deposition Model CERN Preprints Summary: The next generation low-background...

98

Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA); Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Radon attenuation handbook for uranium mill tailings cover design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook has been prepared to facilitate the design of earthen covers to control radon emission from uranium mill tailings. Radon emissions from bare and covered uranium mill tailings can be estimated from equations based on diffusion theory. Basic equations are presented for calculating surface radon fluxes from covered tailings, or alternately, the cover thicknesses required to satisfy a given radon flux criterion. Also described is a computer code, RAECOM, for calculating cover thicknesses and surface fluxes. Methods are also described for measuring diffusion coefficients for radon, or for estimating them from empirical correlations. Since long-term soil moisture content is a critical parameter in determining the value of the diffusion coefficient, methods are given for estimating the long-term moisture contents of soils. The effects of cover defects or advection are also discussed and guidelines are given for determining if they are significant. For most practical cases, advection and cover defect effects on radon flux can be neglected. Several examples are given to demonstrate cover design calculations, and an extensive list of references is included. 63 references, 18 figures, 6 tables.

Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Radon Transform in Finite Dimensional Hilbert Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel analysis of ?nite dimensional Hilbert space is outlined. The approach bypasses general, inherent, di?culties present in handling angular variables in ?nite dimensional problems: The ?nite dimensional, d, Hilbert space operators are underpinned with ?nite geometry which provide intuitive perspective to the physical operators. The analysis emphasizes a central role for projectors of mutual unbiased bases (MUB) states, extending thereby their use in ?nite dimensional quantum mechanics studies. Interrelation among the Hilbert space operators revealed via their (?nite) dual a?ne plane geometry (DAPG) underpinning are displayed and utilized in formulating the ?nite dimensional ubiquitous Radon transformation and its inverse illustrating phase space-like physics encoded in lines and points of the geometry. The ?nite geometry required for our study is outlined.

M. Revzen

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Lung Cancer Attributable to Indoor Radon Exposures in Two Radon--Prone Areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. For medium and low concentrations which are the typical residential radon levels, recent researches have also demonstrated increased risks of lung cancer for people exposed. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon--prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). One important difference between the two studied areas is related to the houses built using uranium waste as construction material in Stei area. Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. and 366 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3} in the Spanish region. The results are compute with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were calculated in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than observed from the national statistics. In comparison, in Torrelodones area, a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer were estimated along a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number observed by authorities. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Vasiliniuc, Stefan [Faculty of Env. Science, 'Babes-Bolyai' University, Fantanele, No. 30 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Sainz, Carlos; Poncela, Luis Santiago Quindos [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Herrera Oria s/n. 39011, Santander (Spain)

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon and Its Decay Products in Indoor Air, Wiley, New York.radon daughter products in indoor air, Radiat. Prot. Dosim..and their decay products in indoor air, Health Phys. , 34,

Nero, A.V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A study of the polyethylene membrane used in diffusion chambers for radon gas concentration measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enhanced. This is explained by enhanced deposition of radon progeny on the outside surface of the PE these deposited radon progeny to reach the SSNTD. We will present the PE thickness which can stop the alpha

Yu, K.N.

104

Sensitivity of LR 115 detectors in hemispherical chambers for radon measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, if the radius is larger than 3 cm, the effects of the deposition fraction of radon progeny will come into effect one which provides the total sensitivity independent of the deposition fraction of radon progeny. Ã?

Yu, K.N.

105

Incidence characteristics of alpha particles on detectors irradiated in a radon progeny atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

progeny (usually about 0.5). This forms the base for determining the exposure to radon progeny expressed methods for long-term passive measure- ments of radon progeny concentrations, despite that short

Yu, K.N.

106

A TIME-DEPENDENT METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING THE DIFFUSION OF RADON-222 IN CONCRETE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coefficient of Radon in Concrete", Health Phys. 30, 263. Didiffusion of radon through concrete. The source loop exposesa 2.5-cm sample taken from a different type of concrete.

Zapalac, Geordie H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term measurements of unattached radon progeny concentrations using solid-state nuclear track of radon progeny from a set of measured (f1, f2, f3) values, where fi¼Ci/C0 (i¼1, 2, 3), and C0, C1, C2 is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, but not to the radon

Yu, K.N.

108

Development and application of the scintillation flask technique for the measurement of indoor radon-222 concentrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

half-life. Exposure to alpha emitting radon progeny is the major source of natural radiation doses to the lung (NCRP84b). Almost all of this is received indoors, where radon levels are elevated due to a trapping effect 1n the enclosed areas. Since... measure indoor radon and radon progeny levels, a suitable detection method must be developed. Charles (Ch84) designed and constructed an air grab sampling system using "scintillation flasks". There were, however, some minor problems with the system...

Vasquez, Gerard Michael

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Stacey G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wowczuk, Andrew (Wheeling, WV); Vellenoweth, Thomas E. (Wheeling, WV)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KILLING OF TARGET CELLS DUE TO RADON PROGENY IN THE HUMAN LUNG B. M. F. Lau1 , D. Nikezic1,2 and K to inhaled radon progeny in the human lung. The present work uses the microdosimetric approach and determines- ratory tract (HRT) due to inhaled radon progeny, ICRP66(1) made use of the absorbed fraction (AF) which

Yu, K.N.

111

Letter to the editor Comment on ``Radon-222 signatures of natural ventilation regimes in an underground  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fraction of radon progeny in human bronchial airways with bifurcation geometry. International Journal-B tree due to radon progeny. International Journal of Radiation Biology 77, 559­565. Nikezic, D., Yu, K for radon progeny. Radiation and Environmental Biophysics 40, 207­211. Nikezic, D., Yu, K.N., 2002a

Yu, K.N.

112

Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny in the human Abstract To calculate the absorbed dose in the human lung due to inhaled radon progeny, ICRP focussed and secretory cells). The absorbed energy for alpha particles emitted by radon progeny in the human respiratory

Yu, K.N.

113

RADIATIOh RESEARCH 142,61-69 (1995) The Biological Effectiveness of Radon-ProgenyAlpha Particles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATIOh RESEARCH 142,61-69 (1995) The Biological Effectiveness of Radon-ProgenyAlpha Particles., Huang, Y. and Hall, E. J. The Biological Effectiveness of Radon-Progeny Alpha Particles. 111. Quality estimates of values appropriate for the quality factor for radon progeny are significantly lower than those

Brenner, David Jonathan

114

Applied Radiation and Isotopes 55 (2001) 707713 Bronchial dosimeter for radon progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Radiation and Isotopes 55 (2001) 707­713 Bronchial dosimeter for radon progeny T of the dose conversion factor (in units of mSv WL M­1 ) with the size of radon progeny from 1 to 1000 nm place and at home. It is now established that the inhalation of airborne short-lived radon progeny

Yu, K.N.

115

Long-term measurements of radon progeny concentrations with LR 115 SSNTDs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term measurements of radon progeny concentrations with LR 115 SSNTDs K.N. Yua,*, D. Nikezica.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Radon progeny concentration; Equilibrium factor; LR 115 detector 1. Introduction Methods for long-term monitoring of concentrations of radon progeny or the equilibrium factor

Yu, K.N.

116

Recycler barrier RF buckets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term determination of airborne radon progeny concentrations using LR 115 solid-state nuclear. Introduction The radon-related absorbed dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e., 218-term measurements of the concentrations of radon progeny or the equilibrium factor F, among other information

Yu, K.N.

118

Retrospective radon progeny measurements through measurements of 210 activities on glass objects using stacked LR 115 detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrospective radon progeny measurements through measurements of 210 Po activities on glass objects 2 September 2008 PACS: 29.40 23.60 Keywords: Radon Radon progeny 210 Po Implantation Retrospective for determining 210 Po activity in glass surfaces after deposition of short-lived radon progeny. The sensitivities

Yu, K.N.

119

Retractable barrier strip  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

New barrier fluids for subsurface containment of contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In some situations, containment of contaminants in the subsurface may be preferable to removal or treatment in situ. In these cases, it maybe possible to form barriers by injecting fluids (grouts) that set in place and reduce the formation permeability. This paper reports laboratory work to develop two types of fluids for this application: colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX). Falling-head permeameter tests of grouted Hanford sand, lasting 50 days, showed hydraulic conductivities of order 10{sup -7} cm/sec for these two materials. Low initial viscosity of the grout is necessary to permit injection without causing fracturing or surface uplift. Experiments with crosslinked polysiloxanes showed that they could be diluted to achieve adequately low viscosity without losing their ability to cure. Control of the gel time is important for grout emplacement. Gel time of CS grouts increased with increasing pH (above 6.5) and with decreasing ionic strength. Salt solutions were added to the colloid-to increase the ionic strength and control gel time. When injected into Hanford sand, the CS grout gelled much more quickly than the same formula without sand. This effect results from salinity that is present in pore water and from multi-valent ions that are desorbed from clays and ion-exchanged for mono-valent ions in the grout. Ion-exchange experiments showed that most of the multi-valent ions could be removed-by flushing the sand with 15 PV of 4% NaCl and sand treated in this manner did not accelerate the gelling of the grout. When grout is injected into unsaturated soil it slumps, leaving the soil only partially saturated and achieving less permeability reduction upon gelling. Multiple injections of CS grout in 1-D sand columns demonstrated that by accumulating the residual gelled grout saturations from several injections, low permeability can be achieved.

Moridis, G.J.; Persoff, P.; Holman, H.Y.; Muller, S.J.; Pruess, K.; Radke, C.J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

Shurter, R.P.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Modeling surface backgrounds from radon progeny plate-out  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The next generation low-background detectors operating deep underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. The surface deposition and subsequent implantation of radon progeny in detector materials will be a source of energetic background events. We investigate Monte Carlo and model-based simulations to understand the surface implantation profile of radon progeny. Depending on the material and region of interest of a rare event search, these partial energy depositions can be problematic. Motivated by the use of Ge crystals for the detection of neutrinoless double-beta decay, we wish to understand the detector response of surface backgrounds from radon progeny. We look at the simulation of surface decays using a validated implantation distribution based on nuclear recoils and a realistic surface texture. Results of the simulations and measured ? spectra are presented.

Perumpilly, G.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Snyder, N. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)] [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

124

Micro heat barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

Henager, Charles H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Recoil-deposited Po-210 in radon dwellings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Short-lived decay products of Rn-222 plate out on all surfaces in a house containing radon gas. Following the subsequent alpha decays of the mother nuclei, the daughter products Pb-214 and Pb-210 are superficially and permanently absorbed. Due to its long half-life (22 y) the activity of absorbed Pb-210 accumulates in the surface. The activity of Pb-210, or its decay products, can thus reflect the past randon daughter and plate-out history of a house over several decades. Our results and experience from measurements of Po-210 and Rn-222 in 22 dwellings will be presented. In these studies the Po-210 surface activity of one plane glass sheet per dwelling (window panes were not used) has been determined and compared with the period of exposure times the mean radon concentration measured over a two-month period. Considering the large uncertainty in the integrated radon exposure estimate the surface {sup 210}Po correlates well (r=0.73) with the accumulated radon exposure. The {sup 210}Po activity of the glass samples has been measured non-destructively using an open-flow pulse ionization chamber and this detector has also been successfully applied in field exercises.

Samuelsson, C.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Dennis, Eberhart, Dulikravich & Radons FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF COOLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arterial supply and effectively blocks the external cooling wave from advancing to the core of the brain1 Dennis, Eberhart, Dulikravich & Radons FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION OF COOLING OF REALISTIC 3-D Rapid cooling of the brain in the first minutes following the onset of cerebral ischemia

Dennis, Brian

129

Thermal barrier coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Spontaneous Imbibition in Low Permeability Medium, SUPRI TR-114  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic experimental investigation of capillary pressure characteristics and fluid flow in diatomite was begun. Using an X-ray CT scanner and a specially constructed imbibition cell, we study spontaneous water imbibition processes in diatomite and, for reference, Berea sandstone and chalk. The mass of water imbibed as a function of time is also measured. Imbibition is restricted to concurrent flow. Despite a marked difference in rock properties such as permeability and porosity, we find similar trends in saturation profiles and weight gain versus time functions. Imbibition in diatomote is relatively rapid when initial water saturation is low due to large capillary forces. Using a non-linear regression analysis together with the experimental data, the capillary pressure and water relative permeability curves are determined for the diatomite in the water-air system. The results given for displacement profiles by numerical simulation match the experimental results.

Kovscek, Anthony R.; Schembre, Josephina

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in a fine-grained saprolite sediment that was collected from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge site, TN, where...

133

Report on Hydrologic Flow in Low-Permeability Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that under normal conditions (under which there are no intersections between tunnels/drifts and conductive geological structures, such as faults), the water flow velocity in the damage zone, as a result of non-Darcian flow behavior, is extremely small such that solute transport is dominated by diffusion, rather than advection. We show that unless non-Darcian flow behavior is considered, significant errors can occur in the “measured” relative-permeability values. We propose a hypothesis to consider the temperature impact based on limited test results from the petroleum literature. To consider the bedding effects, we present an empirical relationship between water flux and hydraulic gradient for non-Darcian water flow in anisotropic cases.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Birkholzer, Jens

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extending up to three thousand feet from the producing well. Also, a model simulating a nuclear cavity was designed. This model simulated a well containing an eighty foot radius cavity with a fractured zone of one hundred times the reservoir permeability... of each system was prepared. The results of this study showed that all fractures of greater than one thousand foot radius had greater productivity and greater cumu- lative gas produced than did the nuclear cavity. It appears that large hydraulic...

Holditch, Stephen A

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of a method for determination of radon emanation from small soil samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bronchial dose after deposition in the lung tissue, since the unattached radon progeny are of optimal particle size to be deposited in the tracheobronchial region of the lung. The magnitude of the unattached fraction is affected by the relative humidity... is the use of organic film that is damaged by interacting alpha particles. A track-etch detector typically consists of a small film placed inside a filtered container. The filter allows radon to diffuse into the container, but filters radon progeny entry...

Madonia, Michael Vincent

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, Charles A. (Tracy, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Barrier breaching device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

Honodel, C.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - au radon gaz Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

est gal au rapport des intensits du tube de radon... place au milieu d'un tube Fis. 2. Une enveloppe ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - admissible du radon Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a and NEMO collaboration... ) Abstract: The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon... can be a non negligible component...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - america residential radon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a and NEMO collaboration... ) Abstract: The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon... can be a non negligible component...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing cumulative radon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a and NEMO collaboration... ) Abstract: The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon... can be a non negligible component...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - astatine radon francium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a and NEMO collaboration... ) Abstract: The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon... can be a non negligible component...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian radon database Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a and NEMO collaboration... ) Abstract: The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon... can be a non negligible component...

145

Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 metre cubed DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a factor of ~10 reduction in internal radon rates. Levels are found to be consistent with the sum from separate radon emanation measurements of the internal materials and also with direct measurement using an attached alpha spectrometer. The current DRIFT detector, DRIFT-IId, is found to have sensitivity to 222Rn of 2.5 {\\mu}Bq/l with current analysis efficiency, potentially opening up DRIFT technology as a new tool for sensitive radon assay of materials.

J. B. R. Battat; J. Brack; E. Daw; A. Dorofeev; A. C. Ezeribe; J. R. Fox; J. -L. Gauvreau; M. Gold; L. J. Harmon; J. L. Harton; J. M. Landers; E. R. Lee; D. Loomba; J. A. J. Matthews; E. H. Miller; A. Monte; A. StJ. Murphy; S. M. Paling; N. Phan; M. Pipe; M. Robinson; S. W. Sadler; A. Scarff; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; S. Telfer; D. Walker; D. Warner; L. Yuriev

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

146

VARIATION WITH EQUILIBRIUM CONDITION OF THE CALIBRATION FACTORS FOR CONTINUOUS RADON PROGENY MONITORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The calibration factor for a continuous monitor that uses gross alpha-particle counting for measuring radon progeny concentration theoretically should vary as a function of the relative concentrations of the radon progeny; therefore, an inherent error is introduced by using a constant calibration factor, regardless of the equilibrium condition, as is the practice for most models of radon progeny monitor. An equation was derived describing the calibration factor as a function of the concentrations of the radon progeny and was used to calculate values of the calibration factor over the entire theoretical range of relative concentrations of radon progeny that comprise a constant collective radon progeny concentration. The results of these calculations showed that the calibration factor varies by approximately 10 % over the entire theoretical range of relative concentrations of radon progeny. The range of relative concentrations that typically exist in indoor air is a small subset of the entire range that is theoretically possible; therefore, the calibration factor varies, in practice, due to this effect by less than 10 % and the inherent error introduced by the detection and analysis method is not serious. Loss of radon progeny, particularly 218~0, due to plateout on surfaces of the monitor before the progeny are collected on the filter has the effect of lowering the value of the calibration factor. This effect can be significant at conditions of low equilibrium when the fraction of radon progeny that are unattached to aerosols in the air is increased and plateout is more likely to occur.

Phillip H. Jenkins

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric radon-222 concentration Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. Radon-222... concentrations in air include ... Source: Baskaran, Mark - Department of Geology, Wayne State University Collection: Geosciences ; Chemistry 30 1.0 MAJOR STUDIES...

148

National Radon Database. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: AR, IL, MD, MT, MS, TX, VA, WA and the Eastern Cherokee Nation, 1990-1992 (5 1/4 inch 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

National Radon Database. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: AR, IL, MD, MT, MS, TX, VA, WA, and the Eastern Cherokee Nation, 1990-1992 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Radon (Rn-222) and thoron (Rn-220) emanation fractions from three separate formations of oil field pipe scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..........................................................................................................................9 Electret Ion Chambers.......................................................................................... 9 Secular Equilibrium in the Scale........................................................................ 13 Radon Progeny...................................................................................................................... 21 Radon Progeny Equilibration and Measurement ............................................... 23 LabSOCS Verification and Virtual Standard Creation ...................................... 24 Electret Calibration...

Fruchtnicht, Erich Harold

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Radon induced surface contaminations in low background experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter searches, one of the main issues is to increase the experimental sensitivity through careful material selection and production, minimizing the background contributions. In order to achieve the required, extremely low, counting rates, very stringent requirements must be fulfilled in terms of bulk material radiopurity. As the experimental sensitivity increases, the bulk impurities in the detector components decrease, and surface contaminations start to play an increasingly significant role In fully active detectors, like cryogenic particle detectors, surface contaminations are a critical issue (as shown by the CUORICINO experiment). {sup 222}Rn is by far the most intense source of airborne radioactivity, and if a radio-pure material is exposed to environment where the Radon concentration is not minimized, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po contaminations can occur. The mechanisms and the dynamics of Radon-induced surface contaminations are reviewed, and specific solutions to prevent and to reject the induced background are presented.

Pattavina, L. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)] [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

SEASONAL AND ANNUAL AVERAGE RADON LEVELS IN 70 HOUSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A year-long, mu1 ti pollutant, indoor air qua1 ity study involving 70 occupied houses in four states was completed in 1987. All of the houses included in the study had a partial or complete basement with a concrete slab floor and block walls. On an approximately quarterly schedule, integrating monitors for short-1 i ved radon progeny, N02, HCHO, and H20 were exposed for one week in each house on both the basement and main 1 eve1 s. At the beginning of the study, a pair of alpha track detectors were placed both on top of the refrigerator in the kitchen (or some other sampling site on the main floor) and at a sampling site in the basement. One detector at each sampl ing site was left in place for a year. The other detector at each sampling site was retrieved after about three month's exposure and replaced with another detector for the next quarter. In addition, short-term samples of radon and radon progeny were made at

C. S. Dudney; A. R. Hawthorne

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inhalation of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron ({sup 220}Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m{sup 3} inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm{sup 3} inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the present status on radon and thoron passive, one-time cycle monitors.

Janik, M., E-mail: mirek@fml.nirs.go.jp; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, 263-8555 Chiba (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, 263-8555 Chiba (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using stacked LR 115 detector with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny using-term measurements Radon progeny a b s t r a c t We developed the theoretical basis for long-term determination of airborne concentrations of unattached and attached radon progeny. The work was separated into two parts

Yu, K.N.

155

Abstract It is an established fact that radon progeny can induce lung cancers. However, there is a well-known  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract It is an established fact that radon progeny can induce lung cancers. However, there is a well-known discrepancy between the epidemiologically derived dose conversion factor for radon progeny is a unit of exposure to radon progeny). Up to now there is no satisfactory expla- nation to this

Yu, K.N.

156

A New Mechanism for DNA Alterations Induced by Alpha Particles Such as Those Emitted by Radon and Radon Progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanism(s) by which alpha (a) particles like those emitted from inhaled radon and radon progeny cause their carcinogenic effects in the lung remains unclear. Although direct nuclear traversals by a-particles may be involved in mediating these outcomes, increasing evidence indicates that a particles can cause alterations in DNA in the absence of direct hits to cell nuclei. Using the occurrence of excessive sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) as an index of DNA damage in human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the hypothesis that a-particles may induce DNA damage through the generation of extracellular factors. We have found that a relatively low dose of a-particles can result in the generation of extracellular factors, which, upon transfer to unexposed normal human cells, can cause excessive SCE to an extent equivalent to that observed when the cells are directly irradiated with the same irradiation dose. A short-lived, SCEinducing factor(s) is generated in a-irradiated culture medium containing serum in the absence of cells. A more persistent SCE-inducing factor(s), which can survive freeze-thaw and is heat labile is produced by fibroblasts after exposure to the a-particles. These results indicate that the initiating target for a-particle-induced genetic changes can be larger than a cell's nucleus or even a whole cell. How transmissible factors like those observed here in vitro may extend to the in vivo condition in the context of a-particle-induced carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract remains to be determined. Environ Health Perspect 1 05(Suppl 5):1095-1101 (1997) Key words: alpha particles, radon/radon progeny, indirect radiation effects, high LET radiation,

Bruce E. Lehnert; Edwin H. Goodwin

157

Performing a local barrier operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value of the counter, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Performing a local barrier operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value of the counter, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the Beta Cage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ?20× reduction at its output, from 7.47±0.56 to 0.37±0.12 Bq/m{sup 3}, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m{sup 3}.

Schnee, R. W.; Bunker, R.; Ghulam, G.; Jardin, D.; Kos, M.; Tenney, A. S. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Characterization of the radon source in North-Central Florida. Final report part 1 -- Final project report; Final report part 2 -- Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains two separate parts: Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (final report part 1 -- final project report); and Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (technical report). The objectives were to characterize the radon 222 source in a region having a demonstrated elevated indoor radon potential and having geology, lithology, and climate that are different from those in other regions of the U.S. where radon is being studied. Radon availability and transport in this region were described. Approaches for predicting the radon potential of lands in this region were developed.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Radon transform on a space over a residue class ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The functions on a space of dimension N over the residue class ring Z{sub n} modulo n that are invariant with respect to the group GL(N,Z{sub n}) form a commutative convolution algebra. We describe the structure of this algebra and find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the operators of multiplication by elements of this algebra. The results thus obtained are applied to solve the inverse problem for the hyperplane Radon transform on Z{sup N}{sub n}. Bibliography: 2 titles.

Molchanov, Vladimir F [Tambov State University, Tambov (Russian Federation)

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Spherical radon transforms and mathematical problems of thermoacoustic tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the two terms interchangeably throughout the text. Let f(x) be a continuous function on Rn, n ? 2. Deflnition 1. The circular Radon transform of f is deflned as Rf(p;r) = Z jy?pj=r f(y)d (y); where d (y) is the surface area on the sphere jy ?pj = r... centered at p 2Rn. In this deflnition we do not restrict the set of centers p or radii r. It is clear, how- ever, that this mapping is overdetermined, since the dimension of pairs (p;r) is n+1, while the function f depends on n variables only...

Ambartsoumian, Gaik

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

ARM - Field Campaign - Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) byCampaignSTations2008) govCampaignsRadon

167

Vehicle barrier with access delay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A PASSIVE RADON DECAY PRODUCTS MONITOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electret-based passive air samplers have been used in United Kingdom and elsewhere for quantitative sampling for airborne dust. Alpha electret ion chambers (EIC) have been used for quantitative measurement of deposited alpha emitting isotopes. These two well documented principles are combined to create a passive radon progeny monitor. Large area (50 cm2) electret charged to 500 to 2000 volts collect airborne radon decay products and the collected sample is "viewed " and measured by an alpha EIC. Such collection and measurement continues for the entire period of sampling, providing an integrated signal to the electret in alpha EIC. The present work is of exploratory nature and provides the responses of three different sizes of collection electrets. Results are also compared with a simple passive device with no collecting electret. The study provides data for optimization of the design depending upon the requirement. Study is limited to a typical home with equilibrium ratios from 40 to 60%. This method can be used for both short term and long term monitoring of RDP in working level units.

F. Stieff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Global interrupt and barrier networks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard V. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

170

Expert systems: A new approach to radon mitigation training and quality assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Training radon mitigators and ensuring that they provide high-quality work on the scale necessary to reduce radon to acceptable levels in the large number of homes and schools requiring some mitigation is a challenging problem. The US Environmental Protection Agency and several states have made commendable efforts to train mitigators and ensure that they provide quality services to the public. Expert systems could be used to extend and improve the effectiveness of these efforts. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the radon community to this promising new technology. The paper includes a description of a prototype system developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory that illustrates several of the capabilities that expert systems can provide, a brief explanation of how the prototype works, and a discussion of the potential roles and benefits of fully-developed expert systems for radon mitigation. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Brambley, M.R.; Hanlon, R.L.; Parker, G.B.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Radon Concentration in Groundwater in the Central Region of Gyeongju, Korea - 13130  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is a well known cause of lung cancer through inhalation. Nevertheless, stomach cancer can also occur if radon-containing water is ingested. This study measured the radon concentration in groundwater for drinking or other domestic uses in the central region of Gyeongju, Korea. The groundwater samples were taken from 11 points chosen from the 11 administrative districts in the central region of Gyeongju by selecting a point per district considering the demographic distribution including the number of tourists who visit the ancient ruins and archaeological sites. The mean radon concentrations in the groundwater samples ranged from 14.38 to 9050.73 Bq.m{sup -3}, which were below the recommendations by the U.S. EPA and WHO. (authors)

Lee, Jung Min; Lee, A. Rim; Park, Chan Hee; Moon, Joo Hyun [Dongguk University, Seokjangdong, Gyeongju, Gyeongbuk, 780-714 (Korea, Republic of)] [Dongguk University, Seokjangdong, Gyeongju, Gyeongbuk, 780-714 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reevaluation of the Inadvertent Intruder, Groundwater, Air, and Radon Analyses for the Saltsone Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Special Analysis updates the inadvertent intruder analysis conducted in 1992 in support of the SDF RPA, extends the groundwater analysis to consider additional radionuclides, and provides an assessment of the air and radon emanation pathways.

Wilhite, E.L.

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

TIME INTEGRATED MEASUREMENTS OF THE ACTIVITY-WEIGHTED SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF RADON PROGENY by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dose to the lung is dependent on the size distribution as well as the concentration of radon progeny. The principal indicator of particle size is the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficient of radon progeny is the most important parameter in determining whether the particle will deposit its alpha energy in the tracheobronchial region of the respiratory tract. Due to the importance of the size distribution of progeny when characterizing health effects, a detector was developed that exploits the difference in diffusion coefficients to provide integrated measurements of the activity-weighted size distribution. Several radon chamber tests were performed in which the diffusion coefficient and unattached fraction of radon progeny were varied by the use of trace gasses and aerosol particles. The technical feasibility of this new detector design was demonstrated in all cases.

William C. Tetley P. E; Daniel R. Westcott; Bruce A. Cununings

174

Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the EPA-recommended closure cap design a waste site can either be covered with a single layer cap made of 36 inches of compacted soil (clay) or with a multilayer cap consisting of an upper vegetative layer underlain by a drainage layer over a low permeability layer. The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four-foot loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected. Currently, detailed soil test data and cavity configuration data are not available to validate the mathematical model. Since the configuration of the cavities created in the testing process is irregular and unpredictable, two extreme configurations are considered in this mathematical model, viz., the circular cavity and the infinitely long trench in the sand underneath the cap. This approach will provide bounds for the testing results.

Gong, Chung

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thoron detection with an active Radon exposure meter—First results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For state-of-the-art discrimination of Radon and Thoron several measurement techniques can be used, such as active sampling, electrostatic collection, delayed coincidence method, and alpha-particle-spectroscopy. However, most of the devices available are bulky and show high power consumption, rendering them unfeasible for personal exposition monitoring. Based on a Radon exposure meter previously realized at the Helmholtz Center Munich (HMGU), a new electronic prototype for Radon/Thoron monitoring is currently being developed, which features small size and weight. Operating with pin-diode detectors, the low-power passive-sampling device can be used for continuous concentration measurements, employing alpha-particle-spectroscopy and coincidence event registration to distinguish decays originating either from Radon or Thoron isotopes and their decay products. In open geometry, preliminary calibration measurements suggest that one count per hour is produced by a 11?Bq?m{sup ?3} Radon atmosphere or by a 15?Bq?m{sup ?3} Thoron atmosphere. Future efforts will concentrate on measurements in mixed Radon/Thoron atmospheres.

Irlinger, J., E-mail: josef.irlinger@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Wielunski, M.; Rühm, W. [ISS, Helmholtz Center Munich, Research Center for Environment and Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)] [ISS, Helmholtz Center Munich, Research Center for Environment and Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Industrial Technology of Decontamination of Liquid Radioactive Waste in SUE MosSIA 'Radon' - 12371  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SUE MosSIA 'RADON' - this enterprise was created more than 50 years ago, which deals with the recycling of radioactive waste and conditioning of spent sources of radiation in stationary and mobile systems in the own factory and operating organizations. Here is represented the experience SUE MosSIA 'Radon' in the field of the management with liquid radioactive waste. It's shown, that the activity of SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is developing in three directions - improvement of technical facilities for treatment of radioactive waters into SUE MosSIA 'RADON' development of mobile equipment for the decontamination of radioactive waters in other organizations, development of new technologies for decontamination of liquid radioactive wastes as part of various domestic Russian and international projects including those related to the operation of nuclear power and nuclear submarines. SUE MosSIA 'RADON' has processed more than 270 thousand m{sup 3} of radioactive water, at that more than 7000 m{sup 3} in other organizations for more than 50 years. It is shown that a number of directions, particularly, the development of mobile modular units for decontamination of liquid radioactive waste, SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is a leader in the world. (authors)

Adamovich, Dmitry V.; Neveykin, Petr P.; Karlin, Yuri V.; Savkin, Alexander E. [SUE MosSIA 'Radon', 7th Rostovsky lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Influence of radon diffusion on the /sup 210/Pb distribution in sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model is presented which describes the distribution of radon 222 in sediments having a constant or variable depth distribution of radium 226. The model is extended to the distribution of lead 210, taking into account the mobility of radon (the precursor of /sup 210/Pb) within the sediment column. The /sup 210/Pb model is compared, at constant radium activity, with the conventional approach which disregards the radon diffusion when estimating sedimentation rates by the /sup 210/Pb method. The ratio between apparent and real sedimentation rate, s'/s, expressed as a function of three dimensionless parameters, demonstrates the importance of the radon diffusion effect. This effect is particularly important for sediments with small initial excess /sup 210/Pb activity, small sedimentation rate, large radon diffusivity, or a combination of these factors. Applied to Lake Geneva, the sedimentation is estimated to be larger by 30--50% than the original value by Krishnaswami et al, (1971). In sediments which are mixed at the surface (physical mixing or bioturbation), the /sup 210/PB activity in the mixed layer is diminished compared to that in the settling sediment material (Robbins et al., 1977), and radon diffusion makes the activity difference even larger, especially for low initial excess /sup 210/Pb activity, small sedimentation rate, and large mixing intensity. This result may be of importance for the balance of /sup 210/Pb in an aquatic system if the calculations are based on activities measured in the sediment.

Imboden, D.M.; Stiller, M.

1982-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 metre cubed DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a f...

Battat, J B R; Daw, E; Dorofeev, A; Ezeribe, A C; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Gold, M; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Landers, J M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Matthews, J A J; Miller, E H; Monte, A; Murphy, A StJ; Paling, S M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Scarff, A; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Walker, D; Warner, D; Yuriev, L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

UN PROCD DE DOSAGE CONTINU DU RADON DANS L'AIR ATMOSPHRIQUE. APPLICATION A LA PROSPECTION DE L'URANIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: it permits measurement of the activity of radioactive products of radon in air ; the air permits pass through176 UN PROC�D� DE DOSAGE CONTINU DU RADON DANS L'AIR ATMOSPH�RIQUE. APPLICATION A LA PROSPECTION DE radon de l'air atmo- sphérique. Une pompe à grand débit aspire l'air à analyser à travers un papier

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

183

Effects of finite sampling and additive noise on image reconstruction from Radon transform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radon transform arises naturally in the problem of reconstructing an image or cross section from line integral measurements through a specified object. Each line integral or ray is a sample of the Radon transform of the object and the set of all samples at a particular angle is called a projection or view. Consequently, the set of all possible samples at all possible projections in a particular plane constitutes the two-dimensional Radon transform. Of course, it is impossible to acquire an infinite number of data points for the purpose of image reconstruction. However, with a sufficient set of Radon transform samples, an images can be determined through various Radon transform inversion techniques. From this statement, however, arises the question of just what constitutes a sufficient set of Radon transform samples. Acquiring an insufficient number of samples results in various artifacts in the reconstructed image. On the other hand, taking too many samples utilizes the data inefficiently. Thus, the problem of interest is to determine the optimum number of projections and the optimum number of samples per projection required to adequately represent the Radon transform such that the image can be accurately reconstructed. The problem of image reconstruction is further complicated if noise is introduced in the projection domain. Noise may be caused by round-off error in the sampled projection data or by various other factors inherent in data acquisition processes. However, several filtering techniques can be implemented to suppress the effects of noise. Therefore, a second problem of interest is to study the effectiveness of different filtering techniques in noise suppression.

Tsujimoto, E.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

Waldrop, James R. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Cohen, Marshall J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

186

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319323 Passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor inside a radon exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. r 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. PACS: 29.40; 23.60 Keywords: Radon progeny; Equilibrium-lived radon progeny contributes about half of the total exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation, but instead to its short-lived progeny. Exposure to radon progeny is measured through the product of PAEC Ã? t

Yu, K.N.

187

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 450 (2000) 568}572 Uncertainty in radon measurements with CR39 detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the detector, i.e., detector sensitivity is dependent on the fraction of radon progeny decaying in the air prior to de- position. The behavior of radon progeny inside the cham- ber (as well as the aerosol of radon progeny decaying prior to deposition. The deposition frac- tion can depend on di

Yu, K.N.

188

In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to above-average'' radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject's presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine); Stark, A.; Ju, C. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Radon in Soil Gas Above Bedrock Fracture Sets at the Shepley’s Hill Superfund Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site near Devens, MA (Figure 1). The technical support was requested as follow-on work to an initial screening level radiation survey conducted in 2008. The purpose of the original study was to assess the efficacy of the INL-developed Backpack Sodium Iodide System (BaSIS) for detecting elevated areas of natural radioactivity due to the decay of radon-222 gases emanating from the underlying fracture sets. Although the results from the initial study were mixed, the BaSIS radiation surveys did confirm that exposed bedrock outcrops have higher natural radioactivity than the surficial soils, thus a high potential for detecting elevated levels of radon and/or radon daughter products. (INL 2009) The short count times associated with the BaSIS measurements limited the ability of the system to respond to elevated levels of radioactivity from a subsurface source, in this instance radon gas emanating from fracture sets. Thus, it was postulated that a different methodology be employed to directly detect the radon in the soil gases. The CR-39 particle track detectors were investigated through an extensive literature and technology search. The relatively long deployment or “detection” time of several days, as well as the sensitivity of the measurement and robustness of the detectors made the CR-39 technology promising for deployment at the Shepley’s Hill site.

J.R. Giles; T.L. McLing; M.V. Carpenter; C.J. Smith; W. Brandon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generalized geologic province information and data on house construction were used to predict indoor radon concentrations in New Hampshire (NH). A mixed-effects regression model was used to predict the geometric mean (GM) short-term radon concentrations in 259 NH towns. Bayesian methods were used to avoid over-fitting and to minimize the effects of small sample variation within towns. Data from a random survey of short-term radon measurements, individual residence building characteristics, along with geologic unit information, and average surface radium concentration by town, were variables used in the model. Predicted town GM short-term indoor radon concentrations for detached houses with usable basements range from 34 Bq/m{sup 3} (1 pCi/l) to 558 Bq/m{sup 3} (15 pCi/l), with uncertainties of about 30%. A geologic province consisting of glacial deposits and marine sediments, was associated with significantly elevated radon levels, after adjustment for radium concentration, and building type. Validation and interpretation of results are discussed.

Apte, M.G.; Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Overcoming Multifamily Sector Barriers in Austin, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents techniques on overcoming the barriers of multifamily energy efficiency projects, including how to market to property managers.

192

Numerical Valuation of Discrete Barrier Options with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical Valuation of Discrete Barrier Options with the Adaptive Mesh Model and Other Competing for discrete barrier options such that many methods have been suggested and declared to price discrete barrier options fast and accurately but no one can tell exactly that what method is the best. We also make

Chu, Hao-hua

193

A thick homogeneous vegetated cover design proves cost - and schedule-effective for the reclamation of uranium mills sites near Spokane, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has licensed two medium sized uranium mills with tailings impoundments covering 28 and 40 hectares (70 and 100 acres), respectively, The uranium mill licensees have submitted closure and reclamation plans to the state, and site-specific conditions have determined the closure design features, Conventional uranium mill cover designs usually incorporate an overall cap of one to three meters, which includes a low-permeability clay barrier layer. A technical evaluation of several uranium mill facilities that used this design was published in the fall of 1994 and reported that unexpected vegetation root damage had occurred in the low-permeability clay (or bentonite amended) barrier layers. The technical report suggested that the low-permeability design feature at some sites could be compromised within a very short time and the regulatory goal of 1,000 years performance might not be achieved. In October 1994, WDOH sponsored a technical forum meeting to consider design alternatives to address these reliability concerns. Representatives from the federal government, nuclear industry, licensees, engineering firms, and state regulatory agencies attended the workshop. Risk factors considered in the evaluation of the uranium mill reclamation plans include: (1) radon gas emanation through the cover (the air pathway), and (2) migration of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents (the groundwater pathway). Additional design considerations include site structural stability, longevity of 1,000 years, and no active (ongoing) maintenance. 9 refs.

Blacklaw, J.; Robertson, G.; Stoffel, D.; Ahmad, J.; Fordham, E. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementa...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementation Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementation This presentation discusses...

196

Evaluation of selected modern filter media for use in radon/thoron progeny measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We tested a number of air sampling filters to determine their suitability for use in radon/thoron progeny measurements. The main test consisted of sampling a radon progeny atmosphere, then measuring the energy spectrum of the alpha particles emerging from the face of the filter. It was found that Millipore AA, long a favorite for this application, is still a good choice. However, this filter is prone to developing electrostatic charge, which can cause the additional collection of {sup 218}Po during filter handling. Metricel DM-800 is also a good choice, and it is less prone to charging. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Knutson, E.O. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York, NY (United States); Seo, Kyung-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of). Health Physics Dept.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

barrier  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview64,783 56,478Tidd Optical Depthbarrier

198

Short communication On the use of the Radon Transform in studying nearshore wave dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shallow water domain, the celerity of short waves is a key kinematic variable to describe energy fluxesShort communication On the use of the Radon Transform in studying nearshore wave dynamics Rafael 23 June 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Surf zone Wave transformation Wave propagation

199

A TIME-DEPENDENT METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING THE DIFFUSION OF RADON-222 IN CONCRETE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The porosity and diffusion length of concrete have been determined by measuring the time-dependent diffusion of radon through a thin slab of the material, One surface of the slab is exposed to a large, fixed radon concentration beginning at t=0. The radon that diffuses out of a portion of the opposite surface is collected during several contiguous time intervals. The total activity collected over a set of intervals beginning at t=0 and the steady-state flux of activity are used to calculate the porosity and diffusion length, As a test of these parameters, they are then used to predict the activity collected during other time intervals and for other sample thicknesses, Samples from two types of concrete were tested: one type yielded a porosity of 0.068 and a diffusion length of 12.6 cm; the respective values for the other were 0.32 and 16.9 cm. The predicted and experimental results agreed well, thereby verifying the assumption that concrete may be treated as a homogenous diffusion medium for radon.

Zapalac, Geordie H.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Four Years of Practical Arrangements between IAEA and Moscow SIA 'Radon': Preliminary Results - 13061  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Education Training Centre (IETC) at Moscow State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon'), in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has developed expertise and provided training to waste management personnel for the last 15 years. Since 1997, the educational system of the enterprise with the support of the IAEA has acquired an international character: more than 470 experts from 35 countries- IAEA Member States completed the professional development. Training is conducted at various thematic courses or fellowships for individual programs and seminars on IAEA technical projects. In June 2008 a direct agreement (Practical Arrangements) was signed between SIA 'Radon' and the IAEA on cooperation in the field of development of new technologies, expert's advice to IAEA Member States, and, in particular, the training of personnel in the field of radioactive waste management (RWM), which opens up new perspectives for fruitful cooperation of industry professionals. The paper summarizes the current experience of the SIA 'Radon' in the organization and implementation of the IAEA sponsored training and others events and outlines some of strategic educational elements, which IETC will continue to pursue in the coming years. (authors)

Batyukhnova, O.G.; Karlina, O.K.; Neveikin, P.P. [SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE SIA 'Radon', The 7-th Rostovsky Lane 2/14, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Seismic imaging with the generalized Radon transform: A curvelet transform perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic imaging with the generalized Radon transform: A curvelet transform perspective M V de Hoop1@purdue.edu Abstract. A key challenge in the seismic imaging of reflectors using surface reflection data. Introduction 1.1. Seismic Imaging with Arrays ­ Beyond Current Capabilities Much research in modern

Smith, Hart F.

202

AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F AREA TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An air and radon pathways analysis was conducted for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. Additionally, the dose to the MEI was estimated at a seepage outcrop located 1600 m from the facility. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

Dixon, K.; Phifer, M.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Radon spectroscopy of packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc claffy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques, specifically the Radon transform previously applied in geophysics [6] and computer tomography [7 the feasibility of Internet spectroscopy techniques for analysis of rate limiting, packet interarrival delay packet trace data, we find that delay's quantization in micro- and millisecond range is ubiquitous

California at San Diego, University of

204

Filter for on-line air monitor unaffected by radon progeny and method of using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for testing air having contaminants and radon progeny therein. The apparatus includes a sampling box having an inlet for receiving the air and an outlet for discharging the air. The sampling box includes a filter made of a plate of sintered stainless steel. The filter traps the contaminants, yet allows at least a portion of the radon progeny to pass therethrough. A method of testing air having contaminants and radon progeny therein. The method includes providing a testing apparatus that has a sampling box with an inlet for receiving the air and an outlet for discharging the air, and has a sintered stainless steel filter disposed within said sampling box; drawing air from a source into the sampling box using a vacuum pump; passing the air through the filter; monitoring the contaminants trapped by the filter; and providing an alarm when a selected level of contaminants is reached. The filter traps the contaminants, yet allows at least a portion of the radon progeny to pass therethrough.

Phillips, Terrance D. (Aiken, SC); Edwards, Howard D. (Augusta, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Effect of radon dose on cleanup criteria and using RESRAD for chemical risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has used RESRAD, a pathway analysis program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, in conjunction with the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle to develop site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines (cleanup criteria) for many sites. This study examines the effects of the radon pathway, recently added to the RESRAD program, on the calculation of uranium, radium, and thorium cleanup criteria. The results show that the derived uranium guidelines will not be affected by the radon ingrowth considerations. The effect of radon on radium and thorium generic guidelines is more significant, but the model does indicate that at the generic soil limits used for radium and thorium the indoor radon decay product concentrations would be below the 0.02 working level standard. This study also examines the feasibility of applying RESRAD to chemical risk assessment. The results show that RESRAD can perform risk assessment of toxic chemicals after simple modifications. Expansion of the RESRAD database to include chemical compounds will increase its capability to handle chemical risk assessments. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wallo, A. III (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The effect of radon-resistant construction techniques in a crawlspace house  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive battery of radon-diagnostic tests were performed on two different houses built on the SAME foundation. A house was studied as part of a multi-year evaluation of radon mitigation measures in the Tennessee Valley. The original house was destroyed in a fire caused by a faulty space heater. The second house was built on the same foundation using passive techniques to reduce radon transport via the crawlspace to the living area. The rebuilt house achieved a 60% reduction in the volumetric transport of air from crawlspace to living area when the heating and cooling system was not operating. An even greater reduction was found when the HAC system was operating, reflecting the benefits of new, well-sealed ductwork. In spite of these enhancements, the passive measures failed to reduce radon concentrations to below 4 pCi/L. The primary reason is believed to be the enclosure of the open carport to form a garage at the time of reconstruction.

Dudney, C S; Wilson, D L [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dyess, T M [US Environmental Protection Agency, Air & Energy Engineering Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [US Environmental Protection Agency, Air & Energy Engineering Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

395NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, VOL.37 NO.4, AUGUST 2005 CONSTRUCTION OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL RADON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

395NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, VOL.37 NO.4, AUGUST 2005 CONSTRUCTION OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL RADON MONITORING SYSTEM USING CR-39 NUCLEAR TRACK DETECTORS GIL HOON AHN* and JAI-KI LEE1 National Nuclear Management & Control Agency 305-600, POX 114 Yuseong, Daejeon, Korea 1 Dept. of Nuclear

208

Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Experiment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

interaction to evaluate sealing and clay barrier performance; 2) EBS Experiment -thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of the EBS under heating conditions and...

210

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

211

Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011....

212

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institutional Barriers to Energy Conservation C. M. York, C.P.R. , 1973. "Energy Conservation in Buildings: ItsS. (eds. ), 1973. Energy Conservation: Implica­ tions for

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

VEHICLE-BARRIER TRACKING OF ASCALED CRASH TEST FOR ROADSIDE BARRIER DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reality of the vehicle-barrier impact. Scaled testing may thus be a cost effective method to evaluateVEHICLE-BARRIER TRACKING OF ASCALED CRASH TEST FOR ROADSIDE BARRIER DESIGN Giuseppina Amato1 Engineering, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast, BT9 5AG, UK 2 Trinity College Dublin, Dept

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

Standards for Barrier-Free Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards for Barrier-Free Campus Office for Students with Disabilities University Planning Office June 2004 F:\\PROJECTS\\Disabled\\ACCESS04.doc #12;INTRODUCTION The McGill standards for barrier-free and universal design (hereafter referred to as the McGill Standards) are the minimum requirements

Kambhampati, Patanjali

215

BUILDING CODES: BARRIERS TO GREEN INNOVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING CODES: BARRIERS TO GREEN INNOVATION JENNIFER GARMAN DR. JIM BOWYER DR. STEVE BRATKOVICH/18/2011 DOVETAIL PARTNERS, INC. www.dovetailinc.org Building Codes: Barriers to Green Innovation Introduction Many architects and contractors want to pursue green building design, technologies and construction. Green

216

Subterranean barriers including at least one weld  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

Multi-layer waste containment barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nickelson, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Processing and Gas Barrier Behavior of Multilayer Thin Nanocomposite Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

barrier for goods requiring long shelf life. Current gas barrier technologies like plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) often create high barrier metal oxide films, which are prone to cracking when flexed. Bulk composites composed of polymer...

Yang, You-Hao

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

DOE to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting at Waste Management Conference DOE to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting at Waste Management...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Drivers and Barriers in the Current...

222

Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report, October 28, 2010 Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report, October 28, 2010 This report...

223

Geothermal Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Geothermal...

224

February 20, 2014 Webinar - Performance of Engineered Barriers...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

20, 2014 Webinar - Performance of Engineered Barriers: Lessons Learned February 20, 2014 Webinar - Performance of Engineered Barriers: Lessons Learned February 20, 2014 Webinar -...

225

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review 2014: Removing Barriers, Implementing Policies and Advancing Alternative Fuels Markets in New England Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers,...

226

Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

227

Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code - Building America Top Innovation Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy...

228

Overview Of The Unattached Fraction of Radon Prouenv and It's Significance To Luna Dosimetrv.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The health risk arising from exposure to radon progeny is strongly related to the deposition of radon progeny in the lungs. It is believed that greater risk is related to the unattached fraction. Achievement of accurate estimations of the radiation dose to the lungs, requires knowledge of both the size and concentration of the unattached fraction. In spite of the capabilities available today to obtain this data, several fundamental issues still need to be resolved. Most notably: l)A clear and universally accepted clarification of precisely how the unattached fraction is to be defined, 2)Development of standardized measurement instrumentation for the detection of unattached fractions. Only then can meaningful scientific comparisons be made. The complex issues surrounding the unattached fraction and

Dr. A. Singmin

229

Radon backgrounds in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low pressure gas Time Projection Chambers being developed for directional Dark Matter searches offer a technology with high particle identification power, combined with poten- tial to produce a definitive detection of galactic Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) Dark Matter. A source of background events in such experiments, able to mimic genuine WIMP in- duced nuclear recoil tracks, arises from potential radon contamination and the recoils that result from associated daughter nuclei, termed Radon Progeny Recoils (RPRs). We present here experi- mental data from a long-term study of this background using the DRIFT-II directional dark matter experiment at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. By detailed examination of event classes in both spatial and time coordinates using 5.5 years of data we show ability to determine the origin of 4 specific background populations and describe development of new technology and mitigation strategies to suppress them.

Daw, E; Gauvreau, J -L; Gold, M; Harmon, L J; Landers, J M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Miller, E H; Murphy, A StJ; Paling, S M; Pipe, M; Robinson, M; Sadler, S; Scarff, A; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Walker, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Method for forming a barrier layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Low Radioactive Techniques in SuperNEMO: Status of the Radon R and D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radon is a well-known source of background with respect to the search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}), due to the high Q{sub {beta}} value of one of its daughter nucleus {sup 214}Bi. Radon has been observed and reduced down to 6.5 mBq/m{sup 3} in the NEMO-3 experiment which is looking for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} process in {sup 100}Mo and in six other isotopes. The SuperNEMO project, a next-generation double beta decay experiment which will also use a tracko-calorimeter technique, has been in an R and D phase since 2006. The goal is to reach a sensitivity of T{sub 1/2}(0{nu})>10{sup 26} y corresponding to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.05-0.1 eV with 100 kg of {sup 82}Se. Such a sensitivity requires in particular to improve the radon radiopurity down to 0.1 mBq/m{sup 3} in the tracking chamber.

Perrot, F. [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut-Vigneau, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut-Vigneau, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modifiers of Exposure-Response Estimates for Lung Cancer among Miners Exposed to Radon Progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort.- Environ Health Perspect 1 03(Suppl 2):49-53 (1995)

Richard W. Hornung; James Deddens; Robert Roscoe

234

ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide-show presents 3M photovoltaic-related products, particularly flexible components. Emphasis is on the 3M Ultra Barrier Solar Films. Topics covered include reliability and qualification testing and flexible photovoltaic encapsulation costs.

DeScioli, Derek

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Communicating across barriers at home and abroad  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper intends to catalyze the exchange of experience among technical communicators in meeting the challenge of communicating across a multitude of barriers: linguistic, disciplinary, cultural, political, intellectual, and emotional.

McDonald, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with...

237

Sunk Costs and Antitrust Barriers to Entry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US antitrust policy takes as its objective consumer welfare, not total economic welfare. With that objective, Joe Bain's definition of entry barriers is more useful than George Stigler's or definitions ...

Schmalensee, Richard

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Sunk Costs and Antitrust Barriers to Entry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US antitrust policy takes as its objective consumer welfare, not total economic welfare. With that objective, Joe Bain's definition of entry barriers is more useful than George Stigler's or definitions based on economic ...

Schmalensee, Richard

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

239

Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant...

Wilkes, K. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster describes the 3M Ultra-Barrier Solar Film and its application; production scale-up and data; reliability and qualification testing; and improvements in the next generation.

Alan, Nachtigal; Berniard, Tracie; Murray, Bill; Roehrig, Mark; Schubert, Charlene; Spagnola, Joseph; Weigel, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Model assessment of protective barriers: Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste exists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in a variety of locations, including subsurface grout and tank farms, solid waste burial grounds, and contaminated soil sites. Some of these waste sites may need to be isolated from percolating water to minimize the potential for transport of the waste to the ground water, which eventually discharges to the Columbia River. Multilayer protective barriers have been proposed as a means of limiting the flow of water through the waste sites (DOE 1987). A multiyear research program (managed jointly by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company for the DOE) is aimed at assessing the performance of these barriers. One aspect of this program involves the use of computer models to predict barrier performance. Three modeling studies have already been conducted and a test plan was produced. The simulation work reported here was conducted by PNL and extends the previous modeling work. The purpose of this report are to understand phenomena that have been observed in the field and to provide information that can be used to improve hydrologic modeling of the protective barrier. An improved modeling capability results in better estimates of barrier performance. Better estimates can be used to improve the design of barriers and the assessment of their long-term performance.

Fayer, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.; Holford, D.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study. Final report, 1 March, 1990--May 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ``above-average`` radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject`s presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine; Stark, A.; Ju, C. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

ELECTROSTATICALLY ENHANCED BARRIER FILTER COLLECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was performed through the University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department with assistance from UND's Energy & Environmental Research Center. This research was undertaken in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Technology Center Program Solicitation No. DE-PS26-99FT40479, Support of Advanced Coal Research at U.S. Universities and Colleges. Specifically, this research was in support of the UCR Core Program and addressees Topic 1, Improved Hot-Gas Contaminant and Particulate Removal Techniques, introducing an advanced design for particulate removal. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) offers the potential for very high efficiency and clean electric generation. In IGCC, the product gas from the gasifier needs to be cleaned of particulate matter to avoid erosion and high-temperature corrosion difficulties arising with the turbine blades. Current methods involve cooling the gases to {approx}100 C to condense alkalis and remove sulfur and particulates using conventional scrubber technology. This ''cool'' gas is then directed to a turbine for electric generation. While IGCC has the potential to reach efficiencies of over 50%, the current need to cool the product gas for cleaning prior to firing it in a turbine is keeping IGCC from reaching its full potential. The objective of the current project was to develop a highly reliable particulate collector system that can meet the most stringent turbine requirements and emission standards, can operate at temperatures above 1500 F, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, is compatible with various sorbent injection schemes for sulfur and alkali control, can be integrated into a variety of configurations for both pressurized gasification and combustion, increases allowable face velocity to reduce filter system capital cost, and is cost-competitive with existing technologies. The collector being developed is a new concept in particulate control called electrostatically enhanced barrier filter collection (EBFC). This concept combines electrostatic precipitation (ESP) with candle filters in a single unit. Similar technology has been recently proven on a commercial scale for atmospheric applications, but needed to be tested at high temperatures and pressures. The synergy obtained by combining the two control technologies into a single system should actually reduce filter system capital and operating costs and make the system more reliable. More specifically, the ESP is expected to significantly reduce candle filter load and also to limit ash reintrainment, allowing for full recovery of baseline pressure drop during backpulsing of the filters.

John Erjavec; Michael D. Mann; Ryan Z. Knutson; Michael L. Swanson; Michael E. Collings

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Schottky barrier MOSFET systems and fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

(MOS) device systems-utilizing Schottky barrier source and drain to channel region junctions are disclosed. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate operation of fabricated N-channel and P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices, and of fabricated single devices with operational characteristics similar to (CMOS) and to a non-latching (SRC) are reported. Use of essentially non-rectifying Schottky barriers in (MOS) structures involving highly doped and the like and intrinsic semiconductor to allow non-rectifying interconnection of, and electrical accessing of device regions is also disclosed. Insulator effected low leakage current device geometries and fabrication procedures therefore are taught. Selective electrical interconnection of drain to drain, source to drain, or source to source, of N-channel and/or P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices formed on P-type, N-type and Intrinsic semiconductor allows realization of Schottky Barrier (CMOS), (MOSFET) with (MOSFET) load, balanced differential (MOSFET) device systems and inverting and non-inverting single devices with operating characteristics similar to (CMOS), which devices can be utilized in modulation, as well as in voltage controled switching and effecting a direction of rectification.

Welch, James D. (10328 Pinehurst Ave., Omaha, NE 68124)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R&D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo- transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Beller, John Michael; Geesey, Gill Gregroy; Glenn, David Frankie; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Martian, Pete; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Porro, Indrek; Southworth, Finis Hio; Steffler, Eric Darwin; Stormberg, Angelica Isabel; Stormberg, Gregory John; Versteeg, Roelof Jan; White, Gregory J

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Methods for fabricating a micro heat barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for fabricating a highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

251

Prediction of tilted capillary barrier performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capillary barriers, consisting of tilted fine-over-coarse layers under unsaturated conditions, have been suggested as landfill covers to divert water infiltration away from sensitive underground regions, especially for arid and semi-arid regions. The Hydrological Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) computer code is an evaluation tool for landfill covers used by designers and regulators. HELP is a quasi-two-dimensional model that predicts moisture movement into and through the underground soil and waste layers. Processes modeled within HELP include precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, unsaturated vertical drainage, saturated lateral drainage, and leakage through liners. Unfortunately, multidimensional unsaturated flow phenomena that are necessary for evaluating tilted capillary barriers are not included in HELP. Differences between the predictions of the HELP and those from a multidimensional unsaturated flow code are presented to assess the two different approaches. Comparisons are presented for the landfill covers including capillary barrier configurations at the Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD) being conducted at Sandia.

Webb, S.W.; McCord, J.T.; Dwyer, S.F.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed. 7 figures.

Carver, D.W.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder's making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

Carver, Don W. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) is located within F-Area in the General Separations Area (GSA) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) as seen in Figure 1. The GSA contains the F and H Area Separations Facilities, the S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility, the Z-Area Saltstone Facility, and the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities. The FTF is a nearly rectangular shaped area and comprises approximately 20 acres, which is bounded by SRS coordinates N 76,604.5 to N 77,560.0 and E 52,435.0 to E 53,369.0. SRS is in the process of preparing a Performance Assessment (PA) to support FTF closure. As part of the PA process, an analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential magnitude of gaseous release of radionuclides from the FTF over the 100-year institutional control period and 10,000-year post-closure compliance period. Specifically, an air and radon pathways analysis has been conducted to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7.degree. F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88.degree. F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/ F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/ F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

Kamath, K.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/F at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/F it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products. 1 table.

Kamath, K.

1983-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

258

Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Analysis in Low Permeability Media Under Nuclear Repository Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Marcelo Sánchez Committee Members, Charles Aubeny Eduardo Gildin Head of Department, Robin Autenrieth December 2013 Major Subject: Civil... gratitude to all the people that in some way helped me during my years as a graduate student at Texas A&M University. First of all, I like to thank my advisor and committee chair, Dr. Marcelo Sánchez, for giving me the opportunity to work in this project...

Aponte Rivera, Fernando Luis

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

259

The application of a type curve reservoir simulator in low permeability gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Professors of Petroleum Engineering; Dr. R. R. Berg, Professor of Geology; Dr. W. D. Yon Gonten, Head of Petroleum Engineering Depart- ment. Others deserving recognition for their assistance and moral support are: Mr. Steve Neuse, Mr. Rhet Gist, Mr. Jarle... Case II - Verification of Interpolation Schemes . Effect of Violating Small Pressure Gradient Assumption (Q = 500 MCF/D) Effect of Violating Small Pressure Gradient Assumption (Q = 1000 MCF/D) . Effect of Violating Small Pressure Gradient...

Whittington, William Forrest

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The measurement of gas relative permeability for low permeability cores using a pressure transient method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of oil and gas from a. typical reservoir. However, determining relative permeability ac- curately, especially for tight formations, has been a, challenging problem to petroleum engineers for many years. Commonly used laboratory methods of measuring.... Generally, there exist three kinds of fluids in petroleum reservoirs, oil, gas and water. In petroleum engineering, relative permeability of formation is one of the most important parameters one must use to estimate the fluid flow rates and recoveries...

Ning, Xiuxu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Determination of the effective stress law for permeability and deformation in low-permeability rocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that laboratory experiments were performed to determine the effective stress law of tight sandstones and chalk for permeability and deformation. Permeability and volumetric strain data were taken at various stresses and pore pressures and were analyzed with a statistical model-building approach. Results show that the effective stress laws for both processes are variable with stress and pressure, depend on the material, and do not agree well with present theories. This may be applied for a greater understanding of oil reservoir formations.

Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W. (Sandia National Lab. (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEM withSecurityUranium(VI) Diffusion in

263

Well Performance Analysis for Low to Ultra-low Permeability Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unconventional reservoir systems can best be described as petroleum (oil and/or gas) accumulations which are difficult to be characterized and produced by conventional technologies. In this work we present the development of a systematic procedure...

Ilk, Dilhan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Final Report Multiazimuth Seismic Diffraction Imaging for Fracture Characterization in Low-Permeability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office ProgramsFinal7,Administrator's

265

ShaCS: Shaped-Charge Stimulation for Low-Permeability Oil and Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluatingconstructionSessioneight New

266

Property measurement and correlation for homogeneous and naturally fractured low permeability cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the results of measurements from ten naturally fractured Devonian Shale cores using a new laboratory technique to determine the distinctive properties of the matrix and the fractures. The new technique is based on a pressure...

Fan, Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

FIRE IMPACTS ON AN ENGINEERED BARRIER’S PERFORMANCE: THE HANFORD BARRIER ONE YEAR AFTER A CONTROLLED BURN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical unknown for long-term engineered barrier performance is the effect of wild fire during a post-institutional control environment where routine maintenance may be limited or non-existent. In September 2008, a controlled burn was conducted on one half of a vegetated, multilayered capillary barrier emplaced over a Hanford waste site. The effects on barrier performance have been monitored and documented over the past year. Soil physical, chemical, and hydrologic properties; plant floristics and density; and animal-use were characterized before and after the fire with the unburned half of the barrier serving as a control. Temperatures during the controlled burn ranged from 250 oC at 1.5 cm below the surface to over 700 oC at 1 m above the surface. Significant decreases in hydraulic conductivity and surface-soil wettability were observed immediately after the fire due primarily to hydrophobic conditions created by the fire. Major soil nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity remain elevated post-fire. Up until June 2009, post-burn soil moisture content in the 0-1 m depth interval was significantly lower on the burned section than the unburned section and is attributed to differences in surface evaporation. Higher soil moisture contents in the 1-2 m interval on the burned section are attributed to insignificant water uptake owing to the absence of deep-rooted shrubs. Moisture profiles reversed after June to show lower water contents throughout the profile on the unburned section. Dense stands of sagebrush were destroyed from the fire allowing many more species to emerge thereby increasing species diversity. Seed sources contributing to this species diversification were from either the existing seedbank and/or wind-blown sources. Measurements are ongoing and the results are expected to help close a knowledge gap about barrier recovery after major disturbances.

Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Leary, Kevin D.; Berlin, Gregory T.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Electrical Transport in Schottky Barrier MOSFETs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barrier (SB) MOSFET is one such device. It consists of metallic silicide source and drain contacts' that result in a reduced local potential at the abrupt metal/semiconductor interface. At relatively high at the Metal/Semiconductor Interface 66 4.3. Current Transport Limits 69 4.4. Sub-threshold Regime 72 4

Reed, Mark

269

IDENTIFYING AND OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

communities need outside intervention to address "legacy" and "remote" barriers. With still very little--even in highly developed nations--for the scientific community in terms of future research priorities significant in motivating or launching the adaptation process. The study also found that communities have

270

Metal Nitride Diffusion Barriers for Copper Interconnects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of copper into silicon, which is primarily through grain boundaries. This dissertation reports the processing of high quality stoichiometric thin films of TiN, TaN and HfN, and studies their Cu diffusion barrier properties. Epitaxial metastable cubic TaN (B1...

Araujo, Roy A.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

P. Dixon

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

273

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations, indicating some loss of reductive capacity within the aquifer. The Technical Assistance Team (TAT) was requested to perform the following activities: (1) evaluate the most probable condition(s) that has led to the presence of Cr(VI) in 12 different barrier wells (i.e. premature loss of reductive capacity), (2) recommend methods for determining the cause of the problem, (3) recommend methods for evaluating the magnitude of the problem, (4) recommend practicable method(s) for mending the barrier that involves a long-term solution, and (5) recommend methods for extending the barrier to the northeast (e.g., changing injection procedure, changing or augmenting the injected material). Since the March 2004 workshop, a decision has been made to place a hold on the barrier extension until more is known about the cause of the problem. However, the report complies with the original request for information on all of the above activities, but focuses on determining the cause of the problem and mending of the existing barrier.

PETERSEN, S.W.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

Model Studies of Pore Stability and Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N. Katz, “Advanced Ceramics: Thermal Barrier Coatings BeatConductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier CoatingsFatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings,” NASA/

Glaeser, A M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Characteristics of a radon diffusion chamber with electrical collection using plastic nuclear track detectors. Open file report 31 August 1982-30 November 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portable radon diffusion chamber was tested with electrical collection of radon daughter nuclei for enhancement of sensitivity. The detector was small enough to be worn suspended from a belt. With a battery-supplied high voltage, the sensitivity was found to be 1.43 tracks/sq cm per pCi-h/lambda of ambient radon at 50% relative humidity. The track densities on the surfaces of the CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors were found to be nonuniform, making the determination of average densities with high accuracy difficult. The fabrication of electrets for use in the detector was investigated in accordance with published techniques with negative results.

Frank, A.L.; Benton, E.V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Biogenic radon emission from uranium mine tailings: A consequence of microbial leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two uranium mine waste heaps near Ronneburg, Germany, were investigated for the occurrence of lithotrophic and chemoorganotrophic leach bacteria. The evaluation of 162 samples (= to 5m depth) resulted in the finding that Thiobacillus (T.) ferrooxidans dominated up to a depth of about 1.5m. Below, T. intermedius/neapolitanus were the most abundant lithotrophs. Pyrite, however, was the only nutrient source in the heaps. Consequently, the latter lithotrophs must have had another source of nutrient. We recently demonstrated leaching to proceed only via the indirect mechanism with thiosulfate and ferrous hexahydrate as the first degradation products. Thiosulfate is the best nutrient for T. intermedius/neapolitanus. In addition, the highest emission of radon, measured as radioactivity 1m above the heap surface, correlated with the highest cell counts of T. Ferrooxidans. Considering the diagenesis of the ore (precipitation of uranite followed by pyrite) a leach pore model was hypothesized explaining the correlation. Accordingly, the biological removal of pyrite allows the trapped radon to escape from the pore.

Sand, W. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nationwide occurrence of radon and other natural radioactivity in public water supplies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nationwide study, which began in November of 1980, was designed to systematically sample water supplies in all 48 contiguous states. The results of the study will be used, in cooperation with EPA's Office of Drinking Water, to estimate population exposures nationwide and to support possible future standards for radon, uranium, and other natural radioactivity in public water supplies. Samples from more than 2500 public water supplies representing 35 states were collected. Although we sampled only about five percent of the total number of groundwater supplies in the 48 contiguous states of the US, those samples represent nearly 45 percent of the water consumed by US groundwater users in the 48 contiguous states. Sample results are summarized by arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and population weighted arithmetic mean for each state and the entire US. Results include radon, gross alpha, gross beta, Ra-226, Ra-228, total Ra, U-234, U-238, total U, and U-234/U-238 ratios. Individual public water supply results are found in the appendices. 24 refs., 91 figs., 51 tabs.

Horton, T. R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK , K Hattori1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK M, Ottawa, ON, 2 Cameco Corporation, Saskatoon, SK Depth Profiles Canada Mining Innovation Council Natural., Portella, P., Olson, R.A., 2007. Unconformity- associated uranium deposits of the Athabasca Basin

280

Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier Wind Power Reliability: Breaking Down a Barrier June 25, 2010 - 12:16pm Addthis EnerNex Corporation is developing documentation and...

283

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD the barrier to linearity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared spectroscopy of HD 3 above the barrier to linearity BY JENNIFER L. GOTTFRIED, transitions of HC 3 above the barrier to linearity have been observed. A highly sensitive near-infrared-adiabatic and radiative corrections is revealed. Keywords: HD 3 ; near-infrared spectroscopy; barrier to linearity 1

Oka, Takeshi

284

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott (Richland, WA); Hardy, John S. (Richland, WA); Kim, Jin Yong (Richland, WA); Choi, Jung-Pyung (Richland, WA)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fission barriers and half-lives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We briefly review the development of theoretical models for the calculation of fission barriers and half-lives. We focus on how results of actual calculations in a unified macroscopic-microscopic approach provide an interpretation of the mechanisms behind some of the large number of phenomena observed in fission. As instructive examples we choose studies of the rapidly varying fission properties of elements at the end of the periodic system. 31 refs., 10 figs.

Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

290

Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

291

Performing a global barrier operation in a parallel computer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Executing computing tasks on a parallel computer that includes compute nodes coupled for data communications, where each compute node executes tasks, with one task on each compute node designated as a master task, including: for each task on each compute node until all master tasks have joined a global barrier: determining whether the task is a master task; if the task is not a master task, joining a single local barrier; if the task is a master task, joining the global barrier and the single local barrier only after all other tasks on the compute node have joined the single local barrier.

Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Alternative barrier layers for surface covers in dry climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface covers are one of the most widespread remediation and waste management options in all climates. Barrier layers to limit percolation through cover systems are principal features of engineered, multi-component cover designs. Conventional barrier layer components developed for humid climates have limitations in dry climates. One alternative barrier layer is a capillary barrier, which consists of a fine-over-coarse soil arrangement. The capacity of capillary barrier to laterally divert downward moving water is the key to their success. Another alternative is a dry barrier, in which atmospheric air is circulated through a coarse layer within the cover to remove water vapor. Incorporating a coarse layer which stores water for subsequent removal by air flow reduces the requirements for the air flow velocity and increases the applicability of the dry barrier.

Stormont, J.C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Robust Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring (HFM) of Multiple Time Overlapping Events Using a Generalized Discrete Radon Transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we propose a novel algorithm for multiple-event localization for Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring (HFM) through the exploitation of the sparsity of the observed seismic signal when represented in a basis consisting of space time propagators. We provide explicit construction of these propagators using a forward model for wave propagation which depends non-linearly on the problem parameters - the unknown source location and mechanism of fracture, time and extent of event, and the locations of the receivers. Under fairly general assumptions and an appropriate discretization of these parameters we first build an over-complete dictionary of generalized Radon propagators and assume that the data is well represented as a linear superposition of these propagators. Exploiting this structure we propose sparsity penalized algorithms and workflow for super-resolution extraction of time overlapping multiple seismic events from single well data.

Ely, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

GAO cites barriers to Romanian ventures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that Romania needs to modernize its energy sector and increase production to help implement free market reforms and invigorate its economy. In a report to Congress, GAO the despite the Romanian government's efforts to reform the energy sector and improve the country's business climate, impediments persist to U.S. Trade with and investment in Romania. The barriers include a lack of a comprehensive energy strategy; underdeveloped legal and business infrastructures, uncertain economic and political conditions, and the absence of a U.S. most favored nation trade status.

Not Available

1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPower Address:ClimaticCoalogix Inc Jump to:Barrier

297

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment ofEnergy Natural Gas: Transmission, StorageIndustry andAir Barriers

298

Highway noise reduction by barrier walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Variables 3. Noise Reduction and Noise Reduction Factor 4. Relationship Between Noise Attenuation and d 5. Rettinger's Variables 6. Relationship of Sound-Level Reduction and v 7. Basic Principles in Sound-Transmission Loss 8. The Mass Law Relationship... that the barrier wall is acoustically opaque (i. e. , impermeable to sound waves). Purcell (8) found that the noise transmission loss of a wall was a measure of the ratio of the acoustical energy transmitted through the wall to the acoustical energy incident...

Young, Murray F

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for determining when a set of compute nodes participating in a barrier operation on a parallel computer are ready to exit the barrier operation that includes, for each compute node in the set: initializing a barrier counter with no counter underflow interrupt; configuring, upon entering the barrier operation, the barrier counter with a value in dependence upon a number of compute nodes in the set; broadcasting, by a DMA engine on the compute node to each of the other compute nodes upon entering the barrier operation, a barrier control packet; receiving, by the DMA engine from each of the other compute nodes, a barrier control packet; modifying, by the DMA engine, the value for the barrier counter in dependence upon each of the received barrier control packets; exiting the barrier operation if the value for the barrier counter matches the exit value.

Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

300

Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment.

Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Hanson, Richard W. (Spokane, WA); Hodges, Richard T. (Deer Park, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Underground barrier construction apparatus with soil-retaining shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably one which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground, a shield means for maintaining the void, and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment. 17 figs.

Gardner, B.M.; Smith, A.M.; Hanson, R.W.; Hodges, R.T.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Corrosion of barrier materials in seawater environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief review has been carried out on the performance of barrier materials for low-level radioactive wastes in seawater environments. The environments include those for shallower coastal waters as well as the deep ocean (down to 3800 m). The review is mainly focused on metallic materials since they are the most common for seawater service and they have the largest data base. Information from the literature is usually pertinent to shallower coastal locations, but there is a valuable source of corrosion data obtained from several studies of metallic specimens exposed to ocean-bed conditions. In addition, the corrosion of carbon steel barriers has been evaluated for actual waste containers that were retrieved from previously-used disposal sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Of the metallic materials studied, carbon steel showed the least corrosion resistance. Failure by non-uniform attack in a typical waste container could occur in as little as 25 y in some ocean environments ` Penetration by local attack, such as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance was also observed for more expensive materials such as low-alloy steels, stainless steels, titanium alloys, zirconium alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys, aluminum alloys, and lead alloys.

Heiser, J.H.; Soo, P.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (20) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating (20) consists essentially of a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula consisting essentially of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements selected from La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof; where B is selected from the group of elements selected from Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof; n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Quantum calculation of Coulomb reorientation and near-barrier fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the role of deformation on the fusion probability around the barrier using the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a full Skyrme force. We obtain a distribution of fusion probabilities around the nominal barrier due to the different contributions of the various orientations of the deformed nucleus at the touching point. It is also shown that the long range Coulomb reorientation reduces the fusion probability around the barrier.

Cédric Simenel; Michael Bender; Philippe Chomaz; Thomas Duguet; Gilles De France

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effects of Alloy Disorder on Schottky-Barrier Heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 35, NUMBER 18 15 JUNE 1987-II Effects of alloy disorder on Schottky-barrier heights Charles W. Myles Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 Shang-Fen Ren* and Roland E...~ The effects of alloy disorder on the Schottky barriers at semiconductor-alloy ?metal interfaces are investigated within the defect model of Schottky-barrier formation. The deep levels and the associ- ated wave functions for surface antisite defects, which...

MYLES, CW; REN, SF; Allen, Roland E.; REN, SY.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office Merit Review 2014: Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

310

Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

helped spur the growth of renewable energy projects, including solar, wind, and biomass power. This report aims to determine the barriers to CHP that exist within state RPS...

311

alveolar epithelial barrier: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lake 3Transmission through a Quantum Dynamical Delta Barrier T. Brandes1 ? and J. Robinson Department Levi, Anthony F. J. 199 Nitrate Removal in NITREXTM Permeable Reactive...

312

Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriers to Their...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to Their Adoption: A Scoping Study Jump to: navigation, search Name Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriers to Their Adoption: A Scoping Study AgencyCompany...

313

New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New Air and Water-Resistive Barrier Technologies for Commercial Buildings Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: 3M - Minneapolis, MN DOE Funding:...

314

Recent Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research to Address Technical Barriers to Increased Use of Biodiesel Wendy Clark & Bob McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado August 23, 2005 What is...

315

Panel 4, Grid-Scale Storage Technologies: Regulatory Barriers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Grid-scale Storage Technologies Regulatory Barriers and Policy Instruments Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services May 15 th , 2014 Sacramento, CA Demand 599...

316

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

317

Overcoming Processing Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Barriers of High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

318

Moving North Texas Forward by Addressing Alternative Fuel Barriers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MOVING NORTH TEXAS FORWARD BY ADDRESSING ALTERANATIVE FUEL BARRIERS Presenter: Pamela Burns North Central Texas Council of Governments June 20, 2014 P.I. Mindy Mize Project ID...

319

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Software Toolbox Capabilities In Assessing The Degradation Of Cementitious Barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Tank Waste and Nuclear Materials Management. The CBP program has developed a set of integrated tools (based on state-of-the-art models and leaching test methods) that help improve understanding and predictions of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. Tools selected for and developed under this program have been used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near-surface engineered waste disposal systems for periods of performance up to 100 years and longer for operating facilities and longer than 1000 years for waste disposal. The CBP Software Toolbox has produced tangible benefits to the DOE Performance Assessment (PA) community. A review of prior DOE PAs has provided a list of potential opportunities for improving cementitious barrier performance predictions through the use of the CBP software tools. These opportunities include: 1) impact of atmospheric exposure to concrete and grout before closure, such as accelerated slag and Tc-99 oxidation, 2) prediction of changes in Kd/mobility as a function of time that result from changing pH and redox conditions, 3) concrete degradation from rebar corrosion due to carbonation, 4) early age cracking from drying and/or thermal shrinkage and 5) degradation due to sulfate attack. The CBP has already had opportunity to provide near-term, tangible support to ongoing DOE-EM PAs such as the Savannah River Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) by providing a sulfate attack analysis that predicts the extent and damage that sulfate ingress will have on the concrete vaults over extended time (i.e., > 1000 years). This analysis is one of the many technical opportunities in cementitious barrier performance that can be addressed by the DOE-EM sponsored CBP software tools. Modification of the existing tools can provide many opportunities to bring defense in depth in prediction of the performance of cementitious barriers over time.

Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Burns, H. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Langton, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, F. G. III [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Brown, K. G. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Kosson, D. S. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Garrabrants, A. C. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Sarkar, S. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); van der Sloot, H. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy (The Netherlands); Meeussen, J. C.L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten (The Netherlands); Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies Inc. , 1400, boul. du Parc - Technologique , Suite 203, Quebec (Canada); Mallick, P. [United States Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave. SW , Washington, DC (United States); Suttora, L. [United States Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave. SW , Washington, DC (United States); Esh, D. W. [U .S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission , Washington, DC (United States); Fuhrmann, M. J. [U .S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission , Washington, DC (United States); Philip, J. [U .S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission , Washington, DC (United States)

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Software Toolbox Capabilities in Assessing the Degradation of Cementitious Barriers - 13487  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Project is a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Tank Waste and Nuclear Materials Management. The CBP program has developed a set of integrated tools (based on state-of-the-art models and leaching test methods) that help improve understanding and predictions of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. Tools selected for and developed under this program have been used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near-surface engineered waste disposal systems for periods of performance up to 100 years and longer for operating facilities and longer than 1000 years for waste disposal. The CBP Software Toolbox has produced tangible benefits to the DOE Performance Assessment (PA) community. A review of prior DOE PAs has provided a list of potential opportunities for improving cementitious barrier performance predictions through the use of the CBP software tools. These opportunities include: 1) impact of atmospheric exposure to concrete and grout before closure, such as accelerated slag and Tc-99 oxidation, 2) prediction of changes in K{sub d}/mobility as a function of time that result from changing pH and redox conditions, 3) concrete degradation from rebar corrosion due to carbonation, 4) early age cracking from drying and/or thermal shrinkage and 5) degradation due to sulfate attack. The CBP has already had opportunity to provide near-term, tangible support to ongoing DOE-EM PAs such as the Savannah River Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) by providing a sulfate attack analysis that predicts the extent and damage that sulfate ingress will have on the concrete vaults over extended time (i.e., > 1000 years). This analysis is one of the many technical opportunities in cementitious barrier performance that can be addressed by the DOE-EM sponsored CBP software tools. Modification of the existing tools can provide many opportunities to bring defense in depth in prediction of the performance of cementitious barriers over time. (authors)

Flach, G.P.; Burns, H.H.; Langton, C.; Smith, F.G. III [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken SC 29808 (United States); Brown, K.G.; Kosson, D.S.; Garrabrants, A.C.; Sarkar, S. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)] [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Van der Sloot, H. [Hans Van der Sloot Consultancy (Netherlands)] [Hans Van der Sloot Consultancy (Netherlands); Meeussen, J.C.L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands)] [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands); Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies Inc., 1400, boul. du Parc-Technologique, Suite 203, Quebec (Canada)] [SIMCO Technologies Inc., 1400, boul. du Parc-Technologique, Suite 203, Quebec (Canada); Mallick, P.; Suttora, L. [United States Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC (United States); Esh, D.W.; Fuhrmann, M.J.; Philip, J. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slideshow presents work intended to: Scale-up the Generation -1 UBT to 1+meter width full-scale manufacturing; Develop a Generation-2 UBT on the pilot line, targeting improved performance, longer lifetime and lower cost; Transfer Generation-2 UBT from the pilot line to the full-scale manufacturing line in 2014; and Validate service life of Generation-1 UBT for the 25+ year lifetime. 3M has scaled up UBT for production at 1.2 meter width. 3M is conducting extensive lifetime studies including: –Evaluation of customer processing and installation conditions; –Indoor accelerated testing of UBT film and full CIGS modules; –Outdoor testing of UBT film and CIGS modules. Results have been used to improve ultra barrier film performance for flex module applications.

Schubert, Charlene

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

323

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Influence of Dust on the Absorptivity of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this project was to model and quantify the increase of the absorptivity of radiant barriers caused by the accumulation of dust on the surface of radiant barriers. This research was the continuation of a previous work by the author...

Noboa, Homero L.

326

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Financial Incentives And Barriers; And  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan Financial Incentives And Barriers; And Other Funding Sources Prepared Summary The goal of this section of the Hawaii Bioenergy Master Plan is to identify and evaluate financial incentives and barriers at points along the bioenergy industry value chain (feedstock production, feedstock

327

Delamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-tempera- ture exposure to oxygen, and an outer low thermal conduc- tivity ceramic coating, such as ytrriaDelamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers Matthew R layers upon thermal cycling delamination failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) driven by thickening

Wadley, Haydn

328

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

Cooling Energy Measurements of Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product...

Levins, W. P.; Karnitz, M. A.; Knight, D. K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the findings obtained from crash tests performed on flat terrain. For barriers placed on roadside and median slopes, vehicle impact height varies depending on the trajectory of the vehicle along the ditch section and lateral offset of the barrier. Thus...

Ferdous, Md Rubiat

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

331

Performance characteristics of a self-sealing/self-healing barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environment Canada and the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation are co-developers of a patented Self-Sealing/Self-Healing (SS/SH) Barrier system for containment of wastes which is licensed to Water Technology International Corporation. The SS/SH Barrier is intended for use as either a liner or cover for landfills, contaminated sites, secondary containment areas, etc., in the industrial, chemical, mining and municipal sectors, and also as a barrier to hydraulic flow for the transportation and construction industry. The SS/SH Barrier`s most significant feature is its capability for self-repair in the event of a breach. By contrast, conventional barrier systems, such as clay, geomembrane, or geosynthetic clay liners can not be repaired without laborious excavation and reconstruction. Laboratory investigations have shown that the SS/SH Barrier concept will function with a variety of reactive materials. Self-Sealing/Self-Healing Barriers are cost competitive and consistently exhibit hydraulic conductivities ranging from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -13} m/s, which decrease with time. These measurements meet or exceed the recommended hydraulic conductivity required by EPA for clay liners (<1x10{sup -9} m/s) used in landfills and hazardous waste sites. Results of mineralogical examination of the seal, diffusion testing, hydraulic conductivity measurement, and durability testing, including wet/dry, freeze/thaw cycling and leachate compatibility are also presented.

McGregor, R.G. [Water Technology International Corp., Burlington, Ontario (Canada); [Canadian Clean Technology Centre, Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Stegemann, J.A. [Canadian Clean Technology Centre, Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Algebrization: A New Barrier in Complexity Theory Scott Aaronson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inverting one-way functions) that we wanted to prove were hard. 1.1 The Need for a New Barrier Yet for both for Advanced Study Abstract Any proof of P = NP will have to overcome two barriers: relativization and natural-protocol for the Inner Product function with O ( n log n) communication (essentially matching a lower bound of Klauck

Wigderson, Avi

333

Vapor deposited samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal barrier coatings The rare earth zirconates (M2Zr2O7, M=LaGd) have a low intrinsic thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability making them attractive candidates for thermal barrier coating conditions and the coating composition, structure, texture, pore morphology, and thermal conductivity

Wadley, Haydn

334

Barriers that impact on the implementation of sustainable design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

page 1 Barriers that impact on the implementation of sustainable design Michelle Hankinson, Amanda of sustainable design and barriers that influence their sustainable design practices. The paper reflects showed that education and experience informs a designer's understanding and values towards sustainable

335

Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Analysis of Gamma Radiation from a Radon Source: Indications of a Solar Influence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article presents an analysis of about 29,000 measurements of gamma radiation associated with the decay of radon in a sealed container at the Geological Survey of Israel (GSI) Laboratory in Jerusalem between 28 January 2007 and 10 May 2010. These measurements exhibit strong variations in time of year and time of day, which may be due in part to environmental influences. However, time-series analysis reveals a number of periodicities, including two at approximately 11.2 year$^{-1}$ and 12.5 year$^{-1}$. We have previously found these oscillations in nuclear-decay data acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), and we have suggested that these oscillations are attributable to some form of solar radiation that has its origin in the deep solar interior. A curious property of the GSI data is that the annual oscillation is much stronger in daytime data than in nighttime data, but the opposite is true for all other oscillations. This may be a systematic effect but, if it is not, this property should help narrow the theoretical options for the mechanism responsible for decay-rate variability.

Peter A. Sturrock; Gideon Steinitz; Ephraim Fischbach; Daniel Javorsek, II; Jere H. Jenkins

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Automated Impedance Tomography for Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barrier Health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was the development of an autonomous, automated electrical geophysical monitoring system which allows for near real-time assessment of Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) health and aging and which provides this assessment through a web-based interface to site operators, owners and regulatory agencies. Field studies were performed at four existing PRB sites; (1) a uranium tailing site near Monticello, Utah, (2) the DOE complex at Kansas City, Missouri, (3) the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado and (4) the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana. Preliminary surface data over the PRB sites were collected (in December, 2005). After the initial round of data collection, the plan was modified to include studies inside the barriers in order to better understand barrier aging processes. In September 2006 an autonomous data collection system was designed and installed at the EPA PRB and the electrode setups in the barrier were revised and three new vertical electrode arrays were placed in dedicated boreholes which were in direct contact with the PRB material. Final data were collected at the Kansas City, Denver and Monticello, Utah PRB sites in the fall of 2007. At the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana, nearly continuous data was collected by the autonomous monitoring system from June 2006 to November 2007. This data provided us with a picture of the evolution of the barrier, enabling us to examine barrier changes more precisely and determine whether these changes are due to installation issues or are normal barrier aging. Two rounds of laboratory experiments were carried out during the project. We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in zero valent iron (ZVI) columns. In the second round of laboratory experiments we observed the electrical response from simulation of actual field PRBs at two sites: the Kansas City barrier and the East Helena barrier. As these sites are also used for our field monitoring efforts, this allowed for a comparison between field and laboratory. In column studies with high concentrations of calcium and carbonate/bicarbonate, we observed that the increase of electrical resistivity and decrease of polarization magnitude is significant and is mainly controlled by the precipitation of calcium carbonates. In general, the electrical properties of all of the barriers studied follow a pattern. New barriers are fairly resistive with in-situ conductivity only a few times background (outside the barrier) values. Older barriers get increasingly conductive, with failed barriers showing values of over 100 S/m. The induced polarization response is more complicated. Chargeability values increase over time for young barriers, are largest for healthy barriers in the middle of their lifespan, and decrease as the barrier ages These results suggest that normalized IP appears promising as a measure of barrier age.

LaBrecque, D J; Adkins, P L

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hanford prototype-barrier status report: FY 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface barriers (or covers) have been proposed for use at the Hanford Site as a means to isolate certain waste sites that, for reasons of cost or worker safety or both, may not be exhumed. Surface barriers are intende to isolated the wastes from the accessible environment and to provide long-term protection to future populations that might use the Hanford Site. Currently, no ``proven`` long-term barrier system is available. For this reason, the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface-Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Designs have been proposed to meet the most stringent needs for long-term waste disposal. The objective of the current barrier design is to use natural materials to develop a protective barrier system that isolates wastes for at least 1000 years by limiting water, plant, animal, and human intrusion; and minimizing erosion. The design criteria for water drainage has been set at 0.5 mm/yr. While other design criteria are more qualitative, it is clear that waste isolation for an extended time is the prime objective of the design. Constructibility and performance. are issues that can be tested and dealt with by evaluating prototype designs prior to extensive construction and deployment of covers for waste sites at Hanford.

Gee, G.W.; Ward, A.L.; Gilmore, B.G.; Ligotke, M.W.; Link, S.O.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The role of plants on isolation barrier systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion.

Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Waugh, W.J. [UNC Chem-Nuclear Geotech, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coins, Quantum Measurements, and Turing's Barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is there any hope for quantum computing to challenge the Turing barrier, i.e. to solve an undecidable problem, to compute an uncomputable function? According to Feynman's '82 argument, the answer is {\\it negative}. This paper re-opens the case: we will discuss solutions to a few simple problems which suggest that {\\it quantum computing is {\\it theoretically} capable of computing uncomputable functions}. In this paper a mathematical quantum "device" (with sensitivity $\\epsilon$) is constructed to solve the Halting Problem. The "device" works on a randomly chosen test-vector for $T$ units of time. If the "device" produces a click, then the program halts. If it does not produce a click, then either the program does not halt or the test-vector has been chosen from an {\\it undistinguishable set of vectors} ${\\IF}_{\\epsilon, T}$. The last case is not dangerous as our main result proves: {\\it the Wiener measure of} ${\\IF}_{\\epsilon, T}$ {\\it constructively tends to zero when} $T$ {\\it tends to infinity}. The "device", working in time $T$, appropriately computed, will determine with a pre-established precision whether an arbitrary program halts or not. {\\it Building the "halting machine" is mathematically possible.}

Cristian S. Calude; Boris Pavlov

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Natural gas vehicles : Status, barriers, and opportunities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, recent shale gas discoveries have generated renewed interest in using natural gas as a vehicular fuel, primarily in fleet applications, while outside the United States, natural gas vehicle use has expanded significantly in the past decade. In this report for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Program - a public-private partnership that advances the energy, economic, and environmental security of the U.S. by supporting local decisions that reduce petroleum use in the transportation sector - we have examined the state of natural gas vehicle technology, current market status, energy and environmental benefits, implications regarding advancements in European natural gas vehicle technologies, research and development efforts, and current market barriers and opportunities for greater market penetration. The authors contend that commercial intracity trucks are a prime area for advancement of this fuel. Therefore, we examined an aggressive future market penetration of natural gas heavy-duty vehicles that could be seen as a long-term goal. Under this scenario using Energy Information Administration projections and GREET life-cycle modeling of U.S. on-road heavy-duty use, natural gas vehicles would reduce petroleum consumption by approximately 1.2 million barrels of oil per day, while another 400,000 barrels of oil per day reduction could be achieved with significant use of natural gas off-road vehicles. This scenario would reduce daily oil consumption in the United States by about 8%.

Rood Werpy, M.; Santini, D.; Burnham, A.; Mintz, M.; Energy Systems

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy tunneling barrier Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

through an insulating barrier with magnetic impurities O. Vvra,1,2, Summary: Josephson junction with a tunneling barrier formed by a paramagnetic insulator. We demonstrate......

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - apply diffusion barrier Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radioactive waste confinement Summary: and solute diffusion in an engineered barrier for radioactive waste confinement. G. Montes-H et al. Applied... barrier (MX80 bentonite)...

345

Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of $^{16}$O with $^{154,}$$^{144}$Sm,$^{186}$W and $^{208}$Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two $^{64}$Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

F. Muhammad Zamrun; K. Hagino; N. Takigawa

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sub-barrier Fusion Cross Sections with Energy Density Formalism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the applicability of the energy density formalism (EDF) for heavy-ion fusion reactions at sub-barrier energies. For this purpose, we calculate the fusion excitation function and the fusion barrier distribution for the reactions of 16O with 154,144Sm, 186W and 208Pb with the coupled-channels method. We also discuss the effect of saturation property on the fusion cross section for the reaction between two 64Ni nuclei, in connection to the so called steep fall-off phenomenon of fusion cross sections at deep sub-barrier energies.

Zamrun, Muhammad; Hagino, F. K.; Takigawa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, 980-8578 (Japan)

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Grid composite for backfill barriers and waste applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A grid composite for protecting men and longwall mining equipment during longwall shield recovery includes a regular polymer geogrid structure formed by biaxially drawing a continuous sheet of select polypropylene material which is heat bonded to a polyester fabric. The grid composite is secured over caving shields of longwall mining equipment during a longwall mining operation. The polymer grid composite is ideal for waste containment structures, backfill barriers, and silt barriers in construction and mining applications. In waste containment and backfill barriers, the grid composite is used to form a containment structure. It principle function is to contain waste material usually consisting of a liquid with some percentage of solids. 10 figs.

Travis, B.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

In situ formation of phosphate barriers in soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reactive barriers and methods for making reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil ontaminants including actinides and heavy metals. The barrier includes phosphate, and techniques are disclosed for forming specifically apatite barriers. The method includes injecting dilute reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source such as a waste drum to achieve complete or partial encapsulation of the waste. Controlled temperature and pH facilitates rapid formation of apatite, for example, where dilute aqueous calcium chloride and dilute aqueous sodium phosphate are the selected reagents. Mixing of reagents to form precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations on the JWKB treatment of the quadratic barrier Hujun Shen1 and Harris J. Silverstone2 June, 2006. Accepted 11 July, 2006. #12;238 Hujun Shen and Harris J. Silverstone where ±x0 = ± -2E

Silverstone, Harris J.

351

Design and analysis of a recycled plastic noise barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the early 1970s. There was steady advancement in barrier innovation as engineers, architects, and contractors relied on local building codes and "Standard Specihcations for Structural Supports for Highway Signs, Luminaires, and Traffic Signals...

Esche, Steven Todd

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

altered glomerular barrier: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Schoofs, Frank; Fix, Thomas; Vickers, Mary E; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G 2014-04-17 284 Neutron pair transfer in sub-barrier capture process Nuclear...

353

Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in Multifamily...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Overcoming P ersistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in MulLfamily Housing through Partnerships January 30 th , 2014 Molly Lunn DOE's State a nd Local Technical Assistance Team 1 |...

354

Sub-barrier capture with quantum diffusion approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the quantum diffusion approach the behavior of capture cross sections and mean-square angular momenta of captured systems are revealed in the reactions with deformed and spherical nuclei at sub-barrier energies. With decreasing bombarding energy under the barrier the external turning point of the nucleus-nucleus potential leaves the region of short-range nuclear interaction and action of friction. Because of this change of the regime of interaction, an unexpected enhancement of the capture cross section is found at bombarding energies far below the Coulomb barrier. This effect is shown its worth in the dependence of mean-square angular momentum on the bombarding energy. From the comparison of calculated capture cross sections and experimental capture or fusion cross sections the importance of quasifission near the entrance channel is demonstrated for the actinidebased reactions and reactions with medium-heavy nuclei at extreme sub-barrier energies.

V. V. Sargsyan; R. A. Kuzyakin; G. G. Adamian; N. V. Antonenko; W. Scheid; H. Q. Zhang

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

Application of a cubic barrier in exotic decay studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In exotic decay studies, the branching ratios for spontaneous emissions of fragments heavier than alpha particle have been found to be very sensitive to the shape of the potential barrier. In order to fix the top of barrier correctly, finite range effects are included in our calculations. Experimental Q values for different decay modes are chosen so as to incorporate the shell effects. The shape of the barrier in the overlapping region is approximated by a third-order polynomial suggested by Nix. The cubic barrier is found to be more suitable near the penetrating region. This model is applied to calculate the branching ratios for the spontaneous emission of heavier fragments. The results obtained compare well with those of other theoretical models and experimental values.

Shanmugam, G.; Kamalaharan, B.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

February 5, 2014 Webinar - The Cementitious Barriers Partnership...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership Toolbox, Version 2.0 David Kosson et al. (Vanderbilt UniversityCRESP) Agenda - 252014 P&RA CoP Webinar Presentation - Tools...

357

Economic evaluation of closure cap barrier materials study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the Economic Evaluation of the Closure Cap Barrier Materials, Revision I contains detailed cost estimates for closure cap barrier materials. The cost estimates incorporate the life cycle costs for a generic hazardous waste seepage basin closure cap under the RCRA Post Closure Period of thirty years. The economic evaluation assessed six barrier material categories. Each of these categories consists of several composite cover system configurations, which were used to develop individual cost estimates. The information contained in this report is not intended to be used as a cost estimating manual. This information provides the decision makers with the ability to screen barrier materials, cover system configurations, and identify cost-effective materials for further consideration.

Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

HOLM MJ

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Microsoft Word - Barriers to Achieving the Modern Grid_Final...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

our 21 st Century Economy V1.0 Barriers to Achieving the Modern Grid A declining infusion of new thought is occurring. The technical experience base of utilities is graying....

360

One-way Ponderomotive Barrier in a Uniform Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of an asymmetric ponderomotive barrier in a nonuniform dc magnetic field by high-frequency radiation near the cyclotron resonance for selected plasma species was contemplated in Physics of Plasmas 11 (November 2004) 5046-5064. Here we show that a similar one-way barrier, which reflects particles incident from one side while transmitting those incident from the opposite side, can be produced also in a uniform magnetic field, entirely due to inhomogeneity of high-frequency drive.

I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Band Tunneling through Double Barrier in Bilayer Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By taking into account the full four band energy spectrum, we calculate the transmission probability and conductance of electrons across symmetric and asymmetric double potential barrier with a confined interlayer potential difference in bilayer graphene. For energies less than the interlayer coupling \\gamma_{1}, E \\gamma_{1}, we obtain four possible ways for transmission resulting from the two propagating modes. We compute the associated transmission probabilities as well as their contribution to the conductance, study the effect of the double barrier geometry.

Hasan A. Alshehab; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

Analysis of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using Mathematical Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center, Cape Canaveral, FL, January 1988. 3. Vilkes, K.E. and D.V. Yarbrough, "Radiant Barrier Research Plan," Draft Report, ORNL/CON-256, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, April 1988. 4. ASHRAE Aandbook of Fundamentals, American... Measurements of Single-Family Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers," Final Report, ORNL/CON-200, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, July 1986. 8. Cummings, J. B., "Central Air Condi tioner Impact Upon Infiltration Rates in Florida...

Fairey, P.; Swami, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Structural and safety characteristics and warrants for highway traffic barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ross Highway traffic barriers are highway appurtenances that provide vehicle occupants with a relative degree of protection from roadside hazards and from errant vehicles encroaching across a median. The six basic types of traffic barr1ers are roads... are decision criteria that 1dentify sites along highways that need traff1c barrier installations. Structural and safety character- istics of the barr1ers refer to the impact performance, the structural integrity, and the safety of the vehicle occupants upon...

Kohutek, Terry Lee

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Use of Subsurface Barriers to Support Treatment of Metals and Reduce the Flux of Tritium to Fourmile Branch at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina - 13358  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) produced tritium, plutonium, and special nuclear materials for national defense, medicine, and the space programs. Acidic groundwater plumes containing metals, metallic radionuclides, non-metallic radionuclides and tritium sourced from the F and H Area Seepage Basins have impacted the surface water of Fourmile Branch on SRS. Tritium releases from Fourmile Branch have impacted the water quality within areas of the Savannah River adjacent to the SRS, and this circumstance has been an ongoing regulatory concern. The F and H Area Seepage Basins operated until 1988 for the disposition of deionized acidic waste water from the F and H Separations Facilities. The waste water contained dilute nitric acid and low concentrations of non-radioactive metals, and radionuclides, with the major isotopes being Cs-137, Sr-90, U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Tc-99, I-129, and tritium. The tritium concentration in the waste water was relatively elevated because there is not a practicable removal method in water. The acid content of the waste water during the operational period of the basins was equal to 12 billion liters of nitric acid. The seepage basins were closed in 1988 and backfilled and capped by 1991. The plumes associated with the F and H basins cover an area of nearly 2.4 square kilometers (600 acres) and discharge along ?2,600 meters of Fourmile Branch. The acidic nature of the plumes and their overall discharge extent along the branch represent a large challenge with respect to reducing contaminant flux to Fourmile Branch. The introduction of nitric acid into the groundwater over a long time effectively reduced the retardation of metal migration from the basins to the groundwater and in the groundwater to Fourmile Branch, because most negatively charged surfaces on the aquifer materials were filled with hydrogen ion. Two large pump and treat systems were constructed in 1997 and operated until 2003 in an attempt to capture and control the releases to Fourmile Branch. The operating cost, including waste disposal, for the two systems was ?$1.3 M/month. Both systems employed reinjection of tritiated water up gradient of the extraction, and produced large quantities of waste from non-tritium isotopes and metals removal prior to reinjection. Both systems were determined to be ineffective and potentially detrimental with respect to limiting the flux of contaminants to Fourmile Branch. After it became apparent that there was very little benefit to continued operation of the systems, and the staggering cost of operations was recognized by the SRS and regulators, a new remedy was developed. The new system uses vertical subsurface barriers to redirect groundwater flow to limit the transport of contaminants to the stream. The barriers were constructed of acid resistant grout using deep soil mixing techniques. The grout mixture used low swelling clay, fly ash, and sodium hydroxide to form a pozzolana material with low permeability and low strength. The SRS and regulators agreed to a series of remedial goals, with the first goal to reduce tritium flux to the stream by 70% and bring constituents other than tritium to groundwater protection standards. (authors)

Blount, Gerald; Thibault, Jeffrey; Wells, Leslie [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC, 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Prater, Phillip [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Department of Energy, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

366

Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

Wilkes, K.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

Nikezic, D., E-mail: nikezic@kg.ac.rs; Stajic, J. M. [Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, R. Domanovica 12, Kragujevac 34000 (Serbia)] [Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, R. Domanovica 12, Kragujevac 34000 (Serbia); Yu, K. N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong)] [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Rogers, V.C., K.K. Nielson, 1991, "Multiphase Radon Generation and Transport in Porous Minerals," Health Physics Vol. 60, No. 6, 807-813.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactivity (TENR) Cause by Non-Uranium Mining, October 16-19, Szczyrk, Poland. Usman, S.S., H.Spitz, and J Limited presented at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Uranium Recovery Licensing Workshop, January 11 to Monitor Radon Emissions from Uranium Tailings," Contract Number EP-D-05-002, Work Assignment No. 4

369

ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they pertain to this report; the current procedures are addressed in Section 2. This revision also addresses updates to the technical basis in supporting analysis and model reports and corroborative documentation, as presented in Sections 4 and 6 of this report. Finally, Sections 4, 5, and 6 of this report provide additional information pertaining to the relevant FEPs-related Acceptance Criteria presented in ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (YMRP) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274], Sections 2.2.1.2.1.3 and 2.2.1.3.3.3).

Jaros, W.

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Verification of the integrity of barriers using gas diffusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ barrier materials and designs are being developed for containment of high risk contamination as an alternative to immediate removal or remediation. The intent of these designs is to prevent the movement of contaminants in either the liquid or vapor phase by long-term containment, essentially buying time until the contaminant depletes naturally or a remediation can be implemented. The integrity of the resultant soil-binder mixture is typically assessed by a number of destructive laboratory tests (leaching, compressive strength, mechanical stability with respect to wetting and freeze-thaw cycles) which as a group are used to infer the likelihood of favorable long-term performance of the barrier. The need exists for a minimally intrusive yet quantifiable methods for assessment of a barrier`s integrity after emplacement, and monitoring of the barrier`s performance over its lifetime. Here, the authors evaluate non-destructive measurements of inert-gas diffusion (specifically, SF{sub 6}) as an indicator of waste-form integrity. The goals of this project are to show that diffusivity can be measured in core samples of soil jet-grouted with Portland cement, validate the experimental method through measurements on samples, and to calculate aqueous diffusivities from a series of diffusion measurements. This study shows that it is practical to measure SF{sub 6} diffusion rates in the laboratory on samples of grout (Portland cement and soil) typical of what might be used in a barrier. Diffusion of SF{sub 6} through grout (Portland cement and soil) is at least an order of magnitude slower than through air. The use of this tracer should be sensitive to the presence of fractures, voids, or other discontinuities in the grout/soil structure. Field-scale measurements should be practical on time-scales of a few days.

Ward, D.B. [SPECTRA Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, C.V. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies Dept.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination...

McMillan, Marcia Donna

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

373

Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density Speci?c heat capacity of liquid phase Speci?c heatspeci?c heat capacity of the solid phase, the liquid phase,Heat capacity Heat conductivity Intrinsic permeability of liquid

Wang, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The effects of damage in and around a fracture upon the analysis of pressure data from low permeability gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildup Data for a 100 Foot Fracture in an Unbounded Reservoir 15 16 Horner Plot of Pressure Buildup Data for a 100 Foot Fracture in an Unbounded Reservoir--Closure and non- Darcy Flow Included 17 Horner Plot of Pressure Buildup Data for a 100 Foot... Fracture in an Unbounded Reservoir--Closure and non- Darcy Flow Included--500 MCFPD Rate 18 10 Horner Plot of Pressure Buildup Data for a 100 Foot Fracture in an Unbounded Reservoir--Closure and non- Darcy Flow Included--1000 MCFPD Rate...

Fox, Thomas Lee

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

In Situ Formation Of Reactive Barriers For Pollution Control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of treating soil contamination by forming one or more zones of oxidized material in the path of percolating groundwater is disclosed. The zone or barrier region is formed by delivering an oxidizing agent into the ground for reaction with an existing soil component. The oxidizing agent modifies the existing soil component creating the oxidized zone. Subsequently when soil contaminates migrate into the zone, the oxidized material is available to react with the contaminates and degrade them into benign products. The existing soil component can be an oxidizable mineral such as manganese, and the oxidizing agent can be ozone gas or hydrogen peroxide. Soil contaminates can be volatile organic compounds. Oxidized barriers can be used single or in combination with other barriers.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Riley, Robert G. (West Richland, WA)

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

Fuller, James L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Development of a low-profile portable concrete barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low-profile portable concrete barrier (PCB) has been developed for use in low-speed (approximately 45 mph [73 km/h] or less) work zones. The purpose of the low-profile barrier is to shield the work zone and redirect errant vehicles while.... SEQUENTIAL PHOTOGRAPHS OF CRASH TESTS APPENDIX D. ACCELEROMETER TRACES AND PLOTS OF ROLL, PITCH AND YAW RATES APPENDIX E. TEST VEHICLE PROPERTIES VITA Page 6 8 8 10 10 13 13 17 18 19 20 24 29 29 41 50 52 53 63 68 73 82 85 LIST...

Guidry, Todd Randall

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a factor of three when groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes.

William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geothermal (Ground-Source) Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pump systems (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pump or Geo-Exchange systems, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national energy and climate strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE s request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential and other benefits, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in a report along with conclusions and recommendations. This paper summarizes the key information from the report.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Geothermal(Ground-Source)Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pumps, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in this report along with conclusions and recommendations.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Triode carbon nanotube field emission display using barrier rib structure and manufacturing method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A triode carbon nanotube field emission display (FED) using a barrier rib structure and a manufacturing method thereof are provided. In a triode carbon nanotube FED employing barrier ribs, barrier ribs are formed on cathode lines by a screen printing method, a mesh structure is mounted on the barrier ribs, and a spacer is inserted between the barrier ribs through slots of the mesh structure, thereby stably fixing the mesh structure and the spacer within a FED panel due to support by the barrier ribs.

Han, In-taek (Yongin, KR); Kim, Jong-min (Seongnam, KR)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Overcoming Barriers to Ground Source Heat Pumps in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overcoming Barriers to Ground Source Heat Pumps in California Geothermal Resources Development Account http://www.energy.ca.gov/geothermal/ grda.html May 2011 The Issue Ground source heat pumps can far made little impact in California. Estimates are that adoption of ground source heat pumps

386

Nanoscale mapping of the W/Si(001) Schottky barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W/Si(001) Schottky barrier was spatially mapped with nanoscale resolution using ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and ballistic hole emission microscopy (BHEM) using n-type and p-type silicon substrates. The formation of an interfacial tungsten silicide is observed utilizing transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The BEEM and BHEM spectra are fit utilizing a linearization method based on the power law BEEM model using the Prietsch Ludeke fitting exponent. The aggregate of the Schottky barrier heights from n-type (0.71?eV) and p-type (0.47?eV) silicon agrees with the silicon band gap at 80?K. Spatially resolved maps of the Schottky barrier are generated from grids of 7225 spectra taken over a 1??m?×?1??m area and provide insight into its homogeneity. Histograms of the barrier heights have a Gaussian component consistent with an interface dipole model and show deviations that are localized in the spatial maps and are attributed to compositional fluctuations, nanoscale defects, and foreign materials.

Durcan, Chris A.; Balsano, Robert; LaBella, Vincent P., E-mail: vlabella@albany.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

Microstructural Evolution and interfacial motion in systems with diffusion barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program was designed to model and simulate phase transformations in systems containing diffusion barriers. The modeling work included mass flow, phase formation, and microstructural evolution in interdiffusing systems. Simulation work was done by developing Cahn-Hilliard and phase field equations governing both the temporal and spatial evolution of the composition and deformation fields and other important phase variables.

Perry H. Leo

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

388

Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European and Barrier Options Belal E. Baaquie RMI are financial derivatives that can be analyzed in the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum finance. Forward-2963 Fax: (65) 6777-6126 Email: phybeb@nus.edu.sg #12;Quantum Finance Hamiltonian for Coupon Bond European

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

389

Peierls-Nabarro Barrier and Protein Loop Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a self-localized quasiparticle excitation propagates along a discrete one dimensional lattice, it becomes subject to a dissipation that converts the kinetic energy into lattice vibrations. Eventually the kinetic energy does no longer enable the excitation to cross over the minimum energy barrier between neighboring sites, and the excitation becomes localized within a lattice cell. In the case of a protein, the lattice structure consists of the C-alpha backbone. The self-localized quasiparticle excitation is the elemental building block of loops. It can be modeled by a kink which solves a variant of the discrete non-linear Schroedinger equation (DNLS). We study the propagation of such a kink in the case of protein G related albumin-binding domain, using the UNRES coarse-grained molecular dynamics force field. We estimate the height of the energy barriers the kink needs to cross over, in order to propagate along the backbone lattice. We analyse how these barriers gives rise to both stresses and reliefs which control the kink movement. For this, we deform a natively folded protein structure by parallel translating the kink along the backbone away from its native position. We release the transposed kink, and we follow how it propagates along the backbone towards the native location. We observe that the dissipative forces which are exerted on the kink by the various energy barriers, have a pivotal role in determining how a protein folds towards its native state.

Adam K. Sieradzan; Antti Niemi; Xubiao Peng

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Integrating PV into Performance Contracts: Barriers and Trends  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

value chain includes the technology's value as a peak-shaving and load management tool, as a sourceIntegrating PV into Performance Contracts: Barriers and Trends Wilson Rickerson Center for Energy incorporated photovoltaic (PV) systems as part of an overall building energy service strategy. This paper

Delaware, University of

391

Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualities for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}--COOH which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces. 8 figs.

King, D.E.; Czanderna, A.W.; Kennedy, C.E.

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualifies for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH.sub.2).sub.11 --COOH Which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces.

King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Helping Utilities Make Smart Solar Decisions Utility Barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helping Utilities Make Smart Solar Decisions Utility Barriers Key issues facing deployment of utility-scale solar PV plants. Sandra Burton Regional Director March 8 ­ 9, 2011 Brookhaven National Lab #12;About SEPA Developed by utilities to facilitate the integration of solar electric power. SEPA

Homes, Christopher C.

394

Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

EasyVoice: Breaking barriers for people with voice disabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disabilities. With the advances in computing power, new applications have been developed for helping peopleEasyVoice: Breaking barriers for people with voice disabilities Paulo A. Condado and Fernando G,flobo}@ualg.pt Abstract. Text-to-speech technology has been broadly used to help people with voice disabilities

Condado, Paulo

396

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-1335E Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California A.T. Mc of Global Energy Partners. This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Demand Response in California. PIER Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency Program. CEC

397

Mobility barrier for disabled people DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobility barrier for disabled people DEJOUX, Virginie; ARMOOGUM, Jimmy 12 th WCTR, July 11-15, 2010 92 55 88 virginie.dejoux@inrets.fr ARMOOGUM Jimmy INRETS - DEST Site de Marne-la-Vallée. "Le Descartes 2" 2 rue de la Butte Verte 93166 Noisy le grand cedex Telephone: 33 1 45 92 55 79 jimmy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

105K West Isolation Barrier Acceptance Test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KW/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan and acceptance test procedure. The test report contains the test data. This document compares the test data against the criteria. A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization describes how the flow characteristics flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report. Two modes of water loss were considered; basin and/or discharge chute leakage, and evaporation. An initial test established baseline leakage data and instrumentation performance. Test 2 evaluated the sealing performance of the isolation barrier by inducing an 11 in. (27.9 cm) level differential across the barrier. The leak rate at this 11 in. (27.9 cm) level is extrapolated to the 16 ft. (4.9 m) level differential postulated in the DBE post seismic event. If the leak rate, adjusted for evaporation and basin leakage (determined from Test 1), is less than the SAR limit of 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) at a 16 ft (4.9 m) level differential, the barriers pass the acceptance test.

McCracken, K.J. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Irwin, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

400

PET radiotracers: crossing the bloodbrain barrier and surviving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PET radiotracers: crossing the blood­brain barrier and surviving metabolism Victor W. Pike in the living human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) are increasingly useful in clinical research or undesirable metabolism. These issues are reviewed. Emerging PET radiotracers for measuring efflux transporter

Shen, Jun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Experimental investigation of a horizontal flexible-membrane wave barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of experiments is conducted in a two-dimensional glass-walled wave tank to confirm numerical solutions based on two-dimensional linear hydro-elastic theory for a horizontal flexible-membrane wave barrier. The model test is performed by a...

Choi, Hae-Jin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Algebrization: A New Barrier in Complexity Theory Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for some of the very same problems (like inverting one­way functions) that we wanted to prove were hard. 1 for Advanced Study Abstract Any proof of P #= NP will have to overcome two barriers: relativization and natural an MA­protocol for the Inner Product function with O ( # n log n) communication (essentially matching

Wigderson, Avi

403

Algebrization: A New Barrier in Complexity Theory Scott Aaronson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems (like inverting one-way functions) that we wanted to prove were hard. 1.1 The Need for a New for Advanced Study Abstract Any proof of P = NP will have to overcome two barriers: relativization and natural-protocol for the Inner Product function with O ( n log n) communication (essentially matching a lower bound of Klauck

Wigderson, Avi

404

The development of surface barriers at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Engineered barriers are being developed to isolate wastes disposed of near the earth`s surface at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Much of the waste that would be disposed of by in-place stabilization currently is located in relatively shallow subsurface structures such as solid waste burial grounds, tanks, vaults, and cribs. Unless protected in some way, the wastes could be transported to the accessible environment via the following pathways: plant, animal, and human intrusion; water infiltration; erosion; and the exhalation of noxious gases. Permanent isolation surface barriers have been proposed to protect wastes disposed of ``in place`` from the transport pathways identified previously (Figure 1). The protective barrier consists of a variety of different materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt, etc.) placed in layers to form an above-grade mound directly over the waste zone. Surface markers are being considered for placement around the periphery of the waste sites to inform future generations of the nature and hazards of the buried wastes. In addition, throughout the protective barrier, subsurface markers could be placed to warn any inadvertent human intruders of the dangers of the buried wastes (Figure 2).

Wing, N.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a, , Carlos G. Levi b is enhanced by incorporation of through-thickness pores within the coating. However, molten calcium­magnesium­alumino­silicate in dissolution of the coat- ing in the silicate melt, precipitation of new phases, and the elimination

Wadley, Haydn

406

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 2, Calculations, Final design for construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume two contains calculations for: embankment design--slope stability analysis; embankment design--excavation stability; embankment design--settlement and cover cracking analysis; radon barrier design--statistical analysis of ra-226 concentrations for North Continent and Union Carbide sites; radon barrier design--RAECOM input data; radon barrier design--design thickness; and cover design--frost penetration depth.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered blood-brain barrier Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

blood-brain barrier Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altered blood-brain barrier Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Applications are...

408

Beyond parallax barriers: applying formal optimization methods to multilayer automultiscopic displays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper focuses on resolving long-standing limitations of parallax barriers by applying formal optimization methods. We consider two generalizations of conventional parallax barriers. First, we consider general two-layer ...

Lanman, Douglas

409

From blood to the brain: can systemically transplanted mesenchymal stem cells cross the blood-brain barrier?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and function of the blood-brain barrier,” Neurobiology ofV. Zlokovic, “The blood-brain barrier in health and chroniccell biology of the blood- brain barrier,” Annual Review of

Liu, Linan; Eckert, Mark A; Riazifar, Hamidreza; Kang, Dong-Ku; Agalliu, Dritan; Zhao, Weian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Recent progress in the study of fission barriers in covariant density functional theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent progress in the study of fission barriers of actinides and superheavy nuclei within covariant density functional theory is overviewed.

A. V. Afanasjev; H. Abusara; P. Ring

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric dielectric barrier Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Force Measurement Techniques and Preliminary Results Summary: Results Using Aerogels and Ferroelectrics for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Actuators Ryan Durscher......

412

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizational Barriers to Cogeneration • • • OrganizationTechnologies Cogeneration. • MSW . Wind. ResidentialPage Industrial Cogeneration. • Residential Photovoltaics. •

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Effect of neutron transfer in the fusion process near and below the Coulomb barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-barrier and sub-barrier fusion of weakly bound neutron-rich isotopes of lithium is explored within the empirical channel coupling model. Several combinations of colliding nuclei are proposed, for which strong enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion is predicted owing to coupling with neutron transfer channels.

Rachkov, V. A.; Adel, A.; Karpov, A. V.; Denikin, A. S.; Zagrebaev, V. I. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation) and International University 'Dubna', Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna, 141980, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Multiple-humped fission and fusion barriers of the heaviest elements and ellipsoidal deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leading possibly to superheavy elements, double-humped potential barriers appear for cold fusionMultiple-humped fission and fusion barriers of the heaviest elements and ellipsoidal deformations G barriers and the predicted half-lives of actinides follow the experimental results. In the fusion path

Boyer, Edmond

415

Low temperature barriers with heat interceptor wells for in situ processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for reducing heat load applied to a frozen barrier by a heated formation is described. The system includes heat interceptor wells positioned between the heated formation and the frozen barrier. Fluid is positioned in the heat interceptor wells. Heat transfers from the formation to the fluid to reduce the heat load applied to the frozen barrier.

McKinzie, II, Billy John (Houston, TX)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

416

Morphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George Island, Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the barrier island are analyzed, along with the short-term post-storm recovery of secondary dunes. ResultsMorphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George September 2009 Keywords: Dune recovery LiDAR Overwash Hurricane Dennis Barrier island During the summer

Fagherazzi, Sergio

417

Blood Brain Barrier group Multi drug resistance and P-glycoprotein efflux transporter: physiological roles and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Blood Brain Barrier group Multi drug resistance and P-glycoprotein efflux transporter-binding cassette) transporter family expressed in many tissue barriers (e.g. gut, lung, blood-brain barrier of many drugs to the brain and has been the subject of intensive research in the last 10 years

Applebaum, David

418

In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced bloodbrain barrier opening in mice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood­brain barrier cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood­brain barrier opening in mice Yao-Sheng Tung1 cavitation response associated with blood­brain barrier (BBB) opening as induced by transcranial focused

Konofagou, Elisa E.

419

Simulation of the high temperature impression of thermal barrier coatings with columnar microstructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the deformation resistance of actual EB-PVD layers and its application to a range of thermal barrier materials [9Simulation of the high temperature impression of thermal barrier coatings with columnar of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are affected by their high temperature mechanical properties: especially

Hutchinson, John W.

420

Design of Roadside Barrier Systems Placed on Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) Retaining Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and LRFD ..............................................................25 2.3.3 Previous Crash Test of Barrier on Edge of MSE Wall......................................26 2.4 Survey of State DOTs... and Conclusion.............................................................................................76 5 5 FT HIGH MSE WALL AND BARRIER STUDY ......................................................84 5.1 5 Ft High MSE Wall and Barrier Study Description...

Kim, Kang

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

Laughlin, David E.

422

Ferroelectric modulation on resonant tunneling through perovskite double-barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative differential resistance (NDR) due to resonance tunneling is achieved at room temperature in perovskite double-barrier heterostructures composed of a 10 unit-cell-thick SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well sandwiched in two 10 unit-cell-thick LaAlO{sub 3} barriers. The NDR occurs at 1.2?V and does not change with voltage cycling. When the paraelectric SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well is replaced by a ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3}, the onset of the NDR can be modulated by polarization switching in the ultrathin BaTiO{sub 3}. A polarization pointing to the collector lowers the NDR voltage but a polarization pointing to the emitter increases it. The shift of the NDR voltage is ascribed to reversal of the extra electric field in the quantum well due to the polarization switching.

Du, Ruifang; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di, E-mail: diwu@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Condensation of actin filaments pushing against a barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a model to describe the force generated by the polymerization of an array of parallel biofilaments. The filaments are assumed to be coupled only through mechanical contact with a movable barrier. We calculate the filament density distribution and the force-velocity relation with a mean-field approach combined with simulations. We identify two regimes: a non-condensed regime at low force in which filaments are spread out spatially, and a condensed regime at high force in which filaments accumulate near the barrier. We confirm a result previously known from other related studies, namely that the stall force is equal to N times the stall force of a single filament. In the model studied here, the approach to stalling is very slow, and the velocity is practically zero at forces significantly lower than the stall force.

K. Tsekouras; D. Lacoste; K. Mallick; J. -F. Joanny

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

424

Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

105 K East isolation barrier acceptance analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KE/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan (McCracken 1995c) and acceptance test procedure (McCracken 1995a). The test report (McCracken 1995b) contains the test data. This document compares the test data (McCracken 1995b) against the criteria (McCracken 1995a, c). A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization (Irwin 1995) describes how the flow characteristics and the flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report (McCracken 1995b). The barriers must adequately control the leakage from the main basin to the discharge chute to less than the 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) Safety Analysis Report (SAR 1994) limit.

McCracken, K.J. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Irwin, J.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level. 4 figs.

Brown, R.L.; Guilford, R.P.; Stichman, J.H.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

Transformer coupling for transmitting direct current through a barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transmission system for transmitting direct current from an energy source on one side of an electrical and mechanical barrier to a load on the other side of the barrier utilizes a transformer comprising a primary core on one side of the transformer and a secondary core on the other side of the transformer. The cores are magnetically coupled selectively by moving a magnetic ferrite coupler in and out of alignment with the poles of the cores. The direct current from the energy source is converted to a time varying current by an oscillating circuit, which oscillating circuit is optically coupled to a secondary winding on the secondary core to interrupt oscillations upon the voltage in the secondary winding exceeding a preselected level.

Brown, Ralph L. (Albuquerque, NM); Guilford, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stichman, John H. (Albuquerque, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Core Internal Transport Barriers in Alcator C-Mod  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Mod Group Supported by DoE grant DE-FC02-99ER54512 #12;Alcator C-Mod Introduction Core Internal TransportAlcator C-Mod Core Internal Transport Barriers in Alcator C-Mod Catherine Fiore MIT Plasma Science types of core ITBs in Alcator C-Mod. Off-Axis ICRF generated core ITBs Spontaneous ITBs at H- to L

Fiore, Catherine L.

429

Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

E.L. Hardin

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

Subramanian, Ramesh

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Water-retaining barrier and method of construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An agricultural barrier providing a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface, the barrier being disposed on native soil of the region, the barrier including: a first layer composed of pieces of basalt, the first layer being porous and being in contact with the native soil; a porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel, the second layer being less porous than, and overlying, the first layer; and a porous third layer containing soil which favors plant growth, the third layer being less porous than, and overlying, the second layer and having an exposed upper surface, wherein the porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer.

Adams, Melvin R. (Richland, WA); Field, Jim G. (Richland, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

TRITIUM BARRIER MATERIALS AND SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR THE NGNP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contamination of downstream hydrogen production plants or other users of high-temperature heat is a concern of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Due to the high operating temperatures of the NGNP (850-900 C outlet temperature), tritium produced in the nuclear reactor can permeate through heat exchangers to reach the hydrogen production plant, where it can become incorporated into process chemicals or the hydrogen product. The concentration limit for tritium in the hydrogen product has not been established, but it is expected that any future limit on tritium concentration will be no higher than the air and water effluent limits established by the NRC and the EPA. A literature survey of tritium permeation barriers, capture systems, and mitigation measures is presented and technologies are identified that may reduce the movement of tritium to the downstream plant. Among tritium permeation barriers, oxide layers produced in-situ may provide the most suitable barriers, though it may be possible to use aluminized surfaces also. For tritium capture systems, the use of getters is recommended, and high-temperature hydride forming materials such as Ti, Zr, and Y are suggested. Tritium may also be converted to HTO in order to capture it on molecular sieves or getter materials. Counter-flow of hydrogen may reduce the flux of tritium through heat exchangers. Recommendations for research and development work are provided.

Sherman, S; Thad Adams, T

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

In-situ chemical barrier and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical barrier is formed by injecting a suspension of solid particles or colloids into the subsurface. First, a stable colloid suspension is made including a surfactant and a non-Newtonian fluid. This stable colloid suspension is characterized by colloid concentration, colloid size, colloid material, solution ionic strength, and chemical composition. A second step involves injecting the optimized stable colloid suspension at a sufficiently high flow rate to move the colloids through the subsurface sediment, but not at such a high rate so as to induce resuspending indigenous soil particles in the aquifer. While injecting the stable colloid suspension, a withdrawal well may be used to draw the injected colloids in a direction perpendicular to the flow path of a contaminant plume. The withdrawal well, may then be used as an injection well, and a third well, in line with the first two wells, may then be used as a withdrawal well, thereby increasing the length of the colloid barrier. This process would continue until emplacement of the colloid barrier is complete. 7 figs.

Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

434

In-situ chemical barrier and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical barrier is formed by injecting a suspension of solid particles or colloids into the subsurface. First, a stable colloid suspension is made including a surfactant and a non-Newtonian fluid. This stable colloid suspension is characterized by colloid concentration, colloid size, colloid material, solution ionic strength, and chemical composition. A second step involves injecting the optimized stable colloid suspension at a sufficiently high flow rate to move the colloids through the subsurface sediment, but not at such a high rate so as to induce resuspending indigenous soil particles in the aquifer. While injecting the stable colloid suspension, a withdrawal well may be used to draw the injected colloids in a direction perpendicular to the flow path of a contaminant plume. The withdrawal well, may then be used as an injection well, and a third well, in line with the first two wells, may then be used as a withdrawal well, thereby increasing the length of the colloid barrier. This process would continue until emplacement of the colloid barrier is complete.

Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richland, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Engineered sorbent barriers for low-level waste disposal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Engineered Sorbent Barriers Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating sorbent materials to prevent the migration of soluble radio nuclides from low-level waste sites. These materials would allow water to pass, preventing the bathtub effect at humid sites. Laboratory studies identifield promising sorbent materials for three key radionuclides: for cesium, greensand; for cobalt, activated charcoal; and for strontium, synthetic zeolite or clinoptilolite. Mixtures of these sorbent materials were tested in 0.6-m-diameter columns using radioactive leachates. To simulate expected worst-case conditions, the leachate solution contained the radionuclides, competing cations, and a chelating agent and was adjusted to a pH of 5. A sorbent barrier comprised of greensand (1 wt%), activated charcoal (6 wt%), synthetic zeolite (20 wt%), and local soil (73 wt%) achieved the decontamination factors necessary to meet the regulatory performance requirements established for this study. Sorbent barriers can be applied to shallow-land burial, as backfill around the waste or engineered structures, or as backup to other liner systems. 7 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

Freeman, H.D.; Mitchell, S.J.; Buelt, J.L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Water-retaining barrier and method of construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An agricultural barrier is disclosed which provides a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface. The barrier is disposed on native soil of the region. The barrier includes a first porous layer composed of pieces of basalt, and is in contact with the native soil. There is a less porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel. The second layer overlies the first layer. A third layer, less porous than the second layer, contains soil which favors plant growth. The third layer overlies the second layer and has an exposed upper surface. The porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer. 2 figs.

Adams, M.R.; Field, J.G.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Protection against malevolent use of vehicles at Nuclear Power Plants. Vehicle barrier system selection guidance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual provides a simplified procedure for selecting land vehicle barriers that will stop the design basis vehicle threat adopted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Proper selection and construction of vehicle barriers should prevent intrusion of the design basis vehicle. In addition, vital safety related equipment should survive a design basis vehicle bomb attack when vehicle barriers are properly selected, sited, and constructed. This manual addresses passive vehicle barriers, active vehicle barriers, and site design features that can be used to reduce vehicle impact velocity.

Nebuda, D.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electrical characteristics and interface structure of magnetic tunnel junctions with hafnium oxyfluoride barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of fluorine inclusion on the electrical transport characteristics and interface structure of the hafnium oxide barrier in a magnetic tunnel junction. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and resistance-area (RA) as a function of oxidation time show that the TMR ratio of the hafnium oxyfluoride barrier is higher (8.3%) than that of the hafnium oxide barrier (5.7%) at their optimum conditions, and the oxyfluoride barrier junctions maintain a high TMR ratio even when the RA product increases by three orders of magnitude. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the fluorine atoms in the oxyfluoride barrier play an important role in the formation of a barrier with uniform composition. We believe that the initial fluoride layer is causing the subsequent oxygen diffusion to slow down, resulting in the formation of a defect-free hafnium oxide layer. These results are consistent with what we have found for aluminum oxyfluoride barriers.

Yu, Y.Y.; Kim, D.S.; Char, K. [Center for Strongly Correlated Materials Research and School of Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Xizhen Wu; Enguang Zhao

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method for the simultaneous preparation of radon-211, xenon-125, xenon-123, astatine-211, iodine-125 and iodine-123  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a practical method for commercially producing radiopharmaceutical activities and, more particularly, relates to a method for the preparation of about equal amount of Radon-211 (/sup 211/Rn) and Xenon-125 (/sup 125/Xe) including a one-step chemical procedure following an irradiation procedure in which a selected target of Thorium (/sup 232/Th) or Uranium (/sup 238/U) is irradiated. The disclosed method is also effective for the preparation in a one-step chemical procedure of substantially equal amounts of high purity /sup 123/I and /sup 211/At. In one preferred arrangement of the invention almost equal quantities of /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe are prepared using a onestep chemical procedure in which a suitably irradiated fertile target material, such as thorium-232 or uranium-238, is treated to extract those radionuclides from it. In the same one-step chemical procedure about equal quantities of /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I are prepared and stored for subsequent use. In a modified arrangement of the method of the invention, it is practiced to separate and store about equal amounts of only /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe, while preventing the extraction or storage of the radionuclides /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I.

Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Biophysical modelling of the effects of inhaled radon progeny on the bronchial epithelium for the estimation of the relationships applied in the two stage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a considerable debate between research groups applying the two stage clonal expansion model for lung cancer risk estimation, whether radon exposure affects initiation and transformation or promotion. The objective of the present study is to quantify the effects of radon progeny on these stages with biophysical models. For this purpose, numerical models of mutation induction and clonal growth were applied in order to estimate how initiation, transformation and promotion rates depend on tissue dose rate. It was found that rates of initiation and transformation increase monotonically with dose rate, while effective promotion rate decreases with time, but increases in a supralinear fashion with dose rate. Despite the uncertainty of the results due to the lack of experimental data, present study suggests that effects of radon exposure on both mutational events and clonal growth are significant, and should be considered in epidemiological analyses applying mathematical models of carcinogenesis.

Madas, Balázs G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Near and sub-barrier fusion as a probe of nuclear structure Sub-barrier fusion is particularly sensitive to the tail of the nuclear matter distribution,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near and sub-barrier fusion as a probe of nuclear structure Sub-barrier fusion is particularly sensitive to the tail of the nuclear matter distribution, hence provides a good probe of the neutron and proton distributions. Measuring fusion for an isotopic chain of projectile nuclei one can sensitively

de Souza, Romualdo T.

443

Surface barrier height for different Al compositions and barrier layer thicknesses in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a physics based analytical model for the calculation of surface barrier height for given values of barrier layer thicknesses and Al mole fractions. An explicit expression for the two dimensional electron gas density is also developed incorporating the change in polarization charges for different Al mole fractions.

Goyal, Nitin, E-mail: goyalnitin.iitr@gmail.com; Fjeldly, Tor A. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Iniguez, Benjamin [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

Systematics of the deduced fission barriers for the doubly even transactinium nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The systematics of the fission barrier shapes of a total of 47 doubly even actinide and transactinide nuclei have been studied using the double-humped fission barrier model. The fission barrier has been parametrized in terms of four smoothly joined parabolic segments. The penetrabilities through such double-humped fission barriers have been calculated in the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, and the various fission half-lives have been determined using the formalism given earlier by Nix and Walker. The various parameters of such fission barriers have been deduced by requiring their simultaneous consistency with the various relevant fission observables, namely, the near-barrier fission cross sections, isomeric energies and isomeric half-lives, where available, and the ground-state spontaneous fission half-lives in the region 90{le}{ital Z}{le}98, and such model calculations with some further justifiable asssumptions have been extended to the region of the still heavier nuclei with {ital Z}{ge}100. The results of our systematic study of the heights of the inner and the outer barriers of the double-humped fission barriers corresponding to such doubly even nuclei suggest that while the height of the inner barrier remains approximately constant in the entire region of such nuclei, the deduced heights of the outer barrier decrease rather sharply and continuously with the increase in the value of the fissility parameter until one reaches the element Rf ({ital Z}=104).

Bhandari, B.S.; Bendardaf, Y.B. (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Garyounis, Benghazi (Libya))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification. The demonstration was installed at a benign site at the Hanford Geotechnical Test Facility, 400 Area, Hanford, Washington. The composite barrier was emplaced beneath a 7,500 liter tank. The tank was chosen to simulate a typical DOE Complex waste form. The stresses induced on the waste form were evaluated during barrier construction. The barrier was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a conical shaped barrier with the waste form inside the cone. Two overlapping rows of cylindrical cement columns were grouted in a honeycomb fashion to form the secondary backdrop barrier layer. The primary barrier, a high molecular weight polymer manufactured by 3M Company, was then installed providing a relatively thin inner liner for the secondary barrier. The primary barrier was emplaced by panel jet grouting with a dual wall drill stem, two phase jet grouting system.

Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies Dept.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Summary of Workshop: Barriers to Energy Efficient Residential Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives for this workshop were to bring together those with different viewpoints on the implementation of energy efficient ventilation in homes to share their perspectives. The primary benefit of the workshop is to allow the participants to get a broader understanding of the issues involved and thereby make themselves more able to achieve their own goals in this area. In order to achieve this objective each participant was asked to address four objectives from their point of view: (1) Drivers for energy efficient residential ventilation: Why is this an important issue? Who cares about it? Where is the demand: occupants, utilities, regulation, programs, etc? What does sustainability mean in this context? (2) Markets & Technologies: What products, services and systems are out there? What kinds of things are in the pipeline? What is being installed now? Are there regional or other trends? What are the technology interactions with other equipment and the envelope? (3) Barriers to Implementation: What is stopping decision makers from implementing energy-efficient residential ventilation systems? What kind of barriers are there: technological, cost, informational, structural, etc. What is the critical path? (4) Solutions: What can be done to overcome the barriers and how can/should we do it? What is the role of public vs. private institutions? Where can investments be made to save energy while improving the indoor environment? Ten participants prepared presentations for the workshop. Those presentations are included in sections at the end of this workshop report. These presentations provided the principal context for the discussions that happened during the workshop. Critical path issues were raised and potential solutions discussed during the workshop. As a secondary objective they have listed key issues and some potential consensus items which resulted from the discussions.

Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

K.G. Mon

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fusion barrier distributions in systems with finite excitation energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eigen-channel approach to heavy-ion fusion reactions is exact only when the excitation energy of the intrinsic motion is zero. In order to take into account effects of finite excitation energy, we introduce an energy dependence to weight factors in the eigen-channel approximation. Using two channel problem, we show that the weight factors are slowly changing functions of incident energy. This suggests that the concept of the fusion barrier distribution still holds to a good approximation even when the excitation energy of the intrinsic motion is finite. A transition to the adiabatic tunneling, where the coupling leads to a static potential renormalization, is also discussed.

K. Hagino; N. Takigawa; A. B. Balantekin

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

Properties and stability of a Texas barrier beach inlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, breakthroughs from the bay side on both wide and narrow islands have been attributed to the gradual buildup of water in the lagoon, followed by a sudden shift in wind to an offshore direction (gg). Thus, large quantities of water are piled up on the island... of central Texas coastal inlets (44), attributes these characteristics of stable inlets to four factors: 1) the position of bays north of the barrier island, 2) strong north winds which funnel water through the inlets, 3) the direction of longshore drift...

Mason, Curtis

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Influence of dust on the emissivity of radiant barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

beloved children Anita Maria and Felipe Homero, and my family in Ecuador. The support and love of my mother and father, and my family-in-law were vital to overcome the difficulties. I would like to mention my sister in law Luly for her special attention... To My Beloved Father To Anita Maria and Fehpe Homero TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT Page ACKNOWLEDGMENTS DEDICATION V 1 1 LIST OF FIGURES Xl NOMENCLATURE . X111 1. INTRODUCTION 2. LITERATURE REVIEW 3. TOPICS ON RADIANT BARRIERS PERFORMANCE 3. 1...

Noboa, Homero Luis

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Nanopillar Spin Filter Tunnel Junctions with Manganite Barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

promising FI tunnel barrier material for SFTJ. In this work, we investigate the spin filtering properties of Sm0.75Sr0.25MnO3 (SSMO) manganite ultrathin films in LNO/SSMO/LNO tunnel junctions. SSMO films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto Sr... -plane rotation vis-à-vis the substrate, i.e. the alignment of [110] of orthorhombic SSMO with the [100] of the underlying cubic SrTiO3 (STO) substrate. Film thickness was calculated from both X-ray reflectivity (not shown) and diffraction fringes around the (004...

Prasad, Bhagwati; Egilmez, Mehmet; Schoofs, Frank; Fix, Thomas; Vickers, Mary E; Zhang, Wenrui; Jian, Jie; Wang, Haiyan; Blamire, Mark G

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

452

Surface charge in dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct measurements of the dielectric surface potential and its dynamics in asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators show that the charge builds up at the dielectric surface and extends far downstream of the plasma. The surface charge persists for a long time (tens of minutes) after the driving voltage has been turned off. For a sinusoidal voltage waveform, the dielectric surface charges positively. With the voltage waveform consisting of nanosecond pulses superimposed on a dc bias, the sign of the dielectric surface charge is the same as the sign (polarity) of the bias voltage. The surface charging significantly affects DBD plasma actuator performance.

Opaits, D. F.; Shneider, M. N.; Miles, Richard B. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Likhanskii, A. V. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Macheret, S. O. [Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Palmdale, California 93599 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Dynamics of kicked particles in a double-barrier structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the classical and quantum dynamics of periodically kicked particles placed initially within an open double-barrier structure. This system does not obey the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem and displays chaotic dynamics. The phase space features induced by non-KAM nature of the system leads to dynamical features such as the non-equilibrium steady state, classically induced saturation of energy growth and momentum filtering. We also comment on the experimental feasibility of this system as well as its relevance in the context of current interest in classically induced localization and chaotic ratchets.

Harinder Pal; M. S. Santhanam

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

454

Bioenergy in India: Barriers and Policy Options | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey:form View source HistoryBarriers and Policy Options Jump

455

GBTL Opening Presentation_Tech Barriers | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings |Safety,ofOpening Presentation_Tech Barriers GBTL

456

Dynamical analysis on heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shell correction is proposed in the improved isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics (ImIQMD) model, which plays an important role in heavy-ion fusion reactions near Coulomb barrier. By using the ImIQMD model, the static and dynamical fusion barriers, dynamical barrier distribution in the fusion reactions are analyzed systematically. The fusion and capture excitation functions for a series of reaction systems are calculated and compared with experimental data. It is found that the fusion cross sections for neutron-rich systems increase obviously, and the strong shell effects of two colliding nuclei result in a decrease of the fusion cross sections at the sub-barrier energies. The lowering of the dynamical fusion barriers favors the enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross sections, which is related to the nucleon transfer and the neck formation in the fusion reactions.

Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Feng-Shou Zhang

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

Sub- and above barrier fusion of loosely bound $^6$Li with $^{28}$Si  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion excitation functions are measured for the system $^6$Li+$^{28}$Si using the characteristic $\\gamma$-ray method, encompassing both the sub-barrier and above barrier regions, viz., $E_{lab}$= 7-24 MeV. Two separate experiments were performed, one for the above barrier region ($E_{lab}$= 11-24 MeV) and another for the below barrier region ($E_{lab}$= 7-10 MeV). The results were compared with our previously measured fusion cross section for the $^7$Li+$^{28}$Si system. We observed enhancement of fusion cross section at sub-barrier regions for both $^6$Li and $^7$Li, but yield was substantially larger for $^6$Li. However, for well above barrier regions, similar type of suppression was identified for both the systems.

Mandira Sinha; H. Majumdar; P. Basu; Subinit Roy; R. Bhattacharya; M. Biswas; M. K. Pradhan; R. Palit; I. Mazumdar; S. Kailas

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification.

Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stewart, W. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Plasma Surface Modification of Polymer Backsheets: Origins of Future Interfacial Barrier/Backsheet Failure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flexible polymer substrates coated with inorganic oxide moisture barriers are a potential replacement for glass backsheets in thin film PV modules. Silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) deposited by PECVD on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) represents one potential new backsheet candidate. Barrier deposition runs at NREL have typically included a nitrogen-rich plasma pretreatment prior to actual barrier deposition with the intention of cleaning the PET surface as well as enhancing adhesion of the SiOxNy barrier film to PET; however, test coupons of PET/barrier/EVA/TPE failed after damp heat exposure. PET substrates exposed to plasma conditions similar to those used in pre-treatment were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to reveal new low molecular weight PET fragments are created which are volatile upon heating and water soluble. Failure analysis of the coupons determined that the moisture barrier is, in fact, transferred to the encapsulant side.

Pankow, J. W.; Glick, S. H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Device and method for producing a containment barrier underneath and around in-situ buried waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably on which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment.

Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smith, Ann M. (Pocatello, ID); Hanson, Richard W. (Spokane, WA); Hodges, Richard T. (Deer Park, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Device and method for producing a containment barrier underneath and around in-situ buried waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for building a horizontal underground barrier by cutting through soil and depositing a slurry, preferably on which cures into a hardened material. The apparatus includes a digging means for cutting and removing soil to create a void under the surface of the ground and injection means for inserting barrier-forming material into the void. In one embodiment, the digging means is a continuous cutting chain. Mounted on the continuous cutting chain are cutter teeth for cutting through soil and discharge paddles for removing the loosened soil. This invention includes a barrier placement machine, a method for building an underground horizontal containment barrier using the barrier placement machine, and the underground containment system. Preferably the underground containment barrier goes underneath and around the site to be contained in a bathtub-type containment. 15 figs.

Gardner, B.M.; Smith, A.M.; Hanson, R.W.; Hodges, R.T.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Heat barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility is disclosed herein. Generally, the thermal barrier comprises a flexible, heat-resistant web mounted over the annular space between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel in order to prevent convection currents generated in the nitrogen atmosphere in this space from entering the relatively cooler atmosphere of the reactor cavity which surrounds these vessels. Preferably, the flexible web includes a blanket of heat-insulating material formed from fibers of a refractory material, such as alumina and silica, sandwiched between a heat-resistant, metallic cloth made from stainless steel wire. In use, the web is mounted between the upper edges of the guard vessel and the flange of a sealing ring which surrounds the reactor vessel with a sufficient enough slack to avoid being pulled taut as a result of thermal differential expansion between the two vessels. The flexible web replaces the rigid and relatively complicated structures employed in the prior art for insulating the reactor cavity from the convection currents generated between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel.

Keegan, Charles P. (South Huntingdon Twp., Westmoreland County, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Multi-barrier borehole canister designs for a tuff repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial dimensions are presented for proposed multi-barrier spent fuel borehole canisters using coated shells combined with sacrificial anodes and alkaline, oxide barriers to adjust potential and pH of the exterior shell into thermodynamically passive or immune regions of the Pourbaix diagram. Configuration of the 3 PWR canister is similar to the 1983 Site Characterization Project (SCP) borehole design. Canister dimensions were determined by using material performance data to calculate wall thickness, criticality, and sacrificial anode life. For the 3-PWR canister. Incoloy 825 is the preferred exterior canister shell material; copper-nickel alloy CDA 715 is the preferred interior canister shell material. High-lime concrete or alumina is preferred for the alkaline filler. Magnesium alloy is the preferred sacrificial anode material. Coating the canister exterior would be necessary to reduce corrosion current density to the point where a 10,000 year design life is possible. A 1 PWR canister has lower mass, thinner walls and lower criticality than the 3 PWR design. Equilibrium calculations for the historical average composition of J-13 water using the aquatic chemical speciation program WQ4F show positive saturation indices for several minerals, indicating potential for deposition on the canister exterior over long time periods. Uniform deposition could reduce corrosion rate by hindering transport of corrosion products from the canister surface. If deposition is non-uniform, local corrosion could increase through development of differential oxygen concentration cells.

James, D.E.; Skaggs, R.L.; Mohansingh, S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Temporal modulation of plasma species in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in helium is a pulsed discharge in nature and the moment of maximum species densities is almost consistent with peak discharge current density. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to investigate the temporal structure of plasma species in an atmospheric He-N{sub 2} dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It is demonstrated that there exist microsecond delays of the moments of the maximum electron and ion densities from the peak of discharge current density. These time delays are caused by a competition between the electron impact and Penning ionizations, modulated by the N{sub 2} level in the plasma-forming gas. Besides, significant electron wall losses lead to the DBD being more positively charged and, with a distinct temporal separation in the peak electron and cation densities, the plasma is characterized with repetitive bursts of net positive charges. The temporal details of ionic and reactive plasma species may provide a new idea for some biological processes.

Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Dingxin; Rong, Mingzhe, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Kong, Michael G. [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Virginia 23508 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

The UFA technology for characterization of in situ barrier materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site characterizations, choices of remedial strategies for site restoration, and performance assessments of chosen strategies all require knowledge of the transport properties for subsurface materials, such as hydraulic conductivities, diffusion coefficients, sorption properties, and in situ recharge rates. Unsaturated conditions in the vadose zone are especially difficult to investigate because of the extreme variability in the transport properties of geologic materials as a function of water content. A new technique, the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus (UFA), was developed to rapidly attain hydraulic steady-state in all porous/fractured media, including multicomponent/multiphase systems. The larger driving forces obtainable with centrifugation techniques are combined with precision fluid flow through a rotating seal. Hydraulic steady state is achieved in a period of hours to days, instead of months to years, depending on the target water content and intrinsic permeability of the material. Barrier materials such as bentonite slurries, chemical barriers, cements, and asphalt concretes can be rapidly run in the UFA prior to emplacement to fine-tune formulations and identify any site-specific or substrate-specific problems that could not be identified without actual field testing.

Wright, J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Conca, J.L. [Washington State Univ. Tri-Cities, Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hygrothermal performance of an engineered clay barrier during sustained heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bentonitic clay buffers, with a potential for swelling, form an integral part of the natural (geological formation)/engineered multi-barrier concepts being proposed for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive nuclear fuel wastes. The integrity of such barriers during thermal loadings is of primary interest to the assessment of their reliability. This paper discusses the results of a series of experiments performed to assess the performance of buffer material under sustained heating. These experiments were conducted in a large-scale granite block facility. The laboratory modeling approximately simulates the local environment that can be encountered in a disposal vault in a granitic rock mass. Experiments in which the power supply to an embedded heater was held constant are described. The temperature distributions within the buffer and the granite block together with the residual moisture content distributions are documented. Also discussed is the application of a computational model of coupled heat and moisture flows. Moisture and heat transfer in the buffer under coupled gradients is described by the Philip-de Vries-type model in which the hygrothermal parameters are determined separately.

Selvadurai, A.P.S. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Onofrei, C. [AECL Research, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Barriers to Planning for At-Risk students Implications for Teacher Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barriers to Planning for At-Risk Students Implications for Teacher Planning Authors: B. Keith Lenz, Brenda Kissam, Janet Roth, Janis Bulgren, & Jeff Melvin The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning No. 7'J. ©August, 1992... Barriers to Planning for At-Risk Students Implications for Teacher Planning B. Keith Lenz Brenda Kissam Janet Roth Janis Bulgren Jeff Melvin The University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning ©August 1992 Running Head: Barriers to Planning...

Lenz, B. Keith; Kissam, Brenda; Roth, Janet; Bulgren, Janis; Melvin, Jeff

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hydraulic properties of an artificial tidal inlet through a Texas barrier beach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These littoral barriers are depositional structures continually changed by waves, tidal currents, and winds. Often the only connections between the open ocean and the bays are small restricted channels through the barrier beaches. These chan- nels, or tidal... too large on wide barrier beaches to permit sufficient scour. Breakthroughs also have been found to be caused by gradual buildups of water in the bays, followed by wind shifts to an off. ? shore direction (27). This tends to be supported by Price...

Prather, Stanley Harold

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Barrier layer for a MCrAlY basecoat superalloy combination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine component contains a substrate (22) such as a superalloy, a basecoat (24) of the type MCrAlY, and a continuous barrier layer (28) between the substrate and basecoat, where the barrier layer (28) is made of an alloy of (Re, Ta, Ru, Os)X, where X can be Ni, Co or their mixture, where the barrier layer is at least 2 micrometers thick and substantially prevents materials from both the basecoat and substrate from migrating through it.

Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

ORNL-5489 Radon and Radon Daughter  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores" _ ,' ,:.''

473

Adiabatic Heavy Ion Fusion Potentials for Fusion at Deep Sub-barrier Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fusion cross sections from well above barrier to extreme sub-barrier energies have been analysed using the energy (E) and angular momentum (L) dependent barrier penetration model ({\\small{ELDBPM}}). From this analysis, the adiabatic limits of fusion barriers have been determined for a wide range of heavy ion systems. The empirical prescription of Wilzynska and Wilzynski has been used with modified radius parameter and surface tension coefficient values consistent with the parameterization of the nuclear masses. The adiabatic fusion barriers calculated from this prescription are in good agreement with the adiabatic barriers deduced from {\\small{ELDBPM}} fits to fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness is larger at adiabatic limit, resulting in a lower $\\hbar\\omega$ leading to increase of "logarithmic slope" observed at energies well below the barrier. The effective fusion barrier radius and curvature values are anomalously smaller than the predictions of known empirical prescriptions. A detailed comparison of the systematics of fusion barrier with and without L-dependence has been presented.

S. V. S. Sastry; S. Kailas; A. K. Mohanty; A. Saxena

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

474

Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report -- October 28, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy's Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Technology Workshop, held October 28, 2010 in Denver, Colorado.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

IPR Barriers in Collaboration between University and Engineering Industry in Sweden.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis examines the barriers, especially intellectual property rights concerned that inhibit industry academia collaboration. By analyzing Swedish firms in the engineering industry, I… (more)

Huang, Wenting

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial root-end barriers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, the latter usually made of plastic or synthetic fabric. Artificial barriers are held in place by an array... Station Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Effects...

477

Electrodeposited Ni/Ge and germanide schottky barriers for nanoelectronics applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In recent years metal/semiconductor Schottky barriers have found numerous applications in nanoelectronics. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the improvement of a few… (more)

Husain, Muhammad Khaled

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - algae mesh barrier Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M Furnas... * and A Mitchell Soft-bottom benthic communities and processes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon D Alongi (Paper Source: Marsh, Helene - School of Earth and...

479

Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in Multifamily Housing through Partnerships  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in Multifamily Housing through Partnerships.

480

Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer.

Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-permeability radon barrier" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481