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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

A study to determine the most effective actuation valve and water distribution head combination for emergency showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for corrosion and wear. Pressure test to determine strength. (5) Remove shower head and dismantle. Clean scale and rust, from the head inlet and from the slots or orifices in the baffle plate. (6) Reassemble. (7) Open OSBY valve and replace seal..., and orifice sprinkler water distribution heads to determine which valve/head combination produced the greatest flow rate at varying static water pressures. Flow rates were measured at static pressures of 20, 30. 40, 50, and 60 pounds per square inch gauge...

Presswood, James Columbus

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Shower Testing for the Texas Department of Corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Council for an Energy Efficient Economy was contacted for information on low-flow showerheads which had been found to provide satisfacyntory showers. They recommended contacting two utilities (PSEG of New Jersey and Northeast Utilities, Connecticut) which...

Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Chen, L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

NERSC Users Showered With Accolades - NERSC Center News, Apr 29, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Users Showered Users Showered With Accolades NERSC Users Showered With Accolades April 29, 2011 April brought in a shower of accolades to longtime NERSC users as chemist Martin Head-Gordon was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Darleane Hoffman was honored with the Glenn T. Seaborg Actinide Separations Award and Phillip Geissler was honored with UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching award. Meanwhile, Martin White was the only physics recipient of the 2011 Guggenheim fellowship. to "mine" BOSS data. Martin White Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship Martin White Martin White of the Physics Division has been granted a 2011 Fellowship by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the only physics recipient among this year's 180 fellows. White, who heads the Survey Science Team for

4

Detection and effects of pump low-flow operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating experience and previous studies have shown that a significant cause of pump problems and failures can result from low- flow operation. Operation at low-flow rates can create unstable flows within the pump impeller and casing. This condition can result in an increased radial and axial thrust on the rotor, which in turn causes higher shaft stresses, increased shaft deflection, and potential bearing and mechanical seal problems. Two of the more serious results of low-flow pump operation are cavitation and recirculation. Cavitation is the formation and subsequent collapse of vapor bubbles in any flow that is at an ambient pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid medium. It is the collapse of these vapor bubbles against the metal surfaces of the impeller or casing that causes surface pitting, erosion, and deterioration. Pump recirculation more damaging than cavitation. If located at the impeller eye, recirculation damages the inlet areas of the casing. At the impeller tips, recirculation alters the outside diameter of the impeller. If recirculation occurs around impeller shrouds, it damages thrust bearings. Recirculation also erodes impellers, diffusers, and volutes and causes failure of mechanical seals and bearings. This paper reports on a utility pump failure caused by low-flow induced phenomena. ORNL is investigating the results of low-flow pump operations by evaluating the types of measurements and diagnostic techniques that are currently used by licensees to detect pump degradation. A new, enhanced application of motor current and power data analysis has been developed that uses a signal comparison methodology to produce an instability ratio indicative of normal or unstable flow conditions. Examples of this type of low-flow detection technique are presented in this paper along with a brief discussion of the various types of technologies currently being used by licensees to evaluate pump operation and determine possible degradation.

Casada, D.A.; Greene, R.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Evaluation of low flow characteristics of the Vermont Yankee plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boiling water reactor (BWR) core flow instrumentation inaccuracies under low-flow conditions have been the subject of both reactor vendor and regulatory communications in response to incidents of the reported core flow being less than the flow corresponding to the natural-circulation line on the power flow map. During single recirculation loop operation, low-flow conditions exist in the idle recirculation loop, and these flow inaccuracies can affect the usefulness of the reported core flow. Accurate core flow indications are needed above 25% power to administer fuel thermal limits and comply with restrictions associated with the potential for thermal-hydraulic instability. While the natural-circulation line on the power flow map is recognized to be a nominal estimate of the flow expected at and near natural-circulation conditions, the boundaries of the stability regions are associated with conditions assumed in safety analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with general design criteria 10 and 12.

Ganther, S.; LeFrancoi, M.; Bergeron, P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Phenomenology of cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of cosmic rays with energies above 1PeV have to be deduced from the spacetime structure and particle content of the air showers which they initiate. In this review, a summary of the phenomenology of these giant air showers is presented. We describe the hadronic interaction models used to extrapolate results from collider data to ultra high energies, an also the main electromagnetic processes that govern the longitudinal shower evolution as well as the lateral spread of particles.

M. T. Dova

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell'Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, W.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

8

Singing in the Shower to Shaking in Your Boots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singing in the Shower to Shaking in Your Boots: The science in the Shower to Shaking in Your Boots: The science of emotion Speaking about

Chou, James

9

Comet showers and Nemesis, the death star  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently proposed hypothesis that the periodic extinctions of terrestrial species are the result of comet showers catalyzed by a hypothetical distant solar companion, Nemesis, a tale of global death by comet bombardment of the earth, is discussed. (GHT)

Hills, J.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Uncertainty in Climate Modelling; Projected climate changes and low flow discharge in Elverdams Å.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This project uses the Danish stream Elversdam Å as a case study to analyse uncertainty in climate modelling, with particular focus on the low flow… (more)

Dam, Peter Rosendahl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy Balance in Extensive Air Showers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of an extensive air shower is discussed starting with the elementary nuclear interaction and proceeding to the development of the various components of the shower. Mention is made of experimental methods used to obtain information about the different components particularly with regard to the energy. Emphasis is placed on the division of the energy of the primary particle among the various components and the way in which this is accomplished. Some numerical values are given to typify the magnitudes involved.

John R. Green

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Classification of ultrahigh-energy extensive air showers in terms of the muon content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrahigh-energy extensive air showers detected at the Yakutsk ... are analyzed. Showers different in the muon content are revealed. Four classes of showers are...

A. A. Mikha?lov; N. N. Efremov…

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying shower development Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

develop differently as the shower progresses. Shower simulations show that for a fixed energy... content of showers from this direction with data from other regions of the sky....

14

E-Print Network 3.0 - air shower plasmas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in satellites. 2. Higher energy cosmic rays generate a small air shower. The Cerenkov radiation emitted... big air showers. The particles in the shower travel to the ground...

15

Upward Showering Muons in Super?Kamiokande  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small subset of neutrino?induced upward going muons in the Super?Kamiokande detector consists of high energy muons that undergo radiative energy losses through bremsstrahlung e + e ? pair production and photo?nuclear interactions. The mean energy of the parent neutrinos of these showering upward muons is approximately 1 TeV allowing the selection of a high energy sample of neutrinos. We present physics(mainly oscillation analysis) as well as astrophysical results with the upward showering muon dataset using about 1680 days of Super?K?I data.

Shantanu Desai; Super?Kamiokande Collaboration

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Synchrotron Radiation at Radio Frequencies from Cosmic Ray Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the properties of extensive cosmic ray air showers and describe a simple model of the radio-frequency radiation generated by shower electrons and positrons as they bend in the Earth's magnetic field. We perform simulations by calculating the trajectory and radiation of a few thousand charged shower particles. The results are then transformed to predict the strength and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the whole shower.

Denis A. Suprun; Peter W. Gorham; Jonathan L. Rosner

2003-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

17

Synchrotron Radiation at Radio Frequencies from Cosmic Ray Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some of the properties of extensive cosmic ray air showers and describe a simple model of the radio-frequency radiation generated by shower electrons and positrons as they bend in the Earth's magnetic field. We perform simulations by calculating the trajectory and radiation of a few thousand charged shower particles. The results are then transformed to predict the strength and polarization of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the whole shower.

Suprun, D A; Rosner, Jonathan L; Suprun, Denis A.; Gorham, Peter W.; Rosner, Jonathan L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hadronic multiparticle production in extensive air showers and accelerator experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using CORSIKA for simulating extensive air showers, we study the relation between the shower characteristics and features of hadronic multiparticle production at low energies. We report about investigations of typical energies and phase space regions of secondary particles which are important for muon production in extensive air showers. Possibilities to measure relevant quantities of hadron production in existing and planned accelerator experiments are discussed.

C. Meurer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; A. Haungs; M. Roth

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Muon Bremsstrahlung and Muonic Pair Production in Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this work is to report on the modifications in air shower development due to muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production. In order to do that we have implemented new muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production procedures in the AIRES air shower simulation system, and have used it to simulate ultra high energy showers in different conditions. The influence of the mentioned processes in the global development of the air shower is important for primary particles of large zenith angles, while they do not introduce significant changes in the position of the shower maximum.

A. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

Head, Henry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract English neurologist Sir Henry Head (1861–1940) conducted pioneering clinical studies of the somatosensory system, in addition to conducting important neurophysiological studies of respiratory control mechanisms. Head has been considered as one of the great English clinical neurologists and was a teacher of ‘infectious enthusiasm and vitality.’ Although some of Head's conceptual contributions have not stood the test of time, his diverse contributions were very influential. Among his many contributions were Head's paradoxical reflex (a positive feedback mechanism, which is inter alia important for the first breath of babies), the first reasonably accurate dermatomal map (Head–Campbell dermatomal map), description of the process of recovery from experimental peripheral nerve transection (in himself), the Head–Riddoch syndrome of autonomic dysreflexia, the mass reflex with recovery from spinal shock after spinal cord transection, and the clinically useful distinction between body schema and body image.

D.J. Lanska

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Simple shower and matching algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple formalism for parton-shower Markov chains. As a first step towards more complete 'uncertainty bands', we incorporate a comprehensive exploration of the ambiguities inherent in such calculations. To reduce this uncertainty, we then introduce a matching formalism which allows a generated event sample to simultaneously reproduce any infrared safe distribution calculated at leading or next-to-leading order in perturbation theory, up to sub-leading corrections. To enable a more universal definition of perturbative calculations, we also propose a more general definition of the hadronization cutoff. Finally, we present an implementation of some of these ideas for final-state gluon showers, in a code dubbed VINCIA.

Giele, Walter T.; /Fermilab; Kosower, David A.; /Saclay, SPhT; Skands, Peter Z.; /Fermilab

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

Jack Q. Richardson

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

New facts about muon production in Extended Air Shower simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whereas air shower simulations are very valuable tools for interpreting cosmic ray data, there is a long standing problem: is seems to be impossible to accommodate at the same time the longitudinal development of air showers and the number of muons measured at ground. Using a new hadronic interaction model (EPOS) in air shower simulations produces considerably more muons, in agreement with results from the HiRes-MIA experiment. We find that this is mainly due to a better description of baryon-antibaryon production in hadronic interactions. This is a new aspect of air shower physics which has never been considered so far.

T. Pierog; K. Werner

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Air shower registration algorithm and mathematical processing of showers with radio signal at the Yakutsk array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper describes the techniques and method of registration of air shower radio emission at the Yakutsk array of extensive air showers at a frequency of 32 MHz. At this stage, emission registration involves two set of antennas, the distance between them is 500m. One set involves 8 antennas, second - 4 antennas. The antennas are perpendicularly crossed dipoles with radiation pattern North South,West East and raised 1.5 m above the ground. Each set of antennas connected to an industrial PC. The registration requires one of two triggers. First trigger are generated by scintillation detectors of Yakutsk array. Scintillation detectors cover area of 12 km^2 and registers air showers with energy more than 10^17 eV. The second trigger is generated by Small Cherenkov Array that covers area of 1 km^2 and registers air showers with energy 10^15 - 5*10^17 eV. Small Cherenkov Array is part of Yakutsk array and involve Cherenkov detectors located at a distance of 50, 100, 250 m. For further selection we are using an addi...

Petrov, I; Petrov, Z

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

High performance in low-flow solar domestic hot water systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-flow solar hot water heating systems employ flow rates on the order of 1/5 to 1/10 of the conventional flow. Low-flow systems are of interest because the reduced flow rate allows smaller diameter tubing, which is less costly to install. Further, low-flow systems result in increased tank stratification. Lower collector inlet temperatures are achieved through stratification and the useful energy produced by the collector is increased. The disadvantage of low-flow systems is the collector heat removal factor decreases with decreasing flow rate. Many solar domestic hot water systems require an auxiliary electric source to operate a pump in order to circulate fluid through the solar collector. A photovoltaic driven pump can be used to replace the standard electrical pump. PV driven pumps provide an ideal means of controlling the flow rate, as pumps will only circulate fluid when there is sufficient radiation. Peak performance was always found to occur when the heat exchanger tank-side flow rate was approximately equal to the average load flow rate. For low collector-side flow rates, a small deviation from the optimum flow rate will dramatically effect system performance.

Dayan, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - air showers correlated Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reconstruction of extensive air showers using the air fluorescence technique... shower simulation software, must be thoroughly ... Source: Utah High Energy Astrophysics...

27

E-Print Network 3.0 - air showers electromagnetic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

traversing... , air showers alone will not increase the conductivity enough to initiate lightning. If air showers... source altitudes From Dwyer and Smith (2005) 12;RF emissions...

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - air showers measured Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

air shower speeds... Introduction Electromagnetic air showers are known to travel at the speed of light. However, no measurement... other assumptions are made in this ... Source:...

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - air shower measurements Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

air shower speeds... Introduction Electromagnetic air showers are known to travel at the speed of light. However, no measurement... other assumptions are made in this ... Source:...

30

Hadronic multiparticle production at ultrahigh energies and extensive air showers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the nature of cosmic ray particles at the highest energies are based on the measurement of extensive air showers. Most cosmic ray properties can therefore be obtained only from the interpretation of air shower data and are thus dependent on predictions of hadronic interaction models at ultrahigh energies. We discuss different scenarios of model extrapolations from accelerator data to air shower energies and investigate their impact on the corresponding air shower predictions. To explore the effect of different extrapolations by hadronic interaction models we developed an ad hoc model. This model is based on the modification of the output of standard hadronic interaction event generators within the air shower simulation process and allows us to study the impact of changing interaction features on the air shower development. In a systematic study we demonstrate the resulting changes of important air shower observables and also discuss them in terms of the predictions of the Heitler model of air shower cascades. It is found that the results of our ad hoc modifications are, to a large extent, independent of the choice of the underlying hadronic interaction model.

Ulrich, Ralf; Engel, Ralph; Unger, Michael [Pennsylvania State University, Center for Particle Astrophysics, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fast Simulation of Electromagnetic Showers in the ATLAS Calorimeter: Frozen Showers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most time consuming process simulating pp interactions in the ATLAS detector at LHC is the simulation of electromagnetic showers in the calorimeter. In order to speed up the event simulation several parametrisation methods are available in ATLAS. In this paper we present a short description of a frozen shower technique, together with some recent benchmarks and comparison with full simulation. An expected high rate of proton-proton collisions in ATLAS detector at LHC requires large samples of simulated events (Monte Carlo) to study various physics processes. A detailed simulation of particle reactions ('full simulation') in the ATLAS detector is based on GEANT4 and is very accurate. However, due to complexity of the detector, high particle multiplicity and GEANT4 itself, the average CPU time spend to simulate typical QCD event in pp collision is 20 or more minutes for modern computers. During detector simulation the largest time is spend in the calorimeters (up to 70%) most of which is required for electromagnetic particles in the electromagnetic (EM) part of the calorimeters. This is the motivation for fast simulation approaches which reduce the simulation time without affecting the accuracy. Several of fast simulation methods available within the ATLAS simulation framework (standard Athena based simulation program) are discussed here with the focus on the novel frozen shower library (FS) technique. The results obtained with FS are presented here as well.

Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell'Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, E.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Low-flow appliances and household water demand: An evaluation of demand-side management policy in Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Residential rebate programs for low-flow water devices have become increasingly popular as a means of reducing urban water demand. Although program specifics vary, low-flow rebates are available in most U.S. metropolitan areas, as well as in many smaller municipalities. Despite their popularity, few statistical analyses have been conducted regarding the effects of low-flow rebates on household water use. In this paper, we consider the effects of rebates from the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA). Using panel regression techniques with a database of rebate recipients, we estimate the marginal effects of various low-flow devices on household water demand. Results indicate a negative correlation between household water use and the presence of most low-flow devices, after controlling for water price and weather conditions. Low-flow toilets have the greatest impact on water use, while low-flow washing machines, dishwashers, showerheads, and xeriscape have smaller but significant effects. In contrast, air conditioning systems, hot water recirculators, and rain barrels have no significant impact on water use. We also test for possible rebound effects (i.e. whether low-flow appliances become less-effective over time due to poor rates of retention or behavioral changes) and compare the cost effectiveness of each rebate using levelised-costs. We find no evidence of rebound effects and substantial variation in levelised-costs, with low-flow showerheads being the most cost-effective device under the current ABCWUA rebate program. The latter result suggests that water providers can improve the efficiency of rebate programs by targeting the most cost-effective devices.

James I. Price; Janie M. Chermak; Jeff Felardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Low-energy muons in extensive air showers (EAS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small air shower array of 21 detectors in conjunction with two shielded muon magnetic spectrographs has been operated for detection of muons of momentum in the range (2÷500...o...45? N at North Bengal Universit...

D. K. Basak; N. Chaudhuri; S. Sarkar; B. Bhattacharya; B. Ghosh

35

Experimental Signature for Black Hole Production in Neutrino Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of extra degrees of freedom beyond the electroweak scale may allow the formation of black holes in nearly horizontal neutrino air showers. In this paper we examine the average properties of the light descendants of these black holes. Our analysis indicates that black hole decay gives rise to deeply penetrating showers with an electromagnetic component which differs substantially from that in conventional neutrino interactions, allowing a good characterization of the phenomenon against background. Naturally occurring black holes in horizontal neutrino showers could be detected and studied with the Auger air shower array. Since the expected black hole production rate at Auger is $> 1$ event/year, this cosmic ray observatory could be potentially powerful in probing models with extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity.

Luis Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Extensive Air Shower Radio Detection Recent Results and Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A prototype system for detecting radio pulses associated with extensive cosmic ray air showers is described. Sensitivity is compared with that in previous experiments, and lessons are noted for future studies.

Rosner, Jonathan L; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Suprun, Denis A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Extensive Air Shower Radio Detection: Recent Results and Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A prototype system for detecting radio pulses associated with extensive cosmic ray air showers is described. Sensitivity is compared with that in previous experiments, and lessons are noted for future studies.

Jonathan L. Rosner; Denis A. Suprun

2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Photoproduction models for total cross section and shower development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for the total photoproduction cross section based on the ansatz that resummation of infrared gluons limits the rise induced by QCD minijets in all the total cross-sections, is used to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic rays with the AIRES simulation program. The impact on common shower observables, especially those related with muon production, is analysed and compared with the corresponding results obtained with previous photoproduction models.

Fernando Cornet; Carlos Garcia Canal; Agnes Grau; Giulia Pancheri; Sergio Sciutto

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

Alternative energy estimation from the shower lateral distribution function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface detector technique has been successfully used to detect cosmic ray showers for several decades. Scintillators or Cerenkov water tanks can be used to measure the number of particles and/or the energy density at a given depth in the atmosphere and reconstruct the primary particle properties. It has been shown that the experiment configuration and the resolution in reconstructing the core position determine a distance to the shower axis in which the lateral distribution function (LDF) of particles shows the least variation with respect to different primary particles type, simulation models and specific shapes of the LDF. Therefore, the signal at this distance (600 m for Haverah Park and 1000 m for Auger Observatory) has shown to be a good estimator of the shower energy. Revisiting the above technique, we show that a range of distances to the shower axis, instead of one single point, can be used as estimator of the shower energy. A comparison is done for the Auger Observatory configuration and the new estimator proposed here is shown to be a good and robust alternative to the standard single point procedure.

Vitor de Souza; Carlos O. Escobar; Joel Brito; Carola Dobrigkeit; Gustavo Medina-Tanco

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes March 5, 2013 - 11:17am Addthis The GE GeoSpring™ Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint as a traditional 50-gallon tank water heater, the Electric Heat Pump Water Heater uses the existing water heater's plumbing and electrical connections. Credit: GE The GE GeoSpring(tm) Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint as a traditional 50-gallon tank water heater, the Electric Heat Pump Water Heater uses the existing water heater's plumbing and electrical connections. Credit: GE To introduce this new electric heat pump water heater, GE ran a memorable ad during the 2010 Winter Olympics featuring snow monkeys enjoying a hot soak. Credit: GE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy spectrum of cascade showers generated in water by near-horizontal muons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss measuring cascade shower energy using the NEVOD Cherenkov water detector with ... applied to showers generated by near-horizontal high-energy muons selected using the DECOR coordinate detector deployed...

S. S. Khokhlov; N. S. Barbashina…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-shower array combined Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Shower Arrays A.I. Mincer 1 New York University, New York, NY 10003... such as gamma ray bursts or to study the time variation of steady'' sources, air shower arrays are...

43

Hadron Production at Fixed Target Energies and Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NA61/SHINE is a fixed-target experiment to study hadron production in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. Due to the very good acceptance and particle identification in forward direction, NA61/SHINE is well suited for measuring particle production to improve the reliability of air shower simulations. Data with proton and pion beams have been taken in 2007 and 2009. First analysis results for the pion yield in proton-carbon interactions at 31 GeV will be shown and compared to predictions from models used in air shower simulations.

M. Unger; for the NA61/SHINE Collaboration

2010-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Air-shower detection of ultrahigh-energy muons and neutrinos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore the possibility for production of air showers by ultrahigh-energy muons and neutrinos. Such showers must be produced both in the Earth's crust and in the atmosphere. Because of the strong absorption in the Earth the rate of upward-going showers generated by a limiting model of cosmological neutrino flux may be, however, low compared with the background of nearly horizontal muon-generated air showers.

Todor Stanev and H. P. Vankov

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Universality of electron distributions in high-energy air showers - description of Cherenkov light production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shower simulation code CORSIKA has been used to investigate the electron energy and angular distributions in high-energy showers. Based on the universality of both distributions, we develop an analytical description of Cherenkov light emission in extensive air showers, which provides the total number and angular distribution of photons. The parameterisation can be used e.g. to calculate the contribution of direct and scattered Cherenkov light to shower profiles measured with the air fluorescence technique.

F. Nerling; J. Blümer; R. Engel; M. Risse

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

THE MUON CONTENT OF EXTENSIVE AIR SHOWERS WITH E 2 x 10 17  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HE 3.4-7 THE MUON CONTENT OF EXTENSIVE AIR SHOWERS WITH E 2 x 10 17 EV. G.L. Cassiday, R. Cooper, S and the Michigan muon array are operating in coincidence, simultaneously measuring the energy, depth of shower maximum, and muon content of high energy (E 2 x 10 17 eV) extensive air showers. We present

47

High-energy muons in extensive air showers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study has been made of the density of high-energy muons (10showers in the size range 2·105

W. S. Rada; A. C. Smith; T. R. Stewart; M. G. Thompson…

1979-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

48

Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of construction, successive trades must take care not to create a defect nor to compound or cover up a previous trade's defect. Covering a defect hides the inevitable point of failure and may even exacerbate the situation.

Dickson, B.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Imaging Pion Showers with the CALICE Analogue Hadron Calorimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CALICE collaboration investigates different technology options for highly granular calorimeters for detectors at a future electron-positron collider. One of the devices constructed and tested by the collaboration is a 1m^3 prototype for an imaging scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter for hadrons with analogue readout (AHCAL). The light from 7608 small scintillator cells is detected with silicon photomultipliers. The AHCAL has been successfully operated during electron and hadron test-beam measurements at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The collected data allow for evaluating the novel technologies employed. In addition, these data provide a valuable basis for validating pion cascade simulations. This paper presents the current status of comparisons between the AHCAL data and predictions from different Monte Carlo models implemented in GEANT4. The comparisons cover the total visible energy, longitudinal and radial shower profiles, and the shower substructure. Furthermore, this paper discusses a sof...

Feege, Nils

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Meteor showers of comet C/1917 F1 Mellish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December Monocerotids and November Orionids are weak but established annual meteor showers active throughout November and December. Analysis of a high quality orbits subset of the SonotaCo video meteor database shows that the distribution of orbital elements, geocentric velocity and also the orbital evolution of the meteors and potential parent body may imply a common origin for these meteors coming from the parent comet C/1917 F1 Mellish. This is also confirmed by the physical properties and activity of these shower meteors. An assumed release of meteoroids at the perihelion of the comet in the past and the sky-plane radiant distribution reveal that the December Monocerotid stream might be younger than the November Orionids. A meteoroid transversal component of ejection velocity at the perihelion must be larger than 100 m/s. A few authors have also associated December Canis Minorids with the comet C/1917 F1 Mellish. However, we did not find any connection.

Vereš, Peter; Tóth, Juraj

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Considerations for Energy Efficient Showers in Hot-Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

major Northeast utilities [2] have conducted extensive shower testing. The utilities have not released results of their testing, but provided the names of three manufacturers which had supplied showerheads for their programs. The utilities....D.,"Energy Efficiency Design Evalua- tion for the Texas Department of Corrections, "Proc. of Fiftv Annual Svm~osium on Im~rovina Buildina Enerav Efficiencv in Hot and Humid Climates, Sept. 13-14, 1988, Houston, pp.129-136. 2. PSEG of New Jersey and Northeast...

Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The neutron 'thunder' accompanying the extensive air shower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulations show that neutrons are the most abundant component among extensive air shower hadrons. However, multiple neutrons which appear with long delays in neutron monitors nearby the EAS core ('neutron thunder') are mostly not the neutrons of the shower, but have a secondary origin. The bulk of them is produced by high energy EAS hadrons hitting the monitors. The delays are due to the termalization and diffusion of neutrons in the moderator and reflector of the monitor accompanied by the production of secondary gamma-quanta. This conclusion raises the important problem of the interaction of EAS with the ground, the stuff of the detectors and their environment since they have often hydrogen containing materials like polyethilene in neutron monitors. Such interaction can give an additional contribution to the signal in the EAS detectors. It can be particularly important for the signals from scintillator or water tank detectors at km-long distances from the EAS core where neutrons of the shower become the dominant component after a few mcsec behind the EAS front.

A. D. Erlykin

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, Z-Shower and Neutrino Astronomy by Horizontal-Upward Tau Air-Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultra High Cosmic Rays (UHECR) Astronomy may be correlated to a primary parental Neutrino Astronomy: indeed any far BL Lac Jet or GRB, sources of UHECR, located at cosmic edges, may send its signal, overcoming the severe GZK cut-off, by help of UHE ZeV energetic neutrino primary. These UHE neutrino scattering on relic light ones (spread on wide Hot Local Groups Halos) maybe fine-tuned : E_(nu) =(M_Z)^2/m_(nu) = 4 10^(22) eV *((0.1eV)/m_(nu)), to combine at once the observed light neutrino masses and the UHECR spectra, leading to a relativistic Z-Shower in Hot Dark Halos (e few tens Mpc wide) whose final nuclear component traces the UHECR event on Earth. Therefore UHECR (with no longer volme GZK constrains) may point to far BL Lac sources. This Z-Burst (Z-Shower) model calls for large neutrino fluxes. Even if Nature do not follow the present Z-model, UHECR while being cut-off by Big Bang Radiation, must produce a minimal UHE neutrino flux, the GZK neutrino secondaries. For both reasons such UHE Neutrino Astronomy must be tested on Earth. Lowest High Energy Astronomy is searched by AMANDA, ANTARES underground deterctors by muons tracks. We suggest a complementary higher energy Neutrino Tau Astronomy inducing Horizontal and Upward Tau AirShowers. Possible early evidence of such a New Neutrino UPTAUs (Upward Tau Showers at PeVs energies) Astronomy may be in BATSE records of Upward Terrestrial Gamma Flashes. Future signals must be found in detectors as EUSO, seeking Upward-Horizontal events: indeed even minimal, guaranteed, GZK neutrino fluxes may be better observed if EUSO threshold reaches 10^(19) eV by enlarging its telescope size.

D. Fargion

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

Lateral distribution and the energy determination of showers along the ankle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The normalization constant of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of an extensive air shower is a monotonous (almost linear) increasing function of the energy of the primary. Therefore, the interpolated signal at some fixed distance from the core can be calibrated to estimate the energy of the shower. There is, somehow surprisingly, a reconstructed optimal distance, r_{opt}, at which the effects on the inferred signal, S(r_{opt}), of the uncertainties on true core location, LDF functional form and shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We calculate the value of r_{opt} as a function of surface detector separation, energy and zenith angle and we demonstrate the advantage of using the r_{opt} value of each individual shower instead of a same fixed distance for every shower, specially in dealing with events with saturated stations. The effects on the determined spectrum are also shown.

G. Ros; G. A. Medina-Tanco; C. De Donato; L. del Peral; D. Rodríguez-Frías; J. C. D'Olivo; J. F. Valdés-Galicia; F. Arqueros; .

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Lateral distribution and the energy determination of showers along the ankle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The normalization constant of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of an extensive air shower is a monotonous (almost linear) increasing function of the energy of the primary. Therefore, the interpolated signal at some fixed distance from the core can be calibrated to estimate the energy of the shower. There is, somehow surprisingly, a reconstructed optimal distance, r_{opt}, at which the effects on the inferred signal, S(r_{opt}), of the uncertainties on true core location, LDF functional form and shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We calculate the value of r_{opt} as a function of surface detector separation, energy and zenith angle and we demonstrate the advantage of using the r_{opt} value of each individual shower instead of a same fixed distance for every shower, specially in dealing with events with saturated stations. The effects on the determined spectrum are also shown.

Ros, G; De Donato, C; Del Peral, L; Rodríguez-Frías, D; D'Olivo, J C; Valdés-Galicia, J F; Arqueros, F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Pion and proton showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadron calorimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Showers produced by positive hadrons in the highly granular CALICE scintillator-steel analogue hadronic calorimeter were studied. The experimental data were collected at CERN and FNAL for single particles with initial momenta from 10 to 80 GeV/c. The calorimeter response and resolution and spatial characteristics of shower development for proton- and pion-induced showers for test beam data and simulations using Geant4 version 9.6 are compared.

The CALICE Collaboration; B. Bilki; J. Repond; L. Xia; G. Eigen; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; S. Chang; A. Khan; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kong; Y. D. Oh; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; K. Francis; J. G. R. Lima; R. Salcido; V. Zutshi; F. Salvatore; K. Kawagoe; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sudo; T. Suehara; T. Tomita; H. Ueno; T. Yoshioka; J. Apostolakis; D. Dannheim; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; W. Klempt; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; A. Ribon; D. Schlatter; E. Sicking; V. Uzhinskiy; J. Giraud; D. Grondin; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; E. Brianne; U. Cornett; D. David; A. Ebrahimi; G. Falley; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; O. Hartbrich; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; K. Krüger; S. Lu; B. Lutz; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; C. Neubüser; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; H. L. Tran; P. Buhmann; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; K. Briggl; P. Eckert; T. Harion; Y. Munwes; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; B. van Doren; G. W. Wilson; M. Wing; C. Combaret; L. Caponetto; R. Eté; G. Grenier; R. Han; J. C. Ianigro; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; H. Mathez; L. Mirabito; A. Petrukhin; A. Steen; J. Berenguer Antequera; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Marin; J. Puerta-Pelayo; A. Verdugo; F. Corriveau; B. Bobchenko; R. Chistov; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Drutskoy; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; D. Mironov; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; D. Besson; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; E. Popova; M. Gabriel; C. Kiesling; N. van der Kolk; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; F. Dulucq; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; G. Martin-Chassard; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; F. Richard; J. Rouëné; N. Seguin-Moreau; Ch. de la Taille; M. Anduze; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; C. Clerc; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; A. Matthieu; P. Mora de Freitas; G. Musat; M. Ruan; H. Videau; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; D. Jeans; S. Weber

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - air shower structure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HEAT Enhancement Telescopes for the Pierre Auger Southern Observatory Summary: , Argentina. Since 2004 the instrument is used to take air shower data at the highest...

58

Impact of Uncertainties in Hadron Production on Air-Shower Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At high energy, cosmic rays can only be studied by measuring the extensive air showers they produce in the atmosphere of the Earth. Although the main features of air showers can be understood within a simple model of successive interactions, detailed simulations and a realistic description of particle production are needed to calculate observables relevant to air shower experiments. Currently hadronic interaction models are the main source of uncertainty of such simulations. We will study the effect of using different hadronic models available in CORSIKA and CONEX on extensive air shower predictions.

T. Pierog; R. Engel; D. Heck

2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - air shower experiment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HiRes Fly's Eye Project Collection: Physics 9 PHYSICAL REVIEW D PARTICLES AND FIELDS Summary: and muon components of showers. Muons are produced copiously in hadronic air...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - air showers affecting Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HiRes Fly's Eye Project Collection: Physics 7 PHYSICAL REVIEW D PARTICLES AND FIELDS Summary: and muon components of showers. Muons are produced copiously in hadronic air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The muon charge ratio in cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The muon charge ratio of the lateral muon density distributions in single EAS is studied by simulations, in context of recent proposals to measure this observable in coincidence with EAS observations. While effects of the hadronic interaction do not lead to significant differences of the total muon plus and muon minus content, the differences of the azimuthal variation of the muon densities of opposite charges and the azimuthal variation of the muon charge ratio appear to be very much pronounced, dependent on the direction of EAS incidence. This is due to the influence of the geomagnetic field which induces related effects in radio emission from extended air showers.

H. Rebel; O. Sima; A. Haungs; C. Manailescu; B. Mitrica; C. Morariu

2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bottom head assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

Fife, A.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hadronic Multiparticle Production at Ultra-High Energies and Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of the nature of cosmic ray particles at the highest energies are based on the measurement of extensive air showers. Most cosmic ray properties can therefore only be obtained from the interpretation of air shower data and are thus depending on predictions of hadronic interaction models at ultra-high energies. We discuss different scenarios of model extrapolations from accelerator data to air shower energies and investigate their impact on the corresponding air shower predictions. To explore the effect of different extrapolations by hadronic interaction models we developed an ad hoc model. This ad hoc model is based on the modification of the output of standard hadronic interaction event generators within the air shower simulation process and allows us to study the impact of changing interaction features on the air shower development. In a systematic study we demonstrate the resulting changes of important air shower observables and also discuss them in terms of the predictions of the Heitler model of air shower cascades. It is found that the results of our ad hoc modifications are, to a large extend, independent of the choice of the underlying hadronic interaction model.

Ralf Ulrich; Ralph Engel; Michael Unger

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Imaging Pion Showers with the CALICE Analogue Hadron Calorimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CALICE collaboration investigates different technology options for highly granular calorimeters for detectors at a future electron-positron collider. One of the devices constructed and tested by the collaboration is a 1m^3 prototype for an imaging scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter for hadrons with analogue readout (AHCAL). The light from 7608 small scintillator cells is detected with silicon photomultipliers. The AHCAL has been successfully operated during electron and hadron test-beam measurements at DESY, CERN, and Fermilab since 2005. The collected data allow for evaluating the novel technologies employed. In addition, these data provide a valuable basis for validating pion cascade simulations. This paper presents the current status of comparisons between the AHCAL data and predictions from different Monte Carlo models implemented in GEANT4. The comparisons cover the total visible energy, longitudinal and radial shower profiles, and the shower substructure. Furthermore, this paper discusses a software compensation algorithm for improving the energy resolution of the AHCAL for single pions.

Nils Feege; for the CALICE collaboration

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1488 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Measuring air shower speeds with the HiRes Fluorescence Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Electromagnetic air showers are known to travel at the speed of light. However, no measurementProceedings of ICRC 2001: 1488 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 ICRC 2001 Measuring air shower speeds the shower is traveling at c. Since speed is not a constraint, it can be measured. The method can be tested

66

Maneuvering impact boring head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

67

Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Reconstruction of Longitudinal Profiles of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Showers from Fluorescence and Cherenkov Light Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new method for the reconstruction of the longitudinal profile of extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In contrast to the typically considered shower size profile, this method employs directly the ionization energy deposit of the shower particles in the atmosphere. Due to universality of the energy spectra of electrons and positrons, both fluorescence and Cherenkov light can be used simultaneously as signal to infer the shower profile from the detected light. The method is based on an analytic least-square solution for the estimation of the shower profile from the observed light signal. Furthermore, the extrapolation of the observed part of the profile with a Gaisser-Hillas function is discussed and the total statistical uncertainty of shower parameters like total energy and shower maximum is calculated.

M. Unger; B. R. Dawson; R. Engel; F. Schüssler; R. Ulrich

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Child Abuse; Head Injuries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Abusive head trauma produces the most long-term morbidity and mortality of all forms of child physical abuse and impacts up to 30 infants per 100 000 births. A great deal of the scientific and lay press has focused on the changes in understanding and the purported controversies surrounding this entity. At the same time, the evidence base for a probabilistic analysis of head injuries and related trauma promises to make the diagnosis more objective, nuanced, and accurate.

S.C. Boos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Mixed convection and high-pressure low-flow steam cooling data from a 64-rod bundle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat transfer data were obtained from low flow steam cooling experiments in a partially uncovered 64-rod bundle. These tests indicated that free convection effects were superimposed on the laminar and turbulent forced convection heat transfer. This paper describes the influence of buoyancy on laminar and turbulent forced convection heat transfer coefficients. Mechanisms due to buoyancy which alter the local heat transfer are summarized. Criteria indicating the importance of buoyancy on laminar and turbulent upflow in a vertical pipe were developed and compared to other criteria found in the literature. These criteria were used to determine the steam cooling data with significant buoyancy influence. Data with buoyancy influence were compared to mixed convection correlations and to a numerical study for rod bundles.

Sozer, A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Studying High $p_T$ Muons in Cosmic-Ray Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most cosmic-ray air shower arrays have focused on detecting electromagnetic shower particles and low energy muons. A few groups (most notably MACRO + EASTOP and SPASE + AMANDA) have studied the high energy muon component of showers. However, these experiments had small solid angles, and did not study muons far from the core. The IceTop + IceCube combination, with its 1 km$^2$ muon detection area can study muons far from the shower core. IceCube can measure their energy loss ($dE/dx$), and hence their energy. With the energy, and the known distribution of production heights, the transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectrum of high $p_T$ muons can be determined. The production of these muons is calculable in perturbative QCD, so the measured muon spectra can be used to probe the composition of incident cosmic-rays.

Spencer R. Klein

2006-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

A semi Monte Carlo calculation of the flux of high-energy muons in air showers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A semi Monte Carlo method has been used to calculate the flux of muons of energy ?180 GeV associated with air showers at ... of nucleon and pion interactions at ultra-high energies. Various aspects of these muons

Siddheshwar Lal

1967-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

An Estimate of the Spectral Intensity Expected from the Molecular Bremsstrahlung Radiation in Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detection technique of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, complementary to the fluorescence technique, would be the use of the molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by low-energy electrons left after the passage of the showers in the atmosphere. The emission mechanism is expected from quasi-elastic collisions of electrons produced in the shower by the ionisation of the molecules in the atmosphere. In this article, a detailed calculation of the spectral intensity of photons at ground level originating from the transitions between unquantised energy states of free ionisation electrons is presented. In the absence of absorption of the emitted photons in the plasma, the obtained spectral intensity is shown to be 5 10^{-26} W m^{-2}Hz^{-1} at 10 km from the shower core for a vertical shower induced by a proton of 10^{17.5} eV.

Samarai, I Al; Lebrun, D; Letessier-Selvon, A; Salamida, F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - air shower particles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics 7 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE A Fast and Accurate Monte Carlo EAS Simulation Scheme in the GZK Energy Re- Summary: , air shower fluctua- tion is very large;...

76

Muon content of ultrahigh-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sample of 33 extensive air showers (EASs) with estimated primary energies above 2 × 1019 eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array is analyzed. The observed muon density is compared event-...

A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov…

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electron-Hadron shower discrimination in a liquid argon time projection chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By exploiting structural differences between electromagnetic and hadronic showers in a multivariate analysis we present an efficient Electron-Hadron discrimination algorithm for liquid argon time projection chambers, validated using Geant4 simulated data.

J. J. Back; G. J. Barker; A. J. Bennieston; S. B. Boyd; B. Morgan; Y. A. Ramachers

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

78

Muon production in extensive air showers and its relation to hadronic interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the relation between muon production in extensive air showers and features of hadronic multiparticle production at low energies is studied. Using CORSIKA, we determine typical energies and phase space regions of secondary particles which are important for muon production in extensive air showers and confront the results with existing fixed target measurements. Furthermore possibilities to measure relevant quantities of hadron production in existing and planned accelerator experiments are discussed.

C. Meurer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; A. Haungs; M. Roth

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Remnant Break-up and Muon Production in Cosmic Ray Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the relation between remnant fragmentation in inelastic high-energy hadronic interactions and muon production in extensive cosmic ray air showers. Using a newly developed tool, a simple and flexible hadronic event generator, we analyze the forward region of hadronic interactions. We show that measurements of the Feynman-x distribution in the beam fragmentation region at LHCf will be key to understanding muon production in air showers quantitatively.

H. J. Drescher

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Crater formation by single ions, cluster ions and ion "showers"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The various craters formed by giant objects, macroscopic collisions and nanoscale impacts exhibit an intriguing resemblance in shapes. At the same time, the arc plasma built up in the presence of sufficiently high electric fields at close look causes very similar damage on the surfaces. Although the plasma–wall interaction is far from a single heavy ion impact over dense metal surfaces or the one of a cluster ion, the craters seen on metal surfaces after a plasma discharge make it possible to link this event to the known mechanisms of the crater formations. During the plasma discharge in a high electric field the surface is subject to high fluxes (~1025 cm-2s-1) of ions with roughly equal energies typically of the order of a few keV. To simulate such a process it is possible to use a cloud of ions of the same energy. In the present work we follow the effect of such a flux of ions impinging the surface in the ‘‘shower’’ manner, to find the transition between the different mechanisms of crater formati...

Djurabekova, Flyura; Timko, Helga; Nordlund, Kai; Calatroni, Sergio; Taborelli, Mauro; Wuensch, Walter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lateral distribution of muon pairs in deep underground muon showers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The lateral distribution of muon showers deep underground in the Utah muon detector has been studied. The results are presented in the form of a decoherence curve, which is defined to be the rate of pairs of coincident muons in two small detectors (as a function of their separation) divided by the product of the areas of the detectors. Rates are measured for separations from 1 to greater than 60 m for depths ranging from 2.4 × 105 gcm-2 to 5.6 × 105 gcm-2 and zenith angles ranging from 42.5 to 62.5 degrees. Significant improvements on previously reported data have been made due to increased detector-memory size, improved triggering efficiency, longer running time and better statistical analysis. When the decoherence curve is parameterized by the function R(x)=R0e-xx0 the value of the mean separation x0 at 47.5°, 2.4 × 105 gcm-2 is 11.21 ± 0.38 m. In a modified scaling model this separation suggests an average transverse momentum of roughly 0.65 GeV/c for muons from hadron-air collisions with energy > 10 TeV.

G. H. Lowe; H. E. Bergeson; J. W. Keuffel; M. O. Larson; J. L. Morrison; W. J. West

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Low flow fume hood  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

Bell, Geoffrey C. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Feustel, Helmut E. (Albany, CA); Dickerhoff, Darryl J. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Micro-purge low-flow sampling of uranium-contaminated ground water at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts to sample representative, undisturbed distributions of uranium in ground water beneath the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) prompted the application of a novel technique that is less invasive in the monitoring well. Recent studies indicate that representative samples can and should be collected without prior well volume exchange purging or borehole evacuation. Field experiments conducted at the FEMP demonstrate that under specific sampling conditions in a well-defined hydrogeologic system, representative ground water samples for a monitoring program can be obtained without removing the conventional three well volumes from the well. The assumption is made that indicator parameter equilibration may not be necessary to determine when to collect representative samples at the FEMP. Preliminary results obtained form the field experiments suggest that this may be true. The technique employs low purge rates (< 1 L/min) with dedicated bladder pumps with inlets located in the screened interval of the well, while not disturbing the stagnant water column above the screened interval. If adopted, this technique, termed micro-purge low-flow sampling, will produce representative ground water samples significantly reduce sampling costs, and minimize waste water over the monitoring life cycle at the FEMP. This technique is well suited for sites that have been fully characterized and are undergoing long-term monitoring.

Shanklin, D.E. Sidle, W.C.; Ferguson, M.E.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Lateral density and arrival time distributions of Cherenkov photons in extensive air showers: a simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated some features of the density and arrival time distributions of Cherenkov photons in extensive air showers using the CORSIKA simulation package. The main thrust of this study is to see the effect of hadronic interaction models on the production pattern of Cherenkov photons with respect to distance from the shower core. Such studies are very important in ground based $\\gamma$-ray astronomy for an effective rejection of huge cosmic ray background, where the atmospheric Cherenkov technique is being used extensively within the energy range of some hundred GeV to few TeV. We have found that for all primary particles, the density distribution patterns of Cherenkov photons follow the negative exponential function with different coefficients and slopes depending on the type of primary particle, its energy and the type of interaction model combinations. Whereas the arrival time distribution patterns of Cherenkov photons follow the function of the form $t (r) = t_{0}e^{\\Gamma/r^{\\lambda}}$, with different values of the function parameters. There is no significant effect of hadronic interaction model combinations onthe density and arrival time distributions for the $\\gamma$-ray primaries. However, for the hadronic showers, the effects of the model combinations are significant under different conditions. There are some contributions from shower to shower fluctuations to the density and arrival time deviations of Cherenkov photons apart from the contribution due to inherent differences in hadronic interaction models.

P. Hazarika; U. D. Goswami; V. R. Chitnis; B. S. Acharya; G. S. Das; B. B. Singh; R. Britto

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Speaker(s): James Lutz Date: October 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Heating water is one of the most energy-consumptive activities in a household, accounting for about 49 percent of California's residential natural gas consumption. Data collected during a pilot field study in California indicate that significant amounts of water and energy are wasted while waiting for hot water to be delivered to the point of end use. We calculate the water and energy wasted during shower events from data collected using a wireless sensor network that monitored water flows and temperatures in three single-family residences. The total calculated water

86

Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Measurement of atmospheric production depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory provides information about the longitudinal development of the muonic component of extensive air showers. Using the timing information from the flash analog-to-digital converter traces of surface detectors far from the shower core, it is possible to reconstruct a muon production depth distribution. We characterize the goodness of this reconstruction for zenith angles around 60 deg. and different energies of the primary particle. From these distributions we define X(mu)max as the depth along the shower axis where the production of muons reaches maximum. We explore the potentiality of X(mu)max as a useful observable to infer the mass composition of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Likewise, we assess its ability to constrain hadronic interaction models.

Pierre Auger Collaboration

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

87

Simulations of reflected radio signals from cosmic ray induced air showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the calculation of coherent radio pulses emitted by extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays accounting for reflection on the Earth's surface. Results have been obtained with a simulation program that calculates the contributions from shower particles after reflection at a surface plane. The properties of the radiation are discussed in detail emphasizing the effects of reflection. The shape of the frequency spectrum is shown to be closely related to the angle of the observer with respect to shower axis, becoming hardest in the Cherenkov direction. The intensity of the flux at a fixed observation angle is shown to scale with the square of the primary particle energy to very good accuracy indicating the coherent aspect of the emission. The simulation methods of this paper provide the foundations for energy reconstruction of experiments looking at the Earth from balloons and satellites. They can also be used in dedicated studies of existing and future experimental proposals.

Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; García-Fernández, Daniel; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Zas, Enrique

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Impact of Varying Atmospheric Profiles on Extensive Air Shower Observation: Fluorescence Light Emission and Energy Reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several experiments measure the fluorescence light produced by extensive air showers in the atmosphere. This light is converted into a longitudinal shower profile from which information on the primary energy and composition is derived. The fluorescence yield, as the conversion factor between light profile measured by EAS experiments and physical interpretation of showers, has been measured in several laboratory experiments. The results, however, differ considerably. In this article, a model calculation of the fluorescence emission from relevant band systems of nitrogen in dependence on wavelength and atmospheric conditions is presented. Different calculations are compared to each other in combination with varying input parameters. The predictions are compared with measurements and the altitude-dependence of the fluorescence yield is discussed in detail.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Artificial Neural Networks as a tool for analysis of the individual Extensive Air Showers data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In that paper we discuss possibilities of using the Artificial Neural Network technic for the individual Extensive Air Showers data evaluation. It is shown that the recently developed new computational methods can be used in studies of EAS registered by very large and complex detector systems. The ANN can be used to classify showers due to e.g. primary particle mass as well as to find a particular EAS parameter like e.g. total muon number. The examples of both kinds of analysis are given and discussed.

Tadeusz Wibig

1996-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

Measuring the Muon Content of Air Showers with IceTop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceTop, the surface component of the IceCube detector, has been used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic ray primaries in the range between 1.58 PeV and 1.26 EeV. It can also be used to study the low energy muons in air showers by looking at large distances (> 300m) from the shower axis. We will show the muon lateral distribution function at large lateral distances as measured with IceTop and discuss the implications of this measurement. We also discuss the prospects for low energy muon studies with IceTop.

Gonzalez, Javier G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Constraints and measurements of hadronic interactions in extensive air showers with the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characteristics of extensive air showers are sensitive to the details of hadronic interactions at energies and in kinematic regions beyond those tested by human-made accelerators. Uncertainties on extrapolations of the hadronic interaction models in these regions hamper the interpretation of the ultra high energy cosmic ray data in terms of primary mass composition. We report on how the Pierre Auger Observatory is able to constrain the hadronic interaction models by measuring the muon content and muon production depth of air showers and also by measuring the proton-air cross section for particle production at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV.

L. Cazon

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Constraints and measurements of hadronic interactions in extensive air showers with the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characteristics of extensive air showers are sensitive to the details of hadronic interactions at energies and in kinematic regions beyond those tested by human-made accelerators. Uncertainties on extrapolations of the hadronic interaction models in these regions hamper the interpretation of the ultra high energy cosmic ray data in terms of primary mass composition. We report on how the Pierre Auger Observatory is able to constrain the hadronic interaction models by measuring the muon content and muon production depth of air showers and also by measuring the proton-air cross section for particle production at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV.

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A prototype system for detecting the radio-frequency pulse associated with cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of a system to detect the radio-frequency (RF) pulse associated with extensive air showers of cosmic rays is described. This work was performed at the CASA/MIA array in Utah, with the intention of designing equipment that can be used in conjunction with the Auger Giant Array. A small subset of data (less than 40 out of a total of 600 hours of running time), taken under low-noise conditions, permitted upper limits to be placed on the rate for pulses accompanying showers of energies around $10^{17}$ eV.

Green, K; Suprun, D A; Wilkerson, J F; Green, Kevin; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Suprun, Denis A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A prototype system for detecting the radio-frequency pulse associated with cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of a system to detect the radio-frequency (RF) pulse associated with extensive air showers of cosmic rays is described. This work was performed at the CASA/MIA array in Utah, with the intention of designing equipment that can be used in conjunction with the Auger Giant Array. A small subset of data (less than 40 out of a total of 600 hours of running time), taken under low-noise conditions, permitted upper limits to be placed on the rate for pulses accompanying showers of energies around $10^{17}$ eV.

Kevin Green; Jonathan L. Rosner; Denis A. Suprun; J. F. Wilkerson

2003-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

Lane Swimming Etiquette 1. All swimmers must shower before entering the pool.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lane Swimming Etiquette 1. All swimmers must shower before entering the pool. 2. Swim hats must be worn. 3. Select a lane based on your ability and stroke/s you intend to swim during your visit. 4. While swimming, follow the directions of the arrows of your designated lane. 5. Clockwise lane-In order

O'Mahony, Donal E.

96

Lane Swimming Etiquette 1. All swimmers must shower before entering the pool.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lane Swimming Etiquette 1. All swimmers must shower before entering the pool. 2. Swim hats must be worn. 3. Select a lane based on your ability and stroke/s you intend to swim during your visit. 4. While swimming, follow the directions of the arrows of your designated lane. 5. In order to pass

O'Mahony, Donal E.

97

Swimming pools and health-related behaviours: results of an Italian multicentre study on showering habits among pool users  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives Showering before entering a swimming pool is highly recommended to reduce the risk of biological and chemical contamination. This study evaluated the behaviour of indoor swimming pool users; analysed the variables associated with lack of showering; and assessed awareness of the importance of showering. Study design Cross-sectional study. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data about users of swimming pools located in five different Italian cities. The association between specific variables and the lack of showering was assessed. P pool. The main reason given for pre-swim showering was ‘to wash oneself’ (50.5%); or ‘to get used to the temperature of the water’ (44.3%); and 5.2% answered ‘for both reasons’. Risk factors significantly associated with lack of showering were: female sex (odds ratio (OR) 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2–1.59), age 14–17 years (OR 5.09, 95% CI 3.40–7.64); not reading the swimming pool rules (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10–1.41); living in Central Italy (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.65–4.1) or Southern Italy (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.18–1.55); and previous/current attendance of a swimming course (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.48–1.97). Conclusions The results revealed low compliance with the rule of showering before entering a swimming pool, and little awareness of the preventive role of showering in the hygienic management of swimming pools. There is a need for targeted educational interventions to inform swimming pool users of the reasons for the importance of showering before entering a pool.

C. Pasquarella; L. Veronesi; C. Napoli; S. Castaldi; M.L. Pasquarella; E. Saccani; M.E. Colucci; F. Auxilia; F. Gallè; V. Di Onofrio; S. Tafuri; C. Signorelli; G. Liguori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W

Rose, Annkatrin

99

Muons in extensive air showers of energies E 0=1016.6–1019.8 eV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on muons with the threshold energy E ?...?1.0×sec? GeV in extensive air showers of energies E 0?4×1016...eV measured on the Yakutsk and Akeno arrays are jointly analyzed. The ...

A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin…

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Impact of Hedonism on Domestic Hot Water Energy Demand for Showering ? The Case of the Schanzenfest, Hamburg  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The causes of variation in energy demand for hot water in showering or bathing ... was triangulated with electric meter data to examine energy use behaviours and explore changes in hot water demand. This occurred...

Stephen Lorimer; Marianne Jang; Korinna Thielen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CORSIKA Implementation of Heavy Quark Production and Propagation in Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heavy quarks are commonly produced in current accelerator experiments. Hence it is natural to think that they should be likewise created in collisions with larger center of mass energies like the ones involving ultra-high energy cosmic rays and atmospheric nuclei. Despite this fact, a detailed treatment of heavy hadrons is missing in Monte Carlo generators of Extensive Air Showers (EAS). It is a must to improve the description of how heavy flavours appear and evolve in atmospheric showers. With this goal in mind, we study two different models for heavy quark production in proton-air collisions. We also analyze a dedicated treatment of heavy hadrons interactions with atmospheric nuclei. This paper shows how those models have been implemented as new options available in CORSIKA, one of the most used EAS simulators. This new computational tool allows us to analyze the effects that the propagation of heavy hadrons has in the EAS development

A. Bueno; A. Gascon

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

102

Heater head for stirling engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

Corey, John A. (R.D. #2, Box 101 E, North Troy, NY 12182)

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

Production and propagation of heavy hadrons in air-shower simulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very energetic charm and bottom hadrons may be produced in the upper atmosphere when a primary cosmic ray or the leading hadron in an extensive air shower collide with a nucleon. At $E\\approx 10^8$ GeV their decay length becomes of the order of 10 km, implying that they tend to interact in the air instead of decaying. Since the inelasticity in these collisions is much smaller than the one in proton and pion collisions, there could be rare events where a heavy-hadron component transports a significant amount of energy deep into the atmosphere. We have developed a module for the detailed simulation of these processes and have included it in a new version of the air shower simulator AIRES. We study the frequency, the energy distribution and the depth of charm and bottom production, as well as the depth and the energy distribution of these quarks when they decay. As an illustration, we consider the production and decay of tau leptons (from $D_s$ decays) and the lepton flux at PeV energies from a 30 EeV proton primary. The proper inclusion of charm and bottom hadrons in AIRES opens the possibility to search for air-shower observables that are sensitive to heavy quark effects.

C. A. Garcia Canal; J. I. Illana; M. Masip; S. J. Sciutto

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Heater head for Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a heater head for a Stirling engine comprising: a housing for enclosing the heater head with gas at a substantial elevated pressure; insulator means attached to the housing for insulating the heater head; inlet means attached to a regenerator in the housing for admission of relatively high pressure working fluid from the regenerator of a Stirling engine; a first annular heating wall in the housing attached to the inlet means for heating the working fluid; and, a second annular heating wall in the housing concentric with the first heating wall but of lesser diameters so that an annular space is formed between the first heating wall and the second heating wall for heating working fluid; and a third heating wall in the housing concentric with and smaller in diameter than the second heating wall forming the condensing area of a heat pipe between the second heating wall and the third heating wall.

White, M.A.; Emigh, S.G.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

Interpretation of the depths of maximum of extensive air showers measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To interpret the mean depth of cosmic ray air shower maximum and its dispersion, we parametrize those two observables as functions of the first two moments of the ln A distribution. We examine the goodness of this simple method through simulations of test mass distributions. The application of the parameterization to Pierre Auger Observatory data allows one to study the energy dependence of the mean ln A and of its variance under the assumption of selected hadronic interaction models. We discuss possible implications of these dependences in term of interaction models and astrophysical cosmic ray sources.

Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Pressure testing of torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two vessels fabricated from SA516-70 steel with 6% knuckle radius torispherical heads were tested under internal pressure to failure. The D/t ratios of Vessel 1 and Vessel 2 were 238 and 185 respectively. The calculated maximum allowable working pressures of Vessel 1 and 2 heads using the ASME Section 8, Div. 1 rules and measured dimensions were 85 and 110 psi, respectively. Vessel 1 failed at a nozzle weld in the cylindrical shell at 700 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed at a theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse pressure of 241 and a calculated buckling pressure of 270 psi. Buckles were observed developing slowly after 600 psi pressure, and a total of 22 buckles were observed after the test, having the maximum amplitude of 0.15 inch. Vessel 2 failed at the edge of the longitudinal weld of the cylindrical shell at 1,080 psi pressure. Neither buckling nor any other objectionable deformation of the head was observed up to the final pressure, which exceeded the theoretical double-elastic-slope collapse and calculated buckling pressures of 274 psi and 342 psi, respectively.

Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.; Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The 'Sphinx' Head from the Cult Center at Mycenae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study identifies the well-known plaster female head (often called a sphinx head) as the head of a cult statue.

Rehak, Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Characterization of Thermal Response Induced by Head/Disk Interaction in Current TGMR Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, resulting in variations in head flying characteristics. Therefore, head- disk interaction in real disk driveCharacterization of Thermal Response Induced by Head/Disk Interaction in Current TGMR Head Suwatana with a lower areal resistance (RA) value. However, as the areal density increases, the actual flying clearance

Kovintavewat, Piya

109

Emergency Eyewash & Showers The availability of first aid in cases of emergency is important to reduce the impact and severity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is offered for informational purposes only and only as a guide for product selection by a properly trained for immediate emergency use". OSHA compliance personnel, when assessing safety and health conditions related to showers and eyewashes, reference both 29 CFR 1910.151 c and ANSI Z358.1-1990 Availability and operability

Shull, Kenneth R.

110

Search for fingerprints of disoriented chiral condensates in cosmic ray showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the generation of disoriented chiral condensates (DCCs), where the order parameter for chiral symmetry breaking is misaligned with respect to the vacuum direction in isospin state, is quite natural in the theory of strong interactions, they have so far eluded experiments in accelerators and cosmic rays. If DCCs are formed in high-energy nuclear collisions, the relevant outcome are very large event-by-event fluctuations in the neutral-to-charged pion fraction. In this note we search for fingerprints of DCC formation in observables of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers. We present simulation results for the depth of the maximum ($X_{max}$) and number of muons on the ground, evaluating their sensitivity to the neutral-to-charged pion fraction asymmetry produced in the primary interaction.

de Almeida, R M; Fraga, E S; Santos, E M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Search for fingerprints of disoriented chiral condensates in cosmic ray showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the generation of disoriented chiral condensates (DCCs), where the order parameter for chiral symmetry breaking is misaligned with respect to the vacuum direction in isospin state, is quite natural in the theory of strong interactions, they have so far eluded experiments in accelerators and cosmic rays. If DCCs are formed in high-energy nuclear collisions, the relevant outcome are very large event-by-event fluctuations in the neutral-to-charged pion fraction. In this note we search for fingerprints of DCC formation in observables of ultra-high energy cosmic ray showers. We present simulation results for the depth of the maximum ($X_{max}$) and number of muons on the ground, evaluating their sensitivity to the neutral-to-charged pion fraction asymmetry produced in the primary interaction.

R. M. de Almeida; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; E. S. Fraga; E. M. Santos

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

First results from the 2009–2010 MU radar head echo observation programme for sporadic and shower meteors: the Orionids 2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......high-power large-aperture...flight in the atmosphere and electromagnetic plasma simulations...collecting area of an HPLA...interferometric 49.92-MHz radar of the...middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar...relatively large FWHM of , resulting......

J. Kero; C. Szasz; T. Nakamura; D. D. Meisel; M. Ueda; Y. Fujiwara; T. Terasawa; H. Miyamoto; K. Nishimura

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Estimation of the energy of the electron-photon component of cosmic rays on the basis of data for Cherenkov light from ultrahigh-energy extensive air showers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy fraction E em/E 0 dissipated to the electron-photon component of extensive air showers (EASs) for E 0=1015?1019 eV is estimated using data on Cherenkov r...

S. P. Knurenko; A. A. Ivanov; I. E. Sleptsov; A. V. Sabourov

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A New Method to Reconstruct the Energy and Determine the Composition of Cosmic Rays from the Measurement of Cherenkov Light and Particle Densities in Extended Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Monte-Carlo study is presented using ground based measurements of the electromagnetic part of showers initiated in the atmosphere by high energetic cosmic rays to reconstruct energy and mass of primary particles with energies above 300 TeV. With two detector arrays measuring Cherenkov light and particle densities as realized in the HEGRA experiment shower properties are reconstructed and interpreted to determine energy and energy per nucleon of the primary particle.

A. Lindner

1996-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

Pion Production Cross-section Measurements in p+C Collisions at the CERN SPS for Understanding Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An important approach to studying high-energy cosmic rays is the investigation of the properties of extensive air showers; however, the lateral distribution of particles in simulations of such showers strongly depends on the applied model of low-energy hadronic interactions. It has been shown that many constraints to be applied to these models can be obtained by studying identified-particle spectra from accelerator collisions, in the energy range of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. Here we present measurements of the pion production cross-section obtained by the NA61/SHINE experiment at the SPS, in proton-carbon collisions at the beam energy of 31 GeV from the year 2007. Further analyses of identified-particle yields in SHINE, in particular with a pion beam, are in preparation.

Marek Szuba; for the NA61/SHINE Collaboration

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Head wear reduction in future hard-disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Head wear and head vibration due to head-disk contact are two main issues that must be resolved for the future high-density Hard Disk Drives (HDDs). To reduce head wear, disk lubricant, carbon overcoat films on head and disk surfaces, head flying characteristics and so on have been studied. In this paper, we first show the effects of several parameters on head wear, including lubricant types, their MW, and disk burnishing. Our recent results on the effects of humidity and temperature on head wear are also explained. We then explain our extended wear equation and estimate the head wear life with present technologies.

Youichi Kawakubo; Shinnichi Nakazawa; Shinnichi Kobatake

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Comparative Study of Various Algorithms for the Merging of Parton Showers and Matrix Elements in Hadronic Collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare different procedures for combining fixed-order tree-level matrix-element generators with parton showers. We use the case of W-production at the Tevatron and the LHC to compare different implementations of the so-called CKKW and MLM schemes using different matrix-element generators and different parton cascades. We find that although similar results are obtained in all cases, there are important differences.

Alwall, J.; Hoche, S.; Krauss, F.; Lavesson, N.; Lonnblad, L.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Moretti, M.; Papadopoulos, C.G.; Piccinini, F.; Schumann, S.; Treccani, M.; Winter, J.; Worek, M.; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Lund U. /Louvain U. /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Athens U. /INFN, Pavia /Dresden, Tech. U. /Karlsruhe U., TP /Silesia U.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

119

Research CtteeEducation Div Heads Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Action Plans School Review Reports Review Co-ordinator drafts Report Report sent to Chair of review panel and approved by UPARC School Review Action Plan Review Co-ordinator sends Action Plan template for completion (and Review Report for information) to Faculty School Relevant Divisional Head/s Complete Action Plan

Bristol, University of

120

RICHARD N. PALMER Professor and Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources Engineers, #00191 Professional History Professor and Head, Department of Civil and Environmental1 RICHARD N. PALMER Professor and Head Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University.D. Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University 1979 M.S. Environmental Engineering, Stanford University

Mountziaris, T. J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Head of Safety 020 7679 1948  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Head of Safety Paul Stirk 020 7679 1948 (Internal 41948) p.stirk@ucl.ac.uk Deputy Head of Safety & Biological Safety Advisor Jillian Deans 020 7679 1814 (Internal 41814) j.deans@ucl.ac.uk Safety Training Manager Kuen Yip Porter 020 7679 1299 (Internal 41299) k.yip-porter@ucl.ac.uk Safety Advisors Rhona Brown

Guillas, Serge

122

Features of Muon Arrival Time Distributions of High Energy EAS at Large Distances From the Shower Axis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In view of the current efforts to extend the KASCADE experiment (KASCADE-Grande) for observations of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) of primary energies up to 1 EeV, the features of muon arrival time distributions and their correlations with other observable EAS quantities have been scrutinised on basis of high-energy EAS, simulated with the Monte Carlo code CORSIKA and using in general the QGSJET model as generator. Methodically various correlations of adequately defined arrival time parameters with other EAS parameters have been investigated by invoking non-parametric methods for the analysis of multivariate distributions, studying the classification and misclassification probabilities of various observable sets. It turns out that adding the arrival time information and the multiplicity of muons spanning the observed time distributions has distinct effects improving the mass discrimination. A further outcome of the studies is the feature that for the considered ranges of primary energies and of distances from the shower axis the discrimination power of global arrival time distributions referring to the arrival time of the shower core is only marginally enhanced as compared to local distributions referring to the arrival of the locally first muon.

I. M. Brancus; H. Rebel; A. F. Badea; A. Haungs; C. D. Aiftimiei; J. Oehlschlaeger; M. Duma

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

Anticipation in the Rodent Head Direction System Can Be Explained by an Interaction of Head Movements and Vestibular Firing Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anticipation in the Rodent Head Direction System Can Be Explained by an Interaction of Head Rossum MC. Anticipation in the rodent head direction system can be explained by an interaction of head, 2007; doi:10.1152/jn.00233.2007. The rodent head-direction (HD) system, which codes for the animal

van Rossum, Mark

124

Depth of Maximum of Air-Shower Profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Composition Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (Xmax), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the distributions with predictions from a variety of hadronic interaction models for variations in the composition of the primary cosmic rays and examining the quality of the fit. Regardless of what interaction model is assumed, we find that our data are not well described by a mix of protons and iron nuclei over most of the energy range. Acceptable fits can be obtained when intermediate masses are included, and when this is done consistent results for the proton and iron-nuclei contributions can be found using the available models. We observe a strong energy dependence of the resulting proton fractions, and find no support from any of the models for a significant contribution from iron nuclei. However, we also observe a...

,

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Observation of Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy with the IceTop Air Shower Array  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at PeV energies. The analysis is based on data taken between 2009 and 2012 with the IceTop air shower array at the south pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10–3 level can, for the first time, be extended to PeV energies. We divide the data set into two parts with median energies of 400 TeV and 2 PeV, respectively. In the low energy band, we observe a strong deficit with an angular size of about 30° and an amplitude of (– 1.58 ± 0.46stat ± 0.52sys) ? 10–3 at a location consistent with previous observations of cosmic rays with the IceCube neutrino detector. The study of the high energy band shows that the anisotropy persists to PeV energies and increases in amplitude to (– 3.11 ± 0.38stat ± 0.96sys) ? 10–3.

M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K.-H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; A. Gross; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J.-H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Rädel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H.-G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; L. Schönherr; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stössl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll; IceCube Collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Muon content of ultra-high-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse a sample of 33 extensive air showers (EAS) with estimated primary energies above 2\\cdot 10^{19} eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array. We compare, event-by-event, the observed muon density to that expected from CORSIKA simulations for primary protons and iron, using SIBYLL and EPOS hadronic interaction models. The study suggests the presence of two distinct hadronic components, ``light'' and ``heavy''. Simulations with EPOS are in a good agreement with the expected composition in which the light component corresponds to protons and the heavy component to iron-like nuclei. With SYBILL, simulated muon densities for iron primaries are a factor of \\sim 1.5 less than those observed for the heavy component, for the same electromagnetic signal. Assuming two-component proton-iron composition and the EPOS model, the fraction of protons with energies E>10^{19} eV is 0.52^{+0.19}_{-0.20} at 95% confidence level.

A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov; D. S. Gorbunov; G. I. Rubtsov; S. V. Troitsky

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC FE Docket No. 15-14-NG  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On January 23, 2015, Bear Head LNG Corporation and Bear Head LNG (USA), LLC (together, “Bear Head LNG”), filed an application for long-term, multi-contract authorization to engage in imports from,...

128

INTERNAL POSTING - Head of Technology Transfer, Patents & Publications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTERNAL POSTING - Head of Technology Transfer, Patents & Publications Department: Best Practices Supervisor(s): John Delooper Staff: AM 7 Requisition Number: 1400936 The Head of...

129

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011....

130

Nanotechnology in Head and Neck Cancer: The Race Is On  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10.1007/s11912-010-0087-2 Nanotechnology in Head and Neckthe applications of nanotechnology in head and neck cancer,plasmonic gold nanotechnology. Keywords Nanotechnology .

El-Sayed, Ivan H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director (PD) Directory DOE Head Contracting Authority (HCA) and Procurement Director (PD) Directory HCA and PD List Sept 23...

132

Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mars mission laser tool Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL Curiosity will carry the newly delivered laser instrument to reveal which elements are present in Mars' rocks and...

133

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Heater head for a Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heater head is described for a compound Stirling engine modules, each including a displacer cylinder coaxially aligned with the displacer cylinder of the other of the engine modules, a displacer piston mounted for reciprocation in the displacer cylinder.

Darooka, D.K.

1988-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

136

Does Head Start help hispanic children?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Poor educational attainment is a persistent problem among US hispanic children, relative to non-hispanics. Many of these children are immigrants and/or come from households that use a minority language in the home. This paper examines the effects of participation in a government sponsored preschool program called Head Start on these children. We find that large and significant benefits accrue to Head Start children when we compare them to siblings who did not participate in the program. On average, Head Start closes at least 1/4 of the gap in test scores between hispanic children and non-hispanic white children, and 2/3 of the gap in the probability of grade repetition. However, we find that the benefits of Head Start are not evenly distributed across sub-groups.

Janet Currie; Duncan Thomas

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: Spatial transformations Multiple Systems for Spatial Imagery: Transformations of Objects and Bodies Jeffrey M. Zacks* and Barbara Tversky * Washington COGNITION & COMPUTATION #12;SPATIAL TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract Problem-solving often requires imagining

Zacks, Jeffrey M.

138

Search for neutrino-induced particle showers with IceCube-40  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the search for neutrino-induced particle showers, so-called cascades, in the IceCube-40 detector. The data for this search were collected between April 2008 and May 2009 when the first 40 IceCube strings were deployed and operational. Three complementary searches were performed, each optimized for different energy regimes. The analysis with the lowest energy threshold (2 TeV) targeted atmospheric neutrinos. A total of 67 events were found, consistent with the expectation of 41 atmospheric muons and 30 atmospheric neutrino events. The two other analyses targeted a harder, astrophysical neutrino flux. The analysis with an intermediate threshold of 25 TeV leads to the observation of 14 cascadelike events, again consistent with the prediction of 3.0 atmospheric neutrino and 7.7 atmospheric muon events. We hence set an upper limit of E2?lim?7.46×10?8??GeV?sr?1?s?1?cm?2 (90% C.L.) on the diffuse flux from astrophysical neutrinos of all neutrino flavors, applicable to the energy range 25 TeV to 5 PeV, assuming an E??2 spectrum and a neutrino flavor ratio of 1?1?1 at the Earth. The third analysis utilized a larger and optimized sample of atmospheric muon background simulation, leading to a higher energy threshold of 100 TeV. Three events were found over a background prediction of 0.04 atmospheric muon events and 0.21 events from the flux of conventional and prompt atmospheric neutrinos. Including systematic errors this corresponds to a 2.7? excess with respect to the background-only hypothesis. Our observation of neutrino event candidates above 100 TeV complements IceCube’s recently observed evidence for high-energy astrophysical neutrinos.

M.?G. Aartsen et al. (IceCube Collaboration)

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Electro-optic voltage sensor head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A study of the appearance of tau neutrinos from a gamma ray burst by detecting their horizontal electromagnetic showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the possibilty of detecting horizontal electromagnetic showers of tau neutrinos from individual gamma ray bursts, in large scale detectors like HiRes and Telescope Array. We study the role of the parameters of a gamma ray burst in determining the expected number of tau events from that burst. The horizontal beam of tau leptons produce visible signals in the atmosphere. We find that there is a slim chance of observing tau lepton appearances from GRBs with Telescope Array. The number of signals is strongly dependent on the Lorentz factor $\\Gamma$, redshift $z$ of a GRB, energy emitted in muon neutrinos and antineutrinos $E_{\

Nayantara Gupta

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper Heads-up Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training and Certification of Lock Operators IMTS Heads-up Paper 1 Heads-up Paper Training called "Training and Certification of Lock and Dam Operators." Interested individuals can send ideas of the Training and Certification program. Examples of what will be in those draft documents are as follows

US Army Corps of Engineers

142

Dual, rotating stripper rubber drilling head  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a drilling head for a well bore through which a tool string of varying outside diameter is run, the drilling head sealing against fluid flow past the tool string to divert such fluid through a side outlet port, said drilling head including a housing having an axial passageway through which the tool string is run and a bearing assembly to facilitate rotation of the tool string within the axial passageway, the improved drilling head comprising: first and second stripper rubbers rotatably mounted within the drilling head housing in seating contact with the tool string, said stripper rubbers having substantially identical inner diameters through which the tool string extends, said first stripper rubber formed of an abrasive resistant material to divert fluid flow from the axial passageway of the housing to the side outlet port and said second stripper rubber formed on a sealingly resilient material which maintains sealing contact with the tool string extending there through preventing fluid flow past said tool string; said first stripper rubber being corrected to clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a first drive ring such that said first stripper rubber rotates with the tool string; and said second stripper rubber is rotatably connected to said clamping means associated with the bearing assembly through a second drive ring, said first and second drive rings coaxially mounted within the housing whereby said first stripper rubber is positioned axially below said second stripper rubber in sealing contact with the tool string.

Bailey, T.F.; Campbell, J.E.

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

143

Rotating head for rotary drilling rigs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rotating head is claimed for a rotary drilling rig which is to be secured to the top of a well pipe having an inner rotating portion with an opening therethrough which permits passage of drill pipe, pipe joints, and Kelly tools; the rotating portion has an annular drive rubber formed integrally with the top portion thereof. A rotating head drive bushing having an opening with a cross-sectional shape generally conforming to the cross-section of the Kelly tool to permit only sliding motion therebetween is provided with helical external ridges which produce a disengagable gripping action with the opening in the drive rubber at the top of the rotating portion of the rotating head. The rotating portion has a conventional stripper rubber at the bottom thereof and is mounted with a double roller bearing to provide low friction motion with respect to the fixed portion of the head. The double roller bearing is lubricated with a viscous lubricating material and paddles are provided between the sets of rollers of the double roller bearing for distributing the viscous lubricating material and in particular propel it onto the upper set of bearings; the upper body portion of the rotating head is readily detachable from the lower sleeve portion which is normally welded to the well conductor pipe.

Adams, J.R.

1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

A New Method to Reconstruct the Energy and Determine the Composition of Cosmic Rays from the Measurement of Cherenkov Light and Particle Densities in Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Monte-Carlo study to reconstruct energy and mass of cosmic rays with energies above 300 TeV using ground based measurements of the electromagnetic part of showers initiated in the atmosphere is presented. The shower properties determined with two detector arrays measuring the air Cherenkov light and the particle densities as realized at the HEGRA experiment are processed to determine the energy of the primary particle without the need of any hypothesis concerning its mass. The mass of the primary particle is reconstructed coarsely from the same observables in parallel to the energy determination.

A. Lindner

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System Edited by Alain Berthoz Laboratoire de Physiologie, sideslip, and thrust) determine its loca- tion in space, and rotations (yaw, pitch, and roll) change its, no functional significance can be attributed to this multiple sampling. Oculomotor System of Calliphora

146

Department Heads Meeting D. MacFarlane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department Heads Meeting D. MacFarlane March 21, 2013 #12;Snowmass working groups Snowmass web-7 at SLAC Energy Frontier All Hands: » April 3-6 at Brookhaven (web site) » June 30-July 3 at U. Washington a world leading cosmic frontier program » Cosmology, cosmic ray, dark matter & dark energy emphasis

Wechsler, Risa H.

147

Employee Handbook & Policy Manual Section Heading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employee Handbook & Policy Manual Section Heading: 2.00 ­ Administrative & Personnel Policies in this document: · Person With Disabilities: a person having a physical or mental impairment which substantially. A "common wheelchair" does not exceed 30 inches in width and 48 inches in length measured two inches from

148

Judith Sheine Professor and Department Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Environmental Design, Department of Architecture Chair, 2002- present Professor, 2002 - present; AssociateJudith Sheine Professor and Department Head Department of Architecture School of Architecture) 346-3626 e-mail: jesheine@uoregon.edu Education 1979 Princeton University, School of Architecture

149

Analog VLSI Architecture for Computing Heading Direction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arrays of elementary velocity sensors to estimate the direction of heading for pure translational motion implementa- tion and the functionality of the elementary motion sensors used to extract the optical ow eld systems place severe constraints on their size, power consumption, shock resistance and manufacturing cost

150

3D head anthropometric analysis Reyes Enciso*ab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a current three-dimensional image-based face modeling technique using a plaster head model. We will also. In this paper we acquired and validated 3-dimensional images of a plaster head using structured-light image

Shahabi, Cyrus

151

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on the Head Injury to a Miner at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad, New Mexico - August 25, 2004 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the Head Injury to a Miner at...

152

Anterior endoderm and head induction in early vertebrate embryos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Early work on the formation of the vertebrate body axis indicated the existence of separate head- and trunk-inducing regions in Spemann's organizer of the amphibian gastrula. In mammals some head-organizing a...

Flávio S. J. de Souza; Christof Niehrs

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A 3-D display head-set for personalized computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis covers the design and implementation of a binocular display head-set akin to Dr . Ivan E. Sutherland's head-mounted display, but using several new technologies and new techniques in computer graphics: small ...

Callahan, Mark A

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION High-head storage hydropower plants operate their turbines during periods of high Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland ABSTRACT: High-head storage hydropower plants

Floreano, Dario

155

Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

Forrest, Stephen R

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Magnetic Field based Heading Estimation for Pedestrian Navigation Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Field based Heading Estimation for Pedestrian Navigation Environments Muhammad Haris Afzal held devices, these other sources are accelerometers for roll and pitch estimates and magnetic field sensors for the heading. In order to utilize the magnetic field sensors for heading estimation

Calgary, University of

157

Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Automatic Tissue Classification for the Human Head from Multispectral MRI Tolga Tasdizen, David for classifying multispectral MR scans of the human head into nine tissue classes. User initialization is adopted. #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Classification of head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data

Utah, University of

158

Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information on head rotation from the vestibular system to the saccade-generating mechanism in the brain stem482 Oculomotor Responses to Active Head Movements in Darkness Formulation and Testing Sistemistica, Università di Pavia, Pavia, Italy Passive head rotation in darkness produces vestibular nystagmus

Ramat, Stefano

159

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: SUBJECT: Project Full Funding Policy in the Annual ~ u d ~ e t Request On July 18,2008, the Secretary approved the Department's Contract and Project Management Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Corrective Action Plan (CAP). This is the Department's plan to improve contract and project management and ultimately be removed from GAO's High Risk List - a list that the Department has been on since 1990. One of the key issues identified in the CAP is the Department's failure to request and obtain full funding for non-information technology capital asset projects, where appropriate. This new policy is established to reduce the inherent inefficiencies and risks ingoduced by prolonging the duration of small projects, as well as to add budget stability

160

Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and University of Oslo, Oslo, N-0316 (Norway) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances.

Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA); Wei, Bo (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Bhatia, C. Singh (Morgan Hill, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances.

Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA); Wei, Bo (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Bhatia, Singh C. (Morgan Hill, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 22 figs.

Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 15 figs.

Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, S.C.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AZ-TRIBE-KAIBAB BAND OF PAIUTE INDIAN TRIBE AZ-TRIBE-KAIBAB BAND OF PAIUTE INDIAN TRIBE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AZ-TRIBE-KAIBAB BAND OF PAIUTE INDIAN TRIBE AZ American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Kaibab Band of Paiute Indian Tribe of Arizona proposes to install energy efficient appliances and perform energy efficient retrofits to homes on the Kaibab Paiute Indian Reservation. These retrofits would include siding, roofing, windows, doors, and other areas of the home losing heat, using excess water, or other non-efficient areas (e.g., replace/upgrade/install water efficient appliances, water saving taps, other water fixtures [low-flow shower heads, low-flow faucet aerators, low-flow toilets]).

166

Definition: Head-End System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head-End System Head-End System Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Head-End System A head-end system is hardware and software that receives the stream of meter data brought back to the utility through the AMI. Head-end systems may perform a limited amount of data validation before either making the data available for other systems to request or pushing the data out to other systems.[1] Related Terms advanced metering infrastructure, system References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/head_end_system [[Ca LikeLike UnlikeLike You and one other like this.One person likes this. Sign Up to see what your friends like. tegory: Smart Grid Definitionssmart grid,smart grid, |Template:BASEPAGENAME]]smart grid,smart grid, Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Head-End_System&oldid=502621"

167

Lateral distribution of Cherenkov light in extensive air showers at high mountain altitude produced by different primary particles in wide energy range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The general aim of this work is to obtain the lateral distribution of atmospheric Cherenkov light in extensive air showers produced by different primary particles precisely by. protons, Helium, Iron, Oxygen, Carbon, Nitrogen, Calcium, Silicon and gamma quanta in wide energy range at high mountain observation level of Chacaltaya cosmic ray station. The simulations are divided generally in two energy ranges 10GeV-10 TeV and 10 TeV-10 PeV. One large detector has been used for simulations, the aim being to reduce the statistical fluctuations of the obtained characteristics. The shape of the obtained lateral distributions of Cherenkov light in extensive air showers is discussed and the scientific potential for solution of different problems as well.

A. Mishev; J. Stamenov

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Low flow showerhead demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the water and energy savings obtained from flow showerheads (LFS) in multifamily buildings in New York City. In 1994, the New York City Department of Water and Energy Conservation had initiated two programs -- the Residential Water Survey and the Toilet Rebate Program -- to conserve water. At about the same time EME was commissioned by the New York State Energy Research Development Authority to measure the water and energy consumption in 50 buildings in New York City. May of the buildings monitored by EME also participated in one or both of the city`s programs. This study is the result of the wide overlap of New York City`s programs and EME`s monitoring project. Ten buildings or more than 60% of the final sample of 16 buildings achieved energy savings close to and exceeding 10%. One building had reductions of only 5%. Four buildings remained virtually unchanged and one building showed increases of 10%. A control group of 14 buildings of similar size and composition was also investigated.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

Malandra, Louis J. (McKeesport, PA); Hornak, Leonard P. (Forest Hills, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Heathrow campaigners – heading for a historic victory?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article assesses the reasons why the government may be heading for a historic defeat over its plans to expand Heathrow. It shows how the people and organisations campaigning to stop the expansion learnt vital lessons from past defeats. It highlights three key tactics the campaigners have used: building a wide-ranging coalition encompassing such diverse groups as local authorities and direct action activists, running a high-profile, pro-active, agenda-setting campaign and a willingness to challenge the government's economic arguments. The campaign is set against a background of peak oil, a deep economic recession and the threat of climate change.

John Stewart

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effects of Shower Partons on Soft and Semihard hadrons Produced in Pb-Pb Collisions at 2.76 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of all identified hadrons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is studied with emphasis on the $p_T$ distributions up to 20 GeV/c in central collisions. In the framework of the recombination model we find that the shower partons (due to the fragmentation of semihard partons) play an important role in the formation of hadrons in the low- and intermediate-$p_T$ regions. Parameters that control the energy loss of minijets are determined by fitting the upper half of the $p_T$ range of the pion distribution. The resultant soft shower partons are then found to dominate over the thermal partons in the non-strange sector, but not in the strange sector. Since the data on the $p_T$ spectra of all observed hadrons are well reproduced, there is no way out of the implication that any alternative dynamical model on particle production would be incomplete if it does not consider the effects of minijets even at very low $p_T$. Hydrodynamics that relies on rapid equilibration without accounting for the delayed thermalization effects of the hard and semihard partons copiously produced at LHC is an example of such models. The difference between the densities of shower partons produced at LHC and at BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) is quantified and discussed.

Lilin Zhu; Rudolph C. Hwa

2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemie 07 Inorganic chemistry 11.14 - 08 Organische chemie 08 Organic chemistry 12.11 - 10 Didactics and priciples of chemistry 14.03 - 16 Vervolgwerken - Annuals 16 Book series and annuals 14Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken

Galis, Frietson

173

Precision predictions for Z'-production at the CERN LHC: QCD matrix elements, parton showers, and joint resummation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We improve the theoretical predictions for the production of extra neutral gauge bosons at hadron colliders by implementing the Z' bosons in the MC@NLO generator and by computing their differential and total cross sections in joint p_T and threshold resummation. The two improved predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with each other for mass spectra, p_T spectra, and total cross sections, while the PYTHIA parton and ``power'' shower predictions usually employed for experimental analyses show significant shortcomings both in normalization and shape. The theoretical uncertainties from scale and parton density variations and non-perturbative effects are found to be 9%, 8%, and less than 5%, respectively, and thus under good control. The implementation of our improved predictions in terms of the new MC@NLO generator or resummed K factors in the analysis chains of the Tevatron and LHC experiments should be straightforward and lead to more precise determinations or limits of the Z' boson masses and/or couplings.

B. Fuks; M. Klasen; F. Ledroit; Q. Li; J. Morel

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act This memorandum provides guidance to the federal agencies on incorporating pollution prevention principles, techniques, and mechanisms into their planning and decisionmaking processes and evaluating and reporting those efforts in documents prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act More Documents & Publications Integrating Pollution Prevention with NEPA Planning Activities

175

Meyer-Harms, Bettina, Xabier Irigoien, Robert Head, and Roger ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

M. Head and Harris (1994) first used this method to describe selective feeding by different size-fractionated zooplankton off the coast of Morocco. A modification ...

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership...

177

Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Abstract This page links...

178

TO: Procurement Directors Head of Contracting Activities FROM...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

8 DATE: December 5, 2014 TO: Procurement Directors Head of Contracting Activities FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of...

179

TO: Procurement Directors Head of Contracting Activities FROM...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 DATE: August 21, 2014 TO: Procurement Directors Head of Contracting Activities FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of...

180

Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laboratory Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine 68bhydrogreensmallhydroch11.ppt More Documents & Publications Real World Demonstration of a New...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Dr. Jim Wright Acting Head, Division of Radiation Oncology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dr. Jim Wright Acting Head, Division of Radiation Oncology Associate Professor Department outstanding contributions to the care and treatment of cancer patients through research. Dr. Jim Wright has

Haykin, Simon

182

Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mars mission laser tool Mars mission laser tool Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL Curiosity will carry the newly delivered laser instrument to reveal which elements are present in Mars' rocks and soils. September 21, 2010 A bright ball of plasma is produced by ChemCam's invisible laser beam striking a rock within the Mars sample chamber. A bright ball of plasma is produced by ChemCam's invisible laser beam striking a rock within the Mars sample chamber. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "ChemCam will act as a geochemical observatory, providing composition data to understand if Mars was, is, or will be a habitable world." Star Wars photon gun will give Mars rover hands-free rock ID LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 21, 2010-The ChemCam instrument has

183

Light water reactor lower head failure analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Topic Models to Interpret MeSH MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://ii.nlm.nih.gov/mti.shtml #12;MeSH heading Major MeSH heading Major qualifier MeSH-qualifier combination Humans Brain metabolism Brain (metabolism) Table 1. Most frequent MeSH headings, major MeSH headings, major qualifiers and MeTopic Models to Interpret MeSH � MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings David Newman12 , Sarvnaz Karimi

Newman, David

185

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements Gary Hodges, CIRES/NOAA and John Schmelzer, PNL gary.hodges@noaa.gov, john.schmelzer@pnl.gov 17th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting 26-30 March 2006 Monterey, CA Head Refurbishment The Process Includes: * New filter detectors * Relocate internal thermistors * New connectors * Gain resistors moved to head * Improved insulation The Finished Heads: * Are lamp calibrated * Have filter profiles measured * Cosine characterized * Are out-of-band tested What Does This Mean For Data Users? * Fewer data gaps * Fewer DQRs * Confidence in the data * Well calibrated data Calibration Improvements 5 6 7 8 0 2 4 6 Airmass ln Direct Data will now be calibrated by the Langley method Extrapolate to TOA to get V 0 Benefits of Langley vs. Lamp calibrations:

186

Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher December 23, 2010 - 11:12am Addthis Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? You'll be able to start monitoring St. Nick's journey starting at 6 AM ET on Christmas Eve. Every year since 1998, the Department of Energy's Los Alamos lab has been using state of the art technology to track Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. You'll be able to start monitoring St. Nick's journey here starting at 6 AM ET on Christmas Eve. This week, I got a chance to talk to Santa Tracker Head Researcher (and Cibola Flight Experiment Project Leader) Diane Roussel-Dupre to get a

187

Design of a dual stage actuator tape head with high-bandwidth track following capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the voice coil motor (VCM). A leaf spring on top of thespring Slot Air bearing surface Read/write elements (in slot) Bracket (b) Servo head Read head Write head Voice coil

Raeymaekers, Bart; Graham, Matthew R.; Callafon, Raymond A.; Talke, Frank E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA With this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality reiterates its previous guidance on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review of proposed emergency response actions.This memorandum clarifies that the previous guidance remains applicable to current situations and provides guidance on required agency environmental review. Emergencies and NEPA More Documents & Publications Memorandum for Federal NEPA Contacts: Emergency Actions and NEPA Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems Final Guidance on Improving the Process for Preparing Efficient and Timely

190

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground Tour Since February Incidents Head of EM Visits Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for First Underground Tour Since...

191

Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small Business Week Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small Business Week June 10, 2013 - 8:50am Addthis Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small Business Week John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization National Small Business Week is around the corner, kicking off on June 17 across the country. The week honors hundreds of thousands of small business that contract with the federal government every year. Diana Lewis, a West Virginia native and founder of Action Facilities Management, Inc., is one of the small business owners being recognized by her state as the Small Business Person of the Year. During National Small

192

Understanding salt-marsh accretion, Scolt Head Island, Norfolk, England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of surface sediment accretion have been obtained for Hut Marsh, Scolt Head Island, Norfolk, England, using sand marker horizons. More than eighty 1-m2 marker sites were deployed in October 1983, and ...

David R. Stoddart; Denise J. Reed; Jonathan R. French

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Theoretical collapse pressures for two pressurized torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine the pressures at which real torispherical heads fail upon a single application of pressure, two heads were pressurized in recent Praxair tests, and displacements and strains were recorded at various locations. In this paper, theoretical results for the two test heads are presented in the form of curves of pressure versus crown deflections, using the available geometry and material parameters. From these curves, limit and collapse pressures are calculated, using procedures permitted by the ASME B and PV Code Section 8/Div.2. These pressures are shown to vary widely, depending on the method and model used to calculate them. The effect of no stress relief on the behavior of the Praxair test heads is also evaluated and found to be of no significance for neither the objectives of the tests nor the objectives of this paper. The results of this paper are submitted as an enhancement to the experimental results recorded during the Praxair tests.

Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents case studies of two moderately sized ammonia refrigeration systems retrofitted for floating head pressure control. It also presents a parametric analysis to assist in selecting appropriate pressures in an ammonia refrigeration...

Barrer, P. J.; Jones, S. M.

195

Modeling Adhesive Forces for Ultra Low Flying Head Disk Interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses a major issue in microtribology related to the head/disk interface (HDI) in magnetic storage. This is the issue of strong intermolecular (adhesive) forces that may be present at the interf...

Andreas A. Polycarpou

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Designation of the Head of Contracting Activity/Redelegation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2B, Designation of the Head of Contracting ActivityRedelegation Order No. 00-003.01-02B to the Deputy Director, Office of Acquisition Management by Joseph Waddell Functional...

197

Multi-atlas segmentation in head and neck CT scans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate automating the task of segmenting structures in head and neck CT scans, to minimize time spent on manual contouring of structures of interest. We focus on the brainstem and left and right parotids. To generate ...

Arbisser, Amelia M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactivating personal memory 1 RUNNING HEAD: Reactivating personal memory Modifying memory: Selectively enhancing and updating personal memories for a museum; Reactivating personal memory 2 Abstract Memory can be modified when reactivated

Schacter, Daniel

199

The automated computation of tree-level and next-to-leading order differential cross sections, and their matching to parton shower simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the theoretical bases that underpin the automation of the computations of tree-level and next-to-leading order cross sections, of their matching to parton shower simulations, and of the merging of matched samples that differ by light-parton multiplicities. We present a computer program, MadGraph5_aMC@NLO, capable of handling all these computations -- parton-level fixed order, shower-matched, merged -- in a unified framework whose defining features are flexibility, high level of parallelisation, and human intervention limited to input physics quantities. We demonstrate the potential of the program by presenting selected phenomenological applications relevant to the LHC and to a 1-TeV $e^+e^-$ collider. While next-to-leading order results are restricted to QCD corrections to SM processes in the first public version, we show that from the user viewpoint no changes have to be expected in the case of corrections due to any given renormalisable Lagrangian, and that the implementation of these are well under way.

J. Alwall; R. Frederix; S. Frixione; V. Hirschi; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer; H. -S. Shao; T. Stelzer; P. Torrielli; M. Zaro

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Leonid Meteor Showers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... got up on recollecting the date, and for about an hour witnessed the most brilliant pyrotechnic display I have ever seen.

THOS. W. KINGSMILL

1900-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bicycle helmets are highly effective at preventing head injury during head impact: Head-form accelerations and injury criteria for helmeted and unhelmeted impacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cycling is a popular form of recreation and method of commuting with clear health benefits. However, cycling is not without risk. In Canada, cycling injuries are more common than in any other summer sport; and according to the US National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration, 52,000 cyclists were injured in the US in 2010. Head injuries account for approximately two-thirds of hospital admissions and three-quarters of fatal injuries among injured cyclists. In many jurisdictions and across all age levels, helmets have been adopted to mitigate risk of serious head injuries among cyclists and the majority of epidemiological literature suggests that helmets effectively reduce risk of injury. Critics have raised questions over the actual efficacy of helmets by pointing to weaknesses in existing helmet epidemiology including selection bias and lack of appropriate control for the type of impact sustained by the cyclist and the severity of the head impact. These criticisms demonstrate the difficulty in conducting epidemiology studies that will be regarded as definitive and the need for complementary biomechanical studies where confounding factors can be adequately controlled. In the bicycle helmet context, there is a paucity of biomechanical data comparing helmeted to unhelmeted head impacts and, to our knowledge, there is no data of this type available with contemporary helmets. In this research, our objective was to perform biomechanical testing of paired helmeted and unhelmeted head impacts using a validated anthropomorphic test headform and a range of drop heights between 0.5 m and 3.0 m, while measuring headform acceleration and Head Injury Criterion (HIC). In the 2 m (6.3 m/s) drops, the middle of our drop height range, the helmet reduced peak accelerations from 824 g (unhelmeted) to 181 g (helmeted) and HIC was reduced from 9667 (unhelmeted) to 1250 (helmeted). At realistic impact speeds of 5.4 m/s (1.5 m drop) and 6.3 m/s (2.0 m drop), bicycle helmets changed the probability of severe brain injury from extremely likely (99.9% risk at both 5.4 and 6.3 m/s) to unlikely (9.3% and 30.6% risk at 1.5 m and 2.0 m drops respectively). These biomechanical results for acceleration and HIC, and the corresponding results for reduced risk of severe brain injury show that contemporary bicycle helmets are highly effective at reducing head injury metrics and the risk for severe brain injury in head impacts characteristic of bicycle crashes.

Peter A. Cripton; Daniel M. Dressler; Cameron A. Stuart; Christopher R. Dennison; Darrin Richards

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Constraining the fraction of primary gamma rays at ultra-high energies from the muon data of the Yakutsk extensive-air-shower array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By making use of the data on the total signal and on the muon component of the air showers detected by the Yakutsk array, we analyze, in the frameworks of the recently suggested event-by-event approach, how large the fraction of primary gamma-rays at ultra-high energies can be. We derive upper limits on the photon fraction in the integral flux of primary cosmic rays. At the 95% confidence level (CL), these limits are 22% for primary energies E_0>4\\cdot 10^{19}eV and 12% for E_0>2\\cdot 10^{19}eV. Despite the presence of muonless events, the data are consistent with complete absence of photons at least at 95% CL. The sensitivity of the results to systematic uncertainties, in particular to those of the energy determination for non-photon primaries, is discussed.

A. V. Glushkov; D. S. Gorbunov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; G. I. Rubtsov; I. E. Sleptsov; S. V. Troitsky

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

203

On the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray using the muon arrival times from extensive air showers: Application for Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we study the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray by observing the muon arrival times in ground detectors. We analyzed extensive air showers (EAS) induced by proton and iron nuclei with the same energy 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV simulated with CORSIKA, and analyzed the muon arrival times at ground measured by the infill array detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO). From the arrival times of the core and of the muons the atmospheric depth of muon generation locus is evaluated. The results suggest a potential mass discrimination on the basis of muon arrival times and of the reconstructed atmospheric depth of muon production. An analysis of a larger set of CORSIKA simulations carried out for primary energies above 10{sup 18} eV is in progress.

Arsene, N.; Rebel, H.; Sima, O. [Institute of Space Science (ISS), Bucharest-Magurele, P.O. Box MG-23 (Romania) and Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

Katie Antypas Named New Head of NERSC User Services Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Katie Antypas Named Katie Antypas Named New Head of NERSC Services Department Katie Antypas Named New Head of NERSC Services Department September 3, 2013 katie2 Katie Antypas Katie Antypas, who has led NERSC's User Services Group since October 2010, has been named as the new Services Department Head, effective September 23. Antypas succeeds Francesca Verdier, who will serve as Allocations Manager until her planned retirement in June 2014. Antypas is also the project lead for the NERSC-8 system procurement, a project to deploy NERSC's next generation system in the 2015 timeframe. "Katie's leadership in ensuring that NERSC users are able to maximize their use of both our current and future systems has positioned her well to help lead NERSC users and staff into the next era of extreme scale

205

World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave April 16, 2010 - 4:47pm Addthis A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world's largest solar energy system by the end of 2013. The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, located just a few miles from the California - Nevada border near Interstate 15, will generate approximately 400 MW of energy per year, almost doubling the amount of solar thermal energy produced in the United States. Ivanpah will focus sunlight from mirrors placed on poles, which don't require the land to be graded and can be placed around areas that are already in use or environmentally sensitive. The project of Oakland, Calif.-based BrightSource Energy, Inc. will likely generate enough power

206

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Solar Decathlon Heads to California for 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Decathlon Heads to California for 2013 Event Decathlon Heads to California for 2013 Event Photo showing the aerial view of several structures with solar panels on top. Aerial view of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 in Washington, D.C. (Credit: Stefano Paltera/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) January 11, 2013 For the first time, the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon will be held outside of Washington, D.C. This fall, 20 collegiate teams will head to the Orange Country Great Park in Irvine, California, to compete in this award-winning showcase of energy-efficient and solar-powered houses. The free event will take place in a specially constructed village Oct. 3-13, 2013. The competition houses will be open to visitors on eight days over two weekends. Public hours will be from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily:

207

Sprinkler Head Replacement (4586), 4/24/2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sprinkler Head Replacement Projects (4586) Sprinkler Head Replacement Projects (4586) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (Citv/Countv/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The proposed action is to replace approximately 1 ,300 sprinkler heads upgrade fire protection systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 81.3- Routine maintenance Submit by E-mail For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each categorical exclusion, see Subpart D of 10 CFR Part 1021. Regulatory Requirements in 10 CFR 1021.410(b): (See full text in regulation) [{Jrhe proposal fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A orB to 10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D. To fit within the classes of actions listed in 10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B, a proposal must be one that would not: (1) threaten

208

Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Srinivasan Named Head Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group August 31, 2011 | Tags: NERSC Jay Srinivasan has been selected as the Computational Systems Group Lead in the NERSC Systems Department. In this role, he will supervise the day-to-day operation of all of NERSC's computer systems. Prior to taking on his new assignment, Srinivasan was the team lead for the PDSF cluster that supports Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics. Srinivasan has more than 15 years of experience in high performance computing, both as a user and administrator. Since joining NERSC in 2001, he has worked on all the large systems from NERSC-3, the IBM/SP2 system called Seaborg, to Hopper, the Cray XE6 that is currently NERSC's

209

EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion November 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Advanced techniques allowed crews at Los Alamos National Laboratory to decontaminate large boxes of waste so it could be shipped as mixed low-level rather than transuranic waste. Advanced techniques allowed crews at Los Alamos National Laboratory to decontaminate large boxes of waste so it could be shipped as mixed low-level rather than transuranic waste. The EM program at Los Alamos National Laboratory exceeded its shipping goals in fiscal year 2013, shipping twice as much waste as it did in fiscal year 2012. The EM program at Los Alamos National Laboratory exceeded its shipping goals in fiscal year 2013, shipping twice as much waste as it did in fiscal

210

Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources (Redirected from Nags Head, NC) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9573922°, -75.6240619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9573922,"lon":-75.6240619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New head of stockpile manufacturing and support New head of stockpile manufacturing and support Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support Carl Beard is the new associate director for stockpile manufacturing and support. Beard has held this position in an acting capacity since June 2007. January 22, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

212

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011. December 1, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202

213

MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kendall Head Tidal Energy Kendall Head Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

214

An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Br). Other radionuclides considered may deposit in bone withm the head region (cranium or the spinal skeleton) (is'I, 2P, ssP, tssRe, 'ssRe, 'ssSm, "7~Sb, ssSr, s Sr, "nY, ss~Tc, tsiCs, ss"Ra), or m the thyroid fss~ Tc, and all iodme radionuclides... tagged to them (i. e. , radiopharmaceuticals). Nevertheless, studies of the small-scale dosimetry of the bram, and more generally, the organs of the head (brain, eyes thyroid, skull, skin), have not kept pace with the current advances in nuclear...

Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

SFU RECREATION & ATHLETICS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY SFU CAMPS HEAD INSTRUCTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SFU RECREATION & ATHLETICS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY SFU CAMPS HEAD INSTRUCTOR GLEE CAMPS POSITION) and supervise recreational activities daily. · Evaluate instructors and volunteers as discussed in staff the allocated budget. · Additional responsibilities as directed by the Summer Camps Programmer and Recreation

Kavanagh, Karen L.

216

Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recto Running Head 1 Available Potential Energy and Exergy in Stratified Fluids R�emi Tailleux, thermodynamic efficiencies, buoyancy forcing. Abstract Lorenz's theory of available potential energy (APE) remains the main framework for studying the atmospheric and oceanic energy cycles. Because the APE

Tailleux, Remi

218

Brief Communications Optic Flow Stimuli Update Anterodorsal Thalamus Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orientation in the yaw plane relative to environmental landmark cues. Head movements provoke optic field flow)istheonlyknownprojectionofheaddirectioninformationtoentorhinalgridcellsandhippocampalplacecells,yawplaneoptic flow signals likely influence representations in this spatial reference coordinate system to the body, independently of the ani- mal's ongoing behavior and of its spatial location. The HD cell system

Arleo, Angelo

219

Effects of Head Movement on Perceptions of Humanoid Robot Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Head Movement on Perceptions of Humanoid Robot Behavior Emily Wang Constantine Lignos@cs.yale.edu ABSTRACT This paper examines human perceptions of humanoid robot behavior, specifically how perception to the lab to "play with Nico," an upper-torso humanoid robot. The follow-up survey asked subjects to rate

Plotkin, Joshua B.

220

Anna Head West Student Housing Construction starts Sept. 27  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to offices in the Anna Head buildings, as well as additional lights, a UCPD "blue phone", and security on the south side of the street are relocated underground. The utilities work will focus on moving the power will remain open. * The sidewalk on Haste Street will be closed adjacent to the site. Pedestrians

Hellerstein, Joseph M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

Burov, Alexey

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

Tran, Vi-Hoa (Newport News, VA); Meikle, Steven Richard (Penshurst, AU); Smith, Mark Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Modeling of Brain Dynamics during Repetitive Head Motions Igor Szczyrba School motions in traumatic scenarios that are as- sociated with severe brain injuries. Our results are based on the linear Kelvin-Voigt brain injury model, which treats the brain matter as a viscoelastic solid, and on our

Burtscher, Martin

224

UNITED STATES: NOAA Head Vows to Protect Marine Re-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flshmg Off U. West Coas Saury Flshing f U.. to Be R duced Sharply Resume Canned-Tuna Sales to U.S. 1971 for FISh Culture Flshery Aid Mlssion to VISit 'Thlrd World' ·'ev; ·'lchlro Head Stresses 'Systematiza- tion

225

Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running Head: TESTOSTERONE AND POWER Testosterone and power Steven J. Stanton and Oliver C. Schultheiss University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA To appear in: K. Dowding (Ed.), Encyclopedia of power-647-9440, email: stantons@umich.edu #12;Testosterone and power 2 Across many studies in humans, two functional

Schultheiss, Oliver C.

226

Modeling Interactions of the Rat's Place and Head Direction Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Interactions of the Rat's Place and Head Direction Systems A. David Redish and David S in a set of experiments by Sharp et al. (1990). 1 The Sharp et al., 1990 experiment Rats spent multiple sessions finding food scattered randomly on the floor of a black cylin­ drical arena with a white cue card

Touretzky, David S.

227

IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGINED TRANSFORMATIONS 1 Running head: IMAGINED TRANSFORMATION OF BODIES Imagined Transformations TRANSFORMATIONS 2 Abstract A number of spatial reasoning problems can be solved by performing an imagined transformation of one's egocentric perspective. A series of experiments were carried out to characterize

Zacks, Jeffrey M.

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin-bound myosin heads Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of actin-bound myosin heads in spin-labeled myofibrils in the presence of the ATP analogs AMPPNP (5... -Si have demonstrated that actin-bound myosin heads are...

229

Study on head instability using Flying-QST tester for HDDs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a tester consisting of minor-loop and major-loop quasi-static test (QST) units in order to better understand head instabilities under conditions where the head slider was flying on the disk. The mino...

Masaru Furukawa; Junguo Xu; Yukio Kato; Tatsuhiko Wada

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Application of Rarefied Gas Dynamics to the Head-Disk Interface in Hard Disk Drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a magnetic disk and a thermal flying height control (TFC)gration on the flying head slider at the head-disk interfaceThermal flying-height control sliders in hard disk drives

Liu, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Dr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and oxygenation of the brain and muscle. Since 2002 he heads the Biomedical Optics Research LaboratoryDr. Martin Wolf, Ph. D Head of Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory Clinic of Neonatology

Zanibbi, Richard

232

A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical areas pVIP and CSv  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running title: Changing heading direction in the human brain Keywords: egomotion; f1 A representation of changing heading direction in human cortical in the environment, we continually change direction. Much work has examined how the brain

Royal Holloway, University of London

233

Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Unit Real World Demonstration of a New American Low-Head Hydropower Unit Real World Demonstration of a New American...

234

Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder Adaptor Adjustment Features Dorsal/Ventral dial.352.3139 Toll Free: 1.877.352.3275 ^^ci&ion Q)e&i^n^^^r ^esea/H^/i Model 923-B Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder 923B-1/07 #12;MODEL 923-B MOUSE GAS ANESTHESIA HEAD HOLDER The KOPF Mouse Gas Anesthesia Head Holder

Kleinfeld, David

235

Improvement of the effectiveness of spillway operation of high-head hydroelectric stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. The distance of deflection of a high-head aerated flow being discharged from spillways decreases in proportio...

P. R. Khlopenkov

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse MEG Simulations Using Realistic Head Models Robert Van of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) forward or inverse sim­ ulations in realistic head models. We verify the accuracy, in an inhomogeneous, non­spherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due to volume

Utah, University of

237

Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Attractor Deformation in the Rodent Head-Direction System JEREMY P. GOODRIDGE1 AND DAVID S attractor deformation in the rodent head-direction system. J Neurophysiol 83: 3402­3410, 2000. We present a model of the head-direction circuit in the rat that improves on earlier models in several respects

Touretzky, David S.

238

NEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have seen that navigation requires knowledge of heading, and that HD cells in the brain actNEURAL MODELS OF HEAD-DIRECTION CELLS PETER ZEIDMAN JOHN A. BULLINARIA School of Computer Science background of Head Direction Cells, and existing models of them, we introduce an improved neural model

Bullinaria, John

239

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume Currents in Forward and Inverse Magnetoencephalographic Simulations Using Realistic Head of magnetoencephalographic MEG forward or in- verse simulations in realistic head models. We verify the accu- racy of our, in an inhomoge- neous, nonspherical realistic head model, the magnetic field normal to the MEG detector due

Utah, University of

240

Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Double-ring network model of the head-direction system Xiaohui Xie,1, * Richard H. R. Hahnloser,1,2 and H. Sebastian Seung1,2 1 Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute 2002; published 9 October 2002 In the head-direction system, the orientation of an animal's head

Xie, Xiaohui Sunney

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Bay Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.0717828°, -74.0543036° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0717828,"lon":-74.0543036,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

242

Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-8-80 -8-80 Vol. 45 No. 175 Pages 59135-59296 e Monday September 8, 1980 Federal Register / Vol. 45, No. 175 Monday, September 8, 1980 / Notices 59189 - -- COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies August 20,1980. The Council on Environmental Quality is publishing three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies. The first memorandum, dated August 11,1980, on Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supe asedes the Council's previous memorandum on this subject of August 1970. The second memorandum, dated August 11,1980, requests information on agency agriculatural land policies and

243

Indian Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7703092°, -87.9022808° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7703092,"lon":-87.9022808,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.082303°, -69.0572612° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.082303,"lon":-69.0572612,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

245

MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brough Head Wave Farm Brough Head Wave Farm < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":59.081,"lon":-3.359,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Bear Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.7638457°, -92.1265023° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.7638457,"lon":-92.1265023,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

New Theory Head to join PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Returning to his Princeton roots: Returning to his Princeton roots: New Theory Head to join PPPL By John Greenwald August 27, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Amitava Bhattacharjee. (Photo by Kristi Donahue, University of New Hampshire Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space) Amitava Bhattacharjee. Physicist Amitava Bhattacharjee is returning to his academic roots. He arrives as the new head of the Theory Department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) on August 27, more than 30 years after completing his doctoral work here. He studied at PPPL from 1977 to 1980 while earning his M. A. and Ph.D. in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University, which runs the Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). His past came flooding back to Bhattacharjee when he gave a talk at PPPL in

248

Development of Power-head based Fan Airflow Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of Power-head Based Fan Airflow Station Gang Wang Research associate University of Nebraska, Lincoln Mingsheng Liu Professor University of Nebraska, Lincoln Abstract Fan airflow measurement is critical for heating... under partial loads. On the other hand, in most of airflow range, the power curve varies exquisitely. Wang and Liu developed the VFD airflow station to obtain the fan airflow using the power and speed based on the power curve. Both the fan...

Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

F A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D Barbara Price, PhD Gregory C. Richter, PhD Priscilla Riggle, PhD Linda Seidel, PhD Mary Shapiro, PhD GreggF A C U L T Y DIVISION HEAD Heinz D. Woehlk, PhD GRADUATE FACULTY Hena Ahmad, PhD Monica Barron, Ph Minch, PhD David Partenheimer, PhD Barry C. Poyner, PhD Alanna Preussner, PhD Arnold Preussner, Ph

Gering, Jon C.

250

Intelligent head-down display design for the smart cockpit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overload has become a highly important area of research. One such research program exists at Texas A&M University which deals extensively with the information overload problem through the concept of the "Smart Cue+it". This thesis follows the format of... be directly measured. These state variables include altitude, heading, indicated airspeed, pitch and roll attitude, and turn rate. One significantly beneficial component of the sensor suites is the Global Positioning System (GPS). By integrating GPS...

Branham, Paul Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

Parton showers as sources of energy-momentum deposition in the QGP and their implication for shockwave formation at RHIC and at the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive the distribution of energy and momentumtransmitted from a primary fast parton and its medium-induced bremsstrahlung gluons to a thermalized quark-gluon plasma. Our calculation takes into account the important and thus far neglected effects of quantum interference between the resulting color currents. We use our result to obtain the rate at which energy is absorbed by the medium as a function of time and find that the rate is modified by the quantum interference between the primary parton and secondary gluons. This Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal type interference persists for time scales relevant to heavy ion phenomenology. We further couple the newly derived source of energy and momentum deposition to linearized hydrodynamics to obtain the bulk medium response to realistic parton propagation and splitting in the quark-gluon plasma. We find that because of the characteristic large angle in-medium gluon emission and the multiple sources of energy deposition in a parton shower, formation of well defined Mach cones by energetic jets in heavy ion reactions is not likely.

Neufeld, Richard B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vitev, Ivan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Head–disk interface problems in first-surface near-field optical recording with flying optical head  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Near-field recording (NFR) technology using a flying optical head is applied for high density optical data storage. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film and PFPE lubricant film are coated on utmost NFR disk to reduce the tribological problems. A contamination at the head–disk interface (HDI), especially on a solid immersion lens (SIL) is observed. The contaminants are composed of dust materials from the surroundings and lubricant materials from a disk surface. The contaminants are supposed to be condensed by heat from a writing laser beam at the HDI. To avoid the contamination problem, a cover-layer is coated and a focal plane moved under the cover-layer from the HDI. First-surface near-field recording configuration can be modified by laminating a cover-layer, which enhances the possibility of a practical application with a media removability function.

Jin-Hong Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: IN GRID^,,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2,2011 2,2011 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: IN GRID^,, DIRECT SUBJECT: Working Effectively with Contractors The Department of Energy (DOE) depends on contractors to provide vital support in achieving our mission. Their contributions are critical t o accomplishing our goals in such important areas as energy research and development, weapons production, stockpile management, and environmental remediation and restoration. Although contractors are integral to our mission accomplishment, we must respect the roles we each have in contract performance. DOE defines deliverables and the contractors determine how to best perform the work. With rare exception, DOE officials should not direct contractors' selection or termination of employees. Giving

255

Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Supplement 23, Part 6, Section B. Subject Headings: J-Z, Parasite-Subject Headings and Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Department over other products not mentioned. SUBJECT HEADINGS 583 Japan Kagei, N., 1973, Snake, v. 5 (1-2), 141-150 macroscopic endoparasites of snakes recorded in Japan Japan Kamiya, H.; et al., 19 73, Japan. J. Vet. Re- search, v. 21 (3), 51... African Med. J., v. 55 (il), 402 [Letter] amoebic liver abscess in patients presenting with jaundice or raised serum bilirubin, suggestions for management Jaundice Hirsch, R. P., 1979, Internat. J. Parasitol., v. 9 (5), 395-399 Histomonas...

Hood, Martha W.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A study on the directional sensitivity of intracranial responses following head impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the present study was to investigate the directional sensitivity of intracranial responses following head impact using a validated mid-sized finite element model of Chinese human head. An impact force was applied to different locations of the model with deformable skull and rigid skull, respectively, under the same boundary conditions. Then a translational acceleration was applied to the rigid skull by keeping the same head position resulting in the same head injury criteria (HIC) as in the cases with impact force. The results showed that directional effect of head impact altered intracranial responses and injury patterns. Brain tissue at impact site was at high risk of contusion during vertical impact and corpus callosum was vulnerable to the impact at forehead when the head was impacted in a 45 degree angle. It was also found that this sensitivity contributed more by a rigid skull than a deformable one.

Wei Zhao; Shijie Ruan; Haiyan Li; Shihai Cui; Lijuan He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

In search of a new governing failure criterion for torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The failure criterion that governs the present design rules of formed heads in Section 8/Div. 2 of the ASME B and PV Code limits crown displacement upon a single application of pressure, and it does so by means of a calculated collapse pressure. One problem with the rules is that they require greater head thicknesses than those of Section 8/Div. 1. Another problem is that recent test data taken for two formed heads have shown no signs of head displacements or deformations that could have rendered the heads unserviceable at pressures substantially higher than the calculated collapse pressures. Any link between the calculated collapse pressures and the failures of the test heads could not be established. The main thesis proposed in the paper is that such a link does not exist for torispherical heads in general. The reason for this is investigated theoretically and attributed to the geometric strengthening of heads, as they deform. It is recommended that the reasons for limiting displacements or deformations for a single application of pressure be reviewed and, if needed, a new failure criterion defined, or other failure modes, such as tensile plastic instability (burst), be considered. The latter mode is described and options for its evaluation are presented in this paper. The protection of torispherical heads against the failure modes of low-cycle fatigue and incremental plastic growth upon cyclic loading, which are controlled by shakedown, is not covered in this paper but is left to future investigations.

Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Treating radiation-induced trismus in head and neck cancer;Exercise intervention and risk structures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Abstract The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the incidence of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) and to assess the treatment… (more)

Pauli, Nina

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Specification for the Reattachment of the EC South Cryostat Heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Note defines technical requirements and the scope of work for reattachment of the heads of the South EC cryostat. This work is to be done in the clean room at the D-Zero Assembly Building (DAB) at Fermilab.and is expected to begin around September 15, 1991. The task consists primarily of welding four heads onto a 17-foot diameter stainless steel double-wall pressure/vacuum vessel. Nominal thicknesses of the welds are all 5/8-inch. Root passes are to be made by TIG welding and the balance by MIG welding. No radiography is required; other NDE per ASME Code, Section VIII, Div. 1. All work is to be done in accordance with the Rules of the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors (ANSI/NB-23), and repairs to the inner vessel are to be documented by the R-1 form executed by the Contractor's Authorized Inspector. The Contractor will be expected to work two shifts per day, five days per week to support the Fermilab schedule. Details of the cryostat are given on Fermilab Drawings 3740.220-ME-222256, Rev. R, 3740.224-ME-273071, and 3740.224-ME-273039. The cryostat was fabricated by Process Engineering, Inc. of Plaistow, NH in 1989-90. The heads were removed using hand-held air-arc gouging equipment. As a result the welding grooves are not straight and their widths are not uniform. In some places the width maybe as wide as 1-inch. For the purposes of quotation, the Contractor should assume a uniform weld groove as shown in Figure 1. The amount of weld metal to be deposited for this geometry is estimated to be 500 lbs. Upon completion, the final contract price will be determined by the following formula: Final Price = Contract Price x (lbs of weld metal deposited/500). Methods of determining the amount of weld metal deposited will be agreed upon before award of the contract.

Luther, R.; /Fermilab

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

MEMORANDUM TO HEADS O F CONTRACTING ACTIVITIES AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2010 2010 MEMORANDUM TO HEADS O F CONTRACTING ACTIVITIES AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS FROM: DIRECTOR OFFICE OF CONTRACT MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Establishment of Requirement for Monthly Status Reporting on Source Evaluation Boards (SEBs) Valued in Excess of $25 Million As everyone is aware, DOE accomplishes the majority of its work through its various contracts. In recent years, the Department has drawn increased scrutiny from a number of different sources. As a result, the procurement process receives a tremendous amount of visibility among senior DOE management, particularly our largest and most critical procurements which are conducted by SEBs. This highlights the critical need for SEB reporting and tracking. At the Procurement Directors meeting held in December 2009, it was mentioned during

263

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: TIMOTHY M. DIRKS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2001 8, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: TIMOTHY M. DIRKS DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: PREVENTIVE HEALTH SCREENINGS As you know, the Secretary recently issued a statement on Worknife Programs, specifically addressing the issues of telecommuting and preventive health measures; a copy of the statement, which was distributed via DOECAST, is attached to this memorandum. The statement provided that the Office of Management and Administration would issue guidelines in support of the new Secretarial policy which authorizes all Department of Energy Federal employees "up to 4 hours of excused absence each leave year in order to participate in preventive health screenings." The following responds to the Secretary's direction for guidelines and provides related information.

264

Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 7, 2009 October 7, 2009 M-10-02 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: Peter R. Orszag Director SUBJECT: Guidance on section 163 of the Continuing Resolution regarding the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) This memorandum provides guidance to Executive Branch agencies regarding the implementation of section 163 of the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2010, Division B of Pub. L. No. 111-68 (CR), which states: SEC. 163. None of the funds made available by this joint resolution or any prior Act may be provided to the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN), or any of its affiliates, subsidiaries, or allied organizations. Your agency must immediately commence all necessary and appropriate steps to comply with

265

Beard to lead Business, Operations Directorate; Girrens named head of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carl Beard new PADOPS Director Carl Beard new PADOPS Director Beard to lead Business, Operations Directorate; Girrens named head of Engineering Beard came to Los Alamos in 2006 to help lead the Stockpile Manufacturing and Support organization. May 4, 2011 Carl Beard Carl Beard Contact Steve Sandoval Communicatons Office (505) 665-9206 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 4, 2011-Carl Beard is the new principal associate director for Business and Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Beard succeeds Mike Mallory, who earlier this year announced his retirement. "Carl is a highly accomplished and versatile leader, managing a wide range of scientific and manufacturing operations," Laboratory Director Michael Anastasio said. "At Los Alamos and elsewhere, Carl's teams have improved productivity and safely executed programs," he said, noting that

266

LANL names new head of Plutonium Science and Manufacturing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jeff Yarbrough joins Los Alamos from B&W Pantex Jeff Yarbrough joins Los Alamos from B&W Pantex LANL names new head of Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Jeff Yarbrough joins Los Alamos from the B&W Pantex plant in Amarillo, Texas. March 2, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office

267

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership position will allow for greater integration in the planning and execution of the stockpile stewardship program. August 18, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

268

ESnet Update Steve Cotter, Dept Head Lawrence Berkeley National Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Update Update Steve Cotter, Dept Head Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Winter 2011 Joint Techs Clemson, SC Feb 2, 2011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science @ESnet: It's all about the Science * More bandwidth to DOE facilities and Labs at lower costs * Richer network services in support of distributed science - Develop 'network aware' integrated services that deliver 'end-to-end' high- performance data transfer, HPC/cloud computing, and science collaborative services * Carrier-class network operations providing high network availability to all DOE facilities - Seamless network interoperability across multiple network domains * Develop and deploy energy-aware and efficient networking infrastructure * Provide a networking research testbed for DOE community

269

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6,2010 6,2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS FROM: SUBJECT: PATRICK M. FERRARO ACTING DIRECTOR OFFICE OR PROCUREMEN ! f ASSISTANCE M JOSEPH WADDEL DIRECTOR r & OFFICE OF ACQU&ITION AND I SUPPLY MANAGEMENT (NA-63) NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change 2010-03 Chapter 3 Federal Acquisition Certification in Contracting (FAC-C) Level II The purpose of this memorandum is t o announce ACMP Change 2010-03. This change amends the experience requirement for FAC-C Level II certification as currently stated in Chapter 3 o f the January 2009, revision of the Department's Acquisition Career Management Program Handbook (ref: Policy Flash 2009-17). In order for the Department of Energy (DOE) t

270

Bauer named Facilities, Infrastructure and Services head | Y-12 National  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bauer named Facilities, ... Bauer named Facilities, ... Bauer named Facilities, Infrastructure and Services head Posted: August 27, 2012 - 1:01pm B&W Y-12 President and General Manager Chuck Spencer has named Linda Bauer as vice president of Facilities, Infrastructure and Services (FI&S). Bauer most recently served as senior vice president with Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc. helping direct large-scale government and private endeavors, such as the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration Project and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Project. Linda Bauer, vice president of Facilities, Infrastructure and Services With 24 years of experience, she also has held positions such as senior operations manager for the Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group and multiple management roles at BWXT Savannah River Company.

271

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS OTHER THAN THE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2013 , 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS OTHER THAN THE NA TI ON AL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: SUBJECT: ROBERT C. GIBBS ~Mb CHIEF HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER W AIYER OF THE BI-WEEKLY PAY LIMITATION FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE ACTIVITIES This memorandum replaces: 1) the January 31, 2002, memorandum from Timothy M. Dirks, (former) Director of Human Resources Management, subject: Waiver of Bi-Weekly Premium Pay Limitation, pertaining to "emergency work in connection with the continuing and immediate threat of further attacks on the United States;" 2) the April 25, 2003, memorandum from Claudia A. Cross, (former) Acting Director of Human Resources Management and Michael C. Kane, (former) Deputy Associate Administrator for Management & Administration, NNSA, subject: Waiver of Bi-Weekly

272

Tribo-chemistry at the head/disk interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tribo-chemical studies at the head/disk interface (HDI) were conducted on hydrogenated (CH{sub x}), nitrogenated (CN{sub x}), and cathodic-arc amorphous hard carbon disk samples coated with perfluoropolyether ZDOL and X1P/ZDOL lubricant. The studies involved drag tests with uncoated and carbon-coated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiC sliders and thermal desorption experiments in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) tribochamber followed with a surface chemistry analysis by X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The friction and catalytic decomposition mechanisms of ZDOL are described, as well as the tribo-chemical performance of cathodic-arc carbon overcoats coated with ZDOL, and data demonstrating the chemical alteration of the lubricant and carbon overcoat are also presented.

Bhatia, C.S. [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States)] [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States); Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Wei, J.; Bogy, D.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Mechanics Lab.] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Mechanics Lab.; Anders, S.; Stammler, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States)] [IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Systematic dental management in head and neck irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preservation of teeth has been possible in 528 head and neck patients treated with irradiation at Centre Georges Leclerc, University of Dijon, by careful adherence to precise dental care. Careful initial dental evaluation with appropriate x rays, restoration of oral hygiene, atraumatic extraction technique where indicated, and institution of a program of topical fluoridation has resulted in an overall incidence of less than 3% post-irradiation dental decay and 2% osteoradionecrosis. In a small group of 22 patient who required extraction post-irradiation, precise, strict technique resulted in successful extraction in all but one patient who subsequently developed osteonecrosis. Soft-based dental prostheses were well tolerated in nearly 90% of patients. Adherence to the described principles of dental care will virtually eliminate post-irradiation decay and osteoradionecrosis.

Horiot, J.C. (Centre Georges Leclerc, Dijon, France); Bone, M.C.; Ibrahim, E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Bailer for top head drive rotary well drills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bailer mounted to the derrick of a top head drive well drilling rig is described. The bailer includes a winch line drum mounted by a bracket to the derrick. A positive displacement hydraulic motor mounts one end of the drum and receives fluid under pressure from the existing hydraulic pressure supply. Valving is provided to allow reverse operation of the motor so equipment can either be raised or lowered relative to the derrick. The hydraulic delivery line to the motor includes a one way restrictor that will allow relatively free passage of fluid to the motor in a driving or lifting mode but will reverse flow of fluid from the motor, thereby affording a braking effect for lowering a load at a selected rate.

Bartholomew, L.

1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 757 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering and Design 189 (1999) 7­57 Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads T Engineering, Building 208, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass A6enue, Argonne, IL 60439, USA Received 24 August 1998; accepted 24 November 1998 Abstract Lower head integrity under steam explosion

Yuen, Walter W.

276

Head tilt during driving DANIEL C. ZIKOVITZ and LAURENCE R. HARRIS *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Head tilt during driving DANIEL C. ZIKOVITZ ² and LAURENCE R. HARRIS² * Departments of ² Biology and Psychology, York University, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada Keywords: Driving behaviour; Head tilt; Vision with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r 2 = 0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r

Harris, Laurence R.

277

Journees Automates Cellulaires 2008 (Uz`es), pp. 54-64 SOFIC ONE HEAD MACHINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journ´ees Automates Cellulaires 2008 (Uz`es), pp. 54-64 SOFIC ONE HEAD MACHINES A. GAJARDO-dimensional Turing machines with only one head is adopted. A subshift is associated to each Turing machine, and its properties are studied. The subshift consists in the set of sequences of symbols that the machine reads

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

278

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans Amelia M. Arbisser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M. Arbisser B.S., Computer Science of Engineering Thesis Committee #12;2 #12;Multi-atlas Segmentation in Head and Neck CT Scans by Amelia M, we employ an atlas of labeled training images. We register each of these images to the unlabeled

Golland, Polina

279

The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Point Spread Function of the Human Head and its Implications for Transcranial Current distribution in the head resulting from the application of scalp currents. Derivation of forward models has represented a major effort in brain stimulation research, with model complexity ranging from spherical shells

Parra, Lucas C.

280

PS3060: Perception and Action (L.3) Driving a vehicle: control of heading,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PS3060: Perception and Action (L.3) Driving a vehicle: control of heading, collision avoidance 11, 12 of Bruce, Green & Georgeson 2003) · the ecological approach to vision: from insects to humans · collision: judging time to impact, braking a vehicle · heading: how you know in which direction you

Zanker, Johannes M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rat anterodorsal thalamic head direction neurons depend upon dynamic visual signals to select anchoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rat anterodorsal thalamic head direction neurons depend upon dynamic visual signals to select., 21, RC154,1­5]. Anterodorsal thalamic head direction cells were recorded while the rat foraged vantage point and separated by 90°. The rat was then disoriented in darkness, the cards were rotated by 90

Arleo, Angelo

282

Phenomenology with unintegrated parton showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a backward evolution Monte Carlo algorithm implementation of the CCFM equation and present latest developments in phenomenology of hadron-hadron collisions for the Monte Carlo generator Cascade.

Michal Deak

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

Dalhousie Peninsula Campuses Shower Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University's Office of Sustainability #12;buildings that used to be residential, a verbal account · Dalhousie University's Office of Sustainability #12;Building Unit Floor Room Number (NEAR) Male (M)/ Femal e of End-of-Trip Facilities Caroline King & Raleigh King Dalhousie University · Office of Sustainability

Brownstone, Rob

284

Dalhousie Peninsula Campuses Shower Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University's Office of Sustainability #12;buildings that used to be residential, a verbal account of Sustainability #12;Building Unit Floor Room Number (NEAR) Male (M)/ Femal e (F)/ BOTH Type (Private (Y OR N of End-of-Trip Facilities Caroline King & Raleigh King Dalhousie University · Office of Sustainability

Brownstone, Rob

285

Fruit and Vegetable Servings in Local Farm-Sourced and Standard Lunches Offered to Children in a Head Start Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project compared servings of fruits and vegetables consumed in farm-to-school lunches to that in conventional lunches served to students attending a Head Start preschool. The sample used was the student population of a Head Start preschool...

Johnson, Amy M.

2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

TORE SUPRA : Physics, Technology and ...Strategy - Andre GROSMAN - Deputy Head of Magnetic Fusion Research Institute (CEA/DSM/IRFM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TORE SUPRA : Physics, Technology and ...Strategy - Andre GROSMAN - Deputy Head of Magnetic Fusion Research Institute (CEA/DSM/IRFM)

CERN. Geneva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 41, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1996 I073 Combinedl Head and Eye Tracking System for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

range of head motion, mainly low-frequency, yaw rotation. An integrated eye-head tracking system and Eye Tracking System for Dynamilc Testing of the Vestibular System Robert S. Allison,* Moshe Eizenman, and Bob S. K. Cheung Abstruct- We present a comlbined head-eye tracking system suitable for use with free

Allison, Robert

288

The nerve supply to the major organs and tissues of the caprine head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE NERVE SUPPIJF TO THE MAJOR ORGANS AND TISSUES OF 1'i E CAPRINE HEAD A Thesis by M ICHA EL EDWARD TATUM Submitted to the Graduate Co11ege of the Texas A I: M University in partial fulf illment, of the requirements for the d gr e of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1959 Majov Subjort: Veterinary Anatomy THE NERVE SUPPLY TO THE MAJOR ORGANS AND TISSUES OF THE CAPRINE HEAD A Thesis by MICHAEL EDWARD TATUM Approved as to style and content by: airman of Commit (Member) {Head q' ' Depar tment Qiien...

Tatum, Michael Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

State of the art for nanospacing flying head slider mechanisms in magnetic recording disk storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports results obtained from studies on important and critical issues related to nanospacing head-disk interface (HDI) development, which has to be achieved in high density (Gb in?2) magnetic recording. The new concepts for flying head slider mechanisms and novel non-contact start-stop systems are also reviewed. It is essential to understand the nanospacing HDI phenomena and to develop new breakthrough technology for head mechanisms and start-stop systems. These issues can be settled through the integration of micromechatronics and microtribology.

N. Tagawa

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Use of dental X rays on postirradiated patients with head and neck cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As cancer therapy becomes more successful and cancer survival rates increase, the dentist will be treating more patients who have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Occasionally, patients and health professionals have indicated a belief that patients who have received irradiation to the head and neck regions should not be subjected to additional radiation through dental diagnostic X-ray exposures. A literature search failed to find any references that specifically addressed this question. This study reflects the opinions of 278 radiation oncologists (400 surveyed) who responded to questions about contraindications of dental X rays for the patient with head and neck cancer.

Jones, G.A.; Purdy, R.B.; Stoker, H.W.; Palmer RW 4

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Improved Combustion of Asphaltite Coals in a Rotating Head Combustor with Various Air Supply Arrangements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small amount of ash is drifted via combustion gas in fine particles while great deal of it flow into the ash pit in the form of clinker from the open side of combustion head. ... In this study, it was shown that the swelling coals that were difficult to burn in conventional stokers could be burned using a rotating head combustor in high efficiencies without any ash problem. ... In this work, a rotating head combustor, which has been designed for burning the coking coals effectively, was deployed to burn a range of coals available in Turkey under agitation conditions with secondary air delivery. ...

Cengiz Öner; ?ehmus Altun

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

292

45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of 45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies 45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies The Council on Environmental Quality is publishing three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies. The first memorandum, dated August 11,1980, on Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supersedes the Council's previous memorandum on this subject of August 1970. The second memorandum, dated August 11,1980, requests information on agency agriculatural land policies and other information related to the implementation of the first memorandum. The third memorandum, dated August 20,1980, on Interagency Consultation to

293

Jeff Broughton Brings 30 Years of HPC Experience to NERSC as New Head of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jeff Broughton Brings Jeff Broughton Brings 30 Years of HPC Experience to NERSC as New Head of Systems Department Jeff Broughton Brings 30 Years of HPC Experience to NERSC as New Head of Systems Department July 31, 2009 Jeffrey M. Broughton, who has 30 years of HPC and management experience, has accepted the position of Systems Department Head at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). Broughton, who most recently served as senior director of engineering at QLogic Corp., joins NERSC on Monday, August 3. "I'm very pleased to announce that Jeff Broughton has accepted the position of Systems Department Head at NERSC," said Kathy Yelick, NERSC Director. "This is a key position for us, and Jeff will be responsible

294

SFU Psychology Department 1 Running head: SFU: APA STYLE FOR PAPERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SFU Psychology Department 1 Running head: SFU: APA STYLE FOR PAPERS SFU Psychology Department: American Psychological Association Style for Undergraduate Papers Joan Wolfe Simon Fraser University Student number, PSYC ###; section #.##, TA's name, instructor's name, due date. #12;SFU Psychology

295

Head Rotational Acceleration Characteristics Influence Behavioral and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Outcomes Following Concussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A majority of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in motor vehicle crashes ... and caused by high-rate acceleration of the head. For injuries caused by rotational acceleration, ... Ninety-two Sprague–Dawley rats were ...

Brian D. Stemper; Alok S. Shah; Frank A. Pintar…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced head-and-neck cancer Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cancer Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced head-and-neck cancer Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Patient geometry-driven...

297

Running head: COGNITIVE ROBOTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Computational Modeling/Cognitive Robotics Compliments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running head: COGNITIVE ROBOTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Computational Modeling/Cognitive;Cognitive Robotics and Experimental Psychology 2 Abstract This position paper explores the possible contributions to the science of psychology from insights obtained by building and experimenting with cognitive

Memphis, University of

298

An optical see-through head mounted display with addressable focal planes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most existing stereoscopic head mounted displays (HMDs), presenting a pair of stereoscopic images at a fixed focal distance, lack the ability to correctly render the naturally coupled accommodation and convergence cues. Psychophysical studies have shown ...

Sheng Liu; Dewen Cheng; Hong Hua

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Thickness Change in Molecularly Thin Lubricant Under Flying Head in Hard Disk Drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In hard disk drives (HDDs), lubricants on disks are very important material to reduce head and disk wear. Thus, it is necessary to ... thickness to keep lubricant thickness constant on rotating disks. For this pu...

K. Yanagisawa; T. Watanabe; Y. Kawakubo; M. Yoshino

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Active-head sliders using piezoelectric thin films for flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes design and fabrication of a MEMS-based active-head slider using a PZT thin film for flying height control in hard disk drives. A piezoelectric cantilever integrated in the ... air bearing sli...

Kenji Suzuki; Takayuki Akimatsu; Kenji Sasaki; Masayuki Kurita

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Characterization of light contact in head disk interface with dynamic flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the light contact in a head disk interface with dynamic flying height control. The touchdown test is conducted for a dynamic flying height control slider and the response i...

Jianfeng Xu; Gang Sheng

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of an optical flying head for a next-generation magneto-optical recording system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed an optical flying head (OFH) comprising a thin-film ... numerical aperture lens for magneto-optical (MO) disk drives. Experiments have shown successful writing and...

Goroh Kawasaki; Tsuyoshi Matsumoto; Nobuyuki Kanto…

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Shakedown and stress range of torispherical heads under cyclic internal pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two effects on shakedown of torispherical heads are addressed in this paper: (1) changing geometry, and (2) initial pressurization, such as by a hydro (or proof) test. Shakedown and the cycled stress intensity range are calculated for two head geometries, having diameter-to-thickness ratios of 238 and 192. The calculations are carried out following two approaches: (1) using a nonlinear, elastic-plastic algorithm that accounts for changes in geometry, and (2) using elastic stresses in the undeformed geometry, which is the commonly used approach. The results show that, when the two geometries are subjected to the same initial and cyclic pressures, shakedown is achieved by the first approach but not by the second. Since real heads do benefit from geometry changes, and since most design codes require hydro (or proof) tests before operation, the first approach is recommended for the design of torispherical heads.

Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Evolution of Mesoscale Precipitation Band Environments within the Comma Head of Northeast U.S. Cyclones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the mesoscale forcing and stability evolution of intense precipitation bands in the comma head sector of extratropical cyclones using the 32-km North American Regional Reanalysis, hourly 20-km Rapid Update Cycle analyses, and ...

David R. Novak; Brian A. Colle; Anantha R. Aiyyer

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Bunker View: Limited-range head-motion-parallax visualization for complex data sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bunker View: Limited-range head-motion-parallax visualization for complex data sets Andrei State tracking. #12;3. THE BUNKER VIEW SYSTEM We propose to use image precomputation to avoid high lag and low

State, Andrei

306

The Health Component of Head Start: Potential Impacts on Childhood Obesity, Immunizations, and Dental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Head Start, an early intervention program administered by the Administration for Children and Families of the Department of Health and Human Services, offers children of low-income families comprehensive services in an effort to even the playing...

Banda, Tanya Y.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed...

Jones, Scott Laurence

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Application of the cumulative risk model in predicting school readiness in Head Start children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates the degree to which the cumulative risk index predicted school readiness in a Head Start population. In general, the reviewed studies indicated the cumulative risk model was efficacious in predicting adverse developmental...

Rodriguez-Escobar, Olga Lydia

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Running head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 2009. This paper researches the possibility of using geothermal energy as an alternative energy Energy Investment cost .................................................... 40 Geothermal use in AlaskaRunning head: GEOTHERMAL POWER PRODUCTION 1 Geothermal Power Production for Emmonak, Alaska Anthony

Scheel, David

310

Going Global Inspired by passion and driven by research, Western Heads East (WHE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Going Global Inspired by passion and driven by research, Western Heads East (WHE) is an innovative an important difference in the remediation of diarrhea ­ a condition that kills a child every 12 seconds

Denham, Graham

311

Simulations of coherent beam-beam effects with head-on compensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron lenses are under construction for installation in RHIC in order to mitigate the head-on beam-beam effects. This would allow operation with higher bunch intensity and result in a significant increase in luminosity. We report on recent strong-strong simulations and experiments that were carried out using the RHIC upgrade parameters to assess the impact of coherent beam-beam effects in the presence of head-on compensation.

White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo. Y.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

CX-008425: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008425: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-City-Jacksonville CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/16/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation plan; 2) hire Energy Conservation Officer; 3) energy efficiency retrofits in public buildings; 4) purchase and install energy management system; 5) education and outreach programs for city residents; 6) purchase and distribute low-flow shower heads, bath tub aerators, and sink/spray controls for kitchen sinks; and 7) purchase and distribute rolling recycle carts. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form More Documents & Publications

313

CX-006106: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006106: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-West Covina CX(s) Applied: B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/11/2011 Location(s): West Covina, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Replace lamps and lights, 2) replace heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) in city buildings, 3) replace traffic signal lamps, 4) install solar film on windows at City Hall, and 5) HVAC equipment replacement, water heating improvements, lighting improvements, low flow shower head replacements, occupancy sensor installation, and pipe insulation on West Covina identified city buildings. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006106.pdf More Documents & Publications

314

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County September 15, 2010 - 5:18pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Officials of PEEP, the Pinellas Energy Efficiency Project, will start handing out energy kits-filled with CFLs, weather stripping, low-flow shower heads and window insulators-over the next few months to residents who attend special classes. Residents in Pinellas County, Fla., will soon receive the gift that keeps on giving. It's pretty straightforward: come to one of the classes, learn how to cut energy use and save money - and leave with the materials to make that happen. "It's more of a holistic approach," says James Stevenson, a conservation

315

Grants | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 15, 2010 September 15, 2010 Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Officials of PEEP, the Pinellas Energy Efficiency Project, will start handing out energy kits-filled with CFLs, weather stripping, low-flow shower heads and window insulators-over the next few months to residents who attend special classes. It's pretty straightforward: come to one of the classes, learn how to cut energy use and save money - and leave with the materials to make that happen. September 15, 2010 A Boost for Small Business Phase III Xlerator awards go out to 33 small businesses in 16 states to make clean energy technology a commercial reality. September 15, 2010 A vacant grocery store was converted into The Elkin Center, a workforce training center in Elkin, N.C. | Courtesy of Joe Seipel-Parks, West Depot Architecture

316

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

West Covina West Covina Location: City West Covina CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Replace lamps and lights, 2) replace HVAC in city buildings, 3) replace traffic signal lamps, 4) install solar film on windows at City Hall, and 5) HVAC equipment replacement, water heating improvements, lighting improvements, low flow shower head replacements, occupancy sensor installation, and pipe insulation on West Covina identified city buildings. Conditions: None-must meet requirements as stated in Programmatic Agreement document Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

317

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County September 15, 2010 - 5:18pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Officials of PEEP, the Pinellas Energy Efficiency Project, will start handing out energy kits-filled with CFLs, weather stripping, low-flow shower heads and window insulators-over the next few months to residents who attend special classes. Residents in Pinellas County, Fla., will soon receive the gift that keeps on giving. It's pretty straightforward: come to one of the classes, learn how to cut energy use and save money - and leave with the materials to make that happen. "It's more of a holistic approach," says James Stevenson, a conservation

318

CX-006017: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6017: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6017: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006017: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program - Louisiana-City-Kenner CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 05/23/2011 Location(s): Kenner, Louisiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Use consultant to help develop energy efficiency (EE) and conservation strategy; 2) perform residential energy audits and direct install of low-cost EE measures which includes compact fluorescent lights, hot water heater wraps, pipe insulation, low-flow shower heads, weather stripping, and caulking; 3) install remote lighting control system and remote monitoring at Sports Field; and 4) install solar shades on windows of Public Works Building

319

Head/tail Breaks for Visualization of City Structure and Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The things surrounding us vary dramatically, which implies that there are far more small things than large ones, e.g., far more small cities than large ones in the world. This dramatic variation is often referred to as fractal or scaling. To better reveal the fractal or scaling structure, a new classification scheme, namely head/tail breaks, has been developed to recursively derive different classes or hierarchical levels. The head/tail breaks works as such: divide things into a few large ones in the head (those above the average) and many small ones (those below the average) in the tail, and recursively continue the dividing process for the large ones (or the head) until the notion of far more small things than large ones has been violated. This paper attempts to argue that head/tail breaks can be a powerful visualization tool for illustrating structure and dynamics of natural cities. Natural cities refer to naturally or objectively defined human settlements based on a meaningful cutoff averaged from a massi...

Jiang, Bin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? September 1, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell Hurricane Earl has the East Coast of the United States in his sights. Earl is moving northward from the Bahamas, and is expected to skirt the U.S. Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to New England, before making landfall in Nova Scotia over the Labor Day weekend. But hurricane paths are uncertain, so we'll have to wait and see where Earl actually ends up. In any event, what does this have to do with energy? Hurricanes can disrupt energy supplies and markets. In addition to the potential for electricity outages, hurricanes can affect offshore oil and gas production, petroleum

322

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

323

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? September 1, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell Hurricane Earl has the East Coast of the United States in his sights. Earl is moving northward from the Bahamas, and is expected to skirt the U.S. Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to New England, before making landfall in Nova Scotia over the Labor Day weekend. But hurricane paths are uncertain, so we'll have to wait and see where Earl actually ends up. In any event, what does this have to do with energy? Hurricanes can disrupt energy supplies and markets. In addition to the potential for electricity outages, hurricanes can affect offshore oil and gas production, petroleum

324

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

325

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus April 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga will provide an overview of EM's proposed fiscal year 2014 budget Thursday in the first of six briefings for the 19th annual U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus. Huizenga rolled out the $5.622 billion budget request earlier this month. The proposal, which requires approval by Congress, enables EM progress in all areas of the nuclear cleanup program while maintaining safety and compliance across the complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. "These briefings provide valuable insight and help educate my colleagues

326

Energy Secretary Bodman Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Bill |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Bill Energy Secretary Bodman Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Bill July 7, 2005 - 2:00pm Addthis Secretary Promotes Energizing America for Energy Security BELLE, WV - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today traveled to West Virginia to urge the Congress to pass comprehensive energy legislation that is now before them. The bill reflects many of the principles of President Bush's national energy policy including the diversification of America's energy supply to include more alternative and renewable sources; encouraging energy efficiency and conservation; promoting more domestic production in environmentally responsible ways; and modernizing our electricity delivery system to minimize the risk of blackouts. President

327

103 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, 3 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. 103 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. April 23, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC- Students from 67 high school teams and 36 middle school teams from across the nation will compete next weekend for championship titles in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl in Washington D.C. The National Science Bowl is the nation's largest academic competition of its kind and the only one sponsored by a federal agency. The National Finals will be held from May 2 through May 4. Each of the participating teams emerged from a regional competition to earn an all-expense-paid trip to the event. The participating teams represent 42 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto

328

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

329

Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat November 10, 2009 - 7:17pm Addthis Mark Morris inspects a furnace. | File photo Mark Morris inspects a furnace. | File photo Joshua DeLung Getting laid off wasn't the only thing putting Americans in a pickle when the recession hit. Mark Morris of South Bend, Ind., is among many in the country who were already retired, but whose 401(k) account took a big hit when the stock market crashed. Mark had retired as a utility-company supervisor in mid-2007, but he lost 40 percent of his retirement money and knew he had to go back to work. So Mark made what he could by working part-time gigs until he heard about a job in September with a local community action agency where he would

330

Head model and electrical source imaging: A study of 38 epileptic patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electrical source imaging (ESI) aims at reconstructing the electrical brain activity from scalp EEG. When applied to interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), this technique is of great use for identifying the irritative zone in focal epilepsies. Inaccuracies in the modeling of electro-magnetic field propagation in the head (forward model) may strongly influence ESI and lead to mislocalization of IED generators. However, a systematic study on the influence of the selected head model on the localization precision of IED in a large number of patients with known focus localization has not yet been performed. We here present such a performance evaluation of different head models in a dataset of 38 epileptic patients who have undergone high-density scalp EEG, intracranial EEG and, for the majority, subsequent surgery. We compared ESI accuracy resulting from three head models: a Locally Spherical Model with Anatomical Constraints (LSMAC), a Boundary Element Model (BEM) and a Finite Element Model (FEM). All of them were computed from the individual MRI of the patient and ESI was performed on averaged IED. We found that all head models provided very similar source locations. In patients having a positive post-operative outcome, at least 74% of the source maxima were within the resection. The median distance from the source maximum to the nearest intracranial electrode showing IED was 13.2, 15.6 and 15.6 mm for LSMAC, BEM and FEM, respectively. The study demonstrates that in clinical applications, the use of highly sophisticated and difficult to implement head models is not a crucial factor for an accurate ESI.

Gwénael Birot; Laurent Spinelli; Serge Vulliémoz; Pierre Mégevand; Denis Brunet; Margitta Seeck; Christoph M. Michel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Methods for characterizing magnetic footprints of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the magnetic footprints, along with some of its dynamic features in recording process, of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads have been characterized by using three different techniques. Those techniques are the spin-stand stationary footprint technique, the spin-stand dynamic footprint technique, and the coherent writing technique combined with magnetic force microscope imaging method. The characteristics of those techniques have been compared to one another. It was found experimentally that the spin-stand stationary method could not precisely catch some peculiar recording dynamics of the write heads in certain conditions. The advantages and disadvantages among all those techniques are also examined and discussed in detail.

Li, Shaoping, E-mail: shaoping.li@wdc.com; Lin, Ed; George, Zach; Terrill, Dave; Mendez, H.; Santucci, J.; Yie, Derek [Western Digital Corp., 44100 Osgood Road, Fremont, California 94539 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Epidemiology of Blunt Head Trauma in Children in U.S. Emergency Departments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To the Editor: Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of death and disabilities in children older than 1 year of age. Detailed data about head trauma in children are needed to better understand the rates and unique age-related risks of injury. We examined the characteristics of children with blunt... Among more than 43,000 children treated in 25 emergency departments for blunt head trauma, traumatic brain injury was identified on CT scan in 7% of the patients. Falls were the most frequent injury mechanism for children under the age of 12 years.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Methyl mercaptan and dimethyl disulfide production from methionine by Proteus species detected by head-space gas-liquid chromatography.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spectra with a reference library file (8). This identification...neither pure sam- ple nor library spectrum was available...comparison of head- space sampling with direct...Shigella Centre, Central Public Health Laboratory, London...chromatographic analysis of head-space gas of dilute aqueous...

N J Hayward; T H Jeavons; A J Nicholson; A G Thornton

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

GNEP Coupled End-to-End Demonstration Project Head-End Processing and Tritium Removal Using Voloxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of operating parameters on removal of volatile fission and activation products. In addition, data fromGNEP Coupled End-to-End Demonstration Project Head-End Processing and Tritium Removal Using fuel per year). The head-end processing segment includes single-pin shearing, voloxidation to remove

Pennycook, Steve

336

POLICIES AND PROCESSES FOR THE APPROVAL OF OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR Departmental Head Advisor Approved Petitions and Forms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advisor Approved Petitions and Forms The College of Agricultural Sciences distributes approval for the following Office of the Registrar petitions and forms to the departmental head advisors, only. Please note that some forms contain sections requiring college head advisor approval, and some have time limitations

Tullos, Desiree

337

A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

339 A SMALL PORTABLE DETECTOR HEAD USING MIS-CONTACTED CdTe FOR X-RAY SPECTROMETRY P. EICHINGER for semiconductor radiation detectors is discussed. A versatile head consisting of a 2 mm thick, 10 mm diameter CdTe and its applica- tion to CdTe and CdS has already been published [2, 3], but because of the many

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Influence of tissue conductivity anisotropy on EEG/MEG field and return current computation in a realistic head model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brain using potential differences and/or magnetic fluxes measured non- invasively directly from the head in a realistic head model: A simulation and visualization study using high-resolution finite element modeling C 3493, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA c Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Utah, University of

339

Measurements on 5:1 Scale Abrasive Water Jet Cutting Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nozzle orifice s Isentropic (e.g. in w.jet.s) w.jet Water jet water Water Superscripts: * Symbol for non, an achievable accuracy also mentioned by Hashish in [7]. Improving the AWJ cutting process in a way that parts with precise accuracy of motion, a precisely manufactured tool (cutting head) and optimally set machining

340

PHENOLOGY AND BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD PARASITISM B.A., University of Colorado, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHENOLOGY AND BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD PARASITISM by TY TUFF B.A., University of Colorado, 2003 A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Colorado in partial, to evaluate the impact of parasitism on two local hosts in the Colorado Front Range: the primary host

Hammerton, James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Professor Veronica HoPe Hailey Dean & Head of the School of Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professor Veronica HoPe Hailey Dean & Head of the School of Management In attendance V eronica's research focuses on the link between Business Strategy, HR Strategy and Change Management. She is particularly interested in the relationship between organisational change and individual transition. She

Burton, Geoffrey R.

342

Magnetic Injection of Nanoparticles into Rat Inner Ears at a Human Head Working Distance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

t57 1 Magnetic Injection of Nanoparticles into Rat Inner Ears at a Human Head Working Distance: azeem@umd.edu Due to the physics of magnetic fields and forces, any single magnet will always attract or pull-in magnetically-responsive particles. However, there are a variety of clinical needs where

Shapiro, Benjamin

343

OSU Council of Head Advisors Spring 2006 OSU Advisor-Advisee Responsibilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSU Council of Head Advisors ­ Spring 2006 OSU Advisor-Advisee Responsibilities As an advisee, you accurate and truthful information when being advised. Initiate a purposeful relationship with your advisor during advising sessions. Your advisor should: Develop a purposeful relationship with and be an advocate

Escher, Christine

344

Agricultural Biotechnology: What's all the fuss about? Marshall A. Martin,* Professor and Associate Head  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Biotechnology: What's all the fuss about? Marshall A. Martin,* Professor and Associate communities across this nation. Biotechnology is truly ubiquitous. Everyone is impacted directly or indirectly it mean for soci- ety? And, where are we headed? This article provides background on biotechnology

345

Leader Training Series Head + Heart + Hands + HealthNew Jersey 4-H  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personnel are carefully selected for their ability and maturity. 4-H camp is licensed by the New JerseyLeader Training Series Head + Heart + Hands + HealthNew Jersey 4-H The Lindley G. Cook 4-H Camp has in Stokes State Forest, in the northwestern part of the state. Operated by Rutgers Cooperative Extension

Goodman, Robert M.

346

Melodic cues to meter 1 Running Head: MELODIC CUES TO METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Melodic cues to meter 1 Running Head: MELODIC CUES TO METER The Role of Melodic and Temporal Cues in Perceiving Musical Meter Erin E. Hannon Cornell University Joel S. Snyder Cornell University Tuomas Eerola-569-4326 Tel: 905-828-5415 E-mail: eeh5@cornell.edu #12;Melodic cues to meter 2 Abstract A number of different

Ahmad, Sajjad

347

Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults' memory errors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults, 90089-0191. Phone: 213-740-6772. Email: barbersa@usc.edu #12;STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS 2 Abstract (144 words) Stereotype threat often incurs the cost of reducing the amount of information

Mather, Mara

348

Stereotype threat in sports 1 Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT AND ACHIEVEMENT GOALS IN SPORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stereotype threat in sports 1 Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT AND ACHIEVEMENT GOALS IN SPORTS Do Achievement Goals Mediate Stereotype Threat? An Investigation on Females' Soccer Performance Aïna Chalabaev Psycholoy 30 (2008) 143-158" #12;Stereotype threat in sports 2 Abstract This research investigated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

Effective scattering coefficient of the cerebral spinal fluid in adult head models for diffuse optical imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correct radiative transport equation (RTE); however, it is commonly assumed that scattering lengths must. Boas An efficient computation of the time-dependent forward solution for photon transport in a head of the brain. The diffusion approximation to photon transport is much faster to simulate than the physically

350

SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES Vice Chancellors, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads shall implement the safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES Vice Chancellors, Deans, Directors, and Department Heads shall implement the safety program in their areas of administrative responsibility and are responsible for the safety for the safety of the personnel under their supervision and will: · Train employees in the safe use of equipment

351

Running Head: Mental Health and Welfare Reform MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG SINGLE MOTHERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running Head: Mental Health and Welfare Reform MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG SINGLE MOTHERS Pennsylvania State University #12;Mental Health and Welfare Reform/2 MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG SINGLE outcomes. #12;Mental Health and Welfare Reform/3 INTRODUCTION The Personal Responsibility and Work

Shyy, Wei

352

Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract--- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo­ graphic (EEG) recordings is an ill­posed problem. Specifi­ cally

Utah, University of

353

Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Component Analysis For EEG Source Localization In Realistic Head Models Leonid Zhukov Abstract-- A pervasive problem in neuroscience is determining which regions of the brain are active, given within the brain from electroencephalo- graphic (EEG) recordings is an ill-posed problem. Specifi- cally

Utah, University of

354

Differential transcriptome profiles of heads from foragers: comparison between Apis mellifera ligustica and Apis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differential transcriptome profiles of heads from foragers: comparison between Apis mellifera ligustica and Apis cerana cerana Zhiguo LI 1 , Fang LIU 1 , Wenfeng LI 1 , Shaowu ZHANG 1,2 , Dong NIU 1 in ecology and biology between Apis cerana cerana and Apis mellifera ligustica, we first used the Illumina

355

Brain mass estimation by head circumference and body mass methods in neonatal glycaemic modelling and control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction Hyperglycaemia is a common complication of stress and prematurity in extremely low-birth-weight infants. Model-based insulin therapy protocols have the ability to safely improve glycaemic control for this group. Estimating non-insulin-mediated brain glucose uptake by the central nervous system in these models is typically done using population-based body weight models, which may not be ideal. Method A head circumference-based model that separately treats small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA) infants is compared to a body weight model in a retrospective analysis of 48 patients with a median birth weight of 750 g and median gestational age of 25 weeks. Estimated brain mass, model-based insulin sensitivity (SI) profiles, and projected glycaemic control outcomes are investigated. SGA infants (5) are also analyzed as a separate cohort. Results Across the entire cohort, estimated brain mass deviated by a median 10% between models, with a per-patient median difference in SI of 3.5%. For the SGA group, brain mass deviation was 42%, and per-patient SI deviation 13.7%. In virtual trials, 87–93% of recommended insulin rates were equal or slightly reduced (? head circumference method, while glycaemic control outcomes showed little change. Conclusion The results suggest that body weight methods are not as accurate as head circumference methods. Head circumference-based estimates may offer improved modelling accuracy and a small reduction in insulin administration, particularly for SGA infants.

Cameron Allan Gunn; Jennifer L. Dickson; Christopher G. Pretty; Jane M. Alsweiler; Adrienne Lynn; Geoffrey M. Shaw; J. Geoffrey Chase

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

M.K. Johnson et al. 1 Running Head: COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF MEMORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.K. Johnson et al. 1 Running Head: COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF MEMORY In Press. In R. F. Belli (Ed on Motivation, Vol. 58. The Cognitive Neuroscience of True and False Memories Marcia K. Johnson, Carol L. Raye, Karen J. Mitchell, & Elizabeth Ankudowich Yale University Send correspondence to: Marcia K. Johnson

Johnson, Marcia K.

357

Insights into Head Related Transfer Function: Spatial Dimensionality and Continuous Representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements are discrete by necessity, and secondly there is no standard HRTF spatial sam- pling theoryInsights into Head Related Transfer Function: Spatial Dimensionality and Continuous Representation, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australiaa) and Ramani Duraiswami Perceptual Interfaces

Abhayapala, Thushara D.

358

Insights into head-related transfer function: Spatial dimensionality and continuous representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by necessity, and second there is no standard HRTF spatial sampling theory to make HRTF measurement practicalInsights into head-related transfer function: Spatial dimensionality and continuous representation, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia Ramani Duraiswami Perceptual Interfaces

Zhang, Wen

359

To: Officers, Deans, Department Heads, and Department Administrators From: Diane Devlin, Purchasing Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To: Officers, Deans, Department Heads, and Department Administrators From: Diane Devlin, Purchasing BY THE PURCHASING OFFICE NO LATER THAN FRIDAY, MAY 16, 2014. Certain commodity items may require longer lead times for such items should be received by the purchasing office no later than MONDAY, MAY 5, 2014. ITEMS OR SERVICES

Dennett, Daniel

360

Running Head: PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 1 Toward a Phenomenology of Feelings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running Head: PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 1 Toward a Phenomenology of Feelings Christopher L. Heavey 455030, Las Vegas, NV 89154- 5030. E-mail: chris.heavey@unlv.edu #12;PHENOMENOLOGY OF FEELINGS 2 Abstract present a preliminary phenomenology of feelings. We begin by observing that often feelings do occur

Ahmad, Sajjad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Event Understanding and Memory 1 Running head: Event Understanding and Memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Event Understanding and Memory 1 Running head: Event Understanding and Memory Event Understanding and Memory in Healthy Aging and Dementia of the Alzheimer Type Jeffrey M. Zacks, Nicole K. Speer, Jean M Understanding and Memory 2 Abstract Segmenting ongoing activity into events is important for later memory

Zacks, Jeffrey M.

362

Working Memory and Schizophrenia 1 Running head: working memory and schizophrenia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Memory and Schizophrenia 1 Running head: working memory and schizophrenia Working memory.Park@vanderbilt.edu or Junghee.Lee@vanderbilt.edu #12;Working Memory and Schizophrenia 2 Abstract Working memory (WM) deficit and/or early part of maintenance may be problematic. #12;Working Memory and Schizophrenia 3

Park, Sohee

363

Improvement of the effectiveness of spillway operation of high-head hydroelectric stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article formulates the hydraulics and energetics involved in the aerated two-phase flow of water over and down the spillway of a high-head hydroelectric power plant into the receiving pools and constructs a flow model describing kinetic energy transfer and losses and air bubble compression forces for different configurations and inclinations of the spillway surface for purposes of spillway design.

Khlopenkov, P.R.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A new design criterion based on pressure testing of torispherical heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two vessels with torispherical heads were pressurized to destruction at the Praxair Tonawanda facility on September 12--13, 1994. The objective was to determine pressures at which observable or measurable indications of failure could be detected. Plastic limit pressures for the two heads were calculated at 190 and 240 psi, respectively. For Vessel 1, the only observable action was a slow formation of some waviness of the knuckle profile at approximately 600 psi. It lost pressure at 700 psi when a crack developed at a nozzle weld at the bottom of the shell. For Vessel 2, no indication of any sign of failure was observed until it burst at a pressure of 1,080 psi by a ductile fracture along the longitudinal weld of the shell. The main conclusion is that there is a problem in the application of the double elastic slope collapse criterion to torispherical heads. It was determined that when using this criterion a collapse pressure signaling excessive deformation cannot be determined with any certainty. Furthermore, the test data do not show anything at any of the calculated collapse pressures that suggests excessive deformation. Thus, the collapse pressures for torispherical heads cannot be confirmed by test. This leads to the inconsistency that if the collapse load is divided by a safety factor, say 1.5, to obtain an allowable pressure, the actual safety margin of the design is not known and may not be 1.5. For a material with sufficient ductility, the use of an estimated burst pressure appears preferable. A design criterion based on the membrane stress at the crown of a torispherical head reaching the ultimate tensile strength is proposed, which is simple, can be supported by theoretical arguments, and is shown to be conservative by current test results as well as by those of two previous test programs.

Kalnins, A. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics; Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Frequency of intracranial injury in cadavers with head trauma with and without scalp injury in Tehran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of morbidity, disability and mortality in patients with head injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the frequency of intracranial injury in cadavers with head trauma with and without scalp injury in Tehran. In this analytical cross-sectional study, we investigated 187 cadavers who died due to head trauma in motor vehicle accident or after falling in Tehran from November 2013 to February 2014. Age, sex, mechanism of trauma, scalp injury, sub-scalp bruising, skull fracture, hemorrhage including subdural hemorrhage (SDH), epidural hemorrhage (EDH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and contusion were recorded from examination and autopsy. One hundred and eighty seven cadavers (165 (88.2%) male and 22 (11.8%) female) with head injury with the mean age of 36.14 years (SD = 15) were recruited in this study. Mechanism of trauma was motor vehicle accident in 147 (78.6%) cadavers and falling in 40 (21.4%) cadavers. One hundred and fifty eight (84.5%) had SDH, 44 (23.5%) had EDH, 162 (86.6%) had SAH and 139 (74.3%) had contusion. Hemorrhage was seen in 132 (93%) cadavers who had scalp injury and 36 (80%) cadavers who did not have scalp injury (p = 0.01). Overall, 168 (89.8%) cadavers had hemorrhage and 139 (74.3%) had contusion. There was a significant correlation between intracranial injuries and scalp injury (p head trauma, complete examination should be performed but absence of findings in examination cannot exclude intracranial injury.

Kamran Aghakhani; Mansoure Heidari; Vahid Yousefinejad; Arash Okazi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Early Head Growth in Infants at Risk of Autism: A Baby Siblings Research Consortium Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective Although early brain overgrowth is frequently reported in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the relationship between ASD and head circumference (HC) is less clear, with inconsistent findings from longitudinal studies that include community controls. Our aim was to examine whether head growth in the first 3 years differed between children with ASD from a high-risk (HR) sample of infant siblings of children with ASD (by definition, multiplex), HR siblings not diagnosed with ASD, and low-risk (LR) controls. Method Participants included 442 HR and 253 LR infants from 12 sites of the international Baby Siblings Research Consortium. Longitudinal HC data were obtained prospectively, supplemented by growth records. Random effects nonlinear growth models were used to compare HC in HR infants and LR infants. Additional comparisons were conducted with the HR group stratified by diagnostic status at age 3: ASD (n = 77), developmental delay (DD; n = 32), and typical development (TD; n = 333). Nonlinear growth models were also developed for height to assess general overgrowth associated with ASD. Results There was no overall difference in head circumference growth over the first 3 years between HR and LR infants, although secondary analyses suggested possible increased total growth in HR infants, reflected by the model asymptote. Analyses stratifying the HR group by 3-year outcomes did not detect differences in head growth or height between HR infants who developed ASD and those who did not, nor between infants with ASD and LR controls. Conclusion Head growth was uninformative as an ASD risk marker within this HR cohort.

Lonnie Zwaigenbaum; Gregory S. Young; Wendy L. Stone; Karen Dobkins; Sally Ozonoff; Jessica Brian; Susan E. Bryson; Leslie J. Carver; Ted Hutman; Jana M. Iverson; Rebecca J. Landa; Daniel Messinger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Permethrin and malathion resistance in head lice: Results of ex vivo and molecular assays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background Treatment of head lice infestation relies on the application of topical insecticides. Overuse of these products has led to the emergence of resistance to pyrethroids and malathion worldwide. Permethrin resistance in head lice is mostly conferred by the knockdown resistance (kdr) trait. Objective To evaluate the occurrence of permethrin- and malathion-resistant head lice in Paris. Methods A prospective survey was conducted in 74 elementary schools. Live lice collected on schoolchildren were randomly selected and submitted to ex vivo bioassays or underwent individual DNA extraction. A fragment of kdr-like gene was amplified and compared with wild-type sequences. Results Live head lice were detected in 574 children. Ex vivo assays showed no surviving lice after a 1-hour contact with malathion while most lice died after a 1-hour exposure to permethrin and piperonyl butoxide (85.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 83.9-87.5). Among the 670 lice with workable DNA sequences, 661 lice (98.7%, 95% CI 97.7-99.3) had homozygous kdr mutations. Limitations The findings of this large-scale survey of the occurrence of insecticide-resistant head lice indicated a major insecticide pressure in the study population, but it was not sufficient to draw conclusions about other populations. The presence of T917I-L920F mutations in kdr gene may not correlate with treatment failure in prospective studies. Conclusion The high occurrence of kdr mutant allele suggests that insecticide resistance was already strongly established in the studied population. This finding must be interpreted with caution as it may not be predictive of treatment failure.

Sophie Bouvresse; Zohra Berdjane; Rémy Durand; Julie Bouscaillou; Arezki Izri; Olivier Chosidow

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 179 individual painted turtles captured in 2006 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Distinct Subpopulations of Head and Neck Cancer Cells with Different Levels of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species Exhibit Diverse Stemness, Proliferation, and Chemosensitivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...outcome in locally advanced squamous cell head-neck cancer.Br J Cancer 2012;106...of antrodia cinnamomea mycelia targeting head and neck cancer initiating cells through...Haddad RI Shin DM.Recent advances in head and neck cancer.N Engl J Med 2008;359...

Ching-Wen Chang; Yu-Syuan Chen; Shiu-Huey Chou; Chia-Li Han; Yu-Ju Chen; Cheng-Chieh Yang; Chih-Yang Huang; Jeng-Fan Lo

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Impact-absorbing Materials in Reducing Brain Vibration Caused by Ball-to-head Impact in Soccer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There has been a long debate among researchers on whether soccer heading is capable of causing brain trauma. A recent study suggests that headings exceeding a threshold level of 855 to 1,550 per year, results in microstructural abnormalities in the brain's white matter. This shows that brain trauma is caused by cumulative effect of repetitive headings. The use of protective headgear is one of the suggested preventive measures to protect the brain especially for younger players. Researchers have tested several commercial headgears and found that they are only effective in head-to-head impact, but ineffective in attenuating impact caused by heading. This is due to the fact that soccer ball is compliant in nature relative to the head. The aim of this study is to investigate materials that can be utilised to minimise the acceleration of the brain caused by soccer heading. A vertical drop ball test was conducted on an instrumented dummy skull. The inner cavity of the skull is filled with ultrasound gel that represents the brain. Six impact-absorbing materials were tested to determine the most effective material that reduces the acceleration of the brain substitute. The speed of the ball before and after impact as well as impact duration were measured using high-speed camera. Coefficient of restitution was calculated to ensure the material is not only capable of reducing the brain acceleration, but also maintains heading performance. It was found that polymer kneepad foam is the most effective material that minimises the acceleration of brain substitute whilst maintaining the speed of the ball after impact.

Zahari Taha; Mohd Hasnun Arif Hassan; Iskandar Hasanuddin; Mohd Azri Aris; Anwar P.P. Abdul Majeed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Questions and Answers - How many atoms are in the human head?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is there a way to tell how manyatoms are in an object? Is there a way to tell how many<br>atoms are in an object? Previous Question (Is there a way to tell how many atoms are in an object?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many atoms are in the human body?) How many atoms arein the human body? How many atoms are in the human head? We can calculate the number of atoms in your head if we know the density and a constant called Avogadro's number. This is really just an estimate, but it's going to be a good one. The equation is fairly simple. The number of atoms of ANY substance in a volume is: # of atoms = N * (density) * volume / (Molecular Weight). N is a constant called Avogadro's number and its equal to 6.022*1023 atoms/mole. It can also be molecules per mole. In the above formula density

375

Supplement 21, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Subject Headings and Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 1973 b Entamoeba histolytica, effects of estrogen on hepatic amoebic abscess, hamsters j possibly responsible for lower frequency of abscess in women Abscess Tsai, S.H., 1973 a human hepatic amoebiasis, review of treatments used over 18 years...index Section UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE CATALOGUE OP MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 21, PART 6 PARASITE-SUBJECT CATALOGUE : SUBJECT HEADINGS AND TREATMENT RECEIVED ! IPP?PV MAY 02 1963 IME UNIVERSITY 0? TEXAS HEAI...

Hood, Martha W.; Rayburn, Jane D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Supplement 19, Part 6, Parasite-Subject Catalogue: Subject Headings And Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE i INDEX-CATALOGUE OF MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ZOOLOGY SUPPLEMENT 19, PART 6 PARASITE-SUBJECT CATALOGUE: SUBJECT HEADINGS AND TREATMENT By MARTHA L. WALKER, Zoologist JANE D. RAYBURN, Technical Information... Specialist JUDITH HUMPHREY SHAW, Zoologist MARGIE D. KIRBY, Technical Information Specialist SHIRLEY J. EDWARDS, Technical Information Specialist ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY INSTITUTE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE Issued March 1974 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING...

Walker, Martha L.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Shaw, Judith H.; Kirby, Margie D.; Edwards, Shirley J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effects of Parent Expectations and Involvement on the School Readiness of Children in Head Start  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of children enrolled in Head Start. The study examined how these iv parent variables were related to children?s school readiness, and differences between ethnic groups, gender groups, and level of risk. The study tested a model whereby the effect... experimental measures in addition to questionnaires adapted from standardized measures to assess parent behaviors. Standardized measures were administered to children to assess school readiness. Demographic information and level of risk were gathered using...

Cook, Krystal Tisha'

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Head-end process for the reprocessing of HTGR spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reprocessing of HTGR spent fuels is in favor of the sustainable development of nuclear energy to realize the maximal use of nuclear resource and the minimum disposal of nuclear waste. The head-end of HTGR spent fuels reprocessing is different from that of the LWR spent fuels reprocessing because of the difference of spent fuel structure. The dismantling of the graphite spent fuel element and the highly effective dissolution of fuel kernel is the most difficult process in the head end of the reprocessing. Recently, some work on the head-end has been done in China. First, the electrochemical method with nitrate salt as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from HTGR fuel elements and release the coated fuel particles, to provide an option for the head-end technology of reprocessing. The results show that the graphite matrix can be effectively separated from the coated particle without any damage to the SiC layer. Secondly, the microwave-assisted heating was applied to dissolve the UO{sub 2} kernel from the crashed coated fuel particles. The ceramic UO{sub 2} as the solute has a good ability to absorb the microwave energy. The results of UO{sub 2} kernel dissolution from crushed coated particles by microwave heating show that the total dissolution percentage of UO{sub 2} is more than 99.99% after 3 times cross-flow dissolution with the following parameters: 8 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, temperature 100 Celsius degrees, initial ratio of solid to liquid 1.2 g/ml. (authors)

Chen, J.; Wen, M. [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Bejing 10084 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Thin film hydrodynamic lubrication of flying heads in magnetic disk storages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical hydrodynamic lubrication problems commonly encountered in the ultrathin spacing between a computer flying head and a magnetic disk are reviewed. In magnetic disk storages, minimizing the spacing between the head and disk is essential to promote the largest possible increase in magnetic bit density. In the small (nearly 1.0 ?m) spacing that has recently been attained, the rarefaction effects owing to the molecular mean free path become dominant. Specifically, in this paper the three governing equations resulting from the first- and second-order slip-flow models and from the linearized Boltzmann equation are compared. Next, some numerical approaches to eliminating the instability in pressure distribution in the high bearing number region are described. Surface roughness effects are also a principal concern in thin spacing. A mixed lubrication model which enables the analysis of the start/stop operation and the average film thickness theory for one- and two-dimensional roughnesses is summarized. Finally, from the viewpoint of practical head design, the slider dynamic characteristics and related slider design factors are discussed.

Yasunaga Mitsuya

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Investigation of the effect of shock, vibration, surface texture and surface pattern on the dynamics of the head disk interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 7.8: Flying height as a function of disk speed forFigure 7.9: Flying height as a function of disk radius fortextured Flying Head Slider Bearings in Magnetic Hard Disk

Murthy, Aravind N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Thin film gas lubrication characteristics of flying head slider bearings over patterned media in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...? This paper describes the effects of moving patterned disk surfaces on thin film gas lubrication characteristics for flying head slider bearings in magnetic hard disk drives. In order to perform the most real...

N. Tagawa; A. Mori

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of June 2002-September 2003. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2002 and 2003 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. In 2002, 27 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored until they nested. Four more females carrying old transmitters were also monitored; only one of these transmitters lasted through the nesting season. In 2003, 30 females were monitored. Twenty-three of the females monitored in 2002 nested and produced 84 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in fall 2002 and reared in captivity at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in the head-start program. Twenty-seven of the turtles monitored in 2003 nested. Six of the turtles nested twice, producing a total of 33 nests. The nests will be checked in September and October 2003 for hatchlings. Of 121 head-started juvenile western pond turtles collected in the Columbia Gorge during the 2001 nesting season, 119 were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2002, and 2 held over for additional growth. Of 86 turtles reared in the head-start program at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos fall 2002 through summer 2003, 67 were released at sites in the Columbia Gorge in summer of 2003, and 15 held over for more growth. Fifty-nine juveniles were released at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge in July 2002, and 51 released there in July 2003. Sixteen of those released in 2002 and 16 released in 2003 were instrumented with radio transmitters and monitored for varying amounts of time for survival and habitat use between the time of release and August 2003, together with juveniles from the 2001 release which were monitored from June 2001 through August 2003, and juveniles from the 2000 release which were monitored from August 2000 through August 2003. The number of functioning transmitters varied due to transmitter failures and detachments, and availability of replacement transmitters, as well as opportunities to recapture turtles. By August 15, 2003, a total of 39 turtles were being monitored: 6 from the 2000 release, 8 from the 2001 release, 10 from the 2002 release, and 15 from the 2003 release. During the 2002 field season trapping effort, 280 turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 236 previously head-started turtles. During the 2003 trapping season, 349 turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge; 304 of these had been head-started. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual re-sightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 160 individual painted turtles captured in 2002 and 189 painted turtles captured in 2003 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Eight female painted turtles were monitored by telemetry during the 2002 nesting season; 4 nests were recorded for these animals, plus 35 nests located incidentally. Preferred habitat for nesting was identified based on the telemetry results, to be considered in anticipating future turtle habitat needs and in management planning at Pierce NWR. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding supported activities in the Columbia River Gorge from June 2002 through September 2003.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approved by: Chair of Committee, Michael Delp Committee Members, Robert Armstrong Judy Muller-Delp Janet r Head of Department, Steve M. Dorman December 2005 Major Subject: Kinesiology iii ABSTRACT Effects of Head-up Tilt... Armstrong, and Dr. Janet Parker for their patience, guidance, and support thoughout the course of this research. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT????????????????????????.. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS??????????????????.. v TABLE OF CONTENTS...

Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Heading 1  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and foster the professional growth and advancements through individual development planning for all individuals in the Department Federal workforce to ensure our employees...

385

Heading 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Small Modular Reactors PI: Yi-Lung Mo: University of Houston Collaborators: Yu Tang: Argonne National Laboratory Ken Barry: Electrical Power Research Institute K.C. Chang:...

386

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R.F.; Jacobson, J.J.; and Searcy, E.M. (2012). Dynamic Analysis of Policy Drivers for Bioenergy Commodity Markets. Energy Policy, accepted for publication. 3. Piet, S.J.;...

387

Head case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to common birth defects such as cleft palate. And, says Andrew Wilkie of the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK, they provide "another little piece of the immensely complicated ...

John Whitfield

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Patents Files; R.D. Boardman, R.A. Carrington; "Method and Apparatus for Oil Shale Pollutant SorptionNOx Reburning, Multi-pollutant Control," June 10, 2008. 2. U.S....

389

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dr. Wood is currently working with the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Office to stand up the Western Energy Corridor Initiative, and he is also...

390

Heading 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011 Technical Evaluation Study Project No. 23843 Integration of HTGRs to an Ex Situ Oil Shale Retort Operation, Economic Analysis 08022011 Form 412.09 (Rev. 10) Idaho National...

391

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

logistics for biomass energy conversion, environmental impacts of in situ and ex situ oil shale energy development, and watershed resource management and energy issues; provides...

392

Heading 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technical Evaluation Study Project No. 23843 Integration of HTGRs with an In Situ Oil Shale Operation 05162011 2 Form 412.09 (Rev. 10) Idaho National Laboratory INTEGRATION...

393

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M.S., Electrical and Computer Engineering 1989 Universidad de Carabobo, Naguanagua, Venezuela, B.S., Electrical Engineering 1987 Current Q, SCI, and Sigmas clearances...

394

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analysis, and general lab duties. Computer Skills Languages Programming experience in Matlab and Visual Basic Word ProcessingSpreadsheetOther Proficient with Microsoft Excel,...

395

Heading 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas (SNG), HCE, 2005. 34. Udengaard, 2008, Udengaard, Niels R., et al., Convert Coal, petcoke into valuable SNG, Haldor Topsoe, April 2008. 35. van der Ploeg, H. J., et al., The...

396

Heading 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Version 19, Sudbury, Massachusetts: Thermoflow, 2009. Udengaard, 2009, "Convert Coal, Petcoke into Valuable SNG," Designing & Operating Coal-base Substitute Natural Gas (SNG)...

397

Heading 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a high temperature pump system that utilizes active magnetic bearings and a switched reluctance motor to remove the need for pump seals which are a major cause of maintenance and...

398

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

work on project designs, engineering design files, and design analysis studies for wind farms, transmission linessystems, power plant systems, and controls, etc;...

399

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on odor control and waste water disposal to regional trout farm, beet sugar, and potato industries. Bioremediation: Tested and developed design procedures for a new style of...

400

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the development of technologies to enhance feasibility of power generation from geothermal energy. In addition to being an investigator for two program projects, his...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HEADING FRONTMATTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

M. CALIVA Education and Training University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, USA, M.S., Systems Engineering 2003 University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA, M.B.A., Emphasis:...

402

A MATLAB-based eye tracking control system using non-invasive helmet head restraint in the macaque  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Tracking eye position is vital for behavioral and neurophysiological investigations in systems and cognitive neuroscience. Infrared camera systems which are now available can be used for eye tracking without the need to surgically implant magnetic search coils. These systems are generally employed using rigid head fixation in monkeys, which maintains the eye in a constant position and facilitates eye tracking. New method We investigate the use of non-rigid head fixation using a helmet that constrains only general head orientation and allows some freedom of movement. We present a MATLAB software solution to gather and process eye position data, present visual stimuli, interact with various devices, provide experimenter feedback and store data for offline analysis. Comparison with existing method Our software solution achieves excellent timing performance due to the use of data streaming, instead of the traditionally employed data storage mode for processing analog eye position data. Results We present behavioral data from two monkeys, demonstrating that adequate performance levels can be achieved on a simple fixation paradigm and show how performance depends on parameters such as fixation window size. Our findings suggest that non-rigid head restraint can be employed for behavioral training and testing on a variety of gaze-dependent visual paradigms, reducing the need for rigid head restraint systems for some applications. Conclusion While developed for macaque monkey, our system of course can work equally well for applications in human eye tracking where head constraint is undesirable.

Paolo De Luna; Mohamed Faiz Bin Mohamed Mustafar; Gregor Rainer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Economic comparison of a well-head geothermal power plant and a traditional one  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this paper was to do an economic comparison between the traditional approach to geothermal projects and a well-head method, where smaller power plants were installed on each well to considerably reduce the time until energy production begins. The two methods were compared in a hypothetical steamfield, based on their NPV and net power production. The comparison showed that wellhead power plants benefit geothermal projects by increasing the power output and NPV by as much as 5% and 16% respectively, depending on how early they can start production and the rate of installation.

Carlos Atli Córdova Geirdal; Maria S. Gudjonsdottir; Pall Jensson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A comparison of two methods of femoral head and neck excision in the dog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

femoral head and neck excision in all dogs. Lameness was graded by the author and 3 unbiased examiners, and forceplate analysis was performed preoperatively and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 16 weeks postoperatively. Other parameters evaluated at these times.... Weight bearing forces of the operated limb were increased at 6 and 16 weeks, but did not return to the preoperative value in either group. The muscle flap group demonstrated less weight bearing force on the operated limb at weeks 6 and 16 than...

Mann, Fred Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

405

Read/write head for a magnetic tape device having grooves for reducing tape floating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A read/write head for a magnetic tape includes an elongated chip assembly and a tape running surface formed in the longitudinal direction of the chip assembly. A pair of substantially spaced parallel read/write gap lines for supporting read/write elements extend longitudinally along the tape running surface of the chip assembly. Also, at least one groove is formed on the tape running surface on both sides of each of the read/write gap lines and extends substantially parallel to the read/write gap lines.

Aoki, Kenji (Kawasaki, JP)

2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Head-on collisions of unequal mass black holes in D=5 dimensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study head-on collisions of unequal mass black hole binaries in D=5 spacetime dimensions, with mass ratios between 1:1 and 1:4. Information about gravitational radiation is extracted by using the Kodama-Ishibashi gauge-invariant formalism and details of the apparent horizon of the final black hole. We present waveforms, total integrated energy and momentum for this process. Our results show surprisingly good agreement, within 5% or less, with those extrapolated from linearized, point-particle calculations. Our results also show that consistency with the area theorem bound requires that the same process in a large number of spacetime dimensions must display new features.

Witek, Helvi [CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa (UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Cardoso, Vitor [CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa (UTL), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049 Lisboa (Portugal); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677 (United States); Gualtieri, Leonardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, 'Sapienza' Universita di Roma e Sezione INFN Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy); Herdeiro, Carlos [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-183 Aveiro (Portugal); Centro de Fisica do Porto (CFP), Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto (FCUP), Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Sperhake, Ulrich [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677 (United States); Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Zilhao, Miguel [Centro de Fisica do Porto (CFP), Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto (FCUP), Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Head Loss Through Fibrous Debris Bed with Different Types of Perforated Strainers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loss of Coolant Accident LWR Light Water Reactor MBLOCA Medium Break Loss of Coolant Accident MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet NEI Nuclear Energy Institute NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology NPP Nuclear Power Plants NPSH Net... than the randomly generated debris bed on the sump strainer of the NPP. The U.S. NRC began their analysis in 1996 in order to predict and estimate the loss of the Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) by establishing GSI-191. In 1995, NUREG/CR-6224...

Abdulsattar, Suhaeb S

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

408

McDermott Technologies to Head Team To Test Materials for 21st Century  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Issued on February 4, 1999 McDermott Technologies to Head Team To Test Materials for 21st Century Power Plant The high-efficiency power plant of the 21st century may still be on the utility industry's drawing boards, but the new high-strength, corrosion resistant alloys that will make these power plants possible are about to enter the "real life" testing stage. The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a contract to McDermott Technology, Inc., Alliance, OH, to test 10 of the most promising of these alloys in a coal-fired boiler at Ohio Edison's Niles (OH) Power Station. DOE, through its Federal Energy Technology Center, will provide $700,000 of a $1.9 million contract for a five-year testing program to identify candidate materials for tomorrow's advanced boilers. McDermott will head a team made up of Babcock & Wilcox, Consol of Library, PA, the Ohio Coal Development Office, DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Ohio Edison.

409

Myosin head orientation: a structural determinant for the Frank-Starling relationship  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cellular mechanism underlying the Frank-Starling law of the heart is myofilament length-dependent activation. The mechanism(s) whereby sarcomeres detect changes in length and translate this into increased sensitivity to activating calcium has been elusive. Small-angle X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the intact myofilament lattice undergoes numerous structural changes upon an increase in sarcomere length (SL): lattice spacing and the I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} intensity ratio decreases, whereas the M3 meridional reflection intensity (I{sub M3}) increases, concomitant with increases in diastolic and systolic force. Using a short ({approx}10 ms) X-ray exposure just before electrical stimulation, we were able to obtain detailed structural information regarding the effects of external osmotic compression (with mannitol) and obtain SL on thin intact electrically stimulated isolated rat right ventricular trabeculae. We show that over the same incremental increases in SL, the relative changes in systolic force track more closely to the relative changes in myosin head orientation (as reported by IM3) than to the relative changes in lattice spacing. We conclude that myosin head orientation before activation determines myocardial sarcomere activation levels and that this may be the dominant mechanism for length-dependent activation.

Farman, Gerrie P.; Gore, David; Allen, Edward; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P. (IIT); (UIC)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Optimization of UAV Heading for the Ground-to-Air Uplink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider a collection of single-antenna ground nodes communicating with a multi-antenna unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over a multiple-access ground-to-air wireless communications link. The UAV uses beamforming to mitigate the inter-user interference and achieve spatial division multiple access (SDMA). First, we consider a simple scenario with two static ground nodes and analytically investigate the effect of the UAV heading on the system sum rate. We then study a more general setting with multiple mobile ground-based terminals, and develop an algorithm for dynamically adjusting the UAV heading in order to maximize a lower bound on the ergodic sum rate of the uplink channel, using a Kalman filter to track the positions of the mobile ground nodes. Fairness among the users can be guaranteed through weighting the bound for each user's ergodic rate with a factor inversely proportional to their average data rate. For the common scenario where a high $K$-factor channel exists between the ground node...

Jiang, Feng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Observations of post-flare supra-arcades: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supra-arcades are bright fans of emission that develop after eruptive flares, above post-flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection site which, because of their low density, are extremely difficult to observe directly. It has been suggested, however, that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low density jet directed towards higher density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low and high density fingers along the interface. Here we show details of SADs forming at the top of bright supra-arcade fans, as seen in Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131A images. The SADs often formed near the top of fan spikes. Some of the SADs were seen to split at their heads. Most SADs did not show enhanced emis...

Innes, Davina; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Huang, Yi-Min

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Web-based parenting skills to reduce behavior problems following abusive head trauma: A pilot study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pediatric abusive head trauma causes significant cognitive and behavioral morbidity, yet very few post-acute interventions exist to facilitate long-term recovery. To meet the needs of this vulnerable population, we piloted a web-based intervention with live coaching designed to improve positive parenting and child behavior. The efficacy of this parenting skills intervention was compared with access to Internet resources on brain injury. Participants included seven families (four randomized to the parenting intervention and three randomized to receive Internet resources). Parenting skills were observed and child behavior was rated at baseline and intervention completion. At completion, parents who received the parenting skills intervention showed significantly more positive parenting behaviors and fewer undesirable behaviors during play than parents who received access to Internet resources. Additionally, during play, children in the parenting skills intervention group were more compliant following parent commands than children in the Internet resources group. Lastly, parents who received the parenting intervention reported less intense oppositional and conduct behavior problems in their children post-intervention than did parents in the Internet resources group. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the use of this web-based positive parenting skills intervention to improve parenting skills and child behavior following abusive head trauma.

Jennifer E. Mast; Tanya N. Antonini; Stacey P. Raj; Karen S. Oberjohn; Amy Cassedy; Kathi L. Makoroff; Shari L. Wade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

Dan Dewey Poster 24.04, AAS HEAD Meeting, 2004 1 A Coarse 3D Model of E0102-72  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dan Dewey Poster 24.04, AAS HEAD Meeting, 2004 1 A Coarse 3D Model of E0102-72 Derived from HETG Schulz, Mike Stage Contact: dd@space.mit.edu #12;Dan Dewey Poster 24.04, AAS HEAD Meeting, 2004 2 HETG (above); Ne X line "color-velocity" map: #12;Dan Dewey Poster 24.04, AAS HEAD Meeting, 2004 3 O III Long

Dewey, Daniel

415

Long-Range And Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation Studies in RHIC With Lessons for the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; /Brookhaven; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley; Kabel, A.; /SLAC

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Head-on collisions of binary white dwarf-neutron stars: Simulations in full general relativity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We simulate head-on collisions from rest at large separation of binary white dwarf-neutron stars (WDNSs) in full general relativity. Our study serves as a prelude to our analysis of the circular binary WDNS problem. We focus on compact binaries whose total mass exceeds the maximum mass that a cold-degenerate star can support, and our goal is to determine the fate of such systems. A fully general relativistic hydrodynamic computation of a realistic WDNS head-on collision is prohibitive due to the large range of dynamical time scales and length scales involved. For this reason, we construct an equation of state (EOS) which captures the main physical features of neutron stars (NSs) while, at the same time, scales down the size of white dwarfs (WDs). We call these scaled-down WD models 'pseudo-WDs (pWDs)'. Using pWDs, we can study these systems via a sequence of simulations where the size of the pWD gradually increases toward the realistic case. We perform two sets of simulations; One set studies the effects of the NS mass on the final outcome, when the pWD is kept fixed. The other set studies the effect of the pWD compaction on the final outcome, when the pWD mass and the NS are kept fixed. All simulations show that after the collision, 14%-18% of the initial total rest mass escapes to infinity. All remnant masses still exceed the maximum rest mass that our cold EOS can support (1.92M{sub {center_dot}}), but no case leads to prompt collapse to a black hole. This outcome arises because the final configurations are hot. All cases settle into spherical, quasiequilibrium configurations consisting of a cold NS core surrounded by a hot mantle, resembling Thorne-Zytkow objects. Extrapolating our results to realistic WD compactions, we predict that the likely outcome of a head-on collision of a realistic, massive WDNS system will be the formation of a quasiequilibrium Thorne-Zytkow-like object.

Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah; Liu, Yuk Tung [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shapiro, Stuart L. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Astronomy and NCSA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Association of Traumatic Brain Injuries With Vomiting in Children With Blunt Head Trauma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Study objective We aimed to determine the prevalence of traumatic brain injuries in children who vomit after minor blunt head trauma, particularly when the vomiting occurs without other findings suggestive of traumatic brain injury (ie, isolated vomiting). We also aimed to determine the relationship between the timing and degree of vomiting and traumatic brain injury prevalence. Methods This was a secondary analysis of children younger than 18 years with minor blunt head trauma. Clinicians assessed for history and characteristics of vomiting at the initial evaluation. We assessed for the prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injury and traumatic brain injury on computed tomography (CT). Results Of 42,112 children enrolled, 5,557 (13.2%) had a history of vomiting, of whom 815 of 5,392 (15.1%) with complete data had isolated vomiting. Clinically important traumatic brain injury occurred in 2 of 815 patients (0.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0% to 0.9%) with isolated vomiting compared with 114 of 4,577 (2.5%; 95% CI 2.1% to 3.0%) with nonisolated vomiting (difference –2.3%, 95% CI –2.8% to –1.5%). Of patients with isolated vomiting for whom CT was performed, traumatic brain injury on CT occurred in 5 of 298 (1.7%; 95% CI 0.5% to 3.9%) compared with 211 of 3,284 (6.4%; 95% CI 5.6% to 7.3%) with nonisolated vomiting (difference –4.7%; 95% CI –6.0% to –2.4%). We found no significant independent associations between prevalence of clinically important traumatic brain injury and traumatic brain injury on CT with either the timing of onset or time since the last episode of vomiting. Conclusion Traumatic brain injury on CT is uncommon and clinically important traumatic brain injury is very uncommon in children with minor blunt head trauma when vomiting is their only sign or symptom. Observation in the emergency department before determining the need for CT appears appropriate for many of these children.

Peter S. Dayan; James F. Holmes; Shireen Atabaki; John Hoyle Jr.; Michael G. Tunik; Richard Lichenstein; Elizabeth Alpern; Michelle Miskin; Nathan Kuppermann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The 'Potato Head' method for identifying driver preferences for vehicle controls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for identifying customer preferences for product features (here, vehicle controls) and how to implement the method. In brief, people sit in a vehicle mockup surrounded by panels of switches. For each function of interest (e.g., headlights on/off, hazard, etc.). They select the switch they prefer and attach it to the instrument panel (covered with Velcro®) or the steering column where they want it. (This is much like the Mr Potato Head® toy where children construct a face from parts - eyes, noses, etc.). To identify poor choices, test participants then drive a simulator while operating the chosen switches. Afterwards, participants can change their preferences, which they often do. While applied to controls here, it could be used to determine preferences for displays or other features.

P. Green; G . Paelke; J . Boreczky

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Unbounded energies of debris from head-on particle collisions near black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If two particles move toward a black hole and collide near the horizon, the energy E_{c.m.} in the centre of mass can grow unbounded. This is a so-called Ba\\~nados-Silk-West (BSW) effect. One of problems creating obstacles to the possibility of its observation consists in that individual energy E of a fragment at infinity remains finite because of redshift. We show that in the case of head-on collision, debris may have unbounded energy E. An essential ingredient of this scenario is a particle moving away from a black hole in the near-horizon region. It can appear due to precedent collision that implies multiple scattering.

O. B. Zaslavskii

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

420

Unbounded energies of debris from head-on particle collisions near black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If two particles move toward a black hole and collide near the horizon, the energy E_{c.m.} in the centre of mass can grow unbounded. This is a so-called Ba\\~nados-Silk-West (BSW) effect. One of problems creating obstacles to the possibility of its observation consists in that individual energy E of a fragment at infinity remains finite because of redshift. We show that in the case of head-on collision, debris may have unbounded energy E. An essential ingredient of this scenario is a particle moving away from a black hole in the near-horizon region. It can appear due to precedent collision that implies multiple scattering.

O. B. Zaslavskii

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Computer modeling of infrared head-on emission from missile noses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model that takes into account the effect of aerodynamic and solar heating, sky irradiation, and radiative cooling on infrared emission from missile noses is presented. The heat transfer equation was solved with numerical techniques both in the steady-state (constant sped and altitude flight of cruise missiles) and in the nonstationary regime (quickly variable speed and altitude of short to medium range ballistic missiles) to give the temperature distribution on the skin surface. The corresponding head-on absolute infrared emission in the 3 to 5 {mu}m spectral bands was computed as a function of time of flight and missile altitude. Results show a strong dependence of temperature on the skin material, on the character of the aerodynamic flow (laminar or turbulent boundary layer), and on the physical characteristics of the atmosphere. By varying these parameters into reasonable ranges, infrared emissions spanning over more than an order of magnitude were obtained.

Tofani, A. (Officine Galileo SpA, Via Einstein 35, 50013 Campi Bisenzio, Florence (IT))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cognitive Functioning After Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To perform a comprehensive cognitive function (CF) assessment in patients who were relapse free after curative intent radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent neuropsychological tests to assess their objective CF; completed questionnaires to assess subjective CF, quality of life, and affect; and underwent blood tests to assess hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Retrospectively, the dosimetry of incidental radiation to the brain was determined for all patients, and the dose intensity of cisplatin was determined in those who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Results: A total of 10 patients were enrolled (5 treated with radiotherapy only and 5 with radiotherapy and cisplatin). The mean time from the end of treatment was 20 months (range, 9-41). All patients were able to complete the assessment protocol. Of the 10 patients, 9 had impaired objective CF, with memory the most severely affected. The severity of memory impairment correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the temporal lobes, and impaired dexterity correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the cerebellum, suggesting that these deficits might be treatment related. Patients receiving cisplatin appeared to have poorer objective CF than patients receiving only RT, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance, likely owing to the small sample size. Consistent with the published data, objective CF did not correlate with subjective CF or quality of life. No association was found between objective CF and patients' affect, hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Conclusion: Neuropsychological testing is feasible in squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck survivors. The findings were suggestive of treatment-related cognitive dysfunction. These results warrant additional investigation.

Gan, Hui K. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bernstein, Lori J. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brown, Jennifer [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ringash, Jolie; Vakilha, Mehrdad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Lisa [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Goldstein, David [Department of Otolaryngology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Kim, John; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.; Chen, Eric X. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Siu, Lillian L., E-mail: lillian.siu@uhn.on.ca [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived from their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p < 0.0001) but an increase in FT4 (p < 0.0001) and T4 (p < 0.022) levels during the radiotherapy course. The threshold dose required to produce significant changes was 12 Gy (Biologically Effective Dose in 2-Gy fractions, BED{sub 2}). There were significant rises in the patients' pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systolic velocity, blood volume flow levels, and RITA diameter (p < 0.0001), as detected by CDU during radiotherapy, compared to those parameters measured before the treatment. Hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns (p < 0.0001) were seen during radiotherapy compared to those before treatment. There was significant Pearson's correlation between the CDU parameters and T4, FT4, and TSH levels. Conclusions: Radiation-induced thyroiditis is regarded as primary damage to the thyroid gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients may result from the increase in intrathyroidal flow.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Edraki, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiology, Panzdahe-Khordad Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Reirradiation of Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an appealing treatment option after previous radiotherapy because of its precision, conformality, and reduced treatment duration. We report our experience with reirradiation using fractionated SRS for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2008, 65 patients received SRS to the oropharynx (n = 13), hypopharynx (n = 8), nasopharynx (n = 7), paranasal sinus (n = 7), neck (n = 7), and other sites (n = 23). Thirty-eight patients were treated definitively and 27 patients with metastatic disease and/or untreated local disease were treated palliatively. Nine patients underwent complete macroscopic resection before SRS. Thirty-three patients received concurrent chemoradiation. The median initial radiation dose was 67 Gy, and the median reirradiation SRS dose was 30 Gy (21-35 Gy) in 2-5 fractions. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 16 months. Fifty-six patients were evaluable for response: 30 (54%) had complete, 15 (27%) had partial, and 11 (20%) had no response. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 12 months. For definitively treated patients, the 2-year OS and locoregional control (LRC) rates were 41% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that higher total dose, surgical resection, and nasopharynx site were significantly associated with improved LRC; surgical resection and nonsquamous histology were associated with improved OS. Seven patients (11%) experienced severe reirradiation-related toxicity, including one treatment-attributed death. Conclusion: SRS reirradiation for head-and-neck cancer is feasible. This study demonstrates encouraging response rates with acceptable toxicity. Fractionated SRS reirradiation with concurrent chemotherapy in select patients warrants further study.

Unger, Keith R., E-mail: kxu2@gunet.georgetown.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C (United States); Lominska, Christopher E. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C (United States); Deeken, John F. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph [Department of Otolaryngology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tuluc, Madalina [Department of Pathology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Abstract--During quadrupedal robot locomotion, there is pitch, yaw, and roll of the head and body due to the stepping.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--During quadrupedal robot locomotion, there is pitch, yaw, and roll of the head and body vestibular system that has been embedded in the robot's head. Our approach can rapidly learn of the biped and quadrupedal robots, however, generates considerable pitch, roll, and yaw body

Parsons, Simon

427

[To be printed on the headed notepaper of the Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer Group (if an independent organisation) or the Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[To be printed on the headed notepaper of the Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer of Signature:___________________________ [Signed by Head Technology Transfer Office (TTO) or Group on behalf of Administering Organisation or its Technology Transfer Group if independent or if the University does not have

Rambaut, Andrew

428

Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The use of cotton blue stain to improve the efficiency of picking and identifying chironomid head capsules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE The use of cotton blue stain to improve the efficiency of picking and identifying chironomid Cotton blue was added to sediment sam- ples at least 2 h before chironomid head capsules were picked during the picking process. Cotton blue has been used previously to stain chitin in fungal cell walls

Bern, Universität

430

IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 30, NO. 5, JUNE 2012 993 Optimization of UAV Heading for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 30, NO. 5, JUNE 2012 993 Optimization of UAV-antenna unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) over a multiple-access ground-to-air communi- cations link. The UAV uses of the UAV's heading on the system sum rate. We then study a more general setting with multiple mobile ground

Swindlehurst, A. Lee

431

Using MR equations built from summary data 1 Running head: Using MR equations built from summary data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using MR equations built from summary data 1 Running head: Using MR equations built from summary, United Kingdom. E-mail: j.crawford@abdn.ac.uk #12;Using MR equations built from summary data 2 Abstract; regression equations; single-case methods #12;Using MR equations built from summary data 3 INTRODUCTION

Crawford, John R.

432

Structure and Statistical Analysis of the Microphysical Properties of Generating Cells in the Comma Head Region of Continental Winter Cyclones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents analyses of the microphysical structure of cloud-top convective generating cells at temperatures between ?10° and ?55°C across the comma head of 11 continental cyclones, using data collected by the W-band Wyoming Cloud Radar ...

David M. Plummer; Greg M. McFarquhar; Robert M. Rauber; Brian F. Jewett; David C. Leon

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Computational Modeling of Human Head Under Blast Shailesh Ganpule, Dr. Linxia Gu, Dr. Guoxin Cao, Dr.Namas Chandra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Modeling of Human Head Under Blast Loading Shailesh Ganpule, Dr. Linxia Gu, Dr;Presentation Objective: To understand role of helmet in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI: To understand underlying mechanisms of blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and develop mitigation

Farritor, Shane

434

Abstract--Dynamic characteristics of a tri-pad contact recording head were analyzed considering the surface energy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the spacing between a head and a disk surface is considered the most important. As a substitute for the flying-degrees-of-freedom (3-DOF) model. The configuration of the contact pad, the lubricant and the disk surface ECORDING density of hard disk drives (HDD) becomes larger to meet the demand of larger capacity

Matsuoka, Hiroshige

435

Seeing the whole elephant in the room: a holistic approach to ebooks Pamela Jacobs, Head (Acting), Information Resources & Collections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Seeing the whole elephant in the room: a holistic approach to ebooks Pamela Jacobs, Head (Acting We chose the title for our presentation to reflect that fact that ebooks are often the "elephant implications for users and staff. Ebooks can also be likened to the story of the Blind Man and the Elephant

Rosen, Jay

436

Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT IN OLDER ADULTS 1 Stereotype threat can enhance, as well as impair, older adults' memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT IN OLDER ADULTS 1 Stereotype threat can enhance, as well as impair, and Rico Velasco for research assistance and to Dr. Tom Hess for providing us with the stereotype threat for publication. #12;STEREOTYPE THREAT IN OLDER ADULTS 2 Abstract (150) Negative stereotypes about aging can

Mather, Mara

437

Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please leave this heading unchanged! Sound radiation of a non-rigid piston and pole cap compared are often modelled as a rigid piston in an infinite baffle. This model is for real loudspeakers somewhat of the baffled-piston radiation the spatial impulse response is presented. 1. Nijboer-Zernike approach

438

Running head: Resistance to floods1 Title: Quantifying invertebrate resistance to floods: a global-scale meta-analysis2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;1 Running head: Resistance to floods1 Title: Quantifying invertebrate resistance to floods Email: Laura.McMullen@icfi.com13 14 Email: lytleda@science.oregonstate.edu15 #12;2 Abstract16 Floods, but it is not clear whether floods have predictable effects on organisms that can18 allow us to generalize across

439

Wind power application for low flow irrigation from the Edwards-Trinity aquifer of West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this region. A relationship of flow pumped from a wind powered pumping system was developed to better predict flow rate based on available wind speed and pumping water depth data.The economic analysis of this system showed that if the local utility sold power...

Molla, Saiful Islam

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioning: General Guidance and Site Considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dehumidification or latent cooling in buildings is an area of growing interest that has been identified as needing more research and improved technologies for higher performance. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems typically expend excessive energy by using overcool-and-reheat strategies to dehumidify buildings. These systems first overcool ventilation air to remove moisture and then reheat the air to meet comfort requirements. Another common strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove moisture from the air more efficiently; however, these systems increase fan energy consumption because of the high airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors and can add heat of absorption to the ventilation air. Alternatively, liquid desiccant air-conditioning (LDAC) technology provides an innovative dehumidification solution that: (1) eliminates the need for overcooling and reheating from traditional cooling systems; and (2) avoids the increased fan energy and air heating from solid desiccant rotor systems.

Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

DRAIN-BACK PROTECTED LOW-FLOW SOLAR HEATING SYSTEM WITH DISTRIBUTED ELEVATED THERMALLY STRATIFIED STORAGE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Design considerations concerning a drain-back freeze and overheat protection system are given with emphasis on nitrogen management and thermal stratification of an elevated distributed storage. The actual system of GNT in Berg, Federal Republic of Germany is described. KEYWORDS Solar Heating; Freeze Protection; Overheat Protection; Drain-Back System;

W.B. VELTKAMP; J. VAN BERKEL; A.T. KEESMAN

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

High Speed Pumps Are No Longer Limited to Low Flow Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, the high-speed centrifugal pump was developed prior to World War II for rocket engine fuel pump applications for its advantages of light weight, compactness and dry running capability. Industrial derivatives were introduced in the 60’s...

Burke, P. Y.

445

Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

Kieper, Douglas Arthur (Newport News, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Welch, Benjamin L. (Hampton, VA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

446

Application of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films to the head/disk tribology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous hard carbon films deposited by filtered cathodic arc deposition exhibit very high hardness and elastic modulus, high mass density, low coefficient of friction, and the films are very smooth. All these properties are beneficial to applications of these films for the head/disk interface tribology. The properties of cathodic arc deposited amorphous carbon films are summarized, and they are compared to sputter deposited, hydrogenated (CH{sub x}), and nitrogenated (CN{sub x}) carbon films which are the present choice for hard disk and slider coatings. New developments in cathodic arc coaters are discussed which are of interest to the disk drive industry. Experiments on the nanotribology, mass density and hardness, corrosion behavior, and tribochemical behavior of cathodic arc films are reported. A number of applications of cathodic arc deposited films to hard disk and slider coatings are described. It is shown that their tribological performance is considerably better compared to CH{sub x} and CN{sub x} films.

Anders, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source Div.; Bhatia, C.S. [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (United States); Fong, W.; Lo, R.Y.; Bogy, D.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Computer Mechanics Lab.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo method, a couple of Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

EL-Shamy, E. F., E-mail: emadel-shamy@hotmail.com [Department of physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Al-Asbali, A. M., E-mail: aliaa-ma@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, Abha, P.O. 960 (Saudi Arabia)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Improved measurement of brain deformation during mild head acceleration using a novel tagged MRI sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In vivo measurements of human brain deformation during mild acceleration are needed to help validate computational models of traumatic brain injury and to understand the factors that govern the mechanical response of the brain. Tagged magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive technique to track tissue motion in vivo which has been used to quantify brain deformation in live human subjects. However, these prior studies required from 72 to 144 head rotations to generate deformation data for a single image slice, precluding its use to investigate the entire brain in a single subject. Here, a novel method is introduced that significantly reduces temporal variability in the acquisition and improves the accuracy of displacement estimates. Optimization of the acquisition parameters in a gelatin phantom and three human subjects leads to a reduction in the number of rotations from 72 to 144 to as few as 8 for a single image slice. The ability to estimate accurate, well-resolved, fields of displacement and strain in far fewer repetitions will enable comprehensive studies of acceleration-induced deformation throughout the human brain in vivo.

Andrew K. Knutsen; Elizabeth Magrath; Julie E. McEntee; Fangxu Xing; Jerry L. Prince; Philip V. Bayly; John A. Butman; Dzung L. Pham

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Neurocognitive Function After (Chemo)-Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Radical radiotherapy has a pivotal role in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) and cures a significant proportion of patients while simultaneously sparing critical normal organs. Some patients treated with radical radiotherapy for HNC receive significant radiation doses to large volumes of brain tissue. In fact, intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for HNC have been associated with a net increase in irradiated brain volumes. The increasing use of chemoradiotherapy for HNC has additionally exposed this patient population to potential neurotoxicity due to cytotoxic drugs. Patients with HNC may be particularly at risk for adverse late brain effects after (chemo)-radiotherapy, such as impaired neurocognitive function (NCF), as risk factors for the development of HNC, such as smoking, excess alcohol consumption and poor diet, are also associated with impaired NCF. The relatively good survival rates with modern treatment for HNC, and exposure to multiple potentially neurotoxic factors, means that it is important to understand the impact of (chemo)-radiotherapy for HNC on NCF, and to consider what measures can be taken to minimise treatment-related neurotoxicity. Here, we review evidence relating to the late neurotoxicity of radical (chemo)-radiotherapy for HNC, with a focus on studies of NCF in this patient population.

L.C. Welsh; A.W. Dunlop; T. McGovern; D. McQuaid; J.A. Dean; S.L. Gulliford; S.A. Bhide; K.J. Harrington; C.M. Nutting; K.L. Newbold

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

UConn LEEDs the Way on Green Case Study for the NCAA's First LEED Athletic Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DualFlush Toilet & LowFlow Showers Drought Tolerant Plants #12;Sustainable Building Materials · 30 Ceiling Tile #12;Sustainable Building Features "Rapidly Renewable" & Durable Dining Rm. Floor Lockers Certification #12;Smart & Sustainable Growth Next Steps · Continue to Apply UConn Sustainable Design

Holsinger, Kent

453

Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

Roy, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikbolpur@rediffmail.com [Beluti M. K. M. High School, P.O. Beluti, Birbhum, West Bengal 731301 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

Report on a randomized trial comparing two forms of immobilization of the head for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires accurate and reproducible immobilization of the patient's head. This randomized study compared the efficacy of two commonly used forms of immobilization used for SRT. Two routinely used methods of immobilization, which differ in their approach to reproduce the head position from day to day, are the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame and the BrainLab thermoplastic mask. The GTC frame fixates on the patient's upper dentition and thus is in direct mechanical contact with the cranium. The BrainLab mask is a two-part masking system custom fitted to the front and back of the patient's head. After patients signed an IRB-approved informed consent form, eligible patients were randomized to either GTC frame or mask for their course of SRT. Patients were treated as per standard procedure; however, prior to each treatment a set of digital kilovolt images (ExacTrac, BrainLabAB, Germany) was taken. These images were fused with reference digitally reconstructed radiographs obtained from treatment planning CT to yield lateral, longitudinal, and vertical deviations of isocenter and head rotations about respective axes. The primary end point of the study was to compare the two systems with respect to mean and standard deviations using the distance to isocenter measure. A total of 84 patients were enrolled (69 patients evaluable with detailed positioning data). A mixed-effect linear regression and two-tiled t test were used to compare the distance measure for both the systems. There was a statistically significant (p<0.001) difference between mean distances for these systems, suggesting that the GTC frame was more accurate. The mean 3D displacement and standard deviations were 3.17+1.95 mm for mask and 2.00+1.04 mm for frame. Both immobilization techniques were highly effective, but the GTC frame was more accurate. To optimize the accuracy of SRT, daily kilovolt image guidance is recommended with either immobilization system.

Bednarz, Greg; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Downes, Beverly; Bogner, Joachim; Hyslop, Terry; Galvin, James; Evans, James; Curran, Walter Jr.; Andrews, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center of the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center of the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical University of Vienna, 1010 Vienna (Austria); Department of Biostatistics, Kimmel Cancer Center of the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center of the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center of the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

A Three-Year Prospective Study of Repeat Head Computed Tomography in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background A definitive consensus on the standardization of practice of a routine repeat head CT (RHCT) scan in patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage is lacking. We hypothesized that in examinable patients without neurologic deterioration, RHCT scan does not lead to neurosurgical intervention (craniotomy/craniectomy). Study Design This was a 3-year prospective cohort analysis of patients aged 18 years and older, without antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, presenting to our level 1 trauma center with intracranial hemorrhage on initial head CT and a follow-up RHCT. Neurosurgical intervention was defined by craniotomy/craniectomy. Neurologic deterioration was defined as altered mental status, focal neurologic deficits, and/or pupillary changes. Results A total of 1,129 patients were included. Routine RHCT was performed in 1,099 patients. The progression rate was 19.7% (216 of 1,099), with subsequent neurosurgical intervention in 4 patients. Four patients had an abnormal neurologic examination, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of ?8 requiring intubation. Thirty patients had an RHCT secondary to neurologic deterioration; 53% (16 of 30) had progression on RHCT, of which 75% (12 of 16) required neurosurgical intervention. There was an association between deterioration in neurologic examination and need for neurosurgical intervention (odds ratio 3.98; 95% CI 1.7 to 9.1). The negative predictive value of a deteriorating neurologic examination in predicting the need for neurosurgical intervention was 100% in patients with GCS > 8. Conclusions Routine repeat head CT scan is not warranted in patients with normal neurologic examination. Routine repeat head CT scan does not supplement the need for neurologic examination for determining management in patients with traumatic brain injury.

Bellal Joseph; Hassan Aziz; Viraj Pandit; Narong Kulvatunyou; Ammar Hashmi; Andrew Tang; Moutamn Sadoun; Terence O’Keeffe; Gary Vercruysse; Donald J. Green; Randall S. Friese; Peter Rhee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Effect of Pretreatment Anemia on Treatment Outcome of Concurrent Radiochemotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the effect of anemia on outcome of treatment with radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 196 patients with Stage II-IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria as hemoglobin <130 g/L in men and <120 g/L in women. Results: Fifty-three patients were classified as anemic, 143 as nonanemic. The 3-year local control rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 72% and 85%, respectively (p = 0.01). The 3-year overall survival rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 52% and 77%, respectively (p = 0.004). In multivariate analysis, anemia was the most significant predictor of local control (hazard ratio, 0.37, p = 0.009) and survival (hazard ratio, 0.47, p = 0.007). A dose-effect relationship was also found for local control (p = .04) and survival (0.04) when grouping by hemoglobin concentration: <120, 120-140, and >140 g/L. Conclusions: Anemia was strongly associated with local control and survival in this cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiochemotherapy.

Fortin, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: afortin@videotron.ca; Wang Changshu; Vigneault, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Evaluation of energy deposition and secondary particle production in proton therapy of brain using a slab head phantom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractAim Evaluation of energy deposition of protons in human brain and calculation of the secondary neutrons and photons produced by protons in proton therapy. Background Radiation therapy is one of the main methods of treating localized cancer tumors. The use of high energy proton beam in radiotherapy was proposed almost 60 years ago. In recent years, there has been a revival of interest in this subject in the context of radiation therapy. High energy protons suffer little angular deflection and have a well-defined penetration range, with a sharp increase in the energy loss at the end of their trajectories, namely the Bragg peak. Materials and methods A slab head phantom was used for the purpose of simulating proton therapy in brain tissue. In this study simulation was carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code. Results By using mono energetic proton pencil beams, energy depositions in tissues, especially inside the brain, as well as estimating the neutron and photon production as a result of proton interactions in the body, together with their energy spectra, were calculated or obtained. The amount of energy escaped from the head by secondary neutrons and photons was determined. Conclusions It was found that for high energy proton beams the amount of escaped energy by neutrons is almost 10 times larger than that by photons. We estimated that at 110 MeV beam energy, the overall proton energy “leaked” from the head by secondary photons and neutrons to be around 1%.

Sayyed Bijan Jia; Mohammad Hadi Hadizadeh; Ali Asghar Mowlavi; Mahdy Ebrahimi Loushab

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Impact of Schedule Duration on Head and Neck Radiotherapy: Accelerated Tumor Repopulation Versus Compensatory Mucosal Proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine how modelled maximum tumor control rates, achievable without exceeding mucositis tolerance (tcp{sub max-early}) vary with schedule duration for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and materials: Using maximum-likelihood techniques, we have fitted a range of tcp models to two HNSCC datasets (Withers' and British Institute of Radiology [BIR]), characterizing the dependence of tcp on duration and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Models likely to best describe future data have been selected using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and its quasi-AIC extension to overdispersed data. Setting EQD{sub 2}s in the selected tcp models to levels just tolerable for mucositis, we have plotted tcp{sub max-early} against schedule duration. Results: While BIR dataset tcp fits describe dose levels isoeffective for tumor control as rising significantly with schedule protraction, indicative of accelerated tumor repopulation, repopulation terms in fits to Withers' dataset do not reach significance after accounting for overdispersion of the data. The tcp{sub max-early} curves calculated from tcp fits to the overall Withers' and BIR datasets rise by 8% and 0-4%, respectively, between 20 and 50 days duration; likewise, tcp{sub max-early} curves calculated for stage-specific cohorts also generally rise slowly with increasing duration. However none of the increases in tcp{sub max-early} calculated from the overall or stage-specific fits reach significance. Conclusions: Local control rates modeled for treatments which lie just within mucosal tolerance rise slowly but insignificantly with increasing schedule length. This finding suggests that whereas useful gains may be made by accelerating unnecessarily slow schedules until they approach early reaction tolerance, little is achieved by shortening schedules further while reducing doses to remain within mucosal tolerance, an approach that may slightly worsen outcomes.

Fenwick, John D., E-mail: john.fenwick@rob.ox.ac.uk [School of Cancer Studies, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GA (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Pardo-Montero, Juan [School of Cancer Studies, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GA (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Nahum, Alan E. [Department of Physics, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Malik, Zafar I. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Primary Melanoma Location on the Scalp is an Important Risk Factor for Brain Metastasis: A Study of 1,687 Patients with Cutaneous Head and Neck Melanomas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Primary cutaneous head and neck melanomas (HNM) are reported ... to be associated with a higher incidence of brain metastasis than trunk and limb melanomas (TLM ... ). In this study, the incidence of brain metas...

Anna M. Huismans MD; Lauren E. Haydu BSCHE; MIPH…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Visualisation of the intact dura mater and brain surface in infant autopsies: a minimally destructive technique for the post-mortem assessment of head injury  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the post-mortem examination of babies and young children, it is important to be able to visualise the brain and its coverings, particularly in cases where a head injury is likely to have occurred. In ... t...

Emma C. Cheshire; Roger D. G. Malcomson…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Online 1H NMR Spectroscopic Study of the Reaction Kinetics in Mixtures of Acetaldehyde and Water Using a New Microreactor Probe Head  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixtures of acetaldehyde and water are reactive multicomponent systems because poly(oxymethylmethylene) glycols are formed. A study on the kinetics of the formation of these oligomers was carried out using a new microreactor NMR probe head that combines ...

Andreas Scheithauer; Alexander Brächer; Thomas Grützner; Daniel Zollinger; Werner R. Thiel; Erik von Harbou; Hans Hasse

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Interactions between nano-spacing flying head sliders and ultra-thin liquid lubricant films with non-uniform distribution in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the effect of ultra-thin liquid lubricant films on air bearing dynamics and flyability of less than 10 nm spacing flying head sliders in hard disk drives. In particular, the effect of non-uni...

Norio Tagawa; Noritaka Yoshioka; Atsunobu Mori

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Corrected expression of the van der Waals pressure for multilayered system with application to analyses of static characteristics of flying head sliders with an ultrasmall spacing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flying height of flying head sliders has rapidly decreased for higher recording densities in hard disk drives. In ultrasmall spacing sliders those flying height are less than about 10 nm,...2002; Li et al. 20...

H. Matsuoka; S. Ohkubo; S. Fukui

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Proprioceptive Hair Cells on the Neck of the Squid Lolliguncula brevis: A Sense Organ in Cephalopods for the Control of Head-To-Body Position  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inputs, controls the position of the animal's head and body. | Marine Biomedical Institute, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 77555-1163, USA. | Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Research Support, U.S...

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The data this time will be the Motorcycle Acceleration Data: A data frame giving a series of measurements of head acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosines The data this time will be the Motorcycle Acceleration Data: A data frame giving a series of measurements of head acceleration in a simulated motorcycle accident, used to test crash helmets. Usage: data

Zeng, Donglin

468

Validation that Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We have previously reported that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) obtained from pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxydeglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/ computed tomography (CT) predicted outcome in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The purpose of this study was to validate these results on an independent dataset, determine whether the primary tumor or nodal MTV drives this correlation, and explore the interaction with p16{sup INK4a} status as a surrogate marker for human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods and Materials: The validation dataset in this study included 83 patients with squamous cell HNC who had a FDG PET/CT scan before receiving definitive radiotherapy. MTV and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were calculated for the primary tumor, the involved nodes, and the combination of both. The primary endpoint was to validate that MTV predicted progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary analyses included determining the prognostic utility of primary tumor vs. nodal MTV. Results: Similarly to our prior findings, an increase in total MTV of 17 cm{sup 3} (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in the risk of disease progression (p = 0.0002) and a 2.0-fold increase in the risk of death (p = 0.0048). SUV{sub max} was not associated with either outcome. Primary tumor MTV predicted progression-free (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.94; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 1.57; p < 0.0001) survival, whereas nodal MTV did not. In addition, MTV predicted progression-free (HR = 4.23; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 3.21; p = 0.0029) survival in patients with p16{sup INK4a}-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Conclusions: This study validates our previous findings that MTV independently predicts outcomes in HNC. MTV should be considered as a potential risk-stratifying biomarker in future studies of HNC.

Tang, Chad; Murphy, James D.; Khong, Brian; La, Trang H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Kong, Christina [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Fischbein, Nancy J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Effectiveness of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy planning for head and neck cancers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to uncertainties in beam range and patient setup. Conventionally, these uncertainties are dealt using geometrically expanded planning target volume (PTV). In this paper, the authors evaluated a robust optimization method that deals with the uncertainties directly during the spot weight optimization to ensure clinical target volume (CTV) coverage without using PTV. The authors compared the two methods for a population of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients. Methods: Two sets of IMPT plans were generated for 14 H and N cases, one being PTV-based conventionally optimized and the other CTV-based robustly optimized. For the PTV-based conventionally optimized plans, the uncertainties are accounted for by expanding CTV to PTV via margins and delivering the prescribed dose to PTV. For the CTV-based robustly optimized plans, spot weight optimization was guided to reduce the discrepancy in doses under extreme setup and range uncertainties directly, while delivering the prescribed dose to CTV rather than PTV. For each of these plans, the authors calculated dose distributions under various uncertainty settings. The root-mean-square dose (RMSD) for each voxel was computed and the area under the RMSD-volume histogram curves (AUC) was used to relatively compare plan robustness. Data derived from the dose volume histogram in the worst-case and nominal doses were used to evaluate the plan optimality. Then the plan evaluation metrics were averaged over the 14 cases and were compared with two-sided paired t tests. Results: CTV-based robust optimization led to more robust (i.e., smaller AUCs) plans for both targets and organs. Under the worst-case scenario and the nominal scenario, CTV-based robustly optimized plans showed better target coverage (i.e., greater D{sub 95%}), improved dose homogeneity (i.e., smaller D{sub 5%}- D{sub 95%}), and lower or equivalent dose to organs at risk. Conclusions: CTV-based robust optimization provided significantly more robust dose distributions to targets and organs than PTV-based conventional optimization in H and N using IMPT. Eliminating the use of PTV and planning directly based on CTV provided better or equivalent normal tissue sparing.

Liu Wei; Li Xiaoqiang; Park, Peter C.; Ronald Zhu, X.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li Yupeng [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Dong Lei [Scripps Proton Center, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid option.

Graff, Pierre [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Alexis Vautrin Cancer Center, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Doctoral School BioSE (EA4360), Nancy (France); Kirby, Neil [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Department of Biostatistics, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Lambert, Louise [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States) [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Radiation-Oncology, Montreal University Centre, Montreal (Canada); Pouliot, Jean, E-mail: jpouliot@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation-Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Risk, Outcomes, and Costs of Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Malignancies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To study the risk, outcomes, and costs of radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM) among patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to head and neck primary cancers. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort consisting of 204 consecutive head-and-neck cancer patients who received RT with or without chemotherapy during 2002 was formed; their records were reviewed for clinical and resource use information. Patients who had received prior therapy, had second primary cancers, or received palliative radiation therapy were excluded. The risk of OM was analyzed by multiple variable logistic regression. The cost of care was computed from the provider's perspective in 2006 U.S. dollars and compared among patients with and without OM. Results: Oral mucositis occurred in 91% of patients; in 66% it was severe (Grade 3-4). Oral mucositis was more common among patients with oral cavity or oropharynx primaries (odds ratio [OR], 44.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2 to >100; p < 0.001), those who received chemotherapy (OR = 7.8; 95% CI, 1.5-41.6; p 0.02), and those who were treated with altered fractionation schedules (OR 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-35.1; p = 0.03). Patients with OM were significantly more likely to have severe pain (54% vs. 6%; p < 0.001) and a weight loss of {>=}5% (60% vs. 17%; p < 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with an incremental cost of $1700-$6000, depending on the grade. Conclusions: Head-and-neck RT causes OM in virtually all patients. Oral mucositis is associated with severe pain, significant weight loss, increased resource use, and excess cost. Preventive strategies are needed.

Elting, Linda S. [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: lelting@mdanderson.org; Cooksley, Catherine D. [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicity of Concurrent Paclitaxel and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the long-term outcomes and toxicity of a regimen of infusion paclitaxel delivered concurrently with radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 1999, 35 patients with nonmetastatic, Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with three cycles of paclitaxel as a 120-h continuous infusion beginning on Days 1, 21, and 42, concurrent with radiotherapy. The initial 16 patients received 105 mg/m{sup 2}/cycle, and the subsequent 19 patients received 120 mg/m{sup 2}/cycle. External beam radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70.2-72 Gy at five fractions weekly. Patients were followed to evaluate the disease outcomes and late toxicity of this regimen. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 56.5 months. The median survival was 56.5 months, and the median time to local recurrence was not reached. Of the 35 patients, 15 (43%) developed hypothyroidism. Of the 33 patients who underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, 11 were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependent until death or their last follow-up visit. Also, 5 patients (14%) required a tracheostomy until death, and 3 (9%) developed a severe esophageal stricture. All evaluated long-term survivors exhibited salivary hypofunction. Fibrosis in the radiation field occurred in 24 patients (69%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a 120-h infusion of paclitaxel provides long-term local control and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Xerostomia, hypothyroidism, esophageal and pharyngeal complications, and subcutaneous fibrosis were common long-term toxicities; however, the vast majority of toxicities were grade 1 or 2.

Citrin, Deborah [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Mansueti, John; Likhacheva, Anna; Sciuto, Linda [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Albert, Paul S. [Biometric Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Rudy, Susan F. [Head and Neck Surgery Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cooley-Zgela, Theresa [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cotrim, Ana [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Solomon, Beth [Speech Language Pathology Section, Rehabilitation Medicine Department, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Head and Neck Oncology Program, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Russo, Angelo [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Morris, John C. [Metabolism Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Herscher, Laurie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, MD (United States); Smith, Sharon [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] (and others)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Interface technology of ultra-low flying height and highly stable head–disk interface for perpendicular magnetic recording  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports authors’ efforts in slider and interface technologies with extremely small and very high stability head–disk spacing. The dual shallow step strategy is proposed in the femto form-factor slider design. It is found that the dual shallow step design is very effective in reducing flying height modulation (FHM) caused by disk waviness and enhancing the cooling effects on the read/write elements. A simple geometric model is built to explain the schematic of the improvement in FHM.

Hui Li; Jin Liu; Bo Liu; Mingsheng Zhang; Leonard Gonzaga; Tow-Chong Chong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A study of the morphology and anatomy of a strain of seed producing great-headed garlic (Allium ampeloprasum L.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these cells finally lignify and form a layer termed endodermis. This endo- dermis is continuous with the endodersd. s of the adven- titious roots. The endodermal layer observed in the stem of great- headed garlic was not as pronounced as that reported... by Mann (20) in common gax lie; although the layer of ligni- fied oells was px'esent and continuous with the adventi? tious root endodermis. The presence of an endodermal layer in onion stem has been described by Mann (20), but Hoffman (14, ) did...

Fuqua, Mack Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

Vissink, Arjan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Grongingen (Netherlands); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Limesand, Kirsten H. [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Jensen, Siri Beier [Department of Oral Medicine, Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Fox, Philip C. [PC Fox Consulting, Spello (Italy); Elting, Linda S. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Reyland, Mary E., E-mail: Mary.Reyland@UCDenver.ed [Department of Craniofacial Biology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

477

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka, during the 1998 spring outmigration at migrant traps on the Snake and Salmon rivers. All hatchery chinook salmon released above Lower Granite Dam 19 1998 were marked with a fin-clip. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 226% of the 1997 number and 110% of the 1996 catch. The wild chinook catch was 120% of the 1997 catch but was only 93% of 1996. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 501% of 1997 numbers but only 90% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 569% of 1997 and 125% of the 1996 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 106 age-0 chinook salmon. During 1998, for the first time, the Snake River trap captured a significant number of hatchery sockeye salmon (1,552) and hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch (166). Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with high flows. Trap operations began on March 8 and were terminated for the season due to high flows on June 12. The trap was out of operation for 34 d during the season due to high flow and debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 476% and wild chinook salmon catch was 137% of 1997 numbers and 175% and 82% of 1996 catch, respectively. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 96% of the 1997 catch and 13% of the 1996 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 1998 was 170% of the 1997 catch and 37% of the 1996 numbers. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. For fish tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 1998 detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge. For hatchery and wild chinook salmon there was a 2.0- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 thousands of cubic feet per second (kcfs). For hatchery steelhead trout there was a 2.6-fold increase in migration rate between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. For fish marked at the Salmon River trap, statistical analysis of the 1998 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon hatchery and found a 3.3- and 2.6-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. A significant relation between migration rate and discharge was not detected for hatchery steelhead trout. Insufficient numbers of wild steelhead trout were PIT-tagged at the Salmon River trap to estimate travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Brimmer, Arnold F.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Estimating the environmental impact of home energy visits and extent of behaviour change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this study was to estimate the environmental impact of a home energy visit programme, known as RE:NEW, that was delivered in London, in the United Kingdom. These home energy visits intended to encourage reductions in household carbon emissions and water consumption through the installation of small energy saving measures (such as radiator panels, in-home energy displays and low-flow shower heads), further significant energy saving measures (loft and cavity wall insulation) and behaviour change advice. The environmental impact of the programme was estimated in terms of carbon emissions abated and on average, for each household in the study, a visit led to an average carbon abatement of 146 kgCO2. The majority of this was achieved through the installation of small energy saving measures. The impact of the visits on the installation of significant measures was negligible, as was the impact on behaviour change. Therefore, these visits did not overcome the barriers required to generate behaviour change or the barriers to the installation of more significant energy saving measures. Given this, a number of recommendations are proposed in this paper, which could increase the efficacy of these home energy visits.

Kristy Revell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Particle-in-cell simulation of the head-on collision between two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions has been studied by using the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method and one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. Then the phase lags of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) obtained from the two approaches have been compared and discussed. It has been found that: if the amplitudes of both the colliding IASWs are small enough, the phase lags obtained from PLK method are in good agreement with those obtained from PIC simulation. As the amplitudes of IASWs increase, the phase lags from PIC simulation become smaller than the analytical ones from PLK method. Besides, the PIC simulation shows the phase lag of an IASW involved in collision depends not only on the characteristics of the wave it collides with but also on itself, which disagrees with the prediction of the PLK method. Finally, the application scopes of the PLK method in studying both the single IASW and the head-on collisions of IASWs have been studied and discussed, and the latter turns out to be more strict.

Qi, Xin; Xu, Yan-xia; Duan, Wen-shan, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhang, Ling-yu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Lei, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Gansu, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Temperature–friction characteristics of used lubricant from two-stroke cross-head marine diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is now quite apparent that, in a two-stroke, cross-head marine diesel engine, the lubrication regime in the contact between piston ring and cylinder liner at the top dead centre (TDC) is of a boundary type. Therefore, the tribological performance of a system to simulate the real contact should be assessed under conditions closely resembling the operating engine environment. In the reality of engine operation, the lubricant is often contaminated by fuel and products of combustion, hence the need to study the temperature–friction characteristics of this actual lubricant under the conditions of boundary lubrication. In this paper, an oil taken from the drainage system of the engine was used. A five times heating and cooling test methodology was employed to assess tribological performance of a model contact lubricated with the actual oil. The model contact was formed by a pin sliding over a plate both made of materials used in two-stroke, cross-head marine diesel engines. Experiments showed that the general trend in temperature–friction characteristics of the used oil is similar to that of a new oil. However, the level of friction in the contact lubricated with an used oil is significantly higher than that for a new oil.

T.A Stolarski; Q Zhou

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Phosphorylation and the N-terminal extension of the regulatory light chain help orient and align the myosin heads in Drosophila flight muscle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I{sub 20}/I{sub 10}), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin filaments. Phosphorylation site disruption (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}), but not N-terminal extension truncation (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}), decreased the 14.5 nm reflection intensity, indicating a spread of the axial distribution of the myosin heads. The arrangement of thick filaments and myosin heads in electron micrographs of the phosphorylation mutant (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) appeared normal in the relaxed and rigor states, but when calcium activated, fewer myosin heads formed cross-bridges. In transgenic flies with both alterations to the RLC (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46; S66A, S67A}), the effects of the dual mutation were additive. The results suggest that the RLC N-terminal extension serves as a 'tether' to help pre-position the myosin heads for attachment to actin, while phosphorylation of the RLC promotes head orientations that allow optimal interactions with the thin filament.

Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.; (IIT); (Vermont); (Duke)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

482

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

483

Comparison of Quantitative EEG to current clinical decision rules for Head CT use in acute mild traumatic brain injury in the ED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Study Objective We compared the performance of a hand-held Quantitative Electroencephalogram (QEEG) acquisition device to New Orleans Criteria (NOC), Canadian CT Head Rule (CCHR) and National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS II) Rule in predicting intracranial lesions on Head CT in acute mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the Emergency Department (ED). Methods Patients between 18-80 years of age who presented to the ED with acute blunt head trauma were enrolled in this prospective observational study at two urban academic \\{EDs\\} in Detroit, Michigan. Data was collected for 10 minutes from frontal leads to determine a QEEG discriminant score that could maximally classify intracranial lesions on Head CT. Results: 152 patients were enrolled from July 2012 to February 2013. 17.1% had acute traumatic intracranial lesions on Head CT. QEEG discriminant score of ? 31 was found to be a good cut-off (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.93) to classify patients with positive head CT. The sensitivity of QEEG discriminant score was 92.3 (95% CI 73.4-98.6) while the specificity was 57.1 (95% CI 48.0-65.8). The sensitivity and specificity of the decision rules were as follows: NOC 96.1 (95% CI 78.4-99.7) and 15.8 (95% CI 10.1-23.6); CCHR 46.1 (95% CI 27.1-66.2) and 86.5 (95% CI 78.9-91.7); NEXUS II 96.1 (95% CI 78.4-99.7) and 31.7 (95% CI 23.9-40.7). Conclusion At a sensitivity of greater than 90%, QEEG discriminant score had better specificity than NOC and NEXUS II. Only CCHR had better specificity than QEEG discriminant score but at the cost of low (< 50%) sensitivity.

Syed Imran Ayaz; Craig Thomas; Andrew Kulek; Rosa Tolomello; Valerie Mika; Duane Robinson; Patrick Medado; Claire Pearson; Leslie S. Prichep; Brian J. O’Neil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Evaluation of surface and superficial dose for head and neck treatments using conventional or intensity-modulated techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With increased use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck treatment questions have arisen as to selection of an optimum treatment approach when either superficial sparing or treatment is desired. Other work has pointed out the increased superficial dose resulting from obliquity effects when multiple tangential beams are applied to head and neck treatment, as is the general case in IMRT planning. Helical tomotherapy might be expected to result in even further enhanced superficial dose compared with conventional bilateral field treatment. We have designed a typical right oropharynx target volume in an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. Three different treatment techniques have been used to optimally treat this target, including bilateral static fields, eight-field IMRT and helical tomotherapy. The phantom was immobilized in a standard treatment position and treated on a Varian 2300cd linear accelerator and on a Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy unit. 1 mm3 lithium-fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed on the surface of the phantom at a number of axial test positions. Film strips (Kodak EDR2) were either wrapped around the surface or sandwiched within the phantom. Measured doses at the surface and as a function of depth are compared with the planning system predictions for each treatment technique. The maximum surface doses on the proximal treatment side, averaged from TLDs and films, were measured to be 69?82% of the target dose with the bilateral fields yielding the lowest surface doses (69%), tomotherapy about 2% more than that (71%) and IMRT 13% more (82%). Anterior to the target volume, doses are always low for bilateral treatment. In this case the minimum anterior surface dose (chin area) was 6% of the prescription dose from that technique as compared with 26% and 35% from the IMRT and tomotherapy methods, respectively. The Eclipse and Tomotherapy planning systems both modelled deep and superficial doses well. Surface doses were better modelled by Eclipse at the test points, while the tomotherapy plans consistently overestimated the measured doses by 10% or more. Depth dose measurements, extracted from embedded films, indicated the depth of dose build-up to >99% to be the shallowest for IMRT (2?5 mm) followed by tomotherapy (5?8 mm) and bilateral fields (10?15 mm). The amount of surface dose is clearly technique dependent and should be taken into account in the planning stage.

P D Higgins; E Y Han; J L Yuan; S Hui; C K Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Speakers: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Michelle Michot Foss, Chief Energy Economist and Head, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7: "Natural Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context" 7: "Natural Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context" Speakers: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Michelle Michot Foss, Chief Energy Economist and Head, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas Benjamin Schlesinger, Benjamin Schlesinger and Associates, Inc. Andrew Slaughter, Shell [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Glenn: Let me welcome you to the Natural Gas Session. This is the only session in this conference that's devoted exclusively to natural gas [laughs]. I'm Glenn Sweetnam and I'm with the Energy Information Administration, and we're very fortunate this morning to have 3 very astute and long-time observers of the natural gas market to

486

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: NANCY H. SUTLEY, Chair, Council on Environmental Quality  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 18, 2010 February 18, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: NANCY H. SUTLEY, Chair, Council on Environmental Quality SUBJECT: DRAFT NEPA GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS I. INTRODUCTION The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) provides this draft guidance memorandum for public consideration and comment on the ways in which Federal agencies can improve their consideration of the effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 1 and climate change in their evaluation of proposals for Federal actions under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 4321 et seq. This draft guidance is intended to help explain how agencies of the Federal government should analyze the

487

Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions [A. L. Moser & S. C. Hsu, Phys. Plasmas, submitted (2014)]. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex ...

Moser, A L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Confined blasts, and the impact of shock wave reflections on a human head and the related traumatic brain injury  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the effects of blast waves in a confined space on a human head model. A finite element human model (FEHM) is exposed to blast waves from explosions, as well as, to the reflected waves from the confinement walls. The intensity of the travelling blast shock waves is measured computationally and compared with experimental results. We monitor the mechanical response of the brain of the FEHM at different stand-off positions, either close to, or away from the surrounding walls in interaction with the travelling blast waves. The skull pressure, brain intracranial pressure (ICP), acceleration, shear stress, and principal stresses and strains are measured as the biomechanical parameters for injury diagnosis and compared for all the situations and stand-off positions considered. The results illustrate that the additional reflected shock waves due to the surrounding walls can dramatically change the brain biomechanical parameters.

Asghar Rezaei; Mehdi Salimi Jazi; Samad Javid; Ghodrat Karami; Mariusz Ziejewski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Reduced 30% scanning time 3D multiplexer integrated circuit applied to large array format 20KHZ frequency inkjet print heads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancement of the number and array density of nozzles within an inkjet head chip is one of the keys to raise the printing speed and printing resolutions. However, traditional 2D architecture of driving circuits can not meet the requirement for high scanning speed and low data accessing points when nozzle numbers greater than 1000. This paper proposes a novel architecture of high-selection-speed three-dimensional data registration for inkjet applications. With the configuration of three-dimensional data registration, the number of data accessing points as well as the scanning lines can be greatly reduced for large array inkjet printheads with nozzles numbering more than 1000. This IC (Integrated Circuit) architecture involves three-dimensional multiplexing with the provision of a gating transistor for each ink firing resistor, where ink firing resistors are triggered only by the selection of their associated gating transistors. Three signals: selection (S), address (A), and power supply (P), are employed toge...

Liou, J -C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Theoretical study of head-on collision of dust acoustic solitary waves in a strongly coupled complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the propagation characteristics of two counter propagating dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) undergoing a head-on collision, in the presence of strong coupling between micron sized charged dust particles in a complex plasma. A coupled set of nonlinear dynamical equations describing the evolution of the two DASWs using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation technique is derived. The nature and extent of post collision phase-shifts of these solitary waves are studied over a wide range of dusty plasma parameters in a strongly and a weakly coupled medium. We find a significant change in the nature and amount of ph