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1

head  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DIRECT COMPUTATION OF CONFORMATIONAL FREE ENERGY. Martha S. Head, James A. Given, Michael K. Gilson. ...

2

"show-me": water consumption at a glance to promote water conservation in the shower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water is a scarce resource worldwide. Yet, we have many opportunities to conserve it. One particular opportunity for water conservation is the shower, because depending on the shower head and shower habits, an individual can save many liters of fresh ... Keywords: ambient display, awareness, water consumption

Karin Kappel; Thomas Grechenig

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

NERSC Users Showered With Accolades - NERSC Center News, Apr...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

29, 2011 April brought in a shower of accolades to longtime NERSC users as chemist Martin Head-Gordon was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Darleane Hoffman...

4

Air Shower Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Air shower simulations are a vital part of the design of air shower experiments and the analysis of their data. We describe the basic features of air showers and explain why numerical simulations are the appropriate approach to model the shower simulation. The CORSIKA program, the standard simulation program in this field, is introduced and its features, performance and limitations are discussed. The basic principles of hadronic interaction models and some gerneral simulation techniques are explained. Also a brief introduction to the installation and use of CORSIKA is given.

Alania, Marco; Gomez, Adolfo V. Chamorro [Centro de Tecnologias de Informacion y Comunicaciones, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima (Peru); Araya, Ignacio J. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Huerta, Humberto Martinez; Flores, Alejandra Parra [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Knapp, Johannes [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Showering behavior: implications for water and energy conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three groups of subjects were selected to determine the amount and temperature of the water used when showering. The control group of 120 subjects (60 men and 60 women) was divided into four groups (15 men and 15 women) who, after showering, dressed in rooms whose temperatures were 18.3/sup 0/C (65 F) 21.1/sup 0/C (70 F) 23.9/sup 0/C (75 F) and 26.7/sup 0/C (80 F). The greatest amount of comfort after showering was experienced in the 26.7/sup 0/C (80 F) room. This group, who did not wash their hair while showering used a mean of 36 liters (9.2 gal) of water for their showers. A second group of subjects (12 men and 12 women), who did wash their hair, used 62 liters (16.4 gal); this represented an increase in water used by 78%. A third group (12 men and 12 women), who had their showers fitted with a shower head that restricted the flow-rate of water, used 24 liters (6.4 gal) or 30% less water. However, they set their water temperature at 41.1/sup 0/C (106 F) vs the 38.9/sup 0/C (102 F) setting of the other two groups. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to both water and energy conservation and the amount of water used at different latitudes in the continental U.S. where the temperature of the water supply is different.

Rohles, F.H.; Konz, S.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Tips for Living Green Conduct a home energy audit -hes.lbl.gov or fcgov.com/greenbuilding/home/existing_programs.php  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clothes. Save water: run the dishwasher only when it's full, install low flow shower heads, turn off

7

NERSC Users Showered With Accolades - NERSC Center News, Apr 29, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users Showered Users Showered With Accolades NERSC Users Showered With Accolades April 29, 2011 April brought in a shower of accolades to longtime NERSC users as chemist Martin Head-Gordon was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Darleane Hoffman was honored with the Glenn T. Seaborg Actinide Separations Award and Phillip Geissler was honored with UC Berkeley Distinguished Teaching award. Meanwhile, Martin White was the only physics recipient of the 2011 Guggenheim fellowship. to "mine" BOSS data. Martin White Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship Martin White Martin White of the Physics Division has been granted a 2011 Fellowship by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the only physics recipient among this year's 180 fellows. White, who heads the Survey Science Team for

8

Air Showers and Geomagnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of the geomagnetic field on the development of air showers is studied. The well known International Geomagnetic Reference Field was included in the AIRES air shower simulation program as an auxiliary tool to allow calculating very accurate estimations of the geomagnetic field given the geographic coordinates, altitude above sea level and date of a given event. Our simulations indicate that the geomagnetic deflections alter significantly some shower observables like, for example, the lateral distribution of muons in the case of events with large zenith angles (larger than 75 degrees). On the other hand, such alterations seem not to be important for smaller zenith angles. Global observables like total numbers of particles or longitudinal development parameters do not present appreciable dependences on the geomagnetic deflections for all the cases that were studied.

A. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fast Shower Simulation in the ATLAS Calorimeter  

SciTech Connect

The time to simulate pp collisions in the ATLAS detector is largely dominated by the showering of electromagnetic particles in the heavy parts of the detector, especially the electromagnetic barrel and endcap calorimeters. Two procedures have been developed to accelerate the processing time of electromagnetic particles in these regions: (1) a fast shower parameterisation and (2) a frozen shower library. Both work by generating the response of the calorimeter to electrons and positrons with Geant 4, and then reintroduce the response into the simulation at runtime. In the fast shower parameterisation technique, a parameterization is tuned to single electrons and used later by simulation. In the frozen shower technique, actual showers from low-energy particles are used in the simulation. Full Geant 4 simulation is used to develop showers down to {approx} 1 GeV, at which point the shower is terminated by substituting a frozen shower. Judicious use of both techniques over the entire electromagnetic portion of the ATLAS calorimeter produces an important improvement of CPU time. We discuss the algorithms and their performance in this paper.

Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell' Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, W.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Title Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events:...

11

Extended Air Showers and Muon Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to report on the influence of muon interactions on the development of air showers initiated by astroparticles. We make a comparative study of the different theoretical approaches to muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production interactions. A detailed algorithm that includes all the relevant characteristics of such processes has been implemented in the AIRES air shower simulation system. We have simulated ultra high energy showers in different conditions in order to measure the influence of these muonic electromagnetic interactions. We have found that during the late stages of the shower development (well beyond the shower maximum) many global observables are significantly modified in relative terms when the mentioned interactions are taken into account. This is most evident in the case of the electromagnetic component of very inclined showers. On the other hand, our simulations indicate that the studied processes do not induce significant changes either in the position of the shower maximum or the structure of the shower front surface.

A. N. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluation of low flow characteristics of the Vermont Yankee plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiling water reactor (BWR) core flow instrumentation inaccuracies under low-flow conditions have been the subject of both reactor vendor and regulatory communications in response to incidents of the reported core flow being less than the flow corresponding to the natural-circulation line on the power flow map. During single recirculation loop operation, low-flow conditions exist in the idle recirculation loop, and these flow inaccuracies can affect the usefulness of the reported core flow. Accurate core flow indications are needed above 25% power to administer fuel thermal limits and comply with restrictions associated with the potential for thermal-hydraulic instability. While the natural-circulation line on the power flow map is recognized to be a nominal estimate of the flow expected at and near natural-circulation conditions, the boundaries of the stability regions are associated with conditions assumed in safety analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with general design criteria 10 and 12.

Ganther, S.; LeFrancoi, M.; Bergeron, P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geomagnetic Field and Air Shower Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of the geomagnetic field on the development of air showers is studied. The well known International Geomagnetic Reference Field was included in the AIRES air shower simulation program as an auxiliary tool to allow calculating very accurate estimations of the geomagnetic field given the geographic coordinates, altitude above sea level and date of a given event. Some test simulations made for representative cases indicate that some quantities like the lateral distribution of muons experiment significant modifications when the geomagnetic field is taken into account.

A. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Systematic Improvement of QCD Parton Showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the progress that has been achieved in the field of combining matrix elements and parton showers. We exemplify this by focusing on the case of electron-positron collisions and by reporting on recent developments as accomplished within the SHERPA event generation framework.

Winter, Jan; /CERN; Hoeche, Stefan; /SLAC; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Zapp, Korinna; /Durham U., IPPP; Schumann, Steffen; /Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.; Siegert, Frank; /Freiburg U.

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Muon Bremsstrahlung and Muonic Pair Production in Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to report on the modifications in air shower development due to muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production. In order to do that we have implemented new muon bremsstrahlung and muonic pair production procedures in the AIRES air shower simulation system, and have used it to simulate ultra high energy showers in different conditions. The influence of the mentioned processes in the global development of the air shower is important for primary particles of large zenith angles, while they do not introduce significant changes in the position of the shower maximum.

A. Cillis; S. J. Sciutto

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N., E-mail: yuvavil@mail.ru; Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Takibaev, J. S. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radiodetection of Cosmic Ray Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the characteristics and performance of a demonstration experiment devoted to the observation of ultra high- energy cosmic ray extensive air showers using a radiodetection technique. In a first step, one antenna narrowed band filtered acting as trigger, with a 4 $\\sigma$ threshold above sky background-level, was used to tag any radio transient in coincidence on the antenna array. Recently, the addition of 4 particle detectors has allowed us to observe cosmic ray events in coincidence with antennas.

D. Ardouin; A. Belletoile; D. Charrier; R. Dallier; L. Denis; P. Eschstruth; T. Gousset; F. Haddad; J. Lamblin; P. Lautridou; A. Lecacheux; D. Monnier-Ragaiggne; A. Rahmani; O. Ravel; the Codalema Collaboration

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Macroscopic Model of Geomagnetic-Radiation from Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays in the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers a simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower and the time-structure of the radio pulse. As we show the structure of the pulse is a direct reflection of the important length scales in the shower.

Scholten, Olaf

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Macroscopic Model of Geomagnetic-Radiation from Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a macroscopic description of coherent electro-magnetic radiation from air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays in the presence of the geo-magnetic field. This description offers a simple and direct insight in the relation between the properties of the air shower and the time-structure of the radio pulse. As we show the structure of the pulse is a direct reflection of the important length scales in the shower.

Olaf Scholten; Klaus Werner

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Speaker(s): James Lutz Date: October 18, 2011 -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

New formalism for QCD parton showers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g. ?S(q2) = q Qc ?S(Q2c) for q ?. Then the total branching probability below Qc is (for massless quarks) Pc(q ? qg) = CF ?S(Q2c) 2? ? 1 0 2z(1 + z2) dz = ?S(Q 2 c) ? , (2.29) and no explicit cutoff is required, although... of course Qc is essentially playing the same roˆle. After branching has terminated, the outgoing partons are put on mass-shell (or given the virtual mass Qg if lighter) and the relative transverse momenta of the branchings in the shower are computed...

Gieseke, Stefan; Stephens, Phil; Webber, Bryan R

22

On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes  

SciTech Connect

We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fast Simulation of Electromagnetic Showers in the ATLAS Calorimeter: Frozen Showers  

SciTech Connect

One of the most time consuming process simulating pp interactions in the ATLAS detector at LHC is the simulation of electromagnetic showers in the calorimeter. In order to speed up the event simulation several parametrisation methods are available in ATLAS. In this paper we present a short description of a frozen shower technique, together with some recent benchmarks and comparison with full simulation. An expected high rate of proton-proton collisions in ATLAS detector at LHC requires large samples of simulated events (Monte Carlo) to study various physics processes. A detailed simulation of particle reactions ('full simulation') in the ATLAS detector is based on GEANT4 and is very accurate. However, due to complexity of the detector, high particle multiplicity and GEANT4 itself, the average CPU time spend to simulate typical QCD event in pp collision is 20 or more minutes for modern computers. During detector simulation the largest time is spend in the calorimeters (up to 70%) most of which is required for electromagnetic particles in the electromagnetic (EM) part of the calorimeters. This is the motivation for fast simulation approaches which reduce the simulation time without affecting the accuracy. Several of fast simulation methods available within the ATLAS simulation framework (standard Athena based simulation program) are discussed here with the focus on the novel frozen shower library (FS) technique. The results obtained with FS are presented here as well.

Barberio, E.; /Melbourne U.; Boudreau, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Butler, B.; /SLAC; Cheung, S.L.; /Toronto U.; Dell'Acqua, A.; /CERN; Di Simone, A.; /CERN; Ehrenfeld, E.; /Hamburg U. /DESY; Gallas, M.V.; /CERN; Glazov, A.; /DESY; Marshall, Z.; /Caltech /Nevis Labs, Columbia U.; Mueller, J.; /Pittsburgh U.; Placakyte, R.; /DESY; Rimoldi, A.; /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia; Savard, P.; /Toronto U.; Tsulaia, V.; /Pittsburgh U.; Waugh, A.; /Sydney U.; Young, C.C.; /SLAC

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

Altitude dependence of fluorescence light emission by extensive air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence light is induced by extensive air showers while developing in the Earth's atmosphere. The number of emitted fluorescence photons depends on the conditions of the air and on the energy deposited by the shower particles at every stage of the development. In a previous model calculation, the pressure and temperature dependences of the fluorescence yield have been studied on the basis of kinetic gas theory, assuming temperature-independent molecular collision cross-sections. In this work we investigate the importance of temperature-dependent collision cross-sections and of water vapour quenching on the expected fluorescence yield. The calculations will be applied to simulated air showers while using actual atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence on the reconstructed energy of extensive air showers.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Extensive Air Shower Radio Detection: Recent Results and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A prototype system for detecting radio pulses associated with extensive cosmic ray air showers is described. Sensitivity is compared with that in previous experiments, and lessons are noted for future studies.

Jonathan L. Rosner; Denis A. Suprun

2001-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Observing air showers from cosmic superluminal particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Poincare relativity principle has been tested at low energy with great accuracy, but its extrapolation to very high-energy phenomena is much less well established. Lorentz symmetry can be broken at Planck scale due to the renormalization of gravity or to some deeper structure of matter: we expect such a breaking to be a very high energy and very short distance phenomenon. If textbook special relativity is only an approximate property of the equations describing a sector of matter above some critical distance scale, an absolute local frame (the 'vacuum rest frame', VRF) can possibly be found and superluminal sectors of matter may exist related to new degrees of freedom not yet discovered experimentally. The new superluminal particles ('superbradyons', i.e. bradyons with superluminal critical speed) would have positive mass and energy, and behave kinematically like 'ordinary' particles (those with critical speed in vacuum equal to c, the speed of light) apart from the difference in critical speed (we expect c{sub i}>>c, where c{sub i} is the critical speed of a superluminal sector). They may be the ultimate building blocks of matter. At speed v>c, they are expected to release ''Cherenkov'' radiation ('ordinary' particles) in vacuum. Superluminal particles could provide most of the cosmic (dark) matter and produce very high-energy cosmic rays. We discuss: a) the possible relevance of superluminal matter to the composition, sources and spectra of high-energy cosmic rays; b) signatures and experiments allowing to possibly explore such effects. Very large volume and unprecedented background rejection ability are crucial requirements for any detector devoted to the search for cosmic superbradyons. Future cosmic-ray experiments using air-shower detectors (especially from space) naturally fulfil both requirements.

Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, College de France, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); L.A.P.P., CNRS-IN2P3, B.P. 110, 74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France)

1998-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

Jack Q. Richardson

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cerenkov Photon Density Fluctuations in Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The details of Cerenkov light produced by a gamma ray or a cosmic ray incident at the top of the atmosphere is best studied through systematic simulations of the extensive air showers. Recently such studies have become all the more important in view of the various techniques resulting from such studies, to distinguish gamma ray initiated showers from those generated by much more abundant hadronic component of cosmic rays. We have carried out here such systematic simulation studies using CORSIKA package in order to understand the Cerenkov photon density fluctuations for 5 different energies at various core distances both for gamma ray and proton primaries incident vertically at the top of the atmosphere. Such a systematic comparison of shower to shower density fluctuations for gamma ray and proton primaries is carried out for the first time here. It is found that the density fluctuations are significantly non-Poissonian. Such fluctuations are much more pronounced in the proton primaries than gamma ray primaries at all energies. The processes that contribute significantly to the observed fluctuations have been identified. It has been found that significant contribution to fluctuations comes from photons emitted after shower maximum. The electron number fluctuations and correlated emission of Cerenkov photons are mainly responsible for the observed fluctuations.

V. R. Chitnis; P. N. Bhat

1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes March 5, 2013 - 11:17am Addthis The GE GeoSpring™ Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint as a traditional 50-gallon tank water heater, the Electric Heat Pump Water Heater uses the existing water heater's plumbing and electrical connections. Credit: GE The GE GeoSpring(tm) Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint as a traditional 50-gallon tank water heater, the Electric Heat Pump Water Heater uses the existing water heater's plumbing and electrical connections. Credit: GE To introduce this new electric heat pump water heater, GE ran a memorable ad during the 2010 Winter Olympics featuring snow monkeys enjoying a hot soak. Credit: GE

30

The Effect of Clouds on Air Showers Observation from Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues relating to extensive air showers observation by a space-borne fluorescence detector and the effects of clouds on the observations are investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulations assume the presence of clouds with varying altitudes and optical depths. Simulated events are reconstructed assuming a cloud-free atmosphere. While it is anticipated that auxiliary instruments, such as LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging), will be employed to measure the atmospheric conditions during actual observation, it is still possible that these instruments may fail to recognize the presence of a cloud in a particular shower observation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the reconstructed shower parameters in such cases. Reconstruction results are shown for both monocular and stereo detectors and for the two limiting cases of optically thin, and optically thick clouds.

T. Abu-Zayyad; C. C. H. Jui; E. C. Loh

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

31

TANGO ARRAY An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new Air Shower Observatory has been constructed in Buenos Aires during 1999, and commissioned and set in operation in 2000. The observatory consists of an array of four water \\v{C}erenkov detectors, enclosing a geometrical area of $\\sim$ 30.000 m$^{2}$, and is optimized for the observation of cosmic rays in the ``knee'' energy region. The array detects $\\sim$ 250 to $\\sim$ 1500 showers/day, depending on the selected triggering condition. In this paper, the design and construction of the array, and the automatic system for data adquisition, daily calibration, and monitoring, are described. Also, the Monte Carlo simulations performed to develop a shower database, as well as the studies performed using the database to estimate the response and the angular and energy resolutions of the array, are presented in detail.

P. Bauleo; C. Bonifazi; A. Filevich; A. Reguera

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Amplified radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in thunderstorms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic ray air showers produce radio emission, consisting in large part of geosynchrotron emission. Since the radiation mechanism is based on particle acceleration, the atmospheric electric field can play an important role. Especially inside thunderclouds large electric fields can be present. We examine the contribution of an electric field to the emission mechanism theoretically and experimentally. Two mechanisms of amplification of radio emission are considered: the acceleration radiation of the shower particles and the radiation from the current that is produced by ionization electrons moving in the electric field. We selected and evaluated LOPES data recorded during thunderstorms, periods of heavy cloudiness and periods of cloudless weather. We find that during thunderstorms the radio emission can be strongly enhanced. No amplified pulses were found during periods of cloudless sky or heavy cloudiness, suggesting that the electric field effect for radio air shower measurements can be safely ignored during non-thunderstorm conditions.

Stijn Buitink; for the LOPES collaboration

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

High performance in low-flow solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low-flow solar hot water heating systems employ flow rates on the order of 1/5 to 1/10 of the conventional flow. Low-flow systems are of interest because the reduced flow rate allows smaller diameter tubing, which is less costly to install. Further, low-flow systems result in increased tank stratification. Lower collector inlet temperatures are achieved through stratification and the useful energy produced by the collector is increased. The disadvantage of low-flow systems is the collector heat removal factor decreases with decreasing flow rate. Many solar domestic hot water systems require an auxiliary electric source to operate a pump in order to circulate fluid through the solar collector. A photovoltaic driven pump can be used to replace the standard electrical pump. PV driven pumps provide an ideal means of controlling the flow rate, as pumps will only circulate fluid when there is sufficient radiation. Peak performance was always found to occur when the heat exchanger tank-side flow rate was approximately equal to the average load flow rate. For low collector-side flow rates, a small deviation from the optimum flow rate will dramatically effect system performance.

Dayan, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Universality of electron distributions in high-energy air showers - description of Cherenkov light production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shower simulation code CORSIKA has been used to investigate the electron energy and angular distributions in high-energy showers. Based on the universality of both distributions, we develop an analytical description of Cherenkov light emission in extensive air showers, which provides the total number and angular distribution of photons. The parameterisation can be used e.g. to calculate the contribution of direct and scattered Cherenkov light to shower profiles measured with the air fluorescence technique.

F. Nerling; J. Blümer; R. Engel; M. Risse

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ultra high energy photon showers in magnetic field:angular distribution of produced particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra high energy (UHE) photons can initiate electromagnetic showers in magnetic field. We analyze the two processes that determine the development of the shower, $e^+ e^-$ pair creation and synchrotron radiation, and derive formulae for the angular distribution of the produced particles. These formulae are necessary to study the three-dimensional development of the shower.

Massimo Coraddu; Marcello Lissia; Giuseppe Mezzorani

2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

The search for extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the status of the project to detect extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We report on detected anomalous signals and present a toy model to estimate at what altitudes we might expect to see air shower signals. According to this model, a significant number of high altitude horizontal air showers could be observed by radar techniques.

Wahl, D. [Radio Observatorio de Jicamarca, Instituto Geofisico del Peru (Peru); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima (Peru); Chau, J.; Galindo, F.; Huaman, A. [Radio Observatorio de Jicamarca, Instituto Geofisico del Peru (Peru); Solano, C. J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima (Peru); Instituto Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion de Telecomunicaciones, UNI, Lima (Peru)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Shower counters for SLAC experiments E142/E143  

SciTech Connect

The authors briefly describe the two electromagnetic calorimeters each made of 200 lead glass blocks used at SLAC to discriminate between electrons and pions and to measure electron energies. Procedures to reconstruct electron showers and to calibrate calorimeters are treated as well as the calorimeter performance.

Borel, H.; Grenier, P.; Le Meur, J. [C.E. de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of construction, successive trades must take care not to create a defect nor to compound or cover up a previous trade's defect. Covering a defect hides the inevitable point of failure and may even exacerbate the situation.

Dickson, B.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Multifamily Apartment Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Amount Refrigerators: 250 per refrigerator Ventilation Systems: 110 per fan Boilers: 2 per MBh Furnaces: 2 per MBh Free Products: CFLs and Low-flow Shower Heads and...

40

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Producing EGS4 shower displays with the Unified Graphics System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EGS4 Code System has been coupled with the SLAC Unified Graphics System in such a manner as to provide a means for displaying showers on UGS77-supported devices. This is most easily accomplished by attaching an auxiliary subprogram package (SHOWGRAF) to existing EGS4 User Codes and making use of a graphics display or a post-processor code called EGS4PL. SHOWGRAF may be used to create shower displays directly on interactive IBM 5080 color display devices, supporting three-dimensional rotations, translations, and zoom features, and providing illustration of particle types and energies by color and/or intensity. Alternatively, SHOWGRAF may be used to record a two-dimensional projection of the shower in a device-independent graphics file. The EGS4PL post-processor may then be used to convert this file into device-dependent graphics code for any UGS77-supported device. Options exist within EGS4PL that allow for two-dimensional translations and zoom, for creating line structure to indicate particle types and energies, and for optional display of particles by type. All of this is facilitated by means of the command processor EGS4PL EXEC together with new options (5080 and PDEV) with the standard EGS4IN EXEC routine for running EGS4 interactively under VM/SP. 6 refs.

Cowan, R.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Lab. for Nuclear Science); Nelson, W.R. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Thunderstorm Observations by Air-Shower Radio Antenna Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relativistic, charged particles present in extensive air showers lead to a coherent emission of radio pulses which are measured to identify the shower initiating high-energy cosmic rays. Especially during thunderstorms, there are additional strong electric fields in the atmosphere, which can lead to further multiplication and acceleration of the charged particles and thus have influence on the form and strength of the radio emission. For a reliable energy reconstruction of the primary cosmic ray by means of the measured radio signal it is very important to understand how electric fields affect the radio emission. In addition, lightning strikes are a prominent source of broadband radio emissions that are visible over very long distances. This, on the one hand, causes difficulties in the detection of the much lower signal of the air shower. On the other hand the recorded signals can be used to study features of the lightning development. The detection of cosmic rays via the radio emission and the influence of s...

Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Buitink, S; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Doll, P; Ender, M; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; 10.1016/j.asr.2011.06.003

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cerenkov radio pulses from electromagnetic showers in the time domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric field of the Cerenkov radio pulse produced by a single charged particle track in a dielectric medium is derived from first principles. An algorithm is developed to obtain the pulse in the time domain for numerical calculations. The algorithm is implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation of electromagnetic showers in dense media (specifically designed for coherent radio emission applications) as might be induced by interactions of ultrahigh energy neutrinos. The coherent Cerenkov radio emission produced by such showers is obtained simultaneously both in the time and frequency domains. A consistency check performed by Fourier transforming the pulse in time and comparing it to the frequency spectrum obtained directly in the simulations yields, as expected, fully consistent results. The reversal of the time structure inside the Cerenkov cone and the signs of the corresponding pulses are addressed in detail. The results, besides testing algorithms used for reference calculations in the frequency domain, shed new light into the properties of the radio pulse in the time domain. The shape of the pulse in the time domain is directly related to the depth development of the excess charge in the shower and its width to the observation angle with respect to the Cerenkov direction. This information can be of great practical importance for interpreting actual data.

Alvarez-Muniz, Jaime; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Zas, Enrique [Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the shower only. The wasted energy is the difference betweenLBNL-5115E Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Showercalculate the water and energy wasted during shower events

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus. [PWR; BWR; LMFBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF.

Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Overview of MHz air shower radio experiments and results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I present a review of the main results obtained in the last 10 years in the field of radio-detection of cosmic-ray air showers in the MHz range. All results from all experiments cannot be reported here so that I will focus on the results more than on the experiments themselves. Modern experiments started in 2003 with CODALEMA and LOPES. In 2006, small-size autonomous prototypes setup were installed at the Pierre Auger Observatory site, to help the design of the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA). We will discuss the principal aspects of the radio data analysis and the determination of the primary cosmic ray characteristics: the arrival direction, the lateral distribution of the electric field, the correlation with the primary energy, the emission mechanisms and the sensitivity to the composition of the cosmic rays.

Revenu, Benoît

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geomagnetic Field Effects on the Imaging Air Shower Cherenkov Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) detect the Cherenkov light flashes of Extended Air Showers (EAS) triggered by very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere. Due to the overwhelming background from hadron induced EAS, the discrimination of the rare gamma-like events is rather difficult, in particular at energies below 100 GeV. The influence of the Geomagnetic Field (GF) on the EAS development can further complicate this discrimination and, in addition, also systematically affect the gamma efficiency and energy resolution of an IACT. Here we present the results from dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the MAGIC telescope site. Additionally we show that measurements of sub-TeV gamma-rays from the Crab nebula are affected even for a low GF strength of less than 33 micro Tesla.

S. C. Commichau; A. Biland; D. Kranich; R. de los Reyes; A. Moralejo; D. Sobczynska

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

48

Matching NLO QCD and parton showers in heavy flavor production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the LO FEX process Qg ? Qg. Since initial-state quasi-collinear gluon splitting forms part of the evolution of the PDFs of the incoming hadrons implemented through parton showers, we are in danger of double-counting if we include both LO FEX and NLO FCR... (Q,t)qq¯ ? ? ? MC ( t¯Q ? t¯Q¯, z(t)Q ? z (t) Q¯ , ? (t) Q ? ? (t) Q¯ ) (5.9) 20 • qg initial state d?ˆ(+,t)qg ? ? ? MC = ?S 4? d?(t)+ ?(t)+ dz(t)+ P (0)gq (z (t) + ) d?¯(t)gg? ( (z(t)+ )2 ? ?(t)+ ) (5.10) d?ˆ(+,u)qg ? ? ? MC = d?ˆ(+,t)qg ? ? ? MC ( d?¯(t)gg ? d?...

Frixione, Stefano; Nason, Paolo; Webber, Bryan R

49

A multivariate study of mass composition for simulated showers at the Auger South Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The output parameters from the ground array of the Auger South observatory, were simulated for the typical instrumental and environmental conditions at its Malarg\\"ue site using the code sample-sim. Extensive air showers started by photons, protons and iron nuclei at the top of the atmosphere were used as triggers. The study utilized the air shower simulation code Aires with both QGSJet and Sibyll hadronic interaction models. A total of 1850 showers were used to produce more than 35,000 different ground events. We report here on the results of a multivariate analysis approach, including principal component analysis and neural networks, to the development of new primary composition diagnostics.

Gustavo A. Medina Tanco; Sergio J. Sciutto

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

A New Approach to Mass Measurements of UHECR: Horizontal Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The role of Horizontal Showers induced by cosmic rays is discussed in detail. A new approach to the calculation of the muon component in horizontal air showers induced by protons, heavier nuclei or photons is presented which allows a simple analytical evaluation of the muon density profiles at ground level. The results of the first application of these results to horizontal air showers detected at the Haverah Park Array by the recently started {\\sl Leeds-Santiago collaboration}, leading to important restrictions on composition at ultra high energies, are reported.

Enrique Zas

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Track segments in hadronic showers in a highly granular scintillator-steel hadron calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the three dimensional substructure of hadronic showers in the CALICE scintillator-steel hadronic calorimeter. The high granularity of the detector is used to find track segments of minimum ionising particles within hadronic showers, providing sensitivity to the spatial structure and the details of secondary particle production in hadronic cascades. The multiplicity, length and angular distribution of identified track segments are compared to GEANT4 simulations with several different shower models. Track segments also provide the possibility for in-situ calibration of highly granular calorimeters.

CALICE Collaboration; C. Adloff; J. -J. Blaising; M. Chefdeville; C. Drancourt; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis; I. Koletsou; J. Prast; G. Vouters; K. Francis; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; J. Smith; L. Xia; E. Baldolemar; J. Li; S. T. Park; M. Sosebee; A. P. White; J. Yu; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; N. K. Watson; G. Mavromanolakis; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; W. Yan; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; J. Apostolakis; D. Dannheim; A. Dotti; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; W. Klempt; E. van der Kraaij; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; A. Ribon; D. Schlatter; V. Uzhinskiy; C. Carloganu; P. Gay; S. Manen; L. Royer; M. Tytgat; N. Zaganidis; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; J. G. R. Lima; V. Zutshi; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; U. Cornett; D. David; G. Falley; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; O. Hartbrich; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; K. Krüger; S. Lu; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; M. Terwort; N. Feege; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; I. Marchesini; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; K. Briggl; P. Eckert; T. Harion; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; Y. Onel; G. W. Wilson; K. Kawagoe; Y. Sudo; T. Yoshioka; P. D. Dauncey; A. -M. Magnan; V. Bartsch; M. Wing; F. Salvatore; E. Cortina Gil; S. Mannai; G. Baulieu; P. Calabria; L. Caponetto; C. Combaret; R. Della Negra; G. Grenier; R. Han; J-C. Ianigro; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; H. Mathez; L. Mirabito; A. Petrukhin; A. Steen; W. Tromeur; M. Vander Donckt; Y. Zoccarato; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Puerta-Pelayo; F. Corriveau; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Popov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; N. Kirikova; V. Kozlov; P. Smirnov; Y. Soloviev; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; V. Kantserov; V. Kaplin; A. Karakash; E. Popova; V. Tikhomirov; C. Kiesling; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; N. van der Kolk; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; J. Rouene; N. Seguin-Moreau; M. Anduze; V. Balagura; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; E. Guliyev; Y. Haddad; F. Magniette; G. Musat; M. Ruan; T. H. Tran; H. Videau; B. Bulanek; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; B. Belhorma; H. Ghazlane; K. Kotera; T. Takeshita; S. Uozumi; D. Jeans; M. Götze; J. Sauer; S. Weber; C. Zeitnitz

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Muon Charge Information from Geomagnetic Deviation in Inclined Extensive Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to extract the charge information of high energy muons in very inclined extensive air showers by analyzing their relative lateral positions in the shower transverse plane. We calculate the muon lateral deviation under the geomagnetic field and compare it to dispersive deviations from other causes. By our criterion of resolvability, positive and negative muons with energies above $10^4$ GeV will be clearly separated into two lobes if the shower zenith angle is larger than $70^\\circ$. Thus we suggest a possible approach to measure the $\\mu^+ / \\mu^-$ ratio for high energy muons.

BingKan Xue; Bo-Qiang Ma

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Blazing Cerenkov Flashes at the Horizons by Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos Induced Air-Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Energy Cosmic Rays (C.R.) versus Neutrino and Neutralino induced Air-Shower maybe tested at Horizons by their muons, gamma and Cerenkov blazing signals. Inclined and Horizontal C.R. Showers (70-90 zenith angle) produce secondary (gamma, e+, e-) mostly suppressed by high column atmosphere depth. Earliest shower Cherenkov photons are diluted by large distances and by air opacity, while secondary penetrating muons and their successive decay into electrons and gamma, may revive additional Cerenkov lights. GeVs gamma telescopes at the top of the mountains or in Space may detect at horizons PeVs up to EeV C.R. and their secondaries. Details on arrival angle and column depth, shower shape, timing signature of photon flash intensity, may inform us on the altitude interaction and primary UHECR composition. Below the horizons, at zenith angle among copious single albedo muons, rare up-going showers traced by muon bundles would give evidence of rare tau Earth-Skimming neutrinos, at EeVs energies. Their rate may be comparable with 6.3 PeVs anti-neutrino electron induced air-shower (mostly hadronic) originated above and also below horizons, in interposed atmosphere by W resonance at Glashow peak. Additional and complementary UHE SUSY neutralinos at tens PeVs-EeV energy may blaze, by its characteristic electromagnetic signature. Their secondary shower blazing Cerenkov lights and distances might be disentangled from UHECR by Stereoscopic Telescopes such as Magic ones or Hess array experiment. The horizontal detection sensitivity of Magic in the present set up (if totally devoted to the Horizons Shower search) maybe already be comparable to AMANDA underground neutrino detector at PeVs energies.

D. Fargion

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

Search for a Ridge Structure Origin with Shower Broadening and Jet Quenching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the role of jet and shower parton broadening by the strong colour field in the $\\Delta\\eta$-$\\Delta\\phi$ correlation of high $p_T$ particles. When anisotropic momentum broadening ($\\Delta p_z > \\Delta p_T$) is given to jet and shower partons in the initial stage, a ridge-like structure is found to appear in the two hadron correlation. The ratio of the peak to the pedestal yield is overestimated.

R. Mizukawa; T. Hirano; M. Isse; Y. Nara; A. Ohnishi

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Energy Sources for Yotta-TeV Iceberg Showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late February of 2002, warming climate along the Antarctic Peninsula triggered a macroscopic particle acceleration event that smashed a 350 Gkg floating ice shelf, called the Larsen B. The particle shower released by the acceleration involved on the order of >10^6 iceberg particles accelerated to an aggregate total kinetic energy of ~10^17 J (100 Mt TNT equivalent). The explosion was so extreme that it caught glaciological science by surprise (an injury to the egos of glaciologists worldwide) and caused glaciers of the Antarctic Peninsula formerly buttressed by the missing ice shelf to surge (yielding a small increment to sea level rise). In this presentation, I shall describe research, both experimental and field oriented, that has revealed the energy source for this explosive event. I shall also describe how climate warming has the capacity to trigger this type of ice-shelf collapse. A review of the geologic record of ice-rafted debris on the ocean floor suggests that extreme, explosive ice-shelf collapse may be a ubiquitous catastrophe that has happened regularly in the past as part of glacial/interglacial climate cycles.

MacAyeal, Douglas [University of Chicago

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wind power application for low flow irrigation from the Edwards-Trinity aquifer of West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attempts were made to reduce the cost of energy for irrigation in West Texas. To do this two wind turbines of 10 kW size were installed in Garden City and Stiles, Texas to pump water. The turbines were installed on 30 m towers. The pumping water head at Garden City and Stiles were 48 m and 80 m, respectively.A double Fourier series analysis of wind speed characteristics was done to better predict wind speed for the test areas and the use of a N=3 and M=7 harmonic term was suggested for this region. A relationship of flow pumped from a wind powered pumping system was developed to better predict flow rate based on available wind speed and pumping water depth data.The economic analysis of this system showed that if the local utility sold power at rate of $0.09kWh then a wind powered pumping system can be economically feasible if the cost of a 10 kW wind turbine was less than $5000 payable over 30 years at 5% interest rate. The current cost of such a system is $30,000, making it prohibitively expensive. However, such a system may become a more economical alternative as the cost of electricity increases and the cost of the turbines decrease.

Molla, Saiful Islam

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Speaker(s): James Lutz Date: October 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Heating water is one of the most energy-consumptive activities in a household, accounting for about 49 percent of California's residential natural gas consumption. Data collected during a pilot field study in California indicate that significant amounts of water and energy are wasted while waiting for hot water to be delivered to the point of end use. We calculate the water and energy wasted during shower events from data collected using a wireless sensor network that monitored water flows and temperatures in three single-family residences. The total calculated water

58

Atmospheric Profiles at the Southern Pierre Auger Observatory and their Relevance to Air Shower Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of atmospheric conditions on altitude and time have to be known at the site of an air shower experiment for accurate reconstruction of extensive air showers and their simulations. The height-profile of atmospheric depth is of particular interest as it enters directly into the reconstruction of longitudinal shower development and of the primary energy and mass of cosmic rays. For the southern part of the Auger Observatory, the atmosphere has been investigated in a number of campaigns with meteorological radio soundings and with continuous measurements of ground-based weather stations. Focussing on atmospheric depth and temperature profiles, temporal variations are described and monthly profiles are developed. Uncertainties of the monthly atmospheres that are currently applied in the Auger reconstruction are discussed.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; D. Gora; P. Homola; H. Klages; J. Pekala; M. Risse; M. Unger; B. Wilczynska; H. Wilczynski; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fluorescence emission induced by extensive air showers in dependence on atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged particles of extensive air showers (EAS), mainly electrons and positrons, initiate the emission of fluorescence light in the Earth's atmosphere. This light provides a calorimetric measurement of the energy of cosmic rays. For reconstructing the primary energy from an observed light track of an EAS, the fluorescence yield in air has to be known in dependence on atmospheric conditions, like air temperature, pressure, and humidity. Several experiments on fluorescence emission have published various sets of data covering different parts of the dependence of the fluorescence yield on atmospheric conditions. Using a compilation of published measurements, a calculation of the fluorescence yield in dependence on altitude is presented. The fluorescence calculation is applied to simulated air showers and different atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence of the atmospheric conditions on the reconstructed shower parameters.

Keilhauer, Bianca

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A prototype system for detecting the radio-frequency pulse associated with cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a system to detect the radio-frequency (RF) pulse associated with extensive air showers of cosmic rays is described. This work was performed at the CASA/MIA array in Utah, with the intention of designing equipment that can be used in conjunction with the Auger Giant Array. A small subset of data (less than 40 out of a total of 600 hours of running time), taken under low-noise conditions, permitted upper limits to be placed on the rate for pulses accompanying showers of energies around $10^{17}$ eV.

Kevin Green; Jonathan L. Rosner; Denis A. Suprun; J. F. Wilkerson

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Azimuthal modulation of the event rate of cosmic ray extensive air showers by the geomagnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth's magnetic field effect on the azimuthal distribution of extensive air showers (EAS) of cosmic rays has been evaluated using a bulk of the Yakutsk array data. The uniform azimuthal distribution of the EAS event rate is rejected at the significance level 10^(-14). Amplitude of the first harmonics of observed distribution depends on zenith angle as A1=0.2*sin^2(theta) and is almost independent of the primary energy; the phase coincides with the magnetic meridian. Basing upon the value of measured effect, the correction factor has been derived for the particle density depending on a geomagnetic parameter of a shower.

A. A. Ivanov; V. P. Egorova; V. A. Kolosov; A. D. Krasilnikov; M. I. Pravdin; I. Ye. Sleptsov

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

An experimental foundation for electromagnetic shower formation in the geomagnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At very high energies the Earth magnetic field, although in many other connections conside red rather weak, acts as a strong field on photons and leptons. This paper discusses the i ntimate connection between this effect and the corresponding `strong field effects' observ ed at accessible accelerator energies in aligned single crystals. As such, these effects c onstitute an experimental verification of the theoretical basis used for simulations of th e development of electromagnetic showers in magnetic fields, in particular the geomagnetic field. A short discussion of more general aspects of the shower development in the fields present at different distance scales is included.

U. I. Uggerhøj

2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Scanning Lidar Based Atmospheric Monitoring for Fluorescent Detectors of Cosmic Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the cosmic-ray air-shower fluorescence at extreme energies require precise knowledge of atmospheric conditions. The absolute calibration of the cosmic-ray energy depends on the absorption of fluorescence light between its origin and point of its detection. To reconstruct basic atmospheric parameters we review a novel analysis method based on two- and multi-angle measurements performed by the scanning backscatter lidar system. Applied inversion methods, optical depth, absorption and backscatter coefficient, as well as other parameters that enter the lidar equation are discussed in connection to the attenuation of the light traveling from shower to fluorescence detector.

A. Filipcic; M. Horvat; D. Veberic; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

A method for the separation and reconstructions of charged hadron and neutral hadron from their overlapped showers in electromagnetic calorimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The separation and reconstructions of charged hadron and neutral hadron from their overlapped showers in electromagnetic calorimeter is very important for the reconstructions of some particles with hadronic decays, for example the tau reconstruction in the searches for the Standard Model and supersymmetric Higgs bosons at the LHC. In this paper, a method combining the shower cluster in electromagnetic calorimeter and the parametric formula for hadron showers, was developed to separate the overlapped showers between charged hadron and neutral hadron. Taking the hadronic decay containing one charged pion and one neutral pion in the final status of tau for example, satisfied results of the separation of the overlapped showers, the reconstructions of the energy and positions of the hadrons were obtained. An improved result for the tau reconstruction with this decay model can be also achieved after the application of the proposed method.

Liang Song; Tao Jun-Quan; Shen Yu-Qiao; Fan Jia-Wei; Xiao Hong; Chen Guo-Ming

2013-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Maneuvering impact boring head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Maneuvering impact boring head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

67

Experiments in Shower-Top Forecasting Using an Interactive One-Dimensional Cloud Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were made in prediction of the elevation of warm season shower-tops, both prevailing and highest, using a one-dimensional cloud model run on a real-time minicomputer system. A forecaster inter-actively altered the initial temperatures ...

Timothy D. Crum; John J. Cahir

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Higgs production through vector-boson fusion at the NLO matched with parton showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of Higgs hadroproduction through vector-boson fusion at the NLO in QCD matched with parton showers. We discuss the matching systematics affecting this process through a comparison of the aMC@NLO predictions with the POWHEG and the pure-NLO ones.

Stefano Frixione; Paolo Torrielli; Marco Zaro

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Gamma Ray Bursts as seen by a Giant Air Shower Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potentiality of a Giant Shower Array to low energy gamma rays from gamma ray bursts is discussed. Effective areas are calculated for different scenarios and the results are encouraging. If gamma ray bursts have a spectrum which continues in the high energy gamma ray region, the Pierre Auger Observatory will be able to detect it.

C. O. Escobar; P. L. Da Silva; R. A. Vázquez

1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

Study of various photomultiplier tubes with muon beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of various photomultiplier tubes with muon beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron beams and Cerenkov light produced in electron showers CMS HCAL collaboration E-mail: Burak their windows were traversed by energetic charged particles. This signal, which is due to Cerenkov light

Akgun, Ugur

71

Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

Abraham, J.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U.; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Numerical Simulation of a Rain Shower Affected by Waste Energy Released from a Cooling Tower Complex in a Calm Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axisymmetric cloud model is used to investigate the evolution of convective cells and associated rain showers that develop due to the sensible and latent heat released into a calm atmosphere from an industrial cooling complex. The simulated ...

S. Guan; G. W. Reuter

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rate of events measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by the shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. Air-shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

Carla Bleve; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

75

Selection and reconstruction of very inclined air showers with the Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-Cherenkov tanks of the Pierre Auger Observatory can detect particles at all zenith angles and are therefore well-suited for the study of inclined and horizontal air showers (60 degrees geomagnetic field. Dedicated algorithms for the selection and reconstruction of such events, as well as the corresponding acceptance calculation, have been set up on basis of muon maps obtained from shower simulations.

Newton, D.; /Santiago de Compostela U.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Simultaneous observation of extensive air showers and deep-underground muons at the Gran Sasso Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined measurements of extensive air showers at the surface and high-energy muons deep underground have been initiated at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The underground detector is the first supermodule of MACRO (area=140 m{sup 2}, depth=3100 m of water equivalent , {ital E}{sub {mu}}{gt}1.3 TeV) and the surface detector is the EAS-TOP array (altitude 2000 m above sea level, total enclosed area {ital A}{approximately}10{sup 5} m{sup 2}). We discuss the correlation technique, the comparison between the shower parameters as determined by the two detectors, and some of the characteristics of the reconstructed events.

Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Caliccio, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Giglietto, N.; Nappi, E.; Spinelli, P. (Istituto di Fisica dell'Universita di Bari, Via Amendola, Bari (Italy)); Cecchini, S.; Fabbri, M.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Matteuzzi, P.; Pal, B.; Patrizii, L.; Predieri, F.; Sanzani, G.L.; Serra, P.; Spurio, M. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126, Bologna (Italy)); Ahlen, S.; Ficenec, D.; Hazen, E.; Klein, S.; Levin, D.; Marin, A.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Worstell, W. (Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA (USA)); Barish, B.; Coutu, S.; Hong, J.; Liu, G.; Peck, C.; Solie, D.; Steele, J. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (USA)); Lane, C.; Steinberg, R. (Physics Department, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Battistoni, G.; Bilokon, H.; Bloise, C.; Campana, P.; Chiarella, V.; Forti, C.; Grillo, A.; Iarocci, E.; Marini, A.; Patera, V.; Re; MACRO Collaboration

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

NLO QCD matrix elements + parton showers in e+e- -> hadrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new approach to combine multiple NLO parton-level calculations matched to parton showers into a single inclusive event sample. The method provides a description of hard multi-jet configurations at next-to leading order in the perturbative expansion of QCD, and it is supplemented with the all-orders resummed modelling of jet fragmentation provided by the parton shower. The formal accuracy of this technique is discussed in detail, invoking the example of electron-positron annihilation into hadrons. We focus on the effect of renormalisation scale variations in particular. Comparison with experimental data from LEP underlines that this novel formalism describes data with a theoretical accuracy that has hitherto not been achieved in standard Monte Carlo event generators.

Gehrmann, Thomas; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Siegert, Frank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy and momentum deposited into a QCD medium by a jet shower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hard virtual parton moving through a dense QCD medium loses energy and momentum by a series of radiative emissions and elastic scatterings. Unlike radiative energy loss, elastic exchanges transfer energy and momentum directly to the constituents of the medium. We present a calculation of this energy and momentum deposited in the medium after the passage of a virtual jet which decomposes into a partonic shower. Calculations are carried out in the higher-twist (HT) formalism of energy loss, which offers a natural extension to compute the amplification of the energy and momentum transfer to the medium due to the produced shower of partons, each of which transfers energy and momentum to the medium by elastic exchanges. Further assuming that the energy-momentum deposited is swiftly equilibrated, we also compute the hydro-dynamical response of the medium to the energy deposited by a jet and obtain a much enhanced conical pattern.

Qin, G -Y; Song, H; Heinz, U

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

On the possible common nature of double extensive air showers and aligned events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Double extensive air showers and aligned events at energies in the region E Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup 16} eV were discovered more than a quarter of a century ago. However, there is still no satisfactory explanation of their nature. In the present study, it is assumed that these two types of events have common nature, stemming from the break of a string that arises in the interaction of ultrahigh-energy particles.

Yakovlev, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Analysis of historical meteor and meteor shower records: Korea, China, and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have compiled and analyzed historical Korean meteor and meteor shower records in three Korean official history books, Samguksagi which covers the three Kingdoms period (57 B.C -- A.D. 935), Goryeosa of Goryeo dynasty (A.D. 918 -- 1392), and Joseonwangjosillok of Joseon dynasty (A.D. 1392 -- 1910). We have found 3861 meteor and 31 meteor shower records. We have confirmed the peaks of Perseids and an excess due to the mixture of Orionids, north-Taurids, or Leonids through the Monte-Carlo test. The peaks persist from the period of Goryeo dynasty to that of Joseon dynasty, for almost one thousand years. Korean records show a decrease of Perseids activity and an increase of Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids activity. We have also analyzed seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from Korean records. We confirm the seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from the records of Joseon dynasty with the maximum number of events being roughly 1.7 times the minimum. The Korean records are compared with Chinese and Japanese records for the same periods. Major features in Chinese meteor shower records are quite consistent with those of Korean records, particularly for the last millennium. Japanese records also show Perseids feature and Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids feature, although they are less prominent compared to those of Korean or Chinese records.

Hong-Jin Yang; Changbom Park; Myeong-Gu Park

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

Sawabe, J.K.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

82

The lateral shower age parameter as an estimator of chemical composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the feasibility of estimating primary cosmic ray composition at ultra high energies from the study of lateral age parameter of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) at ground level. Using different types of lateral distribution functions, we fit the particle density of simulated EAS to find the lateral age parameter. We discuss the chemical composition calculating the merit factor for each parameter distribution. The analysis considers three different primary particles (proton, iron and gamma), four different zenith angles (0{\\deg}, 15{\\deg}, 30{\\deg} and 45{\\deg}) and three primary energies (10^{17.25} eV, 10^{17.50} eV and 10^{17.75} eV).

A. Tapia; D. Melo; F. Sánchez; A. Sedoski Croce; A. Etchegoyen; J. M. Figueira; R. F. Gamarra; B. García; N. González; M. Josebachuili; D. Ravignani; I. Sidelnik; B. Wundheiler

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

83

Amplitude calibration of a digital radio antenna array for measuring cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radio pulses are emitted during the development of air showers, where air showers are generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere. These nanosecond short pulses are presently investigated by various experiments for the purpose of using them as a new detection technique for cosmic particles. For an array of 30 digital radio antennas (LOPES experiment) an absolute amplitude calibration of the radio antennas including the full electronic chain of the data acquisition system is performed, in order to estimate absolute values of the electric field strength for these short radio pulses. This is mandatory, because the measured radio signals in the MHz frequency range have to be compared with theoretical estimates and with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations to reconstruct features of the primary cosmic particle. A commercial reference radio emitter is used to estimate frequency dependent correction factors for each single antenna of the radio antenna array. The expected received power is related to the power recorded by the full electronic chain. Systematic uncertainties due to different environmental conditions and the described calibration procedure are of order 20%.

S. Nehls; A. Hakenjos; M. J. Arts; J. Bluemer; H. Bozdog; W. A. van Cappellen; H. Falcke; A. Haungs; A. Horneffer; T. Huege; P. G. Isar; O. Kroemer

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Measurements of the Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in a Scintillator-Tungsten HCAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For calorimeter applications requiring precise time stamping, the time structure of hadronic showers in the detector is a crucial issue. This applies in particular to detector concepts for CLIC, where a hadronic calorimeter with tungsten absorbers is being considered to achieve a high level of shower containment while satisfying strict space constraints. The high hadronic background from gamma gamma to hadrons processes at 3 TeV in combination with the 2 GHz bunch crossing frequency at CLIC requires good time stamping in the detectors. To provide first measurements of the time structure in a highly granular scintillator-tungsten calorimeter, T3B, a dedicated timing experiment, was installed behind the last layer of the CALICE WHCAL prototype, a 30 layer tungsten scintillator calorimeter. T3B consists of 15 small scintillator cells with embedded silicon photomultipliers, read out with fast digitizers over a time window of 2.4 us, and provides detailed measurements of the time structure of the signal. The offline data reconstruction performs an automatic gain calibration using noise events recorded between physics triggers and allows the determination of the arrival time of each photon at the photon sensor. The T3B setup, its calibration and data reconstruction, as well as first results of the time structure of the calorimeter response for 10 GeV pions recorded at the CERN PS confronted with Geant4 simulations using different physics lists are discussed.

Frank Simon; for the CALICE Collaboration

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Nonpotable reuse: Development of health criteria and technologies for shower water recycle. (Reannouncement with new availability information)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army is evaluating recycle of field shower water as a conservation practice in arid regions and is seeking to define appropriate technologies and health criteria. Shower wastewaters at a military installation have been characterized in terms of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. Two treatment technologies havebeen investigated. Microfiltration cartridges with a nominal pore size of 0.2 MU m achieved consistent removals of 75 15% of total organic carbon (TOC) and better than 99% of turbidity from synthetic shower water containing 50 to 100 mg/L of TOC as soap. An alternative treatmenttechnology utilized powered activated carbon and coagulation/flocculation/ sedimentation followed by diatomaceous earth filtration. A TOC reduction of 70 15% was achieved in three separate studies, although at a cost of 1 g/L or more of powered activated carbon. Revised quality criteria for recycled shower water have been developed with guidance from the National Research Council. Parameters which can practically be measured in the field are primarily associated with microbiological safety.

Burrows, W.D.; Schmidt, M.O.; Carnevale, R.M.; Schaub, S.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

Heater head for stirling engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

Corey, John A. (R.D. #2, Box 101 E, North Troy, NY 12182)

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a laminated metal composite, comprising alternating layers of low flow stress material and high flow stress material, and formed using flow constraining elements around each low flow stress layer; and a method of making same. A composite is a combination of at least two chemically distinct materials with a distinct interface separating the two materials. A metal matrix composite (MMC) is a composite material composed of a metal and a nonmetallic reinforcing agent such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite in continuous or discontinuous fiber, whisker, or discrete particulate form. A laminate is a material composed of several bonded layers. It is possible to have a laminate composed of multi-layers of a single type of material bonded to each other. However, such a laminate would not be considered to be a composite. The term {open_quotes}laminated metal composite{close_quotes} (LMC), as used herein, is intended to include a structural material composed of: (1) layers of metal or metal alloys interleaved with (2) a different metal, a metal alloy, or a metal matrix composite (MMC) containing strengthening agents.

Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio [Center for Integrated Research, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Possibility of Using a Satellite-Based Detector for Recording Cherenkov Light from Ultrahigh-Energy Extensive Air Showers Penetrating into the Ocean Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have estimated the reflected component of Cherenkov radiation, which arises in developing of an extensive air shower with primary energy of 10^20 eV over the ocean surface. It has been shown that, under conditions of the TUS experiment, a flash of the reflected Cherenkov photons at the end of the fluorescence track can be identified in showers with zenith angles up to 20 degrees.

Shustova, O P; Khrenov, B A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Heater head for Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a heater head for a Stirling engine comprising: a housing for enclosing the heater head with gas at a substantial elevated pressure; insulator means attached to the housing for insulating the heater head; inlet means attached to a regenerator in the housing for admission of relatively high pressure working fluid from the regenerator of a Stirling engine; a first annular heating wall in the housing attached to the inlet means for heating the working fluid; and, a second annular heating wall in the housing concentric with the first heating wall but of lesser diameters so that an annular space is formed between the first heating wall and the second heating wall for heating working fluid; and a third heating wall in the housing concentric with and smaller in diameter than the second heating wall forming the condensing area of a heat pipe between the second heating wall and the third heating wall.

White, M.A.; Emigh, S.G.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Roundness of Molded Detonator Heads  

SciTech Connect

The magnitude of the deviations from roundness of molded detonator heads, caused by the geometry of the part and by different materials, was investigated to provide a scientific basis which can be used to predict dimensions and tolerances of size and roundness for new heads. Injection presses were used to mold detonator heads to precision tolerances. Twenty parts were molded under optimum conditions in two different molds using both DAP filled with long glass fibers and DAP filled with asbestos. Each of the parts was analyzed for size and roundness, and the data were analyzed statistically. The results indicate: 1. Geometry is highly significant. 2. Material is highly significant. 3. Geometry and material do not interact. 4. Geometry affects magnitude of deviation from roundness. 5. Geometry affects magnitude of shrinkage.

Wendeln, D. E.; Waldfogle, E. A.

1968-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an extensive air shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 10^{17} and 10^{19} eV and zenith angles up to 65 degs. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte-Carlo results showing how LTP functions from data are in good agreement with simulations.

The Pierre Auger Collaboration; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anti?i?; A. Anzalone; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bäcker; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Bäuml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Bellétoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; A. Chou; J. Chudoba; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; J. Coppens; A. Cordier; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; W. J. M. de Mello Junior; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; G. Decerprit; L. del Peral; M. del Río; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; J. C. Diaz; M. L. Díaz Castro; P. N. Diep; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. D'Urso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; J. Espadanal; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; A. Ferrero; B. Fick; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; E. D. Fraenkel; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. García; D. García Gámez; D. Garcia-Pinto; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; K. Gesterling; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. Gonçalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; D. Góra; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; S. R. Gozzini; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; M. Hrabovský; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. H. Kampert; P. Karhan; P. Kasper; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; J. Knapp; D. -H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; P. Lautridou; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Lemiere; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agüera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; L. Lu; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; C. Macolino; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martínez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; W. Miller; L. Miramonti; L. Molina-Bueno; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; C. Morris; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; S. Mueller; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra ‡; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Nožka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschläger; A. Olinto; P. Oliva; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; R. D. Parsons; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; N. Phan; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; C. Robledo; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; J. Rodriguez Rojo

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Estimating the Annual Water and Energy Savings in Texas A & M University Cafeterias using Low Flow Pre-Rinse Spray Valves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency of a Pre- Rinse Spray Valve (PRSV) is one of the most cost effective water conservation methods in the Food Services Industry. A significant contributor to this cost efficiency is the reduction in the energy costs required to provide the mandatory hot water. This research paper estimates the potential quantity and dollar value of the water and energy that can be saved annually in Texas A&M University's dining services with the installation of low flow pre-rinse spray valves. The data collection was obtained from four of Texas A&M University's Dining Services facilities. The annual savings were estimated by contrasting the water consumption of the existing T & S Brass B 0107-M PRSVs with the latest and most advanced available low flow T and S Brass B 0107-C PRSV. The annual water consumption of the existing and new PRSVs were predicted by measuring an individual average flow rate for each and observing the number of hours per day the PRSV would be used. The observed and measured values were extrapolated to amount rates to determine cost savings. The dollar value was ascertained using the utility cost data recorded over a semester by the Facilities Coordinator of the Department of Dining Services. The findings of this study show that the water savings from a single PRSV could lead to an estimated annual saving ranging between 46% and 78% of the current operation cost. The T & S Brass B 0107-C PRSV is currently priced between $52- $60 per valve resulting in a payback period ranging between 1.5-6 months per valve. If every valve on campus was replaced, the University could reap a savings in the range of $ 5,400- $22,590 over the 5 year useful life of the valve, having initially invested less than $550.

Rebello, Harsh Varun

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Detection and imaging of atmospheric radio flashes from cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) at energies >10^20 eV remains a mystery. They are likely to be of extragalactic origin, but should be absorbed within ~50 Mpc through interactions with the cosmic microwave background. As there are no sufficient powerful accelerators within this distance from the Galaxy, explanations for UHECRs range from unusual astrophysical sources to exotic string physics. Also unclear is whether UHECRs consist of protons, heavy nuclei, neutrinos or gamma-rays. To resolve these questions, larger detectors with higher duty cycles and which combine multiple detection techniques are needed. Radio emission from UHECRs, on the other hand, is unaffected by attenuation, has a high duty cycle, gives calorimetric measurements and provides high directional accuracy. Here we report the detection of radio flashes from cosmic-ray air showers using low-cost digital radio receivers. We show that the radiation can be understood in terms of the geosynchrotron effect. Our results show that it should be possible to determine the nature and composition of UHECRs with combined radio and particle detectors, and to detect the ultrahigh-energy neutrinos expected from flavour mixing.

H. Falcke; W. D. Apel; A. F. Badea

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

96

Studies of Air Showers above 10^18 eV with the CHICOS Array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHICOS (California HIgh school Cosmic ray ObServatory) is presently an array of more than 140 detectors distributed over a large area (~400 km^2) of southern California, and will consist of 180 detectors at 90 locations in the near future. These sites, located at area schools, are equipped with computerized data acquisition and automatic nightly data transfer (via internet) to our Caltech lab. The installed sites make up the largest currently operating ground array for ultra-high energy cosmic ray research in the northern hemisphere. The goal of CHICOS is to provide data related to the flux and distribution of arrival directions for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We have performed detailed Monte-Carlo calculations to determine the density and arrival-time distribution of charged particles in extensive air showers for the CHICOS array. Calculations were performed for proton primaries with energies 10^18 to 10^21 eV and zenith angles out to 50 degrees. We have developed novel parameterizations for both distribu...

Lynn, T W; Carlson, B E; Jillings, C J; Larson, M B; McKeown, R D; Hill, J E; Falkowski, B J; Seki, R; Sepikas, J; Yodh, G B; Wells, D; Chan, K C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

An ET Origin for Stratospheric Particles Collected during the 1998 Leonids Meteor Shower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On 17 November 1998, a helium-filled weather balloon was launched into the stratosphere, equipped with a xerogel microparticle collector. The three-hour flight was designed to sample the dust environment in the stratosphere during the Leonid meteor shower, and possibly to capture Leonid meteoroids. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope analyses of the returned collectors revealed the capture of a $\\sim$30-$\\mu$m particle, with a smooth, multigranular shape, and partially melted, translucent rims; similar to known Antarctic micrometeorites. Energy-dispersive X-ray Mass Spectroscopy shows enriched concentrations of the non-volatile elements, Mg, Al, and Fe. The particle possesses a high magnesium to iron ratio of 2.96, similar to that observed in 1998 Leonids meteors (Borovicka, {\\it et al.} 1999) and sharply higher than the ratio expected for typical material from the earth's crust. A statistical nearest-neighbor analysis of the abundance ratios Mg/Si, Al/Si, and Fe/Si demonstrates that the particle is most similar in composition to cosmic spherules captured during airplane flights through the stratosphere. The mineralogical class is consistent with a stony (S) type of silicates, olivine [(Mg,Fe)$_{2}$SiO$_{4}$] and pyroxene [(Mg,Fe)SiO$_{3}$]--or oxides, herecynite [(Fe, Mg) Al$_{2}$O$_{4}$]. Attribution to the debris stream of the Leonids' parent body, comet Tempel-Tuttle, would make it the first such material from beyond the orbit of Uranus positively identified on Earth.

D. A. Noever; J. A. Phillips; J. M. Horack; G. Jerman; E. Myszka

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Rotating control head applications increasing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rotating control head technology has become an important tool for lowering drilling costs and increasing well productivity, especially in many hard-rock areas and mature oil and gas fields. Lower drilling costs are achieved primarily by the faster penetration rates, reduced nondrilling time, and reduced mud volume requirements associated with underbalanced drilling. Greater well productivity can sometimes be obtained because of reduced formation damage for mud. Recent advances in rotating head technology have increased the range of well conditions to which this technology can be applied. Even though the use of rotating control heads is growing rapidly, this topic has been largely neglected in most well control training programs. Many engineers are not yet familiar with this important emerging technology and some of the modern concepts and practices used. The paper discusses the high-pressure rotating head and its application to gas or air drilling, flow drilling, geothermal drilling, overbalanced drilling and workover operations. The paper also discusses operating guidelines and rig crew training.

Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1995-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

99

Intergranular Cracking of Brass Sprinkler Heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Charles R. Morin Memorial Symposium on Failure Analysis and Prevention. Presentation Title, Intergranular Cracking of Brass Sprinkler Heads.

100

Low cutter load raise head  

SciTech Connect

A raise head having a multiplicity of cutters for enlarging a pilot hole into a larger diameter hole by disintegrating the earth formations that surround the pilot hole is provided that will require lower cutter loads to penetrate the formations being bored by directing the rock fracture planes toward the pilot hole forcing the rock to yield with less input energy. The cutters are positioned on the raise head to provide an earth formation contact profile with a major portion of said earth formation contact profile extending outward and upward from said pilot hole. The included angle between the major portion of the earth formation contact profile and the axis of the pilot hole is less than 90/sup 0/.

Saxman, W.C.

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CFD Analysis for Flow Behavior Characteristics in the Upper Plenum during low flow/low pressure transients for the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas coolant at low pressure exhibits poor heat transfer characteristics. This is an area of concern for the passive response targeted by the Generation IV GCFR design. For the first 24 hour period, the decay heat removal for the GCFR design is dependent on an actively powered blower, which also would reduce the temperature in the fuel during transients, before depending on the passive operation. Natural circulation cooling initiates when the blower is stopped for the final phase of the decay heat removal, as under forced convection the core decay heat is adequately cooled by the running blower. The ability of the coolant to flow in the reverse direction or having recirculation, when the blowers are off, necessitates more understanding of the flow behavior characteristics in the upper plenum. The work done here focuses primarily on the period after the blower has been turned off, as the core is adequately cooled when the blowers are running, thus there was no need to carry out the analysis for the first 24 hours. In order to understand the plume behavior for the GCFR upper plenum several cases were run, with air, helium and helium-air mixture. For each case, the FLUENT was used to characterize the steady state velocity vectors and corresponding temperature in the upper plenum under passive decay heat removal conditions. This study will provide better insight into the plume interaction in the upper plenum at low flow and low pressure conditions.

Piyush Sabharwall; Theron Marshall; Kevan Weaver; Hans Gougar

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Establishment of very uniform gas-flow pattern in the process chamber for microwave-excited high-density plasma by ceramic shower plate  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed a ceramic upper shower plate used in the microwave-excited high-density plasma process equipment incorporating a dual shower-plate structure to establish a very uniform gas-flow pattern in the process chamber. Thousands of very fine gas-injection holes are implemented on this Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} upper shower plate with optimized allocation to establish a uniform gas-flow pattern of plasma-excitation gases and radical-generation gases for generating intended radicals in the plasma-excitation region. The size of these fine holes must be 50 {mu}m or less in diameter and 8 mm or more in length because these holes perform an essential role: They completely avoid the plasma excitation in these fine holes and upper gas-supply regions resulting from the plasma penetration into these regions from excited high-density plasma, even if very high-density plasma greater than 1x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} is excited just under the ceramic upper shower plate by microwaves supplied from the radial line slot antenna. On the other hand, various process gases, such as material gases for film formations and etching gases, are supplied from the lower shower plate installed in the diffusion plasma region to this very uniform gas-flow pattern region of plasma-excitation gases and radical-generation gases. As a result, the process gases are supplied to the wafer surface in a very effective manner without excess decomposition of those process gas molecules and undesired reaction-product deposition on the inner surface of the process chamber. The process results are improved drastically by introducing the newly developed ceramic upper shower plate. But also, process uniformity on the entire wafer is improved with drastically reducing reaction-product deposition on the inner surface of the process chamber.

Goto, Tetsuya; Inokuchi, Atsutoshi; Ishibashi, Kiyotaka; Yasuda, Seij; Nakanishi, Toshio; Kohno, Masayuki; Okesaku, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masaru; Nozawa, Toshihisa; Hirayama, Masaki; Ohmi, Tadahiro [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Ltd., Tokyo 107-6325 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Technology Development Institute, Inc., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Tokyo Electron AT Ltd., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Hokuriku Seikei Industrial, Co., Ltd., Ishikawa 923-0157 (Japan); Tokyo Electron Technology Development Institute, Inc., Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Failure Analysis of a Reciprocating Compressor Head  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A major oil company operation experienced a reciprocating compressor failure on one of its offshore platforms. The compressor head on the 1st ...

104

HeadLock : wide-range head pose estimation for low resolution video  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on data mining technologies to extract head pose information from low resolution video recordings. Head pose, as an approximation of gaze direction, is a key indicator of human behavior and interaction. ...

DeCamp, Philip (Philip James)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Automatic Interpretation of Human Head Movements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a complete face tracking system that interprets human head movements in real time. The system combines motion analysis with reliable and efficient object recognition strategies. It classifies head movements as "yes" (nodding head), "no" (shaking head) or "nothing" (still head). The system's skill allows contactless man-machine interaction, thus giving access to a number of new applications. 1 Introduction As industrialization proceeds, the importance of interactions between man and machine increases rapidly. Information flow from machine to man has become comfortable and direct in recent years due to tremendous progresses in computer graphics. Information flow from man to machine, on the other hand, is still on a low level. It is restricted to moving mice, pressing buttons, and typing character sequences on a keyboard. Automatic interpretation of gestures and facial expressions could reduce this imbalance and is therefore of central interrest for current and futu...

Bichsel Pentland; M. Bichsel; A. P. Pentland

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment - A laboratory measurement of the microwave emission from extensive air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AMY experiment aims to measure the microwave bremsstrahlung radiation (MBR) emitted by air-showers secondary electrons accelerating in collisions with neutral molecules of the atmosphere. The measurements are performed using a beam of 510 MeV electrons at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories. The goal of the AMY experiment is to measure in laboratory conditions the yield and the spectrum of the GHz emission in the frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. The final purpose is to characterise the process to be used in a next generation detectors of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A description of the experimental setup and the first results are presented.

K. Louedec; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; M. Blanco; M. Bohácová; B. Buonomo; G. Cataldi; M. R. Coluccia; P. Creti; I. De Mitri; C. Di Giulio; P. Facal San Luis; L. Foggetta; R. Gaïor; D. Garcia-Fernandez; M. Iarlori; S. Le Coz; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. C. Mari?; D. Martello; G. Mazzitelli; M. Monasor; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; S. Petrera; P. Privitera; V. Rizi; G. Rodriguez Fernandez; F. Salamida; G. Salina; M. Settimo; P. Valente; J. R. Vazquez; V. Verzi; C. Williams

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Flicker and the Red Headed Woodpecker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smaller than the flicker, it is the only woodpecker with the entire head and neck red -- a bright scarlet. The breast is white; the back bluish- black with a big square...

108

Vacuum compatible miniature CCD camera head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close(0.04" for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military industrial, and medical imaging applications.

Conder, Alan D. (Tracy, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Heater head for a Stirling engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heater head is described for a compound Stirling engine modules, each including a displacer cylinder coaxially aligned with the displacer cylinder of the other of the engine modules, a displacer piston mounted for reciprocation in the displacer cylinder.

Darooka, D.K.

1988-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Electro-optic voltage sensor head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electro-optic voltage sensor head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Measurement of the response of an SCG1-C scintillation glass shower detector to 2 to 17. 5 GeV positrons  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the response of an electromagnetic shower counter constructed from the new scintillation glass (SCG1-C, Ohara Optical Glass, Inc.) to positrons in the energy range 2 to 17.5 GeV. We have measured the energy resolution of this 18.4 radiation length detector plus its attendant SF5 lead glass shower counter array to be sigma/E = (1.64 +- 0.14)% + (1.13 +- 0.33)%/..sqrt..E with the constant term dominated by variations in the conversion point of the positron and shower leakage. We found this counter to be linear over the energy range examined. We have also measured the light output of the SCG1-C counter relative to light output of the SF5 lead glass guard blocks using 17.5 GeV positrons. We find that the SCG1-C counter produces 5.10 +- 0.30 more light at the phototube than the SF5 lead glass counters.

Cox, B.; Hale, G.; Mazur, P.O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Bath and Shower Effects in the Rat Parotid Gland Explain Increased Relative Risk of Parotid Gland Dysfunction After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess in a rat model whether adding a subtolerance dose in a region adjacent to a high-dose irradiated subvolume of the parotid gland influences its response (bath-and-shower effect). Methods and Materials: Irradiation of the whole, cranial 50%, and/or the caudal 50% of the parotid glands of Wistar rats was performed using 150-MeV protons. To determine suitable (i.e., subtolerance) dose levels for a bath-dose, both whole parotid glands were irradiated with 5 to 25 Gy. Subsequently groups of Wistar rats received 30 Gy to the caudal 50% (shower) and 0 to 10 Gy to the cranial 50% (bath) of both parotid glands. Stimulated saliva flow rate (function) was measured before and up to 240 days after irradiation. Results: Irradiation of both glands up to a dose of 10 Gy did not result in late loss of function and is thus regarded subtolerance. Addition of a dose bath of 1 to 10 Gy to a high-dose in the caudal 50% of the glands resulted in enhanced function loss. Conclusion: Similar to the spinal cord, the parotid gland demonstrates a bath and shower effect, which may explain the less-than-expected sparing of function after IMRT.

Luijk, Peter van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: p.van.luijk@rt.umcg.nl; Faber, Hette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schippers, Jacobus M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Accelerator Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Meertens, Harm [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie - Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy Gang . kast - Aisle . bookcase 01 Algemeen 01 chemie 05 Physical chemistry 10.08 - 06 Chemische binding 06 Chemical bonding 10.13 - 07 Anorganische

Galis, Frietson

115

Comparing LOPES measurements of air-shower radio emission with REAS 3.11 and CoREAS simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic ray air showers emit radio pulses at MHz frequencies, which can be measured with radio antenna arrays - like LOPES at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany. To improve the understanding of the radio emission, we test theoretical descriptions with measured data. The observables used for these tests are the absolute amplitude of the radio signal, and the shape of the radio lateral distribution. We compare lateral distributions of more than 500 LOPES events with two recent and public Monte Carlo simulation codes, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS (v 1.0). The absolute radio amplitudes predicted by REAS 3.11 are in good agreement with the LOPES measurements. The amplitudes predicted by CoREAS are lower by a factor of two, and marginally compatible with the LOPES measurements within the systematic scale uncertainties. In contrast to any previous versions of REAS, REAS 3.11 and CoREAS now reproduce the shape of the measured lateral distributions correctly. This reflects a remarkable progress compared to the si...

Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

Frank, Donald N. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

Frank, D.N.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy Spectrum and Chemical Composition of Cosmic Rays between 0.3 and 10 PeV determined from the Cherenkov-Light and Charged-Particle distributions in Air Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the lateral distribution of Cherenkov photons with the wide-angle atmospheric Cherenkov light detector array AIROBICC and of the charged particle lateral distribution with the scintillator matrix of the HEGRA air-shower detector complex in air showers are reported. With the atmospheric shower-front sampling technique these detectors measure the electromagnetic component of an extensive air shower via the lateral density distribution of the shower particles and of the Cherenkov photons. The data are compared with events generated with the CORSIKA program package with the QGSJET hadronic-event generator. Consistency checks performed with primary energy-reconstruction methods based on different shower observables indicate satisfactory agreement between these extensive air shower simulations and the experimental data. The energy spectrum features a so called ``knee'' at an energy of E_knee = 3.98 (+4.66) (-0.83) (stat) +- 0.53 (syst) PeV. Power law fits to the differential energy spectrum yield indices of -2.72 (+0.02)(-0.03) (stat) +- 0.07 (syst) below, and -3.22 (+0.47) (-0.59) (stat) +- 0.08 (syst)} above the knee. The best-fit elongation rate for the whole energy range is determined to 78.3 +- 1.0 (stat) +- 6.2 (syst) g/cm^2. At the highest energies it seems to decrease slightly.The best-fit fraction of light nuclei decreases from 37 (+28) (-21) % (combined statistical and systematic) to 8 (+32) (-8) % (combined statistical and systematic) in the energy range discussed here. A detailed study of the systematic errors reveals that a non-changing composition cannot be excluded.

F. Arqueros; The HEGRA Collaboration

1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Reliable forward walking parameters from head-track data alone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Head motion during real walking is complex: The basic translational path is obscured by head bobbing. Many VE applications would be improved if a bobbing-free path were available. This paper introduces a model that describes head position while walking ...

Jeremy D. Wendt; Mary C. Whitton; David Adalsteinsson; Frederick P. Brooks

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Head Orientation and Gaze Direction in Meetings Rainer Stiefelhagen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Head Orientation and Gaze Direction in Meetings Rainer Stiefelhagen Interactive Systems factors in the formation of where a person is looking at : head orientation and eye orientation. In this poster, we present an experiment aimed at evaluating the potential of head orientation estimation

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121

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: SUBJECT: Project Full Funding Policy in the Annual ~ u d ~ e t Request On July 18,2008, the Secretary approved the Department's Contract and Project Management Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Corrective Action Plan (CAP). This is the Department's plan to improve contract and project management and ultimately be removed from GAO's High Risk List - a list that the Department has been on since 1990. One of the key issues identified in the CAP is the Department's failure to request and obtain full funding for non-information technology capital asset projects, where appropriate. This new policy is established to reduce the inherent inefficiencies and risks ingoduced by prolonging the duration of small projects, as well as to add budget stability

122

Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances.

Komvopoulos, Kyriakos (Orinda, CA); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA); Wei, Bo (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Bhatia, Singh C. (Morgan Hill, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 15 figs.

Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, S.C.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vapor generator steam drum spray head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and "cooldown" water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure.

Fasnacht, Jr., Floyd A. (Massillon, OH)

1978-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Definition: Head-End System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head-End System Head-End System Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Head-End System A head-end system is hardware and software that receives the stream of meter data brought back to the utility through the AMI. Head-end systems may perform a limited amount of data validation before either making the data available for other systems to request or pushing the data out to other systems.[1] Related Terms advanced metering infrastructure, system References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/head_end_system [[Ca LikeLike UnlikeLike You and one other like this.One person likes this. Sign Up to see what your friends like. tegory: Smart Grid Definitionssmart grid,smart grid, |Template:BASEPAGENAME]]smart grid,smart grid, Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Head-End_System&oldid=502621"

126

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waterless urinals, low flow toilets, flow restrictors on sinks and showers and efficient commercial dishwasher Comprehensive waste management Environmental Metric Percent...

127

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AZ-TRIBE-KAIBAB BAND OF PAIUTE INDIAN TRIBE AZ-TRIBE-KAIBAB BAND OF PAIUTE INDIAN TRIBE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AZ-TRIBE-KAIBAB BAND OF PAIUTE INDIAN TRIBE AZ American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Kaibab Band of Paiute Indian Tribe of Arizona proposes to install energy efficient appliances and perform energy efficient retrofits to homes on the Kaibab Paiute Indian Reservation. These retrofits would include siding, roofing, windows, doors, and other areas of the home losing heat, using excess water, or other non-efficient areas (e.g., replace/upgrade/install water efficient appliances, water saving taps, other water fixtures [low-flow shower heads, low-flow faucet aerators, low-flow toilets]).

128

Integrated head package for top mounted nuclear instrumentation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor such as a pressurized water reactor has an integrated head package providing structural support and increasing shielding leading toward the vessel head. A reactor vessel head engages the reactor vessel, and a control rod guide mechanism over the vessel head raises and lowers control rods in certain of the thimble tubes, traversing penetrations in the reactor vessel head, and being coupled to the control rods. An instrumentation tube structure includes instrumentation tubes with sensors movable into certain thimble tubes disposed in the fuel assemblies. Couplings for the sensors also traverse penetrations in the reactor vessel head. A shroud is attached over the reactor vessel head and encloses the control rod guide mechanism and at least a portion of the instrumentation tubes when retracted. The shroud forms a structural element of sufficient strength to support the vessel head, the control rod guide mechanism and the instrumentation tube structure, and includes radiation shielding material for limiting passage of radiation from retracted instrumentation tubes. The shroud is thicker at the bottom adjacent the vessel head, where the more irradiated lower ends of retracted sensors reside. The vessel head, shroud and contents thus can be removed from the reactor as a unit and rested safely and securely on a support.

Malandra, Louis J. (McKeesport, PA); Hornak, Leonard P. (Forest Hills, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Heading Error Removal System for Tracking Devices - Energy ...  

Systems are able to reduce or remove slowly-varying drift errors, such as heading errors, rate of rotation errors, and direction of travel errors, to correct the ...

130

Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act This memorandum provides guidance to the federal agencies on incorporating pollution prevention principles, techniques, and mechanisms into their planning and decisionmaking processes and evaluating and reporting those efforts in documents prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act More Documents & Publications Integrating Pollution Prevention with NEPA Planning Activities

131

On the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray using the muon arrival times from extensive air showers: Application for Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we study the possibility to discriminate the mass of the primary cosmic ray by observing the muon arrival times in ground detectors. We analyzed extensive air showers (EAS) induced by proton and iron nuclei with the same energy 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV simulated with CORSIKA, and analyzed the muon arrival times at ground measured by the infill array detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO). From the arrival times of the core and of the muons the atmospheric depth of muon generation locus is evaluated. The results suggest a potential mass discrimination on the basis of muon arrival times and of the reconstructed atmospheric depth of muon production. An analysis of a larger set of CORSIKA simulations carried out for primary energies above 10{sup 18} eV is in progress.

Arsene, N.; Rebel, H.; Sima, O. [Institute of Space Science (ISS), Bucharest-Magurele, P.O. Box MG-23 (Romania) and Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Physics Department, University of Bucharest, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mars mission laser tool Mars mission laser tool Mars mission laser tool heads to JPL Curiosity will carry the newly delivered laser instrument to reveal which elements are present in Mars' rocks and soils. September 21, 2010 A bright ball of plasma is produced by ChemCam's invisible laser beam striking a rock within the Mars sample chamber. A bright ball of plasma is produced by ChemCam's invisible laser beam striking a rock within the Mars sample chamber. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "ChemCam will act as a geochemical observatory, providing composition data to understand if Mars was, is, or will be a habitable world." Star Wars photon gun will give Mars rover hands-free rock ID LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 21, 2010-The ChemCam instrument has

133

Closure head for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closure head for a nuclear reactor includes a stationary outer ring integral with the reactor vessel with a first rotatable plug disposed within the stationary outer ring and supported from the stationary outer ring by a bearing assembly. A sealing system is associated with the bearing assembly to seal the annulus defined between the first rotatable plug and the stationary outer ring. The sealing system comprises tubular seal elements disposed in the annulus with load springs contacting the tubular seal elements so as to force the tubular seal elements against the annulus in a manner to seal the annulus. The sealing system also comprises a sealing fluid which is pumped through the annulus and over the tubular seal elements causing the load springs to compress thereby reducing the friction between the tubular seal elements and the rotatable components while maintaining a gas-tight seal therebetween.

Wade, Elman E. (South Huntingdon, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Light water reactor lower head failure analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An integrated approach for head gesture based interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The head pose and movement of a user is closely related with his/her intention and thought, recognition of such information could be useful to develop a natural and sensitive user-wheelchair interface. This paper presents an original integrated approach ... Keywords: Electric powered wheelchair, Face authentication, Facial pose estimation, Head gesture based interface, State machine

Gin Chong Lee; Chu Kiong Loo; Letchumanan Chockalingam

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Mathematical Model for a Vibrating Human Head  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a mathematical model has been formulated to study the vibration of the human head. In the mathematical analysis of the model, the skull is considered as an anisotropic spherical shell and brain matter is represented as an inviscid compressible ... Keywords: Anisotropic, Human Head, Laplace Transformation, Skull Vibration, Stress Distribution

J. C. Misra; S. Dandapat; S. Adhikary

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Distribution of visual attention in head-worn displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With head-worn displays, information can be presented in addition to the real surround. But, the virtual information is self-illuminating, has an unclear depth, and, depending on the visual background, the signal-noise ratio and the brightness contrast ... Keywords: head-worn displays, optical see-through displays, visual search

Anke Huckauf; Mario H. Urbina; Fabina Doil; Johannes Tümler; Rüdiger Mecke

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A M3G Talking Head for Smartphones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Often customer information services or virtual support guides make use of friendly interface to facilitate human-machine interaction. Indeed, virtual guided tours or helpdesks use a talking anthropomorphic head to communicate with the user. In this paper, ... Keywords: Talking Head, M3G, Smartphones, PDA, J2ME

O. Gambino; A. Caronia; V. Di Bella; R. Pirrone; S. Gaglio

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements Gary Hodges, CIRES/NOAA and John Schmelzer, PNL gary.hodges@noaa.gov, john.schmelzer@pnl.gov 17th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting 26-30 March 2006 Monterey, CA Head Refurbishment The Process Includes: * New filter detectors * Relocate internal thermistors * New connectors * Gain resistors moved to head * Improved insulation The Finished Heads: * Are lamp calibrated * Have filter profiles measured * Cosine characterized * Are out-of-band tested What Does This Mean For Data Users? * Fewer data gaps * Fewer DQRs * Confidence in the data * Well calibrated data Calibration Improvements 5 6 7 8 0 2 4 6 Airmass ln Direct Data will now be calibrated by the Langley method Extrapolate to TOA to get V 0 Benefits of Langley vs. Lamp calibrations:

140

Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher December 23, 2010 - 11:12am Addthis Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? You'll be able to start monitoring St. Nick's journey starting at 6 AM ET on Christmas Eve. Every year since 1998, the Department of Energy's Los Alamos lab has been using state of the art technology to track Santa Claus as he circles the globe the night before Christmas. You'll be able to start monitoring St. Nick's journey here starting at 6 AM ET on Christmas Eve. This week, I got a chance to talk to Santa Tracker Head Researcher (and Cibola Flight Experiment Project Leader) Diane Roussel-Dupre to get a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

Reactor Vessel Head Disposal Campaign for Nuclear Management Company  

SciTech Connect

After establishing a goal to replace as many reactor vessel heads as possible - in the shortest time and at the lowest cost as possible - Nuclear Management Company (NMC) initiated an ambitious program to replace the heads on all six of its pressurized water reactors. Currently, four heads have been replaced; and four old heads have been disposed of. In 2002, NMC began fabricating the first of its replacement reactor vessel heads for the Kewaunee Nuclear Plant. During its fall 2004 refueling outage, Kewaunee's head was replaced and the old head was prepared for disposal. Kewaunee's disposal project included: - Down-ending, - Draining, - Decontamination, - Packaging, - Removal from containment, - On-Site handling, - Temporary storage, - Transportation, - Disposal. The next two replacements took place in the spring of 2005. Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP) Unit 2 and Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant (PINGP) Unit 2 completed their head replacements during their scheduled refueling outages. Since these two outages were scheduled so close to each other, their removal and disposal posed some unique challenges. In addition, changes to the handling and disposal programs were made as a result of lessons learned from Kewaunee. A fourth head replacement took place during PBNP Unit 1's refueling outage during the fall of 2005. A number of additional changes took place. All of these changes and challenges are discussed in the paper. NMC's future schedule includes PINGP Unit 1's installation in Spring 2006 and Palisades' installation during 2007. NMC plans to dispose of these two remaining heads in a similar manner. This paper presents a summary of these activities, plus a discussion of lessons learned. (authors)

Hoelscher, H.L.; Closs, J.W. [Nuclear Management Company, LLC, 700 First Street, Hudson, WI 54016 (United States); Johnson, S.A. [Duratek, Inc., 140 Stoneridge Drive, Columbia, SC 29210 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Heading off the permanent oil crisis  

SciTech Connect

The 1996 spike in gasoline prices was not a signal of any fundamental worldwide shortage of crude oil. But based on a review of many studies of recoverable crude oil that have been published since the 1950s, it looks as though such a shortfall is now within sight. With world demand for oil growing at 2 percent per year, global production is likely to peak between the years 2007 and 2014. As this time approaches, we can expect prices to rise markedly and, most likely, permanently. Policy changes are needed now to ease the transition to high-priced oil. Oil production will continue, though at a declining rate, for many decades after its peak, and there are enormous amounts of coal, oil sands, heavy oil, and oil shales worldwide that could be used to produce liquid or gaseous substitutes for crude oil, albeit at higher prices. But the facilities for making such synthetic fuels are costly to build and environmentally damaging to operate, and their use would substantially increase carbon dioxide emissions (compared to emissions from products made from conventional crude oil). This paper examines ways of heading of the impending oil crisis. 8 refs., 3 figs.

MacKenzie, J.J. [World Resources Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)  

SciTech Connect

A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies: Emergencies and NEPA With this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality reiterates its previous guidance on the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental review of proposed emergency response actions.This memorandum clarifies that the previous guidance remains applicable to current situations and provides guidance on required agency environmental review. Emergencies and NEPA More Documents & Publications Memorandum for Federal NEPA Contacts: Emergency Actions and NEPA Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems Final Guidance on Improving the Process for Preparing Efficient and Timely

145

Steam Generator Group Project. Task 6. Channel head decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The Steam Generator Group Project utilizes a retired-from-service pressurized-water-reactor steam generator as a test bed and source of specimens for research. An important preparatory step to primary side research activities was reduction of the radiation field in the steam generator channel head. This task report describes the channel head decontamination activities. Though not a programmatic research objective it was judged beneficial to explore the use of dilute reagent chemical decontamination techniques. These techniques presented potential for reduced personnel exposure and reduced secondary radwaste generation, over currently used abrasive blasting techniques. Two techniques with extensive laboratory research and vendors prepared to offer commercial application were tested, one on either side of the channel head. As indicated in the report, both techniques accomplished similar decontamination objectives. Neither technique damaged the generator channel head or tubing materials, as applied. This report provides details of the decontamination operations. Application system and operating conditions are described.

Allen, R.P.; Clark, R.L.; Reece, W.D.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small Business Week Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small Business Week June 10, 2013 - 8:50am Addthis Department of Energy Contractor Diana Lewis Heading to National Small Business Week John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization National Small Business Week is around the corner, kicking off on June 17 across the country. The week honors hundreds of thousands of small business that contract with the federal government every year. Diana Lewis, a West Virginia native and founder of Action Facilities Management, Inc., is one of the small business owners being recognized by her state as the Small Business Person of the Year. During National Small

147

Using 3DF GPS Heading for Improving Underway ADCP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic error in the cross-track velocity measured under way from shipboard acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be attributed to error in measuring the ship's heading with a gyrocompass. Drift- and direction-dependent errors in ...

Gwyn Griffiths

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Intense, Variable Mixing near the Head of Monterey Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microstructure survey near the head of Monterey Submarine Canyon, the first in a canyon, confirmed earlier inferences that coastal submarine canyons are sites of intense mixing. The data collected during two weeks in August 1997 showed ...

Glenn S. Carter; Michael C. Gregg

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A study of the shadowing of galactic cosmic rays by the sun in a quiet phase of solar activity with the Tibet air shower array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have shown that the Sun's shadow by high energy cosmic rays moves year by year and its behavior is correlated with a time variation of the large-scale structure of the solar and interplanetary magnetic fields. The solar activity was near minimum in the period from 1996 through 1997. Using the data obtained with the Tibet air shower array, we examined the shadowing of cosmic rays by the Sun in this quiet phase of solar cycle, and found that the Sun's shadow was just in the apparent direction of the Sun, though it was observed at the position considerably away from the Sun to the south-west in the period between 1990 and 1993. It is known that the magnetic pole of equivalent solar dipole was reversed during the previous active phase, and near solar minimum the dipole was aligned with the rotating axis, preserving its N-pole on the north pole side of the Sun. This causes the solar magnetic field to shift the Sun's shadow to the east. Thus, the observed results suggest that the shift of the Sun's shadow due to the solar magnetic field was pushed back by the effect of the geomagnetic field, since the geomagnetic field always make the shadow shift to the west. We discuss the Sun's shadow observed during the period near solar minimum in 1996-1997 and compare it with the simulation results.

M. Amenomori; S. Ayabe; Caidong

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Parton showers as sources of energy-momentum deposition in the QGP and their implication for shockwave formation at RHIC and at the LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive the distribution of energy and momentumtransmitted from a primary fast parton and its medium-induced bremsstrahlung gluons to a thermalized quark-gluon plasma. Our calculation takes into account the important and thus far neglected effects of quantum interference between the resulting color currents. We use our result to obtain the rate at which energy is absorbed by the medium as a function of time and find that the rate is modified by the quantum interference between the primary parton and secondary gluons. This Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal type interference persists for time scales relevant to heavy ion phenomenology. We further couple the newly derived source of energy and momentum deposition to linearized hydrodynamics to obtain the bulk medium response to realistic parton propagation and splitting in the quark-gluon plasma. We find that because of the characteristic large angle in-medium gluon emission and the multiple sources of energy deposition in a parton shower, formation of well defined Mach cones by energetic jets in heavy ion reactions is not likely.

Neufeld, Richard B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vitev, Ivan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An improved dosimetric model of the head and brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last decade, various brain imaging methods using radionuclides have become available. Due to the introduction of new techniques, a small-scale dosimetry study of the brain, and more specifically the organs of the head (brain, eyes thyroid, skull, skin) was needed. However, the brain and head models developed in the past were crude representations of the human. In this research, a new brain model has been developed which includes eight subregions. This head model was included in a revised head model developed by Posion et al. in 1984. Some corrections and improvements were added to this head model such as the development of a new spinal region and a new cranium region in order to incorporate the cerebrospinal fluid. This model was used with a Monte Carlo code, EGS4, to calculate absorbed fraction of energy and specific absorbed fraction of energy for photon and electron sources located in one of thirteen chosen source regions. These calculations were made for radiations in the energy range 10 keV to 4 MeV. All twenty-three regions included in the revised head and brain model were taken as target regions. S-values were also calculated for several radionuclides used in brain imaging, and also deposited in the thyroid, the skull or the spinal skeleton. The S-values were calculated using discrete energy points on the beta emission spectrum of the radionuclides.

Bouchet, Lionel Gerard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Trombola, Daniel M. (Murrysville, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

TESLA Report 2003-10 Studies of Electromagnetic Cascade Showers Development in the TESLA Main Linac Initiated by Electron Field Emission in RF Cavities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper, and, in order to see this point more clearly, none of the other possible particle multiplication processes will be included in our simulations. 2 Simulation Procedure and Code Design The process of particle transport in our computer code DUST (DUnkel STrom, in German) is organized in such a way that it naturally breaks down into two parts, Monte Carlo simulation of the electromagnetic shower development when a particle impacts the inner vacuum surface of the accelerator, and particle dynamics in an electromagnetic field inside the accelerator vacuum. As usual, the accelerator to be studied is described as a sequence of physical elements. The user specifies the element geometry, materials and electromagnetic fields. And although we have not implemented something similar to the MAD [20] lattice description language yet, to simplify the accelerator description, elements in our program can be grouped into di#erent modules, from modules one constructs cells, and a sequence of cells forms the linac. 2.1 Particle Transport in Nonvacuum Media When an energetic primary particle incidents on a mass of material of su#cient thickness a cascade of particles and electromagnetic radiation of great complexity results, and the most practical way to obtain the characteristics of this cascade, the distribution and parameters of secondary particles, especially for complicated material geometries, is through Monte Carlo simulations. Even though a code for the transport of high energy particles (in GeV range) can be developed without too great complications (see, for example, [21], [22]), the accurate simulation of the low energy particles is a very demanding e#ort. So, it is obvious, that it is better to use a thoroughly tested, standard programme, based on an extensive and r...

Balandin Brinkmann Flottmann; V. Bal; R. Brinkmann; K. Flöttmann; N. Golubeva

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New head of stockpile manufacturing and support New head of stockpile manufacturing and support Los Alamos names new head of stockpile manufacturing and support Carl Beard is the new associate director for stockpile manufacturing and support. Beard has held this position in an acting capacity since June 2007. January 22, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

155

Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Los Alamos National Laboratory names new head of weapons programs Bret Knapp has been acting in that position since June 2011. December 1, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202

156

Katie Antypas Named New Head of NERSC User Services Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Katie Antypas Named Katie Antypas Named New Head of NERSC Services Department Katie Antypas Named New Head of NERSC Services Department September 3, 2013 katie2 Katie Antypas Katie Antypas, who has led NERSC's User Services Group since October 2010, has been named as the new Services Department Head, effective September 23. Antypas succeeds Francesca Verdier, who will serve as Allocations Manager until her planned retirement in June 2014. Antypas is also the project lead for the NERSC-8 system procurement, a project to deploy NERSC's next generation system in the 2015 timeframe. "Katie's leadership in ensuring that NERSC users are able to maximize their use of both our current and future systems has positioned her well to help lead NERSC users and staff into the next era of extreme scale

157

World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave World's Largest Solar Energy Project Heads to Mojave April 16, 2010 - 4:47pm Addthis A California company will harness the Mojave Desert sunshine to create the world's largest solar energy system by the end of 2013. The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, located just a few miles from the California - Nevada border near Interstate 15, will generate approximately 400 MW of energy per year, almost doubling the amount of solar thermal energy produced in the United States. Ivanpah will focus sunlight from mirrors placed on poles, which don't require the land to be graded and can be placed around areas that are already in use or environmentally sensitive. The project of Oakland, Calif.-based BrightSource Energy, Inc. will likely generate enough power

158

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Solar Decathlon Heads to California for 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon Heads to California for 2013 Event Decathlon Heads to California for 2013 Event Photo showing the aerial view of several structures with solar panels on top. Aerial view of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 in Washington, D.C. (Credit: Stefano Paltera/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) January 11, 2013 For the first time, the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon will be held outside of Washington, D.C. This fall, 20 collegiate teams will head to the Orange Country Great Park in Irvine, California, to compete in this award-winning showcase of energy-efficient and solar-powered houses. The free event will take place in a specially constructed village Oct. 3-13, 2013. The competition houses will be open to visitors on eight days over two weekends. Public hours will be from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily:

159

Sprinkler Head Replacement (4586), 4/24/2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sprinkler Head Replacement Projects (4586) Sprinkler Head Replacement Projects (4586) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (Citv/Countv/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The proposed action is to replace approximately 1 ,300 sprinkler heads upgrade fire protection systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 81.3- Routine maintenance Submit by E-mail For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each categorical exclusion, see Subpart D of 10 CFR Part 1021. Regulatory Requirements in 10 CFR 1021.410(b): (See full text in regulation) [{Jrhe proposal fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A orB to 10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D. To fit within the classes of actions listed in 10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B, a proposal must be one that would not: (1) threaten

160

Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Srinivasan Named Head Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group Srinivasan Named Head of NERSC's Computational Systems Group August 31, 2011 | Tags: NERSC Jay Srinivasan has been selected as the Computational Systems Group Lead in the NERSC Systems Department. In this role, he will supervise the day-to-day operation of all of NERSC's computer systems. Prior to taking on his new assignment, Srinivasan was the team lead for the PDSF cluster that supports Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics. Srinivasan has more than 15 years of experience in high performance computing, both as a user and administrator. Since joining NERSC in 2001, he has worked on all the large systems from NERSC-3, the IBM/SP2 system called Seaborg, to Hopper, the Cray XE6 that is currently NERSC's

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161

EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion EM's Los Alamos TRU Waste Campaign Heads Toward Completion November 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Advanced techniques allowed crews at Los Alamos National Laboratory to decontaminate large boxes of waste so it could be shipped as mixed low-level rather than transuranic waste. Advanced techniques allowed crews at Los Alamos National Laboratory to decontaminate large boxes of waste so it could be shipped as mixed low-level rather than transuranic waste. The EM program at Los Alamos National Laboratory exceeded its shipping goals in fiscal year 2013, shipping twice as much waste as it did in fiscal year 2012. The EM program at Los Alamos National Laboratory exceeded its shipping goals in fiscal year 2013, shipping twice as much waste as it did in fiscal

162

Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources Nags Head, North Carolina: Energy Resources (Redirected from Nags Head, NC) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9573922°, -75.6240619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9573922,"lon":-75.6240619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

163

Experimental investigation of creep behavior of reactor vessel lower head  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the USNRC supported Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program at Sandia National Laboratories is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head due to the thermal and pressure loads of a severe accident. The experimental program is complemented by a modeling program focused on the development of a constitutive formulation for use in standard finite element structure mechanics codes. The problem is of importance because: lower head failure defines the initial conditions of all ex-vessel events; the inability of state-of-the-art models to simulate the result of the TMI-II accident (Stickler, et al. 1993); and TMI-II results suggest the possibility of in-vessel cooling, and creep deformation may be a precursor to water ingression leading to in-vessel cooling.

Chu, T.Y.; Pilch, M.; Bentz, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Behbahani, A. [NRC, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Economics of Cherepnov water lifter for low-head hydropower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic feasibility of using the Cherepnov lifter to augment the water head in small-scale hydroelectric power generation was investigated, and is reported. The economics of the cherepnov lifter for use as a pump to supply water looks very promising both for large and small systems. However, the economics of using the lifter in hydroelectric power generation is not promising, especially for large and high-head systems. This, however, does not preclude the economics or the desirability of using the lifter for microhydro low-head systems, especially if low-cost tanks are available and PVC pipes can be used. A desirable feature of the lifter separate from economical considerations is the ability of the lifter to pass fish unharmed. This feature should be taken advantage of when the lifter is used for hydropower generation.

Liu, H.; Geekie, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kendall Head Tidal Energy Kendall Head Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

166

CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma  

SciTech Connect

A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia.

Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

Tran, Vi-Hoa (Newport News, VA); Meikle, Steven Richard (Penshurst, AU); Smith, Mark Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

Designing Against Head Injury While Considering Neck Injury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Without a doubt, the major concern of vehicle design is safety ¨C increasing the survival chance of driver and passenger during a crash and decreasing the risk of injury. Safety features, such as seat belt, seat cushion with crash tubing, or frontal ... Keywords: HIC, head injury criterion, neck injury, whiplash

Simon M. Hsiang; Stephen Ekwaro-Osire; Taek Hyun Jang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mixed reality with multimodal head-mounted pico projector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many kinds of displays can be used for augmented reality (AR). Multimodal head-mounted pico projector is a concept, which is little explored for AR. It opens new possibilities for wearable displays. In this paper we present our proof-of-concept prototype ... Keywords: augmented reality, mixed reality, multimodality, pico projector, wearable displays

Antti Sand; Ismo Rakkolainen

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Does Head Start Improve Long-Term Outcomes? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aughinbaugh, Alison (200? ) "Does Head Start Yield Long-TermDuncan Thomas (1995) "Does Head Start Make a Difference?"J. Smith (1998) "How much does childhood poverty affect the

LUDWIG, JENS O; Miller, Doug

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

QCD matrix elements + parton showers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? Q Q1 dq? ?q(q?, Q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?g(q?, q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?f(q?)?f (Q1, q?) } (2.4) where ?q,g,f are q ? qg, g ? gg and g ? qq¯ branching probabilities ?q(q, Q... ) = 2CF pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 3 4 ) (2.5) ?g(q, Q) = 2CA pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 11 12 ) (2.6) ?f(q) = Nf 3pi ?S(q) q , (2.7) CF = (N2c ?1)/2Nc and CA = Nc for Nc colours, Nf is the number of active flavours, and ?q,g are the quark and gluon Sudakov form...

Catani, S; Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Webber, Bryan R

172

Child head injury criteria investigation through numerical simulation of real world trauma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finite element modelling has been used for decades in the study of adult head injury biomechanics and determination of injury criteria. Interest is recently growing in investigation on pediatric head injury which requires elaboration of biofidelic models ... Keywords: Accident reconstructions, Child head, Finite element modelling, Neurological injuries

Sebastien Roth; Jonathan Vappou; Jean-Sebastien Raul; Rémy Willinger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Headio: zero-configured heading acquisition for indoor mobile devices through multimodal context sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heading information becomes widely used in ubiquitous computing applications for mobile devices. Digital magnetometers, also known as geomagnetic field sensors, provide absolute device headings relative to the earth's magnetic north. However, magnetometer ... Keywords: ceiling pictures, digital compass, geolocation, heading, indoor locationing, indoor navigation, mobile sensing, orientation, perspective transformation, task scheduling

Zheng Sun, Shijia Pan, Yu-Chi Su, Pei Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Bear Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources Head Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.7638457°, -92.1265023° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.7638457,"lon":-92.1265023,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

175

New Theory Head to join PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Returning to his Princeton roots: Returning to his Princeton roots: New Theory Head to join PPPL By John Greenwald August 27, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Amitava Bhattacharjee. (Photo by Kristi Donahue, University of New Hampshire Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space) Amitava Bhattacharjee. Physicist Amitava Bhattacharjee is returning to his academic roots. He arrives as the new head of the Theory Department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) on August 27, more than 30 years after completing his doctoral work here. He studied at PPPL from 1977 to 1980 while earning his M. A. and Ph.D. in astrophysical sciences from Princeton University, which runs the Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). His past came flooding back to Bhattacharjee when he gave a talk at PPPL in

176

Bay Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources Head, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.0717828°, -74.0543036° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0717828,"lon":-74.0543036,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-8-80 -8-80 Vol. 45 No. 175 Pages 59135-59296 e Monday September 8, 1980 Federal Register / Vol. 45, No. 175 Monday, September 8, 1980 / Notices 59189 - -- COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies August 20,1980. The Council on Environmental Quality is publishing three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies. The first memorandum, dated August 11,1980, on Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supe asedes the Council's previous memorandum on this subject of August 1970. The second memorandum, dated August 11,1980, requests information on agency agriculatural land policies and

178

Indian Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7703092°, -87.9022808° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7703092,"lon":-87.9022808,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Owls Head, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.082303°, -69.0572612° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.082303,"lon":-69.0572612,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brough Head Wave Farm Brough Head Wave Farm < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":59.081,"lon":-3.359,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Heatup of the TMI-2 lower head during core relocation  

SciTech Connect

An analysis has been carried out to assess the potential of a melting attack upon the reactor vessel lower head and incore instrument nozzle penetration weldments during the TMI core relocation event at 224 minutes. Calculations were performed to determine the potential for molten corium to undergo breakup into droplets which freeze and form a debris bed versus impinging upon the lower head as one or more coherent streams. The effects of thermal-hydraulic interactions between corium streams and water inside the lower plenum, the effects of the core support assembly structure upon the corium, and the consequences of corium relocation by way of the core former region were examined. 19 refs., 24 figs.

Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head  

SciTech Connect

An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

Marriott, Craig D. (Clawson, MI); Neal, Timothy L. (Ortonville, MI); Swain, Jeff L. (Flushing, MI); Raimao, Miguel A. (Colorado Springs, CO)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mass composition of 10{sup 17}- to 10{sup 18}-eV primary cosmic rays according to data on the lateral distribution of radio emission from extensive air showers  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data obtained for the lateral distribution of radio emission from extensive air showers (EAS) at the array of Moscow State University (30-34 MHz) and the LOPES array (40-80 MHz) were comparedwith the results of calculations performed within amicroscopic approach based on aMonte Carlo simulation of EAS (CORSIKA code). The same experimental data were used to reconstruct the distribution of the depth of the EAS maximum at cosmic-ray energies in the range of 1017-1018 eV. The energy dependence of the depth of the EAS maximum was constructed for the case of data from the LOPES array, and the mass composition of cosmic rays was estimated for this case. From the resulting dependences, it follows that the mass composition shows a trend toward becoming lighter in the energy range being considered.

Kalmykov, N. N., E-mail: kalm@eas.sinp.msu.ru; Konstantinov, A. A.; Vedeneev, O. V. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: IN GRID^,,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2,2011 2,2011 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: IN GRID^,, DIRECT SUBJECT: Working Effectively with Contractors The Department of Energy (DOE) depends on contractors to provide vital support in achieving our mission. Their contributions are critical t o accomplishing our goals in such important areas as energy research and development, weapons production, stockpile management, and environmental remediation and restoration. Although contractors are integral to our mission accomplishment, we must respect the roles we each have in contract performance. DOE defines deliverables and the contractors determine how to best perform the work. With rare exception, DOE officials should not direct contractors' selection or termination of employees. Giving

185

Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options  

SciTech Connect

Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cervicopectoral flap in head and neck cancer surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2003 Copcu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Flapsreconstructionhead neckcancercarcinomatumorcosmesis Background: Reconstruction of the head and neck after adequate resection of primary tumor and neck dissection is a challenge. It should be performed at one sitting in advanced tumors. Defects caused by the resection should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Cervicopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the cheek defects. Methods: This study included twelve patients presenting with cancer of the head and neck to Izmir Ataturk Training Hospital and Adnan Menderes University Hospital. Tumor resection and neck dissection was performed in one session by the same surgeon. A single incision was made and a medially based cervicopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure in neck dissection and for closure of defects after tumor resection. Results: There was no major complication. Two flaps had partial superficial epidermolysis at the

Technical Innovations; Eray Copcu; Kubilay Metin; Alper Aktas; Nazan S Sivrioglu; Yücel Öztan; Nazan S Sivrioglu; Yücel Öztan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Low hydrostatic head electrolyte addition to fuel cell stacks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell and system for supply electrolyte, as well as fuel and an oxidant to a fuel cell stack having at least two fuel cells, each of the cells having a pair of spaced electrodes and a matrix sandwiched therebetween, fuel and oxidant paths associated with a bipolar plate separating each pair of adjacent fuel cells and an electrolyte fill path for adding electrolyte to the cells and wetting said matrices. Electrolyte is flowed through the fuel cell stack in a back and forth fashion in a path in each cell substantially parallel to one face of opposite faces of the bipolar plate exposed to one of the electrodes and the matrices to produce an overall head uniformly between cells due to frictional pressure drop in the path for each cell free of a large hydrostatic head to thereby avoid flooding of the electrodes. The bipolar plate is provided with channels forming paths for the flow of the fuel and oxidant on opposite faces thereof, and the fuel and the oxidant are flowed along a first side of the bipolar plate and a second side of the bipolar plate through channels formed into the opposite faces of the bipolar plate, the fuel flowing through channels formed into one of the opposite faces and the oxidant flowing through channels formed into the other of the opposite faces.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera  

SciTech Connect

A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

189

Integrated titer plate-injector head for microdrop array preparation, storage and transfer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated titer plate-injector head for preparing and storing two-dimensional (2-D) arrays of microdrops and for ejecting part or all of the microdrops and inserting same precisely into 2-D arrays of deposition sites with micrometer precision. The titer plate-injector head includes integrated precision formed nozzles with appropriate hydrophobic surface features and evaporative constraints. A reusable pressure head with a pressure equalizing feature is added to the titer plate to perform simultaneous precision sample ejection. The titer plate-injector head may be utilized in various applications including capillary electrophoresis, chemical flow injection analysis, microsample array preparation, etc.

Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Origin of Folded Chert Horizons in the Monterey Formation, Lions Head, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Small scale folds that deform the chert rich horizons in siliceous facies of the Monterey Formation, in Santa Maria Basin, at Lions Head, California are… (more)

Crowther, Derrick D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Examining Coach Pathways and Learning Situations: High-Performance Head Hockey Coaches who Played Goal .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Using archival analysis and interviews this study examined the career pathways, learning experiences, and athletic experiences of 11 high-performance head hockey coaches who played goal… (more)

Crickard, Travis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6,2010 6,2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS FROM: SUBJECT: PATRICK M. FERRARO ACTING DIRECTOR OFFICE OR PROCUREMEN ! f ASSISTANCE M JOSEPH WADDEL DIRECTOR r & OFFICE OF ACQU&ITION AND I SUPPLY MANAGEMENT (NA-63) NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change 2010-03 Chapter 3 Federal Acquisition Certification in Contracting (FAC-C) Level II The purpose of this memorandum is t o announce ACMP Change 2010-03. This change amends the experience requirement for FAC-C Level II certification as currently stated in Chapter 3 o f the January 2009, revision of the Department's Acquisition Career Management Program Handbook (ref: Policy Flash 2009-17). In order for the Department of Energy (DOE) t

193

Bauer named Facilities, Infrastructure and Services head | Y-12 National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bauer named Facilities, ... Bauer named Facilities, ... Bauer named Facilities, Infrastructure and Services head Posted: August 27, 2012 - 1:01pm B&W Y-12 President and General Manager Chuck Spencer has named Linda Bauer as vice president of Facilities, Infrastructure and Services (FI&S). Bauer most recently served as senior vice president with Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc. helping direct large-scale government and private endeavors, such as the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration Project and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Project. Linda Bauer, vice president of Facilities, Infrastructure and Services With 24 years of experience, she also has held positions such as senior operations manager for the Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group and multiple management roles at BWXT Savannah River Company.

194

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS OTHER THAN THE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2013 , 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS OTHER THAN THE NA TI ON AL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: SUBJECT: ROBERT C. GIBBS ~Mb CHIEF HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER W AIYER OF THE BI-WEEKLY PAY LIMITATION FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE ACTIVITIES This memorandum replaces: 1) the January 31, 2002, memorandum from Timothy M. Dirks, (former) Director of Human Resources Management, subject: Waiver of Bi-Weekly Premium Pay Limitation, pertaining to "emergency work in connection with the continuing and immediate threat of further attacks on the United States;" 2) the April 25, 2003, memorandum from Claudia A. Cross, (former) Acting Director of Human Resources Management and Michael C. Kane, (former) Deputy Associate Administrator for Management & Administration, NNSA, subject: Waiver of Bi-Weekly

195

MEMORANDUM TO HEADS O F CONTRACTING ACTIVITIES AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 2010 MEMORANDUM TO HEADS O F CONTRACTING ACTIVITIES AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS FROM: DIRECTOR OFFICE OF CONTRACT MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: Establishment of Requirement for Monthly Status Reporting on Source Evaluation Boards (SEBs) Valued in Excess of $25 Million As everyone is aware, DOE accomplishes the majority of its work through its various contracts. In recent years, the Department has drawn increased scrutiny from a number of different sources. As a result, the procurement process receives a tremendous amount of visibility among senior DOE management, particularly our largest and most critical procurements which are conducted by SEBs. This highlights the critical need for SEB reporting and tracking. At the Procurement Directors meeting held in December 2009, it was mentioned during

196

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: TIMOTHY M. DIRKS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2001 8, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: TIMOTHY M. DIRKS DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SUBJECT: PREVENTIVE HEALTH SCREENINGS As you know, the Secretary recently issued a statement on Worknife Programs, specifically addressing the issues of telecommuting and preventive health measures; a copy of the statement, which was distributed via DOECAST, is attached to this memorandum. The statement provided that the Office of Management and Administration would issue guidelines in support of the new Secretarial policy which authorizes all Department of Energy Federal employees "up to 4 hours of excused absence each leave year in order to participate in preventive health screenings." The following responds to the Secretary's direction for guidelines and provides related information.

197

Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 7, 2009 October 7, 2009 M-10-02 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: Peter R. Orszag Director SUBJECT: Guidance on section 163 of the Continuing Resolution regarding the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) This memorandum provides guidance to Executive Branch agencies regarding the implementation of section 163 of the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2010, Division B of Pub. L. No. 111-68 (CR), which states: SEC. 163. None of the funds made available by this joint resolution or any prior Act may be provided to the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN), or any of its affiliates, subsidiaries, or allied organizations. Your agency must immediately commence all necessary and appropriate steps to comply with

198

Beard to lead Business, Operations Directorate; Girrens named head of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carl Beard new PADOPS Director Carl Beard new PADOPS Director Beard to lead Business, Operations Directorate; Girrens named head of Engineering Beard came to Los Alamos in 2006 to help lead the Stockpile Manufacturing and Support organization. May 4, 2011 Carl Beard Carl Beard Contact Steve Sandoval Communicatons Office (505) 665-9206 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 4, 2011-Carl Beard is the new principal associate director for Business and Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Beard succeeds Mike Mallory, who earlier this year announced his retirement. "Carl is a highly accomplished and versatile leader, managing a wide range of scientific and manufacturing operations," Laboratory Director Michael Anastasio said. "At Los Alamos and elsewhere, Carl's teams have improved productivity and safely executed programs," he said, noting that

199

LANL names new head of Plutonium Science and Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jeff Yarbrough joins Los Alamos from B&W Pantex Jeff Yarbrough joins Los Alamos from B&W Pantex LANL names new head of Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Jeff Yarbrough joins Los Alamos from the B&W Pantex plant in Amarillo, Texas. March 2, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office

200

Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates Bret Knapp to head combined Weapons Engineering, Weapons Physics Directorates at Los Alamos National Laboratory New leadership position will allow for greater integration in the planning and execution of the stockpile stewardship program. August 18, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ESnet Update Steve Cotter, Dept Head Lawrence Berkeley National Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update Update Steve Cotter, Dept Head Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Winter 2011 Joint Techs Clemson, SC Feb 2, 2011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science @ESnet: It's all about the Science * More bandwidth to DOE facilities and Labs at lower costs * Richer network services in support of distributed science - Develop 'network aware' integrated services that deliver 'end-to-end' high- performance data transfer, HPC/cloud computing, and science collaborative services * Carrier-class network operations providing high network availability to all DOE facilities - Seamless network interoperability across multiple network domains * Develop and deploy energy-aware and efficient networking infrastructure * Provide a networking research testbed for DOE community

202

Hydraulic head interpolation using anfis-model selection and sensitivity analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to investigate the efficiency of anfis (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) for interpolating hydraulic head in a 40-km^2 agricultural watershed of the Seine basin (France). Inputs of anfis are Cartesian coordinates and the ... Keywords: Hydraulic head, Hydrogeology, Sensitivity analysis, Spatial interpolation, anfis

Bedri Kurtulus; Nicolas Flipo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Stability and charging characteristics of the comma head region of continental winter cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents analyses of the fine-scale structure of convection in the comma head of two continental winter cyclones and a 16-storm climatology analyzing the distribution of lightning within the comma head. A case study of a deep cyclone is ...

Robert M. Rauber; Joseph Wegman; David M. Plummer; Andrew A. Rosenow; Melissa Peterson; Greg M. McFarquhar; Brian F. Jewett; David Leon; Patrick S. Market; Kevin R. Knupp; Jason M. Keeler; Steven M. Battaglia

204

Research for the Crane Boom Length Coefficient Considering the Tower Head Flexibility in Rotary Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the crane boom length in rotary plane is determined, the traditional methods only consider support condition, non-uniform, boom end lateral displacement constraint effect of amplitude dragline and hoist rope tensile forces. Ignoring tower head elastic ... Keywords: Equivalent elastic support method, Rotary plane, Tower head flexibility, Non-conservative loading, Length coefficient

Zhang Guangyun; Lan Peng; Lu Nianli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Evaluating requirements for gaze-based interaction in a see-through head mounted display  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study suggests an approach to the evaluation of gaze-based interaction with information displayed on a see-through HMD. For these purposes, a mock-up system consisting of a head-mounted eye tracker and a see-through HMD was developed. In a series ... Keywords: eye tracking, gaze control, head-mounted displays, human computer interaction

Sven-Thomas Graupner; Michael Heubner; Sebastian Pannasch; Boris M. Velichkovsky

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ultra low head ambient pressure hydroturbine. Technical report, fiscal year one, fourth quarter ending June 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the testing and design of a model for a ultra head ambient pressure hydroturbine.

NONE

1998-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water  

SciTech Connect

Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions.

Goldman, M. (Camp Dresser McKee, Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A field-specific web tool for the prediction of Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol content in Belgium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusarium head blight is a worldwide problem in wheat growing areas. In addition to yield loss, Fusarium species can also synthesise mycotoxins and thus threaten animal and human health. Models for predicting Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol content ... Keywords: Deoxynivalenol, Forecasting, Fusarium head blight, Web tool

S. Landschoot; W. Waegeman; K. Audenaert; P. Van Damme; J. Vandepitte; B. De Baets; G. Haesaert

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Efficiency United (Gas) - Home Performance Program (Michigan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air sealing, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Programmable Thermostats, Water Heaters, Windows, Energy Audit, Shower Head, Faucet Aerator, Pipe Wrap Active Incentive No...

210

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program (Michigan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air sealing, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Programmable Thermostats, Water Heaters, Windows, Energy Audit, Shower Head, Faucet Aerator, Pipe Wrap Active Incentive Yes...

211

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

toilets, faucets and shower heads. Builders must also provide the option for the homeowner to purchase Energy Star rated dishwashers and clothes washers and various water...

212

Woodruff Narrows low head hydroelectric power plant feasibility determination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Woodruff Narrows Reservoir, owned by the State of Utah, was built in 1961 as an irrigation reservoir. The reservoir outlet works and spillway are in need of repair, and plans have been made to enlarge the reservoir from its present capacity of 28,000 acre-feet to 53,200 acre-feet when these repairs are made. The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to add hydropower facilities when the reservoir is repaired and enlarged. A computer simulation model based on mean monthly values, utilizing 26 years of recorded streamflow into the reservoir, was used to determine the mean annual energy potential for the following configurations: (1) present dam, (2) the proposed enlarged dam, (3) a new dam at the lower site with a maximum head of 65 feet, and (4) a new dam at the lower site which would store water to the same elevation as the proposed enlarged dam. Results of the simulation study show that maximum power capacities are respectively 2.1, 3.0, 3.9, and 4.5 megawatts. The marketing potential for this electric power, cost estimates and financial analysis, and environmental, social, and regulatory aspects of the proposed hydropower facilities were evaluated. The results showed the addition of hydroelectric power development at the Woodruff Narrows site would have minimal social and environmental effects on the area, would result in little or no changes in the present patterns of water and land use, income, population, and employment and would not result in any significant changes of the social structure or characteristics of the area. However, hydroelectric power development at the Woodruff Narrows site is not economically feasible at the present time. (LCL)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Jeff Broughton Brings 30 Years of HPC Experience to NERSC as New Head of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jeff Broughton Brings Jeff Broughton Brings 30 Years of HPC Experience to NERSC as New Head of Systems Department Jeff Broughton Brings 30 Years of HPC Experience to NERSC as New Head of Systems Department July 31, 2009 Jeffrey M. Broughton, who has 30 years of HPC and management experience, has accepted the position of Systems Department Head at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). Broughton, who most recently served as senior director of engineering at QLogic Corp., joins NERSC on Monday, August 3. "I'm very pleased to announce that Jeff Broughton has accepted the position of Systems Department Head at NERSC," said Kathy Yelick, NERSC Director. "This is a key position for us, and Jeff will be responsible

214

45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of 45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies 45 Fed Reg 59189: Publishing of Three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies The Council on Environmental Quality is publishing three Memoranda for Heads of Agencies. The first memorandum, dated August 11,1980, on Analysis of Impacts on Prime and Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supersedes the Council's previous memorandum on this subject of August 1970. The second memorandum, dated August 11,1980, requests information on agency agriculatural land policies and other information related to the implementation of the first memorandum. The third memorandum, dated August 20,1980, on Interagency Consultation to

215

The helical turbine: A new idea for low-head hydro  

SciTech Connect

Substantial potential exists at small hydro sites where heads are too low for conventional hydraulic turbines. A spiral-bladed turbine may offer a new alternative for tapping that potential in a cost-efficient manner.

Gorlov, A.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

SUBJECT HEADINGS USED BY THE U.S.A.E.C. DIVISION OF TECHNICAL INFORMATION  

SciTech Connect

A list is presented of subject headings used by the U.S.A.E.C. Division of Technical Information for indexing literature in the field of nuclear science and technology. (C.H.)

Hargrave, C.W.

1962-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Tom D'Agostino retires from his post as head of the NNSA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submit Tom D'Agostino retires from his post as head of the NNSA Led the nuclear weapons complex during a major transition March 25, 2013 Tom D'Agostino Tom D'Agostino...

218

Design of transmission mechanisms for the head of the 'Huggable' robotic teddy bear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The head of the Huggable teddy bear, a robotic companion for use in hospitals, schools, and other locations, must contain three degrees of freedom. It must contain transmissions allowing it to nod up and down, tilt side ...

Akraboff, Nicolina Alden

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An optical see-through head mounted display with addressable focal planes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most existing stereoscopic head mounted displays (HMDs), presenting a pair of stereoscopic images at a fixed focal distance, lack the ability to correctly render the naturally coupled accommodation and convergence cues. Psychophysical studies have shown ...

Sheng Liu; Dewen Cheng; Hong Hua

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 15, 2010 September 15, 2010 Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Officials of PEEP, the Pinellas Energy Efficiency Project, will start handing out energy kits-filled with CFLs, weather stripping, low-flow shower heads and window insulators-over the next few months to residents who attend special classes. It's pretty straightforward: come to one of the classes, learn how to cut energy use and save money - and leave with the materials to make that happen. September 15, 2010 A Boost for Small Business Phase III Xlerator awards go out to 33 small businesses in 16 states to make clean energy technology a commercial reality. September 15, 2010 A vacant grocery store was converted into The Elkin Center, a workforce training center in Elkin, N.C. | Courtesy of Joe Seipel-Parks, West Depot Architecture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Covina West Covina Location: City West Covina CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Replace lamps and lights, 2) replace HVAC in city buildings, 3) replace traffic signal lamps, 4) install solar film on windows at City Hall, and 5) HVAC equipment replacement, water heating improvements, lighting improvements, low flow shower head replacements, occupancy sensor installation, and pipe insulation on West Covina identified city buildings. Conditions: None-must meet requirements as stated in Programmatic Agreement document Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

222

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County September 15, 2010 - 5:18pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Officials of PEEP, the Pinellas Energy Efficiency Project, will start handing out energy kits-filled with CFLs, weather stripping, low-flow shower heads and window insulators-over the next few months to residents who attend special classes. Residents in Pinellas County, Fla., will soon receive the gift that keeps on giving. It's pretty straightforward: come to one of the classes, learn how to cut energy use and save money - and leave with the materials to make that happen. "It's more of a holistic approach," says James Stevenson, a conservation

223

CX-006017: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6017: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6017: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006017: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program - Louisiana-City-Kenner CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 05/23/2011 Location(s): Kenner, Louisiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Use consultant to help develop energy efficiency (EE) and conservation strategy; 2) perform residential energy audits and direct install of low-cost EE measures which includes compact fluorescent lights, hot water heater wraps, pipe insulation, low-flow shower heads, weather stripping, and caulking; 3) install remote lighting control system and remote monitoring at Sports Field; and 4) install solar shades on windows of Public Works Building

224

CX-008425: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008425: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-City-Jacksonville CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/16/2012 Location(s): North Carolina Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation plan; 2) hire Energy Conservation Officer; 3) energy efficiency retrofits in public buildings; 4) purchase and install energy management system; 5) education and outreach programs for city residents; 6) purchase and distribute low-flow shower heads, bath tub aerators, and sink/spray controls for kitchen sinks; and 7) purchase and distribute rolling recycle carts. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form More Documents & Publications

225

CX-006106: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006106: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-West Covina CX(s) Applied: B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/11/2011 Location(s): West Covina, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Replace lamps and lights, 2) replace heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) in city buildings, 3) replace traffic signal lamps, 4) install solar film on windows at City Hall, and 5) HVAC equipment replacement, water heating improvements, lighting improvements, low flow shower head replacements, occupancy sensor installation, and pipe insulation on West Covina identified city buildings. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006106.pdf More Documents & Publications

226

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County Classes, Kits and Energy Savings for Pinellas County September 15, 2010 - 5:18pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Officials of PEEP, the Pinellas Energy Efficiency Project, will start handing out energy kits-filled with CFLs, weather stripping, low-flow shower heads and window insulators-over the next few months to residents who attend special classes. Residents in Pinellas County, Fla., will soon receive the gift that keeps on giving. It's pretty straightforward: come to one of the classes, learn how to cut energy use and save money - and leave with the materials to make that happen. "It's more of a holistic approach," says James Stevenson, a conservation

227

Simulations of coherent beam-beam effects with head-on compensation  

SciTech Connect

Electron lenses are under construction for installation in RHIC in order to mitigate the head-on beam-beam effects. This would allow operation with higher bunch intensity and result in a significant increase in luminosity. We report on recent strong-strong simulations and experiments that were carried out using the RHIC upgrade parameters to assess the impact of coherent beam-beam effects in the presence of head-on compensation.

White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo. Y.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

228

Second Blows in the Head-on Collisions of the Spherical Nano Polymer Droplets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report observations of weird but interesting phenomenon from the molecular dynamics simulations, occurrence of second blows in the head-on collisions of two equal-sized spherical nano polymer droplets. In the head-on collisions, we usually expect a single peak of impact forces between two colliding droplets. But, in the simulations, the second peak of the impact forces is actually observed. Its underlying mechanisms at the molecular scale are also proposed.

Sangrak Kim

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mime: compact, low power 3D gesture sensing for interaction with head mounted displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Mime, a compact, low-power 3D sensor for unencumbered free-form, single-handed gestural interaction with head-mounted displays (HMDs). Mime introduces a real-time signal processing framework that combines a novel three-pixel time-of-flight ... Keywords: 3d sensing, gesture sensing, glasses, hand tracking, head mounted displays, mobile, time-of- flight imaging

Andrea Colaço, Ahmed Kirmani, Hye Soo Yang, Nan-Wei Gong, Chris Schmandt, Vivek K. Goyal

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

103 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, 3 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. 103 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. April 23, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC- Students from 67 high school teams and 36 middle school teams from across the nation will compete next weekend for championship titles in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl in Washington D.C. The National Science Bowl is the nation's largest academic competition of its kind and the only one sponsored by a federal agency. The National Finals will be held from May 2 through May 4. Each of the participating teams emerged from a regional competition to earn an all-expense-paid trip to the event. The participating teams represent 42 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto

231

Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells

232

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? September 1, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell Hurricane Earl has the East Coast of the United States in his sights. Earl is moving northward from the Bahamas, and is expected to skirt the U.S. Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to New England, before making landfall in Nova Scotia over the Labor Day weekend. But hurricane paths are uncertain, so we'll have to wait and see where Earl actually ends up. In any event, what does this have to do with energy? Hurricanes can disrupt energy supplies and markets. In addition to the potential for electricity outages, hurricanes can affect offshore oil and gas production, petroleum

233

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

234

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? Hurricane Earl - Where Is It Headed and What Does It Have to Do With Energy? September 1, 2010 - 5:50pm Addthis Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell Hurricane Earl has the East Coast of the United States in his sights. Earl is moving northward from the Bahamas, and is expected to skirt the U.S. Atlantic coast from Cape Hatteras to New England, before making landfall in Nova Scotia over the Labor Day weekend. But hurricane paths are uncertain, so we'll have to wait and see where Earl actually ends up. In any event, what does this have to do with energy? Hurricanes can disrupt energy supplies and markets. In addition to the potential for electricity outages, hurricanes can affect offshore oil and gas production, petroleum

235

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

236

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Head of EM to Kick Off Congressional Nuclear Cleanup Caucus April 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga will provide an overview of EM's proposed fiscal year 2014 budget Thursday in the first of six briefings for the 19th annual U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus. Huizenga rolled out the $5.622 billion budget request earlier this month. The proposal, which requires approval by Congress, enables EM progress in all areas of the nuclear cleanup program while maintaining safety and compliance across the complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. "These briefings provide valuable insight and help educate my colleagues

237

Energy Secretary Bodman Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Bill |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Bill Energy Secretary Bodman Heads to West Virginia to Promote Energy Bill July 7, 2005 - 2:00pm Addthis Secretary Promotes Energizing America for Energy Security BELLE, WV - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today traveled to West Virginia to urge the Congress to pass comprehensive energy legislation that is now before them. The bill reflects many of the principles of President Bush's national energy policy including the diversification of America's energy supply to include more alternative and renewable sources; encouraging energy efficiency and conservation; promoting more domestic production in environmentally responsible ways; and modernizing our electricity delivery system to minimize the risk of blackouts. President

238

Dynamic structural analysis of a head assembly for a large loop-type LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

An investigation is presented on the dynamic structural response of the primary vessel's head closure to slug impact loadings generated from a 1000 MJ source term. The reference reactor considered was designed in a loop configuration. The head structure consisted of a deck and a triple rotatable plug assembly. Two designs were considered for the deck structure: a reference design and an alternate design. The reference deck was designed as a single flat annular plate. For the alternate design, the deck plate was reinforced by adding an extender cylinder with a flange and flanged webs between the deck-plate and cylinder. The investigation showed that the reference design cannot maintain containment integrity when subjected to slug loading generated by a 1000 MJ source term. It was determined that the head deformed excessively.

Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

240

Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat Retiree Heads Back to Work, Helps Families Stay Afloat November 10, 2009 - 7:17pm Addthis Mark Morris inspects a furnace. | File photo Mark Morris inspects a furnace. | File photo Joshua DeLung Getting laid off wasn't the only thing putting Americans in a pickle when the recession hit. Mark Morris of South Bend, Ind., is among many in the country who were already retired, but whose 401(k) account took a big hit when the stock market crashed. Mark had retired as a utility-company supervisor in mid-2007, but he lost 40 percent of his retirement money and knew he had to go back to work. So Mark made what he could by working part-time gigs until he heard about a job in September with a local community action agency where he would

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Numerical Simulation of Earth Pressure on Head Chamber of Shield Machine with FEM  

SciTech Connect

Model parameters of conditioned soils in head chamber of shield machine are determined based on tree-axial compression tests in laboratory. The loads acting on tunneling face are estimated according to static earth pressure principle. Based on Duncan-Chang nonlinear elastic constitutive model, the earth pressures on head chamber of shield machine are simulated in different aperture ratio cases for rotating cutterhead of shield machine. Relationship between pressure transportation factor and aperture ratio of shield machine is proposed by using aggression analysis.

Li Shouju; Kang Chengang [State Key Laboratory of structural analysis for industrial equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Wei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Shangguan Zichang [School of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Institute of Civil Engineering, Dalian Fishery University, Dalian 116023 (China)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

EXTINCTION OF SPECIES BY PERIODIC COMET SHOWERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mass of the solar system is near the sun) it will have anan unseen solar companion need not come dose to the sun towith extra-solar system material. In addition, the sun is

Davis, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Observing Air Showers from Cosmic Superluminal Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

''vacuum rest frame'', VRF) can possibly be found and superluminal sectors of matter may exist related

245

A simple device for high-precision head image registration: Preliminary performance and accuracy tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to present a new device for multimodal head study registration and to examine its performance in preliminary tests. The device consists of a system of eight markers fixed to mobile carbon pipes and bars which can be easily mounted on the patient's head using the ear canals and the nasal bridge. Four graduated scales fixed to the rigid support allow examiners to find the same device position on the patient's head during different acquisitions. The markers can be filled with appropriate substances for visualisation in computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance, single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography images. The device's rigidity and its position reproducibility were measured in 15 repeated CT acquisitions of the Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom and in two SPECT studies of a patient. The proposed system displays good rigidity and reproducibility characteristics. A relocation accuracy of less than 1,5 mm was found in more than 90% of the results. The registration parameters obtained using such a device were compared to those obtained using fiducial markers fixed on phantom and patient heads, resulting in differences of less than 1 deg. and 1 mm for rotation and translation parameters, respectively. Residual differences between fiducial marker coordinates in reference and in registered studies were less than 1 mm in more than 90% of the results, proving that the device performed as accurately as noninvasive stereotactic devices. Finally, an example of multimodal employment of the proposed device is reported.

Pallotta, Stefania [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze (Italy)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Estimation of Fusarium Head Blight of Triticale Using Digital Image Analysis of Grain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of spring triticale to the infection of heads with mixture of Fusarium culmorum and F. avenaceum isolates was investigated with the application of colour image analysis of grains. The results seem to suggest that there is a strong relationship ...

Marian Wiwart; Irena Koczowska; Andrzej Borusiewicz

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Authority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF COMMUNITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The magnitude of the disaster overwhelmed institutions normally responsible for providing relief--forums, bulletin boards, blogs, and personal websites--to coordinate a massive grassroots response to the disasterAuthority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF

Kiesler, Sara

248

Head-mounted and multi-surface displays support emergency medical teams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency medical teams collaborate to solve problems and take care of patients under time pressure and high cognitive load, in noisy and complex environments. This paper presents preliminary work in the design and evaluation of head-mounted and multi-surface ... Keywords: checklists, hmd, hud, large displays, medical interfaces

Leslie Wu; Jesse Cirimele; Jonathan Bassen; Kristen Leach; Stuart Card; Larry Chu; Kyle Harrison; Scott Klemmer

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Medical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING The Use of Different Technologies During a Medical Interview: Effects on Perceived Quality of Care Julia M. DeBlasio, Britt Caldwell of Technology GVU Technical Report # GIT-GVU-07-13 October, 2007 #12;Medical Technology 2 Abstract This two

250

Dynamic response of a lare loop-type LMFBR head closure to HCDA loads  

SciTech Connect

An investigation is presented here on the dynamic structural response of the primary vessel's head closure to slug impact loadings generated from a 1000 MJ source term. The reference reactor considered was designed in a loop configuration. The head structure consisted of a deck and a triple rotatable plug assembly. The deck was a large annular structure that was supported along its outer periphery by the vessel flange. The deck provided support to the triple rotatable plug (TRP) assembly along its inner periphery. Two designs were considered for the deck structure: a reference design and an alternate design. The reference deck was designed as a single flat annular plate. For the alternate design, the deck plate was reinforced by adding an extender cyclinder with a flange and flanged webs between the deck-plate and cylinder. A decoupled analysis of this fluid-structure interaction problem was performed. A two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic computation (reported in a companion paper) was performed to define the head loadings. Then a three-dimensional structural response computation was made to assess the containment capability of the head closure.

Kulak, R.F.; Fiala, C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Heatup of the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) lower head during core relocation  

SciTech Connect

According to current perceptions of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, corium largely relocated into the reactor vessel lower head at {approximately}224 min into the accident. Defueling examinations have revealed that the corium relocated from the molten core region to the lower head predominantly by way of drainage through the core former region (CFR) located between the vertical baffle plates immediately surrounding the fuel assemblies and the core barrel. An analysis has been carried out to assess the heatup of the reactor vessel lower head during the core relocation event, particularly the potential for a melting attack on the lower head wall and the in-core instrument nozzle penetration weldments. The analysis employed the THIRMAL computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to predict the breakup and quenching or corium jets under film boiling conditions as well as the size distributions and quenching of the resultant molten droplets. The transient heatup and ablation of the vessel wall and penetration weldments due to impinging corium jets was calculated using the MISTI computer code.

Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Channel Head Degradation Failure Modes and Effects Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

 During a fall 2011 refueling outage, visual inspection of a steam generator (SG) at a non-U.S. Westinghouse-designed plant identified defects in the channel head cladding of one of the three SGs. The inspection identified degradation in the cladding that apparently resulted in exposure and wastage of the channel ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

253

User boresight calibration precision for large-format head-up displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The postural sway in 24 subjects performing a boresight calibration task on a large format head-up display is studied to estimate the impact of human limits on boresight calibration precision and ultimately on static registration errors. The dependent ... Keywords: augmented reality, boresight, calibration, line of sight, postural sway

Magnus Axholt; Stephen Peterson; Stephen R. Ellis

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

On the relationship between head pose, social attention and personality prediction for unstructured and dynamic group interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlates between social attention and personality traits have been widely acknowledged in social psychology studies. Head pose has commonly been employed as a proxy for determining the social attention direction in small ... Keywords: head pose, personality classification, social attention, unstructured and dynamic group interactions

Ramanathan Subramanian, Yan Yan, Jacopo Staiano, Oswald Lanz, Nicu Sebe

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Ultra-thin overcoats for the head/disk interface tribology  

SciTech Connect

Areal density in magnetic storage is increasing at a blistering pace of 60% annually. Recently IBM announced its mobile product with the industry highest areal density of 2.64 Gb/In{sup 2}. The areal density demonstrations have shown up to 5 Gb/In{sup 2} possible. Reaching higher areal density targets dictate that magnetic spacing between heads and disks be reduced. For the example of a 10 Gb/In{sup 2} areal density goal, the magnetic spacing should be {approx}25 nm. In budgeting this magnetic spacing, it is required that disk and slider air bearing surface overcoats thickness be reduced to 5 nm range. Present choice of carbon overcoat in the magnetic storage hard disk drive industry is sputter deposited, hydrogenated carbon (CH{sub x}) with thickness in the range of 12-15 nm on heads and disks. Novel overcoats such as nitrogenated carbon (CN{sub x}) and cathodic arc carbon films are being developed for future applications. Cathodic arc deposition forms ultra-thin amorphous hard carbon films of high sp{sup 3} content, high hardness, and low coefficient of friction. These properties make it of great interest for head/disk interface application, in particular for contact recording. In many cases, the tribological properties of the head disk interface could be improved by factors up to ten applying cathodic arc overcoats to the slider or disk surface. This paper reviews the results of cathodic arc ultra-thin (2-10 nm) carbon overcoats for head/disk interface tribological applications.

Bhatia, C.S. [SSD/IBM, San Jose, CA (US); Anders, S.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US)] [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam; Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Entities, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2001 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2001 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11% of the 2000 numbers. The wild chinook catch was 3% of the previous year's catch. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 49% of 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout catch was 69% of 2000 numbers. The Snake River trap collected 28 age-0 chinook salmon. During 2001 the Snake River trap captured zero hatchery and zero wild/natural sockeye salmon and six hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant reduction in catch during 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery chinook production (60% of 2000 release) and due to extreme low flows. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 29. The trap was out of operation for a total of two days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 47% and wild chinook salmon catch was 67% of 2000 numbers. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 178% of the 2000 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2001 was 145% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 11 and were terminated on June 8 due to the end of the smolt monitoring season. There were no days where the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery chinook catch in 2001 was due to a reduction in hatchery production (39% of 2000 releases). The increase in hatchery and wild steelhead trap catch is due to the ability to operate the trap in the thalweg for a longer period of time because of the extreme low flow condition in 2001. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the head of the reservoir were affected by discharge. There were not enough hatchery and wild chinook salmon tagged at the Snake River trap in 2001 to allow migration rate/discharge analysis. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis of 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 2.2-fold and a 1.5-fold increase in migration rate in, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2001 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery and wild chinook salmon and hatchery and wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 3.7-fold for hatchery chinook salmon and 2.5-fold for wild chinook salmon between 50 and 100 kcfs. For hatchery steelhead there was a 1.6-fold increase in migration rate, and for wild steelhead trout there was a 2.2-fold increase between 50 kcfs and 100 kcfs. Fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags at the Snake River trap were interrogated at four dams with PIT tag detection systems (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and McNary dams). Because of the addition of the fourth interrogation site (Lower Monumental) in 1993, cumulative interrogation data is not comparable with the prior five years (1988-1992). Cumulative interrogations at the four dams for fish marked at the Snake River trap were 86% for hatchery chinook, 70% for wild chinook, 71% for hatchery steelhead, and 89% for wild steelhead. Cumulat

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 75% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2004 through September 2005.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Questions and Answers - How many atoms are in the human head?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is there a way to tell how manyatoms are in an object? Is there a way to tell how many<br>atoms are in an object? Previous Question (Is there a way to tell how many atoms are in an object?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many atoms are in the human body?) How many atoms arein the human body? How many atoms are in the human head? We can calculate the number of atoms in your head if we know the density and a constant called Avogadro's number. This is really just an estimate, but it's going to be a good one. The equation is fairly simple. The number of atoms of ANY substance in a volume is: # of atoms = N * (density) * volume / (Molecular Weight). N is a constant called Avogadro's number and its equal to 6.022*1023 atoms/mole. It can also be molecules per mole. In the above formula density

259

Evaluation of the leakage behavior of pressure-unseating equipment hatches and drywell heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a recent research program to investigate the leakage behavior of pressure unseating equipment hatches. A total of thirteen tests have been conducted under various conditions to determine the pressure and temperature at which leakage through unseating equipment hatches would occur. A simple analytical model is presented that provides a good estimate of the leakage onset pressure for these tests. Because of the similarity in the sealing mechanism between unseating equipment hatches and drywell heads, the results of this program also provide insight into the leakage behavior of drywell heads. The research activities described herein are a part of the Containment Integrity Programs, which are managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 16 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Parks, M.B.; Walther, H.P.; Lambert, L.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Low Head/Low Power Hydropower Resource Assessment of the Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical assessment of the hydropower potential of the Pacific Northwest Hydrologic Region was performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was the amount of low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) potential in the region and the fractions of this potential that corresponded to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW) technologies. To obtain these estimates, the hydropower potential of all the stream segments in the region, which averaged 2 miles in length, were calculated. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower in the

Power Hydropower; Douglas G. Hall; Gregory R. Carroll; Shane J. Cherry; Y D. Lee; Garold L. Sommers

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

22nd Steam Generator NDE Workshop: June 30 - July 2, 2003, Hilton Head, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year's workshop took place in Hilton Head, South Carolina, from June 30th to July 2nd, 2003. It covered one full day and two half-days of presentations. Attendees included representatives from domestic and overseas nuclear utilities, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) service and equipment organizations, research laboratories, and regulatory bodies. This annual workshop serves as a forum for NDE specialists to gather and discuss current steam generator NDE is...

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Materials Reliability Program, Reactor Vessel Head Boric Acid Corrosion Testing (MRP-165)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant leakage from stress corrosion cracking of an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetration has led to one case of severe corrosion and cavity formation in a low-alloy steel reactor vessel head (RVH). The detailed progression of RVH wastage following initial leakage is complicated and probably involves several corrosion mechanisms. The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has completed three tasks of a comprehensive program to examine postulated sequential...

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Report covering examination of parts from downhole steam generators. [Combustor head and sleeve parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustor head and sleeve parts were examined by using optical and scanning electron metallography after use in oxygen/diesel and air/diesel downhole steam generators. The degradation of the different alloy components is described in terms of reactions with oxygen, sulfur and carbon in the presence of cyclic stresses, all generated by the combustion process. Recommendations are presented for component materials (alloys and coatings) to extend component lives in the downhole steam generators. 9 references, 22 figures, 3 tables.

Pettit, F. S.; Meier, G. H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Field test of ultra-low head hydropower package based on marine thrusters. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project includes the design, fabrication, assembly, installation, and field test of the first full-scale operating hydropower package (turbine, transmission, and generator) based on a design which incorporates a marine-thruster as the hydraulic prime mover. Included here are: the project overview; engineering design; ultra-low head hydropower package fabrication; component procurement, cost control, and scheduling; thruster hydraulic section installation; site modeling and resulting recommended modifications; testing; and baseline environmental conditions at Stone Drop. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of Channel Head Susceptibility to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been several documented cases of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) indications in the divider plate assembly in Westinghouse model steam generators in operation outside the United States. These indications were observed in plants that operated with proper primary water chemistry. The function of the divider plate in most steam generators is to separate the cold and hot legs of the channel head as the primary water enters the steam generator so that the primary coolant flows up in...

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

Steam Generator Management Program: Flaw Tolerance Evaluation of the Steam Generator Channel Head  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

 Indications have previously been reported in the steam generator divider plate at operating plants outside the United States. The function of the divider plate in most steam generators is to separate the cold and hot legs of the channel head as the primary water enters the steam generator so that the primary coolant flows up into the tubes. As such, the divider plate is not considered a primary pressure ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Materials Reliability Program: Reactor Vessel Head Boric Acid Corrosion Testing (MRP-199)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PWR coolant leakage from stress corrosion cracking of an Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetration has led to one case of severe corrosion and cavity formation in a low-alloy steel reactor vessel head (RVH). The detailed progression of RVH wastage following initial leakage is complicated and probably involves several corrosion mechanisms. The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has completed three tasks of a comprehensive program to examine postulated sequential stages of boric acid corros...

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Materials Reliability Program: Destructive Examination of the North Anna 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel Head (MRP-198)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final of three reports concerning the nondestructive and destructive examinations of selected control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetrations from the decommissioned North Anna Unit 2 reactor vessel head (RVH). The phase-1 report of the EPRI-MRP (Materials Reliability Program) managed program described the selection and removal of penetrations from the decommissioned RVH and the penetration decontamination and laboratory nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The phase-2 report detailed th...

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

269

Materials Reliability Program: Utility Preparation for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Vessel Upper Head Penetrations (MRP-360)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide nuclear power plant owners with recommendations for planning and executing reactor vessel upper head (RVUH) penetration examinations in a manner that will minimize the occurrence of human errors while maximizing the probability of success. RVUH penetrations include control rod drive mechanism, control element drive mechanism, in-core instrumentation, and vent line penetrations. These encompass the standard nomenclatures for domestic utilities but might not ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Flaw Tolerance Approach to Address Reactor Vessel Head Penetration Cracking Issue  

SciTech Connect

Nickel-based alloys and the associated welds are susceptible to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking. In Pressurized Water Reactor nuclear power plants, the reactor vessel closure head upper penetration nozzles used for the Control Rod Drive Mechanisms and other instrumentation systems are made of such nickel-based alloys. Cracking and leakage have been observed in the upper head penetration nozzles in nuclear power plants worldwide. Such cracking and the resulting leakage is a degradation of the reactor vessel pressure boundary. Regulatory requirements have been issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regarding periodic inspection of the susceptible areas to enable detection of indications and provide reasonable assurance of continued structural integrity for reactor vessel closure head. A flaw tolerance approach has been used in the disposition of detected indications to minimize outage delays, by performing up-front fracture mechanics evaluations for the common types of indications detected in the susceptible areas. Details of the flaw tolerance approach are presented in this paper. (authors)

Ng, C. K.; Jirawongkraisorn, S.; Swamy, S. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, Nuclear Services Division, P. O. Box 158, Madison, PA 15663 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Function of the parotid gland following radiation therapy for head and neck cancer  

SciTech Connect

The parotid gland was selected for study of its salivary output before and after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Before radiation therapy, a sialogram of the parotid gland was performed with the patient's head positioned for radiation therapy; a lateral radiographic view of the parotid gland was used to compare with the radiation treatment portal to determine the portion of the parotid gland to be irradiated. Samples of stimulated saliva were collected from the parotid gland before and at 1 and 6 months post-radiation. Eighteen patients with head and neck cancer who received radiation therapy were studied. The data showed that in the irradiation of nasopharyngeal, advanced oropharyngeal and Waldeyer's ring lesions, 100% of the parotid gland was irradiated; for the early oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal lesions, from 30 to 90% of the parotid gland was irradiated and for the supraglottic and oral cavity lesions, 25 to 30% of the parotid gland was irradiated. When 100% of the parotid gland was irradiated, no saliva was produced at 1 month post-radiation; this remained the same when re-tested at 4 to 8 months, however, when any portion of the parotid gland was not irradiated, there was residual salivary function.

Cheng, V.S.T.; Downs, J.; Herbert, D.; Aramany, M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Luu, Quang [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

An analytical study of rail grinding optimization for rail-head fatigue defect prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last two decades, the railroad industry has experienced a significant increase in heavy axle loads acting on railroad rails. In addition, railroad operations have been consolidated resulting in the elimination of redundant routes and increased train traffic on the remaining routes. These changes in railroad industry practice have caused an increase in the rate of occurrence of rail head fatigue defects, one potential cause of train derailment. The primary form of maintenance employed by the individual railroads to combat the formation of fatigue defects is rail grinding. Current rail grinding practices involve removal of surface defects and reshaping worn rail, but they do not involve grinding as a means to mitigate internal fatigue damage. In this study, a model for optimizing a grinding schedule which will prevent the formation of internal fatigue defects is proposed. The model includes a statistical representation of wheel loads, a rail head stress analysis, a rail head fatigue analysis, and optimization of a grinding schedule via mathematical programming. Results from using this model indicate that rail grinding might be performed in such a way as to double the useful service life of railroad rail.

Jones, Scott Laurence

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Status of RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two electron lenses are under construction for RHIC to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in order to increase both the peak and average luminosities. The final design of the overall system is reported as well as the status of the component design, acquisition, and manufacturing. An overview of the RHIC head-on beam-beam compensation project is given in [1], and more details in [2]. With 2 head-on beam-beam interactions in IP6 and IP8, a third interaction with a low-energy electron beam is added near IP10 to partially compensate the the head-on beam-beam effect. Two electron lenses are under construction, one for each ring. Both will be located in a region common to both beams, but each lens will act only on one beam. With head-on beam-beam compensation up to a factor of two improvement in luminosity is expected together with a polarized source upgrade. The current RHIC polarized proton performance is documented in Ref. [4]. An electron lens (Fig. 1) consists of an DC electron gun, warm solenoids to focus the electron beam during transport, a superconducting main solenoid in which the interaction with the proton beam occurs, steering magnets, a collector, and instrumentation. The main developments in the last year are given below. The experimental program for polarized program at 100 GeV was expected to be finished by the time the electron lenses are commissioned. However, decadal plans by the RHIC experiments STAR and PHENIX show a continuing interest at both 100 GeV and 250 GeV, and a larger proton beam size has been accommodated in the design (Tab. 1). Over the last year beam and lattice parameters were optimized, and RHIC proton lattices are under development for optimized electron lens performance. The effect of the electron lens magnetic structure on the proton beam was evaluated, and found to be correctable. Experiments were done in RHIC and the Tevatron.

Fischer, W.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; Bruno, D.; Gassner, D.M.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.C.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.K.; Lambiase, R.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Montag, C.; Oerter, B.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

Design, fabrication, and characterization of a low-cost flexural bearing based 3D printing tool head  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the design, characterization and optimization of a low-cost additive rapid-prototyping tool head for a technology known as Fused Filament Fabrication for use in an educational curriculum. Building a ...

Ramirez, Aaron Eduardo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations-- -2010 Update (MRP-234)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Issues Task Group (ITG) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations. This new qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for the upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably throughout th...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations - - 2012 Update (MRP-311, Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head (RPVUH) penetrations. This qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations 2 011 Update (MRP-311)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations (RPVUHs). This new qualification program was implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably th...

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many senescent individuals demonstrate an inability to regulate mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to standing or head-up tilt; however, whether this aging effect is the result of depressed cardiac function or an inability to reduce peripheral vascular conductance remains unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of aging on MAP, heart rate (HR), regional blood flow (via radioactive-microspheres), and vascular conductance during head-up tilt in conscious young (4 mo; n=12) and old (24 mo; n=10) male Fischer-344 rats. Heart rate and MAP were measured continuously during normal posture and during 10 minutes of head-up tilt. Blood flow was determined during normal posture and at the end of 10 minutes of head-up tilt. Young rats increased MAP significantly at the onset of head-up tilt and generally maintained the increase in MAP for the duration of head-up tilt, while aged rats showed a significant reduction in MAP after 10 minutes of head-up tilt. In the normal posture, aged rats demonstrated lower blood flow to splanchnic, bone, renal, and skin tissues versus young rats. With tilt there were decreases in blood flow to skin, bone, and hind-limb in both age groups and in fat, splanchnic, reproductive, and renal tissues in the young. Bone blood flow was attenuated with age across both conditions in hind foot, distal femur, femur marrow, and proximal and distal tibia. Head-up tilt caused a decrease in blood flow across both age groups in all bones sampled with the exception of the hind foot. These results provide evidence that the initial maintenance of MAP in aged rats during head-up tilt occurs through decreased regional blood flow and vascular conductance, and that the fall in pressure is not attributable to an increase in tissue blood flow and vascular conductance. Therefore, reductions in arterial pressure during headup tilt are likely a result of an old age-induced reduction in cardiac performance. In addition, this is the first study to demonstrate a decreased bone vascular conductance in both young and old rats during head-up tilt.

Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Terms of Reference Administrative Assistant to the Deputy Head of Mission (G5) Election Observation Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ODIHR is the leading agency in Europe in the field of election observation. It co-ordinates and organizes the deployment of several observation missions with thousands of observers every year to assess the compliance of elections in OSCE participating States in line with OSCE commitments, other international standards for democratic elections and national legislation. Its unique methodology provides an in-depth insight into all elements of an electoral process, and permits to make concrete recommendations to further improve electoral processes. Under the supervision of the Deputy Head of Mission for the ODIHR Election Observation Mission (EOM), the Administrative Assistant to the Deputy Head of Mission assists the Deputy Head of Mission (DHoM). S/he reports directly to the DHoM. Tasks and responsibilities:- Arrange appointments and maintain supervisor’s calendar, receive high-ranking visitors, place and screen telephone calls and answer queries with discretion- Organize various meetings with senior officials from presidential administration, national election authorities, relevant ministries, leaders of political parties, representatives of the media and civil society- Interpret meetings to/from English from/to local language- Translate sensitive documents from and to English- Draft non-substantive correspondence and ensure follow up- Keep lists of names, addresses and phone number of the DHoM’s interlocutors- Perform other tasks as required. Education and Experience:- Completion of secondary education- Five years of relevant experience. Experience in international organizations is an asset.- Tact, discretion, self-confidence and diplomacy- Ability to work long hours and under pressure- Demonstrated ability to work with people of different cultural and religious backgrounds,

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analytical solutions for the three-dimensional side-fringing field of magnetic recording heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using conical coordinates, and in the limit of small gap length, the three-dimensional boundary value problem for the side-fringing field of beveled recording heads is reduced to two dimensions. This makes it possible to use analytic functions of a complex variable, and find simple expressions, in terms of elementary functions, for the scalar potential and three-dimensional magnetic fringing field. For a given bevel angle, the spectral response for side reading from in-plane and perpendicular magnetization depends on a single dimensionless parameter, and a quasi-exponential falloff of this response is calculated as a function of the bevel angle.

Mayergoyz, I.D.; Bloomberg, D.S.

1988-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

A study of a turbine-generator system for low-head hydropower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is outlined for determining the optimum operating conditions of a turbine-generator unit installed across a low-head irrigation structure for electrical power generation. For a given regulator's characteristic, the unit's rated power and design parameters are determined such that its cost-benefit ratio is minimum. The economical feasibility of the microhydro plant is studied by comparing its life-time cost to its lifetime benefit. The benefit is determined by the cost of the corresponding energy generated through a dieseldriven generator set. The microhydro plant was found to be economically feasible over a wide range of inflation and interest rates.

Mankbadi, R.R.; Mikhail, S.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

McDermott Technologies to Head Team To Test Materials for 21st Century  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Issued on February 4, 1999 McDermott Technologies to Head Team To Test Materials for 21st Century Power Plant The high-efficiency power plant of the 21st century may still be on the utility industry's drawing boards, but the new high-strength, corrosion resistant alloys that will make these power plants possible are about to enter the "real life" testing stage. The Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a contract to McDermott Technology, Inc., Alliance, OH, to test 10 of the most promising of these alloys in a coal-fired boiler at Ohio Edison's Niles (OH) Power Station. DOE, through its Federal Energy Technology Center, will provide $700,000 of a $1.9 million contract for a five-year testing program to identify candidate materials for tomorrow's advanced boilers. McDermott will head a team made up of Babcock & Wilcox, Consol of Library, PA, the Ohio Coal Development Office, DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Ohio Edison.

284

Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived from their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients may result from the increase in intrathyroidal flow.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Edraki, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiology, Panzdahe-Khordad Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations  

SciTech Connect

This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [comps.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Metallographic and hardness examinations of TMI-2 lower pressure vessel head samples  

SciTech Connect

Fifteen steel samples were removed from the lower pressure vessel head of the damaged TMI-2 nuclear reactor to assess the thermal threat to the head posed by 15 to 20 metric tons of molten core debris relocating there during the accident. Full sections of thirteen of the samples and partial sections of the other two samples underwent hardness and metallographic examinations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These examinations have shown that eleven of the fifteen samples did not exceed the ferrite-austenite transformation temperature of 727 C during the accident. The remaining four samples did show evidence of having a much more severe thermal history. The samples from core grid positions F-10 and G-8 are believed to have experienced temperatures of 1,040 to 1,060 C for about 30 minutes. Samples from positions E-8 and E-6 appear to have been subjected to 1,075 to 1,100 C for approximately 30 minutes.

Korth, G. E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. 5 figs.

Fife, A.B.; Ballas, G.J.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

Fife, Alex Blair (San Jose, CA); Ballas, Gary J. (San Jose, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Pilot Study Of Impedance-controlled Microcurrent Therapy For Managing Radiation-induced Fibrosis In Head-and-neck Cancer Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pilot Study Of Impedance-controlled Microcurrent Therapy For Managing Radiation-induced Fibrosis In Head-and-neck Cancer Patients

Lennox, A J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Assessing the imprint of space, geography, land cover, and host species on the local abundance of a generalist nest parasite, the Brown-headed Cowbird.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Brown-headed Cowbird is an obligate nest parasite suspected of causing local population declines in several threatened and endangered passerine species. Much attention has been… (more)

Cummings, Katherine Elizabeth Rainey 1982-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Long-Range And Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation Studies in RHIC With Lessons for the LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; /Brookhaven; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley; Kabel, A.; /SLAC

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC  

SciTech Connect

Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. Electron lenses were proposed for both RHIC and the LHC to reduce the head-on beam-beam effect. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H.-J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Long-range and head-on beam-beam compensation studies in RHIC with lessons for the LHC  

SciTech Connect

Long-range as well as head-on beam-beam effects are expected to limit the LHC performance with design parameters. They are also important consideration for the LHC upgrades. To mitigate long-range effects current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed. Two such wires are installed in RHIC where they allow studying the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects, as well as the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The tests provide benchmark data for simulations and analytical treatments. To reduce the head-on beam-beam effect electron lenses were proposed for both RIDC and the LHC. We present the experimental long-range beam-beam program at RHIC and report on head-on compensations studies based on simulations.

Fischer,W.; Luo, Y.; Abreu, N.; Calaga, R.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Dorda, U.; Koutchouk, J. -P.; Sterbini, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Kim, H. -J.; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Kabel, A.

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

294

Head-on collisions of electrostatic solitons in multi-ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Head-on collisions between two electrostatic solitons are dealt with by the Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method of strained coordinates, for a plasma composed of a number of cold (positive and negative) ion species and Boltzmann electrons. The nonlinear evolution equations for both solitons and their phase shift due to the collision, resulting in time delays, are established. A Korteweg-de Vries description is the generic conclusion, except when the plasma composition is special enough to replace the quadratic by a cubic nonlinearity in the evolution equations, with concomitant repercussions on the phase shifts. Applications include different two-ion plasmas, showing positive or negative polarity solitons in the generic case. At critical composition, a combination of a positive and a negative polarity soliton is possible.

Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hellberg, Manfred A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Hereman, Willy A. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401-1887 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Severe Dry Eye Syndrome After Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the incidence of severe dry eye syndrome (DES) after external beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer and its dependence on the parameters relevant to external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study included 78 patients treated for primary extracranial head-and-neck tumors between 1965 and 2000, whose lacrimal apparatus/entire globe was exposed to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The dose received by the major lacrimal gland was used for analysis. The end point of the present study was the ophthalmologic diagnosis of severe DES leading to vision compromise. Results: Of the 78 patients, 40 developed severe DES leading to visual compromise. The incidence of DES increased steadily from 6% at 35-39.99 Gy to 50% at 45-49.99 Gy and 90% at 60-64.99 Gy. With a mean of 0.9 years (range, 1 month to 3 years), the latency of DES was observed to be a function of the total dose and the dose per fraction. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the total dose (p =}60 Gy. A logistic normal tissue complication probability model fit to our data obtained a dose of 34 and 38 Gy corresponding to a 5% and 10% incidence of DES. Conclusion: With a dose of 34 Gy corresponding to a 5% incidence of DES, the risk of severe DES increased, and the latency decreased with an increase in the total dose and dose per fraction to the lacrimal gland. The effect of chemoradiotherapy and hyperfractionation on the risk of DES needs additional investigation.

Bhandare, Niranjan, E-mail: bhandn@shands.ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Song, William Y. [University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bhatti, M. Tariq [Department of Ophthalmology and Medicine (Division of Neurology), Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Study and analysis of the stress state in a ceramic, button-head, tensile specimen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final results are reported for a study to identify and correct the causes of nongage-section failures (notably button-head failures) in ceramic tensile specimens observed in several laboratories. Numerical modeling of several candidate specimen gripping systems has shown inherent stress concentrations near the specimen button head at which the maximum stress may approach 75 to 100% of the gage-section stress for certain grip conditions. Empirical comparisons of both tapered- and straight-collet gripping systems revealed compromises in both systems. The straight-collet system, with deformable collets, is simpler to use but produces statistically significant greater average percent bending for all tests than those produced for the tapered-collet system, which is slightly more difficult to use. Empirical tensile tests of {approximately}50 aluminium oxide and {approximately}50 silicon nitride specimens were conducted to evaluate the loading capability of both gripping systems, the percent bending in each system, and the potential of consistently producing successful test results. These tests revealed that, due to variations in individuals specimens or the individual specimen/grip interfaces, neither of the gripping systems can consistently produce bending of less than 3 to 4% at failure although occasional values of {approximately}0.5% bending were attained. Refinements of grinding procedures and dimensional measurement techniques have shown critical details in both the practices and consistency of machining necessary for achieving the dimensional tolerances while minimizing subsurface damage. Numerical integration techniques indicate that up to a consistent 5.0% bending during fast- fracture tests can be tolerated before large influences are detected in the determination of the Weibull modulus and the Weibull characteristic strength.

Jenkins, M.G.; Ferber, M.K.; Martin, R.L.; Jenkins, V.T.; Tennery, V.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Indirect MR lymphangiography of the head and neck using conventional gadolinium contrast: A pilot study in humans  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MR-LAG) using interstitial injection of conventional gadolinium contrast (gadoteridol and gadopentetate dimeglumine) for delineating the primary lymphatic drainage of head-and-neck sites. Methods and Materials: We performed head-and-neck MR-LAG in 5 healthy volunteers, with injection of dermal and mucosal sites. We evaluated the safety of the procedure, the patterns of enhancement categorized by injection site and nodal level, the time course of enhancement, the optimal concentration and volume of contrast, and the optimal imaging sequence. Results: The worst side effects of interstitial contrast injection were brief, mild pain and swelling at the injected sites that were self-limited. MR-LAG resulted in consistent visualization of the primary lymphatic drainage pattern specific to each injected site, which was reproducible on repeated examinations. The best enhancement was obtained with injection of small volumes (0.3-0.5 mL) of either agent diluted, imaging within 5-15 min of injection, and a three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence with magnetization transfer. Conclusions: We found head-and-neck MR-LAG to be a safe, convenient imaging method that provides functional information about the lymphatic drainage of injected sites. Applied to head-and-neck cancer, it has the potential to identify sites at highest risk of occult metastatic spread for radiotherapy or surgical planning, and possibly to visualize micrometastases.

Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Draney, Mary T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sivanandan, Ranjiv [Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Ruehm, Stefan G. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pawlicki, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Herfkens, Robert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy-Efficient Cluster Head Selection Scheme Based on Multiple Criteria Decision Making for Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficiency is an essential issue in the applications of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) all along. Clustering with data aggregation is a significant direction to improve energy efficiency through software. The selection of cluster head (CH) is ... Keywords: Clustering, Hierarchical fuzzy integral, Multiple criteria decision making, Trapezoidal fuzzy AHP, Wireless sensor networks

Teng Gao; Ren Cheng Jin; Jin Yan Song; Tai Bing Xu; Li Ding Wang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Visit to Toyota July 31, 1991 My host was Mr Y. Kuranaga, head of Development Div 1 of Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visit to Toyota July 31, 1991 Background My host was Mr Y. Kuranaga, head of Development Div 1 for engineering, business, and factory operations, plus to provide software training. Toyota has agreements with several companies such as Nihon Unisys to support and sell its CAD software to Toyota's vendors

Whitney, Daniel

300

Cortical dynamics of navigation and steering in natural scenes: Motion-based object segmentation, heading, and obstacle avoidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visually guided navigation through a cluttered natural scene is a challenging problem that animals and humans accomplish with ease. The ViSTARS neural model proposes how primates use motion information to segment objects and determine heading for purposes ... Keywords: MST, MT, Motion segmentation, Navigation, Object tracking, Optic flow, Steering

N. Andrew Browning; Stephen Grossberg; Ennio Mingolla

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

playing dirty discoveries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, thicker walls, enhanced insulation, a low-flow shower, and a solar-powered hot water heater. The project so libraries can prove their worth Follow the Water 14 The high-tech hunt for H2 0 and organic Navigating the legal waters of electronic discovery Faster Than Real Time 30 Simulations set to revolutionize

Tennessee, University of

302

Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industry’s analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Prospective Study of Salivary Gland Function in Lymphoma Patients Receiving Head and Neck Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the radiation dose-response relationship on salivary dysfunction and quality of life (QOL) over time in patients with lymphoma receiving radiation therapy (RT) to the head and neck (H and N). Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective study on salivary-gland function in lymphoma patients receiving RT to the H and N. Fifteen patients were enrolled on the study. Dose-volume histograms and mean doses to the salivary glands were generated. Radiation-related toxicities and H and N-specific QOL were assessed before treatment and at prespecified time points posttreatment. Factors predicting a decrement in QOL were explored using Fisher's exact test. Results: During RT, 47% of patients experienced Grade >= 2 acute toxicity of the salivary gland, mucous membrane, or both. QOL scores improved over time, but up to one third of patients continued to have persistent oral symptoms at 2 years. At 6 months, a mean dose to at least one of the parotids of > 31 Gy was significantly associated with persistent dry mouth (100% vs. 17%, p = 0.02) and sticky saliva (100% vs. 25%, p = 0.04); a mean dose of > 11 Gy to the minor salivary glands was significantly associated with persistent sticky saliva (100% vs. 25%, p = 0.04), although the difference was no longer significant at 1 year. Conclusions: Limiting the mean parotid dose to gland dose to <= 11 Gy in lymphoma patients treated to the H and N may help reduce the risk of subacute xerostomia.

Rodrigues, Neesha A.; Killion, Leah; Hickey, Gail; Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Martin, Chrystalla; Stevenson, Mary Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Ng, Andrea K., E-mail: ang@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Traffic of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A: effects of lane changing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KIF1A kinesins are single-headed motor proteins which move on cylindrical nano-tubes called microtubules (MT). A normal MT consists of 13 protofilaments on which the equispaced motor binding sites form a periodic array. The collective movement of the kinesins on a MT is, therefore, analogous to vehicular traffic on multi-lane highways where each protofilament is the analogue of a single lane. Does lane-changing increase or decrease the motor flux per lane? We address this fundamental question here by appropriately extending a recent model [{\\it Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 75}, 041905 (2007)}]. By carrying out analytical calculations and computer simulations of this extended model, we predict that the flux per lane can increase or decrease with the increasing rate of lane changing, depending on the concentrations of motors and the rate of hydrolysis of ATP, the ``fuel'' molecules. Our predictions can be tested, in principle, by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments with fluorescently labelled KIF1A molecules.

Debashish Chowdhury; Ashok Garai; Jian-Sheng Wang

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Feasibility study for low-head hydropower on the Mill River, Northampton, Massachusetts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Five existing dams along a 6.5-mile reach of the Mill River in the City of Northampton, Massachusetts were studied to assess the feasibility of developing the sites for low-head hydroelectric power generation. Each of the dams was inspected to evaluate existing conditions and necessary work required to rehabilitate the structures. Analyses of hydrology and power potential were carried out and a packaged tube turbine-generator unit was found to be suitable for installation at all sites. Project layouts were developed making maximum use of existing structures and natural and man-made features. Capital and operation and maintenance costs were estimated based on the project layouts and the selected turbine-generator units. Financial analyses were performed using a set of baseline assumptions. Sensitivity tests of alternative assumptions were also prepared, along with analyses of assistance program alternatives. Finally, the legal, environmental, and socio-institutional considerations affecting development of the hydro projects were identified and reviewed. Hydro developments on the Mill River were found to be technically feasible, presenting no extraordinary engineering, environmental, or legal problems. However, none of these projects, either individually or jointly, would be financially feasible without substantial assistance in the form of capital grants.

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large, fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P . 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A.; Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P = 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima-Nagasaki, Japan); Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

STAR FORMATION IN THE MOLECULAR CLOUD ASSOCIATED WITH THE MONKEY HEAD NEBULA: SEQUENTIAL OR SPONTANEOUS?  

SciTech Connect

We mapped the (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) lines of NH{sub 3} toward the molecular cloud associated with the Monkey Head Nebula (MHN) with a 1.'6 angular resolution using a Kashima 34 m telescope operated by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The kinetic temperature of the molecular gas is 15-30 K in the eastern part and 30-50 K in the western part. The warmer gas is confined to a small region close to the compact H II region S252A. The cooler gas is extended over the cloud even near the extended H II region, the MHN. We made radio continuum observations at 8.4 GHz using the Yamaguchi 32 m radio telescope. The resultant map shows no significant extension from the H{alpha} image. This means that the molecular cloud is less affected by the MHN, suggesting that the molecular cloud did not form by the expanding shock of the MHN. Although the spatial distribution of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and Two Micron All Sky Survey point sources suggests that triggered low- and intermediate-mass star formation took place locally around S252A, but the exciting star associated with it should be formed spontaneously in the molecular cloud.

Chibueze, James O.; Imura, Kenji; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Nagayama, Takumi; Sunada, Kazuyoshi [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fujisawa, Kenta [Department of Physics and Informatics, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University, Yoshida 1677-1, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan)] [Department of Physics and Informatics, Faculty of Science, Yamaguchi University, Yoshida 1677-1, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan); Nakano, Makoto [Faculty of Education and Welfare Science, Oita University, Oita 870-1192 (Japan)] [Faculty of Education and Welfare Science, Oita University, Oita 870-1192 (Japan); Sekido, Mamoru, E-mail: james@milkyway.sci.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Kashima Space Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 893-1 Hirai, Kashima, Ibaraki 314-8501 (Japan)] [Kashima Space Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 893-1 Hirai, Kashima, Ibaraki 314-8501 (Japan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system  

SciTech Connect

An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

Kieper, Douglas Arthur (Seattle, WA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, WV); Welch, Benjamin L. (Hampton, VA)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

Method to improve cancerous lesion detection sensitivity in a dedicated dual-head scintimammography system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for enhancing the contrast between background and lesion areas of a breast undergoing dual-head scintimammographic examination comprising: 1) acquiring a pair of digital images from a pair of small FOV or mini gamma cameras compressing the breast under examination from opposing sides; 2) inverting one of the pair of images to align or co-register with the other of the images to obtain co-registered pixel values; 3) normalizing the pair of images pixel-by-pixel by dividing pixel values from each of the two acquired images and the co-registered image by the average count per pixel in the entire breast area of the corresponding detector; and 4) multiplying the number of counts in each pixel by the value obtained in step 3 to produce a normalization enhanced two dimensional contrast map. This enhanced (increased contrast) contrast map enhances the visibility of minor local increases (uptakes) of activity over the background and therefore improves lesion detection sensitivity, especially of small lesions.

Kieper, Douglas Arthur (Newport News, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Welch, Benjamin L. (Hampton, VA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dentalmaps: Automatic Dental Delineation for Radiotherapy Planning in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To propose an automatic atlas-based segmentation framework of the dental structures, called Dentalmaps, and to assess its accuracy and relevance to guide dental care in the context of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A multi-atlas-based segmentation, less sensitive to artifacts than previously published head-and-neck segmentation methods, was used. The manual segmentations of a 21-patient database were first deformed onto the query using nonlinear registrations with the training images and then fused to estimate the consensus segmentation of the query. Results: The framework was evaluated with a leave-one-out protocol. The maximum doses estimated using manual contours were considered as ground truth and compared with the maximum doses estimated using automatic contours. The dose estimation error was within 2-Gy accuracy in 75% of cases (with a median of 0.9 Gy), whereas it was within 2-Gy accuracy in 30% of cases only with the visual estimation method without any contour, which is the routine practice procedure. Conclusions: Dose estimates using this framework were more accurate than visual estimates without dental contour. Dentalmaps represents a useful documentation and communication tool between radiation oncologists and dentists in routine practice. Prospective multicenter assessment is underway on patients extrinsic to the database.

Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Ramus, Liliane [DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); INRIA (Institut National de Recherche en Automatique et en Automatique)-Asclepios Research Project, Sophia-Antipolis (France); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Dijon Cedex (France); Odin, Guillaume [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Gregoire, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, St.-Luc University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium); Darcourt, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology-Dentistry, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Guevara, Nicolas [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Orlanducci, Marie-Helene [Department of Odontology, CHU, Nice (France); Marcie, Serge [Department of Radiation Oncology/Institut de biologie et developpement du cancer (IBDC) centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) unite mixte de recherche UMR 6543, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); Poissonnet, Gilles [Department of Head-and-Neck Surgery, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne-Institut Universitaire de la Face et du Cou, Nice Cedex (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Antoine-Lacassagne, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice Cedex (France); and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Small, Low Flow, High Sensitivity Reaction Vessel for NO Chemiluminescence Detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of a reaction vessel suitable for atmospheric measurements of nitric oxide at parts per trillion mixing ratios using the chemiluminescent reaction with ozone are provided. It is designed to operate at an ambient air flow of 1 standard ...

B. A. Ridley; F. E. Grahek

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Heat Transfer in Intermediate Heat Exchanger Under Low Flow Rate Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 2008 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants / Thermal Hydraulics

Hiroyasu Mochizuki

315

Choosing an Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Technique in the Treatment of Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: With the emerging use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer, selection of technique becomes a critical issue. The purpose of this article is to establish IMRT guidelines for head-and-neck cancer at a given institution. Methods and Materials: Six common head-and-neck cancer cases were chosen to illustrate the points that must be considered when choosing between split-field (SF) IMRT, in which the low anterior neck (LAN) is treated with an anterior field, and the extended whole-field (EWF) IMRT in which the LAN is included with the IMRT fields. For each case, the gross tumor, clinical target, and planning target volumes and the surrounding critical normal tissues were delineated. Subsequently, the SF and EWF IMRT plans were compared using dosimetric parameters from dose-volume histograms. Results: Target coverage and doses delivered to the critical normal structures were similar between the two different techniques. Cancer involving the nasopharynx and oropharynx are best treated with the SF IMRT technique to minimize the glottic larynx dose. The EWF IMRT technique is preferred in situations in which the glottic larynx is considered as a target, i.e., cancer of the larynx, hypopharynx, and unknown head-and-neck primary. When the gross disease extends inferiorly and close to the glottic larynx, EWF IMRT technique is also preferred. Conclusion: Depending on the clinical scenario, different IMRT techniques and guidelines are suggested to determine a preferred IMRT technique. We found that having this treatment guideline when treating these tumors ensures a smoother flow for the busy clinic.

Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org; Mechalakos, James [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Puri, Dev R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hunt, Margie [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Jetting, In-Nozzle Meniscus Motion and Nozzle-Plate Flooding in an Industrial Drop-on-Demand Print Head  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-up of fluid in an annulus around the nozzle (flooding rate) has been characterized and compared with models for the net ink flow through the nozzle. Introduction In a commercial drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet print head, the ink meniscus at nozzles... . The flash, focused by a condenser, illuminates the nozzles about 21 degrees off-axis from the opposite direction. The arrangement is configured to maximize the illumination reaching the camera lens within the space constraints. A protective glass plate...

Hsiao, W.-K.; Hoath, S.D.; Martin, G.D.; Hutchings, I.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effect of Radiotherapy Interruptions on Survival in Medicare Enrollees With Local and Regional Head-and-Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate whether interruptions in radiotherapy are associated with decreased survival in a population-based sample of head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years and older diagnosed with local-regional head-and-neck cancer during the period 1997-2003. We examined claims records of 3864 patients completing radiotherapy for the presence of one or more 5-30-day interruption(s) in therapy. We then performed Cox regression analyses to estimate the association between therapy interruptions and survival. Results: Patients with laryngeal tumors who experienced an interruption in radiotherapy had a 68% (95% confidence interval, 41-200%) increased risk of death, compared with patients with no interruptions. Patients with nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral, salivary gland, and sinus tumors had similar associations between interruptions and increased risk of death, but these did not reach statistical significance because of small sample sizes. Conclusions: Treatment interruptions seem to influence survival time among patients with laryngeal tumors completing a full course of radiotherapy. At all head-and-neck sites, the association between interruptions and survival is sensitive to confounding by stage and other treatments. Further research is needed to develop methods to identify patients most susceptible to interruption-induced mortality.

Fesinmeyer, Megan Dann [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Mehta, Vivek [Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Blough, David [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tock, Lauri [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Ramsey, Scott D., E-mail: sramsey@fhcrc.or [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high flows. There were zero days when the trap was out of operation due to high flow or debris. The decrease in hatchery Chinook catch in 2003 was partially due to differences in flow between years because there was a 5.9% increase in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. The decrease in hatchery steelhead catch may be partially due to a 13% decrease in hatchery production in the Salmon River drainage in 2003. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km/d) through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT-tagged Chinook salmon and steelhead trout marked at the Snake River trap were affected by discharge. Statistical analysis of 2003 data detected a relation between migration rate and discharge for wild Chinook salmon but was unable to detect a relation for hatchery Chinook. The inability to detect a migration rate discharge relation for hatchery Chinook was probably caused by age 0 fall Chinook being mixed in with the age 1 Chinook. Age 0 fall Chinook migrate much slower than age 1 Chinook, which would confuse the ability to detect the migration rate discharge relation. For wild Chinook salmon there was a 1.4-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. For steelhead trout tagged at the Snake River trap, statistical analysis detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge. For hatchery and wild steelhead trout, there was a 1.7-fold and a 1.9-fold increase in migration rate, respectively, between 50 and 100 kcfs. Travel time and migration rate to Lower Granite Dam for fish marked at the Salmon River trap were calculated. Statistical analysis of the 2003 data detected a significant relation between migration rate and Lower Granite Reservoir inflow discharge for hatchery Chinook salmon, wild Chinook salmon and hatchery steelhead trout. Not enough data were available to perform the analysis for wild steelhead trout. Migration rate increased 14-fold for hatchery Chinook salmon, 8.3-fold for wild Chinook salmon and 2.4-fold for hatchery steelhead as discharge increased between 50 kcfs and

Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A. [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

319

Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

Adams, Amy Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Understanding Food Stamp Program Participation Among Female-Headed Households: Has It Been Affected By Participation In The AFDC/TANF Program?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The caseloads of food stamp program and welfare program experienced sharp drops among non-metropolitan single female-headed families with children (SFHFwC) after welfare reform in 1996.… (more)

Shangguan, Zhaoyun

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Distant Metastases in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the pattern and risk factors for distant metastases in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after curative treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 284 HNSCC patients treated in a single institution with IMRT. Sites included were oropharynx (125), oral cavity (70), larynx (55), hypopharynx (17), and unknown primary (17). American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution includes I (3), II (19), III (42), and IV (203). There were 224 males and 60 females with a median age of 57. One hundred eighty-six patients were treated with definitive IMRT and 98 postoperative IMRT. One hundred forty-nine patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 22.8 months (range, 0.07-77.3 months) and 29.5 months (4.23-77.3 months) for living patients. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 94.6%, 96.4%, 92.5%, 84.1%, and 68.95%, respectively. There were 45 patients with distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was strongly associated with N stage (p = 0.046), T stage (p < 0.0001), and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value of the lymph node (p = 0.006), but not associated with age, gender, disease sites, pretreatment standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, or locoregional control. The freedom from distant metastasis at 3 years was 98.1% for no factors, 88.6% for one factor, 68.3% for two factors, and 41.7% for three factors (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Conclusion: With advanced radiation techniques and concurrent chemotherapy, the failure pattern has changed with more patients failing distantly. The majority of patients with distant metastases had no local or regional failures, indicating that these patients might have microscopic distant disease before treatment. The clinical factors identified here should be incorporated in future clinical trials.

Yao Min, E-mail: min.yao@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lu Minggen [School of Public Health, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Savvides, Panayiotis S. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad A.; Lavertu, Pierre [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Enteral Feeding During Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience Using a Reactive Approach  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The optimal method for providing enteral nutrition to patients with head-and-neck cancer is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of our reactive policy, which consists of the installation of a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube only when required by the patient's nutritional status. Methods and Materials: The records of all patients with Stage III and IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. The overall and disease-free survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: The present study included 253 patients, and the median follow-up was 33 months. At 3 years, the estimated overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 82.8% and 77.8%, respectively, for the whole population. No survival difference was observed when the patients were compared according to the presence and absence of a NG tube or stratified by weight loss quartile. The mean weight loss during treatment for all patients was 10.4%. The proportion of patients requiring a NG tube was 49.8%, and the NG tube remained in place for a median duration of 40 days. No major complications were associated with NG tube installation. Only 3% of the patients were still dependent on enteral feeding at 6 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that the use of a reactive NG tube with an interdisciplinary team approach is a safe and effective method to manage malnutrition in patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Charpentier, Danielle [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Belair, Manon [Department of Radiology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Li Baoqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Head-and-Neck Target Delineation Among Radiation Oncology Residents After a Teaching Intervention: A Prospective, Blinded Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We conducted this study to determine the feasibility of incorporating a teaching intervention on target delineation into the educational curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program and to assess the short-term effects on resident skills. Methods and Materials: The study schema consisted of a baseline evaluation, the teaching intervention, and a follow-up evaluation. At the baseline evaluation, the participants contoured three clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) (70 Gy, 59.4 Gy, and 54 Gy) on six contrast-enhanced axial computed tomography images of a de-identified patient with Stage T2N2bM0 squamous cell carcinoma of the right base of the tongue. The participants attended a series of head-and-neck oncology and anatomy seminars. The teaching intervention consisted of a didactic lecture and an interactive hands-on practical session designed to improve the knowledge and skills for target delineation in the head and neck. At the follow-up evaluation, the residents again contoured the CTVs. Results: Of the 14 eligible residents, 11 (79%) actually participated in the study. For all participants, but especially for those who had not had previous experience with head-and-neck target delineation, the teaching intervention was associated with improvement in the delineation of the node-negative neck (CTV 54 Gy contour). Regardless of clinical experience, participants had difficulty determining what should be included in the CTV 59.4 Gy contour to ensure adequate coverage of potential microscopic disease. Conclusion: Incorporating a teaching intervention into the education curriculum of a radiation oncology residency program is feasible and was associated with short-term improvements in target delineation skills. Subsequent interventions will require content refinement, additional validation, longer term follow-up, and multi-institutional collaboration.

Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: bekelmaj@mskcc.org; Wolden, Suzanne; Lee, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effect of microtubule-associated protein tau in dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with non-motile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al. Science 319, 1086 (2008)] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduce experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

J. Sparacino; M. G. Farías; P. W. Lamberti

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

329

Clinical Management of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Successes and Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most significant long-term complication of radiotherapy in the head-and-neck region is hyposalivation and its related complaints, particularily xerostomia. This review addresses the pathophysiology underlying irradiation damage to salivary gland tissue, the consequences of radiation injury, and issues contributing to the clinical management of salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia. These include ways to (1) prevent or minimize radiation injury of salivary gland tissue, (2) manage radiation-induced hyposalivation and xerostomia, and (3) restore the function of salivary gland tissue damaged by radiotherapy.

Vissink, Arjan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Grongingen (Netherlands); Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Limesand, Kirsten H. [Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Jensen, Siri Beier [Department of Oral Medicine, Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Fox, Philip C. [PC Fox Consulting, Spello (Italy); Elting, Linda S. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Reyland, Mary E., E-mail: Mary.Reyland@UCDenver.ed [Department of Craniofacial Biology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

The effect of q-distributed electrons on the head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves  

SciTech Connect

The head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in two component plasma comprising nonextensive distributed electrons is investigated. Two opposite directional Kortewg-de-vries (KdV) equations are derived and the phase shift due to collision is obtained using the extended version of Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method. Different ranges of nonextensive parameter q are considered and their effects on phase shifts are observed. It is found that the presence of nonextensive distributed electrons plays a significant role on the nature of collision of ion acoustic solitary waves.

Ghosh, Uday Narayan; Chatterjee, Prasanta [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics, ISI, Kolkata 700009 (India)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes  

SciTech Connect

Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B. [Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico); Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hot Showers, Fresh Laundry, Clean Dishes | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dishes March 5, 2013 - 11:17am Addthis The GE GeoSpring Electric Heat Pump Water Heater is readily integrated into new and existing home designs. Taking up the same footprint...

334

Extracting longitudinal shower development information from crystal calorimetry plus tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal calorimetry plus tracking D.N. Brown a , J. Ilic b ,calorimeter by using tracking information. Ourgood three- dimensional tracking resolution of B A B AR ,

Brown, D.N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Showering with the Sun at Chickasaw National Recreation Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ark Golnar, a mechanical engineer with the National Park Service (NPS), describes solar water heating as the "perfect heat source" for the comfort stations at Chickasaw National Recreation Area. "The demand for hot water coincides with the availabil- ity of sunlight, which makes solar water heaters the obvious choice," he says. "As a bonus, the solar systems are an environmentally sound and cost- effective way to heat water." Located about 100 miles (161 km) south of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on Lake of the Arbuckles, the facility is used primarily in the summer, when solar energy is abundant. The solar water heating systems supply all the hot water for one large comfort station and two small ones at the Buckhorn Campground. (There are no

336

Showering with the Sun at Chickasaw National Recreation Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ark Golnar, a mechanical engineer with ark Golnar, a mechanical engineer with the National Park Service (NPS), describes solar water heating as the "perfect heat source" for the comfort stations at Chickasaw National Recreation Area. "The demand for hot water coincides with the availabil- ity of sunlight, which makes solar water heaters the obvious choice," he says. "As a bonus, the solar systems are an environmentally sound and cost- effective way to heat water." Located about 100 miles (161 km) south of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on Lake of the Arbuckles, the facility is used primarily in the summer, when solar energy is abundant. The solar water heating systems supply all the hot water for one large comfort station and two small ones at the Buckhorn Campground. (There are no

337

PARTLY CLOUDY WITH NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS. MAX TEMPERATURE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABOVE 8000 FT....69-74. BELOW 8000 FT....80-85. 24 HR TREND......LITTLE CHANGE. MIN HUMIDITY... ABOVE 8000 FT....32-42 PCT. BELOW 8000 FT....28-38 PCT. 24 HR TREND......DOWN...

338

Matching NLO QCD computations and parton shower simulations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¯ ?? W+W? , (4.2) qq¯ ?? W+W?g , (4.3) qg ?? W+W?q , (4.4) where q = u, d, . . . and eq. (4.4) includes the corresponding antiquark processes. Equation (4.2) contributes to Born and virtual emission terms, whereas eqs. (4.3) and (4.4) contribute to real...

Frixione, Stefano; Webber, Bryan R

339

An Object-Oriented Approach to Nowcasting Showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a simple conceptual model depicting the life cycle of a convective cell, including the production of daughter cells, has been examined as a way of improving nowcasts in certain showery situations. The evolution of the cell from birth ...

W. H. Hand; B. J. Conway

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Feasibility assessment of low-head hydroelectric development at the Peninsular Paper Company dam in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study into the feasibility of developing a small, low-head dam site for hydroelectric generation in southeastern Michigan are presented. Average hydraulic head at the site is 13.0 ft, mean stream flow is 498 cfs. Economic, environmental and institutional factors were considered. Seven specific hypothetical designs were examined in detail, including vertical, bulb, cross-flow and tubular turbine designs. It was determined that the production capacity of the facility had an important influence on the cost-effectiveness of the project. A detailed benefit/cost analysis was conducted to identify the optimum facility size in terms of incremental costs and benefits. From an economic standpoint, it was found that the most cost-effective design for developing the site, although profitable, would not be financially attractive to the owner compared to other investment opportunities with which the company is faced. The projected after-tax return on investment for the project, based on current costs, was projected to be from 2 to 6%, depending upon the depreciation basis used. The project would, however, have a favorable effect on the corporation's working capital. The environmental issues associated with the development of the site would be relatively minor. The most important consequence would be enhanced public safety due to structural repairs to the dam and the availability of a small, independent source of electric generation that could be called on in times of power outages or natural disaster.

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Neuro-fuzzy controller of low head hydropower plants using adaptive-network based fuzzy inference system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an attempt of nonlinear, multivariable control of low-head hydropower plants, by using adaptive-network based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The new design technique enhances fuzzy controllers with self-learning capability for achieving prescribed control objectives in a near optimal manner. The controller has flexibility for accepting more sensory information, with the main goal to improve the generator unit transients, by adjusting the exciter input, the wicket gate and runner blade positions. The developed ANFIS controller whose control signals are adjusted by using incomplete on-line measurements, can offer better damping effects to generator oscillations over a wide range of operating conditions, than conventional controllers. Digital simulations of hydropower plant equipped with low-head Kaplan turbine are performed and the comparisons of conventional excitation-governor control, state-feedback optimal control and ANFIS based output feedback control are presented. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme and the robustness of the acquired neuro-fuzzy controller, the controller has been implemented on a complex high-order non-linear hydrogenerator model.

Djukanovic, M.B. [Inst. Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Power Systems; Calovic, M.S. [Univ. of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Vesovic, B.V. [Inst. Mihajlo Pupin, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Automatic Control; Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Neural-net based coordinated stabilizing control for the exciter and governor loops of low head hydropower plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a design technique of a new adaptive optimal controller of the low head hydropower plant using artificial neural networks (ANN). The adaptive controller is to operate in real time to improve the generating unit transients through the exciter input, the guide vane position and the runner blade position. The new design procedure is based on self-organization and the predictive estimation capabilities of neural-nets implemented through the cluster-wise segmented associative memory scheme. The developed neural-net based controller (NNC) whose control signals are adjusted using the on-line measurements, can offer better damping effects for generator oscillations over a wide range of operating conditions than conventional controllers. Digital simulations of hydropower plant equipped with low head Kaplan turbine are performed and the comparisons of conventional excitation-governor control, state-space optimal control and neural-net based control are presented. Results obtained on the non-linear mathematical model demonstrate that the effects of the NNC closely agree with those obtained using the state-space multivariable discrete-time optimal controllers.

Djukanovic, M.; Novicevic, M.; Dobrijevic, D.; Babic, B. [Electrical Engineering Inst. Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Pao, Y.H. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[AI WARE, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Feasibility of determination of low-head hydroelectric power development at existing sites: North Hartland Dam Project. Feasibility report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of constructing a low-head hydroelectric power plant at the North Hartland Dam in Vermont was investigated. Evaluation of technical, economic, environmental, safety, and regulatory aspects led to the conclusion that the North Hartland Dam Hydroelectric Project is a technically feasible concept. The proposed project will have a recommended 6000 kW nominally rated capacity at a 52 ft turbine design head and 1680 cfs demand flow. The gross generation expected from the project is 11,980,000 kWh per year. It is estimated that the project will cost $8,997,000 at 1978 price levels, with no allowance for funds during construction. The project will provide peaking power at a levelized cost of about 41 mills per kWh at 1979 price levels, based on 7% cost of money, a 1985 commissioning date, and allowing for funds during construction and cost escalation over a 30 y period. The benefit-cost ratio compared with an equivalent oil-based generation source over a similar period is estimated as 1.06. (LCL)

None

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Phosphorylation and the N-terminal extension of the regulatory light chain help orient and align the myosin heads in Drosophila flight muscle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I{sub 20}/I{sub 10}), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin filaments. Phosphorylation site disruption (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}), but not N-terminal extension truncation (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}), decreased the 14.5 nm reflection intensity, indicating a spread of the axial distribution of the myosin heads. The arrangement of thick filaments and myosin heads in electron micrographs of the phosphorylation mutant (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) appeared normal in the relaxed and rigor states, but when calcium activated, fewer myosin heads formed cross-bridges. In transgenic flies with both alterations to the RLC (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46; S66A, S67A}), the effects of the dual mutation were additive. The results suggest that the RLC N-terminal extension serves as a 'tether' to help pre-position the myosin heads for attachment to actin, while phosphorylation of the RLC promotes head orientations that allow optimal interactions with the thin filament.

Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.; (IIT); (Vermont); (Duke)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Offering Songs, Festive Songs, Processional Songs mGar-gLu, Khro-Glu, Phebsnga: Tashi Tsering's Music: Gho la sha mo go gyi, 'The head and the hat wed each other'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bundle of threa s). It sounds really nice at the festival.” last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 ?????? = head (H); ??????? = looks very nice. ...

Blumenthal, Katey

346

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

Materials Reliability Program: Safety Evaluation for Boric Acid Wastage of PWR Reactor Vessel Bottom Heads Due to Bottom-Mounted Noz zle Leakage (MRP-167)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses one of the potential safety issues associated with aging degradation of reactor vessel bottom head penetrations: bottom mounted nozzles (BMNs). Specifically, this report evaluates the concern that BMN leakage due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of the Alloy 600 nozzle and/or Alloy 82/182 J-groove attachment weld could lead to significant wastage of the low-alloy steel head shell material due to concentration of the boric acid present in the leaking prim...

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

349

Speakers: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Michelle Michot Foss, Chief Energy Economist and Head, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7: "Natural Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context" 7: "Natural Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context" Speakers: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Michelle Michot Foss, Chief Energy Economist and Head, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas Benjamin Schlesinger, Benjamin Schlesinger and Associates, Inc. Andrew Slaughter, Shell [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Glenn: Let me welcome you to the Natural Gas Session. This is the only session in this conference that's devoted exclusively to natural gas [laughs]. I'm Glenn Sweetnam and I'm with the Energy Information Administration, and we're very fortunate this morning to have 3 very astute and long-time observers of the natural gas market to

350

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: NANCY H. SUTLEY, Chair, Council on Environmental Quality  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 18, 2010 February 18, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF FEDERAL DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES FROM: NANCY H. SUTLEY, Chair, Council on Environmental Quality SUBJECT: DRAFT NEPA GUIDANCE ON CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS I. INTRODUCTION The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) provides this draft guidance memorandum for public consideration and comment on the ways in which Federal agencies can improve their consideration of the effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 1 and climate change in their evaluation of proposals for Federal actions under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 4321 et seq. This draft guidance is intended to help explain how agencies of the Federal government should analyze the

351

Parotid Gland Dose in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Is What You Plan What You Get?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the differences between planned and delivered parotid gland and target doses, and to assess the benefits of daily bone alignment for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eleven head and neck cancer patients received two CT scans per week with an in-room CT scanner over the course of their radiotherapy. The clinical IMRT plans, designed with 3-mm to 4-mm planning margins, were recalculated on the repeat CT images. The plans were aligned using the actual treatment isocenter marked with radiopaque markers (BB) and bone alignment to the cervical vertebrae to simulate image-guided setup. In-house deformable image registration software was used to map daily dose distributions to the original treatment plan and to calculate a cumulative delivered dose distribution for each patient. Results: Using conventional BB alignment led to increases in the parotid gland mean dose above the planned dose by 5 to 7 Gy in 45% of the patients (median, 3.0 Gy ipsilateral, p = 0.026; median, 1.0 Gy contralateral, p = 0.016). Use of bone alignment led to reductions relative to BB alignment in 91% of patients (median, 2 Gy; range, 0.3-8.3 Gy; 15 of 22 parotids improved). However, the parotid dose from bone alignment was still greater than planned (median, 1.0 Gy, p = 0.007). Neither approach affected tumor dose coverage. Conclusions: With conventional BB alignment, the parotid gland mean dose was significantly increased above the planned mean dose. Using daily bone alignment reduced the parotid dose compared with BB alignment in almost all patients. A 3- to 4-mm planning margin was adequate for tumor dose coverage.

O'Daniel, Jennifer C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang He [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, Kian K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Rosenthal, David I.; Morrison, William H.; Asper, Joshua A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang Lifei; Tung Shihming; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Novel Dose Constraint to Reduce Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the predictors of incidence and duration of xerostomia (XT) based on parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SMG), and both glands taken as a whole organ (TG) in head-and-neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was initiated in May 2003. Sixty-three head-and-neck patients (44 with nasopharynx cancer) were included in the analysis. Using the dose-volume histogram the PG, SMG, and TG mean doses were calculated. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow were measured and XT-related questionnaires were compiled before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after radiotherapy. Salivary gland toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and Grade >=3 toxicity was used as the endpoint. The XT incidence was investigated according to descriptive statistics and univariate and multivariate analysis. The Bonferroni method was used for multiple comparison adjustment. Results: After a reduced flow at 3 months after radiotherapy, recovery of salivary flow was observed over time. Primary site and salivary gland mean doses and volumes were identified in univariate analysis as prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TG mean dose (p = 0.00066) and pretreatment stimulated salivary flow (p = 0.00420) are independent factors for predicting XT. Conclusion: The TG mean dose correlates with XT as assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, salivary output, and XT-related questionnaires. Our results suggest that TG mean dose is a candidate dose constraint for reducing XT, requiring considerably more validation in non-nasopharyngeal cancer patients.

Strigari, Lidia, E-mail: strigari@ifo.i [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Bruzzaniti, Vicente [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Giovinazzo, Giuseppe; Marucci, Laura [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Assessment of concentrations of trace organic contaminants in sediments at Rame Head Cefas Multi-disciplinary Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrations of organic contaminants were determined in seabed sediments from the Rame Head area. These are presented here together with concentrations of the same contaminants determined at other disposal grounds around England and Wales. Brominated flame retardants (BFR) Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) The use of PCB has been controlled for over 20 years, but their persistence in the environment means that they are still detectable today. Organochlorine pesticides (OCP) The OCPs studied in this survey were dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p’-DDT) and its degradation products/metabolites p,p’-DDE and p,p’-TDE, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dieldrin and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH). BFR determined were the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDE) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). Total BDE ? 10 congeners Total PCB ? 25 congeners Elevated concentrations of PCB at the disposal site are probably due to historic disposal activity. Concentrations of PCB at the SAC and outside the disposal area are either low or below the limit of detection of the methods used. Dieldrin Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) A range of oil and combustion-derived PAH were monitored in this survey. Total DDT ? p,p’-DDT, p,p’-DDE and p,p’-TDE concentrations Total HBCD ? ?, ? and ?-HBCD isomers. Except for p,p’-DDT at one site, all OCP concentrations were low, below sediment quality guidelines 2,3. Concentrations of BFR measured in this study are comparable to the lowest concentrations detected in European marine sediments 1 and at other disposal grounds around the UK. These concentrations of BFR represent general environmental background, which may have resulted from a combination of diffuse inputs and atmospheric deposition. References Environmental impacts resulting from disposal of dredged material at the Rame Head disposal site, S.W.

The Centre For Environment; Aquaculture Science

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Proton Beam Therapy as a Nonsurgical Approach to Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical benefit of proton beam therapy for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck with histologically confirmed malignant melanoma and N0 and M0 disease were enrolled. Proton therapy was delivered three times per week with a planned total dose of 60 Gy equivalents (GyE) in 15 fractions. Results: Fourteen consecutive patients were enrolled from January 2004 through February 2008. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 73 years old (range, 56 to 79 years); male/female ratio, 7/7; and T stage 1/2/3/4, 3/2/0/9. All patients were able to receive the full dose of proton therapy. The most common acute toxicities were mucositis (grade 3, 21%) and mild dermatitis (grade 3, 0%). As for late toxicity, 2 patients had a unilateral decrease in visual acuity, although blindness did not occur. No treatment-related deaths occurred throughout the study. Initial local control rate was 85.7%, and, with a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, median progression-free survival was 25.1 months, and 3-year overall survival rates were 58.0%. The most frequent site of first failure was cervical lymph nodes (6 patients), followed by local failure in 1 patient and lung metastases in 1 patient. On follow-up, 5 patients died of disease, 4 died due to cachexia caused by distant metastases, and 1 patient by carotid artery perforation cause by lymph nodes metastases. Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy showed promising local control benefits and would benefit from ongoing clinical study.

Zenda, Sadamoto, E-mail: szenda@east.ncc.go.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nihei, Keiji; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Arahira, Satoko; Ogino, Takashi [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Internationalization of a Talking Head Ouni, S. Massaro, D.W., Cohen, M.M., Young, K. & Jesse, A.(2003). Internationalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internationalization of a Talking Head Ouni, S. Massaro, D.W., Cohen, M.M., Young, K. & Jesse, A and providing the test facilities. REFERENCES [1] D.W. Massaro, Perceiving Talking Faces, From Speech Perception to a Behavioral Principle, MIT Press, 1998. [2] A. Bosseler and D.W. Massaro, "Development and Evaluation

Cohen, Michael M.

356

Midline Dose Verification with Diode In Vivo Dosimetry for External Photon Therapy of Head and Neck and Pelvis Cancers During Initial Large-Field Treatments  

SciTech Connect

During radiotherapy treatments, quality assurance/control is essential, particularly dose delivery to patients. This study was designed to verify midline doses with diode in vivo dosimetry. Dosimetry was studied for 6-MV bilateral fields in head and neck cancer treatments and 10-MV bilateral and anteroposterior/posteroanterior (AP/PA) fields in pelvic cancer treatments. Calibrations with corrections of diodes were performed using plastic water phantoms; 190 and 100 portals were studied for head and neck and pelvis treatments, respectively. Calculations of midline doses were made using the midline transmission, arithmetic mean, and geometric mean algorithms. These midline doses were compared with the treatment planning system target doses for lateral or AP (PA) portals and paired opposed portals. For head and neck treatments, all 3 algorithms were satisfactory, although the geometric mean algorithm was less accurate and more uncertain. For pelvis treatments, the arithmetic mean algorithm seemed unacceptable, whereas the other algorithms were satisfactory. The random error was reduced by using averaged midline doses of paired opposed portals because the asymmetric effect was averaged out. Considering the simplicity of in vivo dosimetry, the arithmetic mean and geometric mean algorithm should be adopted for head/neck and pelvis treatments, respectively.

Tung, Chuan-Jong [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Yu, Pei-Chieh [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Min-Chi [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chi-Yuan [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tungs' Taichung Metroharbor Hospital, Wuci, Taichung County, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian, E-mail: chaot@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Department _____________________ Dept. Head Initials _______________ Date__________________ Adding machine tape, by piece File Folder Tabs, 1/3 cut by piece Legal Pads by piece  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pads by piece _____ _____1-10 8 tabs, assort.____ ruled_____ Paper, white by ream _____1-12 5 tabsDepartment _____________________ Dept. Head Initials _______________ Date__________________ Adding_____ ,white, ,yellow, Box Cutter by piece tap action _____ _____red clear_____ _____5x7" 5x7"_____ standard

Dasgupta, Dipankar

358

Augmented reality performance assessment battery (arpab): object recognition, distance estimation and size estimation using optical see-through head-worn displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Augmented reality (AR) is a maturing technology that often utilizes head-worn see-through displays and shows digital objects so they appear as part of the environment. AR systems are increasingly being used in training and to support on-the-job performance. ...

Sonny Eugene Harrison Kirkley, Jr. / Martin A. Siegel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38-55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8-78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O. [Division of Otolaryngology-Head Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Agarwal, Neeraj [Department of Internal Medicine, Oncology Division, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J., E-mail: ying.hitchcock@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Role of Positron Emission Tomography in the Treatment of Occult Disease in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine under what conditions positron emission tomography (PET) imaging will be useful in decisions regarding the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of clinically occult lymph node metastases in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A decision model of PET imaging and its downstream effects on radiotherapy outcomes was constructed using an influence diagram. This model included the sensitivity and specificity of PET, as well as the type and stage of the primary tumor. These parameters were varied to determine the optimal strategy for imaging and therapy for different clinical situations. Maximum expected utility was the metric by which different actions were ranked. Results: For primary tumors with a low probability of lymph node metastases, the sensitivity of PET should be maximized, and 50 Gy should be delivered if PET is positive and 0 Gy if negative. As the probability for lymph node metastases increases, PET imaging becomes unnecessary in some situations, and the optimal dose to the lymph nodes increases. The model needed to include the causes of certain health states to predict current clinical practice. Conclusion: The model demonstrated the ability to reproduce expected outcomes for a range of tumors and provided recommendations for different clinical situations. The differences between the optimal policies and current clinical practice are likely due to a disparity between stated clinical decision processes and actual decision making by clinicians.

Phillips, Mark H., E-mail: markp@u.washington.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Smith, Wade P. [Department of Veterans Affairs, Albany, NY (United States); Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Recurrence in Region of Spared Parotid Gland After Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To discuss the implications of three examples of periparotid recurrence after definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We present 3 patients with HNC who underwent definitive IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy and later had treatment failure in or near a spared parotid gland. Two patients had bilateral multilevel nodal disease, and all had Level II nodal disease ipsilateral to the site of recurrence. The patients were treated using dose-painting IMRT with a dose of 70 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 59.4 Gy or 54 Gy to the high-risk or low-risk clinical tumor volume, respectively. The parotid glands were spared bilaterally. The patients had not undergone any surgical treatment for HNC before radiotherapy. Results: All patients had treatment failure in the region of a spared parotid gland. Failure in the 2 patients with bilateral multilevel nodal involvement occurred in the periparotid lymph nodes. The third patient developed a dermal metastasis near the tail of a spared parotid gland. On pretreatment imaging, the 2 patients with nodal failure had small nonspecific periparotid nodules that showed no hypermetabolic activity on positron emission tomography. Conclusion: For HNC patients receiving definitive IMRT, nonspecific positron emission tomography-negative periparotid nodules on pretreatment imaging should raise the index of suspicion for subclinical disease in the presence of multilevel or Level II nodal metastases. Additional evaluation of such nodules might be indicated before sparing the ipsilateral parotid gland.

Cannon, Donald M. [Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reducing Xerostomia After Chemo-IMRT for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Beyond Sparing the Parotid Glands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess whether, in addition to sparing the parotid glands (PGs), xerostomia after chemotherapy plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (chemo-IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer is affected by reducing the dose to the other salivary glands. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study, 78 patients with Stage III-IV oropharynx/nasopharynx cancer underwent chemo-IMRT, with the aim of sparing the parts of the bilateral PGs, oral cavity (OC) containing the minor salivary glands, and contralateral submandibular gland (SMG) outside the target (when contralateral level I was not a target). Before therapy and periodically for 24 months, validated patient-reported xerostomia questionnaire (XQ) scores and observer-graded xerostomia scores were recorded. Also, the stimulated and unstimulated saliva was measured selectively from each of the PGs and SMGs. The mean OC doses served as surrogates of minor salivary gland dysfunction. Regression models assessed the XQ and observer-graded xerostomia predictors. Results: Statistically significant predictors of the XQ score on univariate analysis included the OC, PG, and SMG mean doses and the baseline XQ score, time since RT, and both stimulated and unstimulated PG saliva flow rates. Similar factors were statistically significant predictors of observer-graded xerostomia. The OC, PG, and SMG mean doses were moderately intercorrelated (r = 0.47-0.55). On multivariate analyses, after adjusting for the PG and SMG doses, the OC mean dose (p glands by IMRT, beyond the PGs alone.

Little, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cancer Center Biostatistics Core, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Felix Y.; Vineberg, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cornwall, Craig; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne [Hospital Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every radiotherapy center has to be equipped with real-time beam monitoring devices. In 2008, the medical application group from the Laboratory of Corpuscular Physics (LPC Caen) developed an Ionization Chamber in collaboration with the company IBA (Ion Beam Applications). This monitoring device called IC2/3 was developed to be used in IBAs universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). The objectives presented in this article are to characterize the IC2/3 monitor in the energy and ux ranges used in protontherapy. The equipment has been tested with an IBAs cyclotronable to deliver proton beams from 70 to 230 MeV. This beam monitoring device has been validated and is now installed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen protontherapy center (WPE, Germany). The results obtained in both terms of spatial resolution and dose measurements are at least equal to the initials speci cations needed for PBS purposes. The detector measures the dose with a relative precision better than 1% in the rang...

Courtois, C; Brusasco, C; Colin, J; Cussol, D; Fontbonne, J M; Marchand, B; Mertens, T; De Neuter, S; Peronnel, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every radiotherapy center has to be equipped with real-time beam monitoring devices. In 2008, the medical application group from the Laboratory of Corpuscular Physics (LPC Caen) developed an Ionization Chamber in collaboration with the company IBA (Ion Beam Applications). This monitoring device called IC2/3 was developed to be used in IBAs universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). The objectives presented in this article are to characterize the IC2/3 monitor in the energy and ux ranges used in protontherapy. The equipment has been tested with an IBAs cyclotronable to deliver proton beams from 70 to 230 MeV. This beam monitoring device has been validated and is now installed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen protontherapy center (WPE, Germany). The results obtained in both terms of spatial resolution and dose measurements are at least equal to the initials speci cations needed for PBS purposes. The detector measures the dose with a relative precision better than 1% in the range 0.5 Gy/min to 8 Gy/min while the spatial resolution is higher than 250 m. The technology has been patented and ve IC2/3 chambers were delivered to IBA. Nowadays, IBA produces the IC2/3 beam monitoring device as part of its Proteus 235 product

C. Courtois; G. Boissonnat; C. Brusasco; J. Colin; D. Cussol; J. M. Fontbonne; B. Marchand; T. Mertens; S. De Neuter; J. Perronnel

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Head shock vs Mach cone: azimuthal correlations from 2 to 3 parton processes in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the energy-momentum deposited by fast moving partons within a medium using linearized viscous hydrodynamics. The particle distribution produced by this energy-momentum is computed using the Cooper-Frye formalism. We show that for the conditions arising in heavy-ion collisions, energy momentum is preferentially deposited along the head shock of the fast moving partons. We also show that the double hump in the away-side of azimuthal correlations can be produced by two (instead of one) away-side partons that deposit their energy-momentum along their directions of motion. These partons are originated in the in-medium hard scattering in 2 to 3 processes. We compare the results of the analysis to azimuthal angular correlations from PHENIX and show that the calculation reproduces the data systematics of a decreasing away-side correlation when the momentum of the associated hadron becomes closer to the momentum of the leading hadron. This scenario seems to avoid the shortcomings of the Mach cone as the origin of the double-hump structure in the away-side

Alejandro Ayala; Isabel Dominguez; Maria Elena Tejeda-Yeomans

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Feasibility study for a low-head hydroelectric installation at Archusa Creek Dam. Final report to the Pat Harrison Waterway District  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rising cost, uncertain future supply, and environmental problems associated with energy sources have resulted in serious investigation of energy sources that have not previously been considered economically and technically feasible. One such source involves low-head hydroelectric generation. The Department of Energy has funded several feasibility studies for the installation of hydroelectric generators at existing low-head dams. Such a feasibility study for the Archusa Creek Dam near Quitman, Mississippi, is described. The study indicates that there are no apparent technical dificulties to prevent such a project and that a suitable turbine-generator could be obtained. The study further indicates that the project should be economically feasible for the Pat Harrison Waterway District (owners of the dam and lake) to construct if arrangements could be completed for interconnecting with the local utility and selling the energy to the utility. The utility (Mississippi Power Company) has expressed interest in such an arrangement.

Carlson, K.W.; Herring, J.W. Jr.

1979-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Materials Reliability Program: Capability Study of Equipment and Procedures for the Inspection of Bottom-Mounted Nozzle Head Penetra tions (MRP-296)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary presents updated results of a project that determined and documented the level of performance of examination processes, procedures, and equipment for detecting and sizing flaws located in Alloy 600 bottom-mounted nozzle (BMN) head penetrations. The document includes the recent 2007 and 2010 demonstration results and previous BMN demonstration activities from 2004 to 2007. EPRIs Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Center staff monitored the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) demonstrations of tw...

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

BWRVIP-272: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR/4 Bottom Head Drain Line Radiographic Examination - Field Trial at KKM Nuclear Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes newly developed remotely operated radiography technology for the examination of the vessel drain line in a boiling water reactor Model 4 (BWR/4). The technology targets the wall-thickness examination of the elbow and piping section that is deemed most susceptible to flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) attack.BackgroundThe BWR vessel bottom head drain line has been identified as being susceptible to FAC because of its material of ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Materials Reliability Program: An Assessment of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) Alloy 600 Reactor Vessel Head Penetration PWS CC Remedial Techniques (MRP-61)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Service experience over the past decade with control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetrations in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) worldwide confirmed primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in alloy 600 base metal at several plants. This report summarizes the evaluations and results of an autoclave-accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test program designed to assess the effectiveness of selected surface remedial techniques to mitigate alloy 600 PWSCC in PWR vessel head penetration base and...

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Effect of Socioeconomic Factors on Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the effect of socioeconomic factors on quality of life (QoL) after treatment in patients with head and neck carcinoma (HNC). Patients and Methods: The study population included 50 HNC patients seen in their control examinations after radiotherapy during a 2-month interval and who were willing to complete the Short-Form 36 QoL questionnaire. Socioeconomic, demographic, and tumor- and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their effect on physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: All patients received radiotherapy, and 33 patients (66%) underwent surgery for the primary tumor and/or neck disease. Chemotherapy was given in 9 patients (18%). Mean PCS and MCS were 47.9 (range, 24.8-59.3) and 46.7 (range, 22-63.3) for the whole patient population. There was no significant factor affecting PCS. Education level of 'middle school or higher,' perceived economic status of 'medium or higher,' social security status of not being 'absent or minimally covered,' and unilateral type of neck surgery were found to increase MCS significantly. According to separate linear regression analyses performed for three socioeconomic variables, the most significant factor for MCS was social security status compared with education level and perceived economic status. It was the only parameter that retained its significance when all five parameters were combined in a linear regression model. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that educational status, perceived economic status, and social security status showed a significant effect on the QoL of HNC patients after radiotherapy. When all variables were taken into account, only 'social security status' remained significant.

Demiral, Ayse Nur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dokuz Eyluel University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ayse.demiral@deu.edu.tr; Sen, Mehmet [Cookridge Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Demiral, Yuecel [Department of Public Health, Dokuz Eyluel University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Kinay, Muenir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dokuz Eyluel University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Phenylbutyrate Mouthwash Mitigates Oral Mucositis During Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Deleterious oral mucositis (OM) develops during radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients. There are currently no effective cytoprotective treatments for OM without a potential risk of tumor protection. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study aimed to determine the therapeutic safety and efficacy of phenylbutyrate (an antitumor histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemical chaperone) 5% mouthwash for treating OM caused by cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2005 and June 2006, 36 HNC patients were randomized to standard oral care plus 5 mL of either phenylbutyrate 5% mouthwash (n = 17) or placebo (mouthwash vehicle, n = 19) taken four times daily (swish and spit). Treatment began when mild mucositis (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1) occurred, and ended 4 weeks after RT completion. Safety and efficacy were based on adverse events, physical examination, laboratory determinations, vital signs, Oral Mucosa Assessment Scale (OMAS) and World Health Organization scores, the ability to eat, body weight change, local control, and survival. Results: We found no severe drug-related side effect. At RT doses of 5500-7500 cGy, phenylbutyrate significantly mitigated the severity of mucositis compared with placebo, based on both the WHO score (severity {>=} 3; p = 0.0262) and the OMAS scale (ulceration score {>=} 2; p = 0.0049). The Kaplan-Meier estimates for 2- and 3-year local control, and overall survival were 100% and 80.8%, and 78.6% and 64.3%, respectively, in the phenylbutyrate group and 74.2% and 74.2%, and 57.4% and 50.2%, respectively, in the placebo group. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggested that phenylbutyrate mouthwash significantly decreased the impact of OM in HNC patients receiving RT or chemoradiotherapy and did not confront the tumor control. Larger Phase II randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

Yen, Sang-Hue; Wang, Ling-Wei [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Hsien [Division of Radiotherapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Yih-Lin, E-mail: ylchung@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Schrag, Deborah [Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling. [Loss-of-Piping Integrity accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests performed in a small scale water loop showed that voiding oscillations, similar to those observed in sodium, were present in water, as well. An analytical model, appropriate for either sodium or water, was developed and used to describe the water flow behavior. The experimental results indicate that water can be successfully employed as a sodium simulant, and further, that the condensation heat transfer coefficient varies significantly during the growth and collapse of vapor slugs during oscillations. It is this variation, combined with the temperature profile of the unheated zone above the heat source, which determines the oscillatory behavior of the system. The analytical program has produced a model which qualitatively does a good job in predicting the flow behavior in the wake experiment. The amplitude discrepancies are attributable to experimental uncertainties and model inadequacies. Several parameters (heat transfer coefficient, unheated zone temperature profile, mixing between hot and cold fluids during oscillations) are set by the user. Criteria for the comparison of water and sodium experiments have been developed.

Levin, A.E.; Griffith, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

830 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES, VOL. 30, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2007 Thermal Design Methodology for Low Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. M., and Gui, F., 1993, "Experimental Measurements of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Microchannel, "Developing Convective Heat Transfer in Deep Rectangular Microchannels," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 20, pp. 149 sinks pro- duce much higher convective heat transfer coefficients, reduce coolant flow rate requirements

Qu, Weilin

376

THERMAL DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR LOW FLOW RATE SINGLE-PHASE AND TWO-PHASE MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Engine Cooling Systems,'' Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, and Thermodynamics 1997, June 1997, ``A Correlation for Boiling Heat Transfer to Saturated Fluids in Convective Flow,'' Ind. Eng. Chem the engines in automotive applications. Heat is transferred essentially under subcooled flow boiling

Qu, Weilin

377

Excel Spreadsheet Headings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Data reduction does not seem to be sufficiently reviewed – Reports are boiler plate rather than specific – Report contents could be improved ...

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

<Heading 1 Project Title>  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Energy Education document. Are adaptable to meet the specific needs of diverse higher education institutions and their student populations. Provide students with an...

379

Letter Head Shell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Primeline ® Monofilament • Duralume ® Light Sticks • Complete Longline Fishing Systems ... Wild fish stocks are already strained and government ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

FDG-PET Assessment of the Effect of Head and Neck Radiotherapy on Parotid Gland Glucose Metabolism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Functional imaging with [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) provides the opportunity to define the physiology of the major salivary glands before and after radiation therapy. The goal of this retrospective study was to identify the radiation dose-response relationship of parotid gland glucose metabolism in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and Methods: Forty-nine adults with HNSCC were identified who had curative intent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and FDG-PET imaging before and after treatment. Using a graphical user interface, contours were delineated for the parotid glands on axial CT slices while all authors were blinded to paired PET slices. Average and maximal standard uptake values (SUV) were measured within these anatomic regions. Changes in SUV and volume after radiation therapy were correlated with parotid gland dose-volume histograms from IMRT plans. Results: The average parotid gland volume was 30.7 mL and contracted 3.9 {+-} 1.9% with every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). However, within the first 3 months after treatment, there was a uniform reduction of 16.5% {+-} 7.3% regardless of dose. The average SUV{sub mean} of the glands was 1.63 {+-} 0.48 pretreatment and declined by 5.2% {+-} 2.5% for every increase of 10 Gy in mean dose (p = 0.04). The average SUV{sub max} was 4.07 {+-} 2.85 pretreatment and decreased in a sigmoid manner with mean dose. A threshold of 32 Gy for mean dose existed, after which SUV{sub max} declined rapidly. Conclusion: Radiation dose responses of the parotid glands can be measured by integrated CT/FDG-PET scans. Retrospective analysis showed sigmoidal declines in the maximum metabolism but linear declines in the average metabolism of the glands with dose. Future studies should correlate this decline in FDG uptake with saliva production to improve treatment planning.

Roach, Michael C. [School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Higgins, Kristin A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hawk, Thomas C. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M., E-mail: david.brizel@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow shower heads" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Li Baoqing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Preliminary analysis of legal obstacles and incentives to the development of low-head hydroelectric power in the northeastern United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary analysis of the legal obstacles and incentives to the development of the low-head hydroelectric potential of the 19 northeastern US (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and West Virginia) is presented. The statutes and case laws of the 19 states and the Federal government which affect developers of small dams are stressed. The legal uncertainty which confronts the developer of small dams and the regulatory burden to which the developer may be subjected once the uncertainty is resolved are emphasized.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A comparison of mean parotid gland dose with measures of parotid gland function after radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Implications for future trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the most adequate parameter to measure the consequences of reducing the parotid gland dose. Methods and Materials: One hundred eight patients treated with radiotherapy for various malignancies of the head and neck were prospectively evaluated using three methods. Parotid gland function was objectively determined by measuring stimulated parotid flow using Lashley cups and scintigraphy. To assess xerostomia-related quality of life, the head-and-neck cancer module European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ (Quality of Life Questionnaire) H and N35 was used. Measurements took place before radiotherapy and 6 weeks and 12 months after the completion of radiotherapy. Complication was defined for each method using cutoff values. The correlation between these complications and the mean parotid gland dose was investigated to find the best measure for parotid gland function. Results: For both flow and scintigraphy data, the best definition for objective parotid gland toxicity seemed to be reduction of stimulated parotid flow to {gland dose was found for the stimulated flow measurements. The predictive ability was the highest for the time point 1 year after radiotherapy. Subjective findings did not correlate with the mean parotid dose. Conclusions: Stimulated flow measurements using Lashley cups, with a complication defined as flow {gland dose. When reduction of the mean dose to the parotid gland is intended, the stimulated flow measurement is the best method for evaluating parotid gland function.

Roesink, Judith M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: J.M.Roesink@azu.nl; Schipper, Maria [Center for Biostatistics, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Busschers, Wim [Center for Biostatistics, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris H.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Fort Polk, LA: Lessons learned  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of 4,003 military family housing units have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). At the same time, other efficiency measures, such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow shower heads, and attic insulation, were installed. An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk ESPC was carried out. Findings indicate that the project has resulted in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing, for a typical meteorological year. Peak electrical demand has also been reduced by 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak demand. Natural gas savings are about 260,000 therms per year. In addition, the ESPC has allowed the Army to effectively cap its future expenditures for family housing HVAC maintenance at about 77% of its previous costs. Given these successful results, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other ESPCs in both the public and the private sectors. The purpose of this paper is to outline the method by which the ESPC was engineered and implemented, both from the standpoint of the facility owner (the US Army) and the energy services company (ESCO) which is carrying out the contract. The lessons learned from this experience should be useful to other owners, ESCOs and investors in the implementation of future ESPCs. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gordon, R. [Applied Energy Management Techniques, Corvallis, OR (United States); Giffin, T. [SAIC/The Fleming Group, East Syracuse, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an independent evaluation of an energy retrofit of 4,003 family housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana, under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Replacement of the heating, cooling, and water heating systems in these housing units with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) anchored the retrofit; low-flow shower heads and compact fluorescent lighting were also installed, as well as attic insulation where needed. Statistically valid findings indicate that the project will save 25.8 million kWh, or 32.5% of the pre-retrofit whole-community electrical consumption, and 100% of the whole-community natural gas previously used for space conditioning and water heating (260,000 therms) in a typical meteorological year. At the end-use level, the GHPs were found to save about 42% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption for heating, cooling, and water heating in housing units that were all-electric in the pre-retrofit period. This report also demonstrates an improved method of predicting energy savings. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-retrofit energy use data collected in the field, the method predicted actual energy savings on one of the electric feeders at Fort Polk with a very high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of this model was in turn dependent on data-calibrated models of the geothermal heat pump and ground heat exchanger that are described in this report. In addition this report documents the status of vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (BHEx) design methods at the time this project was designed, and demonstrates methods of using data collected from operating GHP systems to benchmark BHEx design methods against a detailed engineering model calibrated to date. The authors also discuss the ESPC`s structure and implementation and how the experience gained here can contribute to the success of future ESPCs.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Image Guidance During Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Alignment Trends With In-Room Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: On-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is currently available for alignment of patients with head-and-neck cancer before radiotherapy. However, daily CBCT is time intensive and increases the overall radiation dose. We assessed the feasibility of using the average couch shifts from the first several CBCTs to estimate and correct for the presumed systematic setup error. Methods and Materials: 56 patients with head-and-neck cancer who received daily CBCT before intensity-modulated radiation therapy had recorded shift values in the medial-lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior dimensions. The average displacements in each direction were calculated for each patient based on the first five or 10 CBCT shifts and were presumed to represent the systematic setup error. The residual error after this correction was determined by subtracting the calculated shifts from the shifts obtained using daily CBCT. Results: The magnitude of the average daily residual three-dimensional (3D) error was 4.8 {+-} 1.4 mm, 3.9 {+-} 1.3 mm, and 3.7 {+-} 1.1 mm for uncorrected, five CBCT corrected, and 10 CBCT corrected protocols, respectively. With no image guidance, 40.8% of fractions would have been >5 mm off target. Using the first five CBCT shifts to correct subsequent fractions, this percentage decreased to 19.0% of all fractions delivered and decreased the percentage of patients with average daily 3D errors >5 mm from 35.7% to 14.3% vs. no image guidance. Using an average of the first 10 CBCT shifts did not significantly improve this outcome. Conclusions: Using the first five CBCT shift measurements as an estimation of the systematic setup error improves daily setup accuracy for a subset of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy and primarily benefited those with large 3D correction vectors (>5 mm). Daily CBCT is still necessary until methods are developed that more accurately determine which patients may benefit from alternative imaging strategies.

Zumsteg, Zachary; DeMarco, John; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Steinberg, Michael L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lin, Chun Shu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McBride, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lin, Kevin; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Correlation of Osteoradionecrosis and Dental Events With Dosimetric Parameters in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is a known complication of radiation therapy to the head and neck. However, the incidence of this complication with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dental sequelae with this technique have not been fully elucidated. Methods and Materials: From December 2000 to July 2007, 168 patients from our institution have been previously reported for IMRT of the oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx/hypopharynx, sinus, and oropharynx. All patients underwent pretreatment dental evaluation, including panoramic radiographs, an aggressive fluoride regimen, and a mouthguard when indicated. The median maximum mandibular dose was 6,798 cGy, and the median mean mandibular dose was 3,845 cGy. Patient visits were retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of ORN, and dental records were reviewed for the development of dental events. Univariate analysis was then used to assess the effect of mandibular and parotid gland dosimetric parameters on dental endpoints. Results: With a median clinic follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 0.8-89.6 months), 2 patients, both with oral cavity primaries, experienced ORN. Neither patient had preradiation dental extractions. The maximum mandibular dose and mean mandibular dose of the 2 patients were 7,183 and 6,828 cGy and 5812 and 5335 cGy, respectively. In all, 17% of the patients (n = 29) experienced a dental event. A mean parotid dose of >26 Gy was predictive of a subsequent dental caries, whereas a maximum mandibular dose >70 Gy and a mean mandibular dose >40 Gy were correlated with dental extractions after IMRT. Conclusions: ORN is rare after head-and-neck IMRT, but is more common with oral cavity primaries. Our results suggest different mechanisms for radiation-induced caries versus extractions.

Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Estilo, Cherry L. [Dental Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mechalakos, James G.; Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Treatment Planning Constraints to Avoid Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: An Independent Test of QUANTEC Criteria Using a Prospectively Collected Dataset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50 patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.

Moiseenko, Vitali, E-mail: vmoiseenko@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hovan, Allan [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Saleh, Ziad; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Harrow, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Rabuka, Carman; Muggli, Adam [Department of Oral Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Thompson, Anna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Prospective Assessment of Patterns of Failure After High-Precision Definitive (Chemo)Radiation in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To prospectively analyze patterns of failure in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive high-precision radiotherapy with a focus on location of failure relative to target volume coverage. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy were included. Locoregional failure volume was defined on the planning data set at relapse, and dose received was analyzed by use of dose-volume histograms. Results: Thirteen patients were deemed to have had locoregional failures, of which two did not have any viable tumor on salvage neck dissection, leaving eleven patients with proven persistent or recurrent locoregional disease. Of these, 9 patients had in-field failure, 1 marginal failure, and 1 both in-field and marginal failures. Overall, only 2 of 11 patients (18%) with relapse had any marginal failure. Of the 20 sites of locoregional failure, 15 (75%) were in-field and 5 (25%) marginal. Distant metastases were detected in 3 patients, whereas a second new primary developed in 3 others. With a median follow-up of 26 months (interquartile range, 18-31 months) for surviving patients, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were 75.3%, 74%, 67.2%, and 60.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Locoregional relapse remains the predominant pattern of failure in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with high-precision definitive radiotherapy with the majority of failures occurring 'in-field' within the high-dose volume. Marginal failures can occur, particularly in the vicinity of the spared parotid gland. The therapeutic index of high-precision conformal radiotherapy is largely dependent on adequate selection and delineation of target volumes and organs at risk.

Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer/Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Jain, Sandeep; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; Ghosh-Laskar, Sarbani; Phurailatpam, Reena; Pai-Shetty, Rajershi; Dinshaw, Ketayun A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer/Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET  

SciTech Connect

We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Beltran, Maria T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Dublin, Arthur B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Analysis of Pretreatment FDG-PET SUV Parameters in Head-and-Neck Cancer: Tumor SUV{sub mean} Has Superior Prognostic Value  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of different descriptive parameters in head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing pretreatment [F-18] fluoro-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Patients and Methods: Head-and-neck cancer patients who underwent FDG-PET before a course of curative intent radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. FDG-PET imaging parameters included maximum (SUV{sub max}), and mean (SUV{sub mean}) standard uptake values, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Tumors and lymph nodes were defined on co-registered axial computed tomography (CT) slices. SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} were measured within these anatomic regions. The relationships between pretreatment SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, and TLG for the primary site and lymph nodes were assessed using a univariate analysis for disease-free survival (DFS), locoregional control (LRC), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared via the log-rank method. SUV data were analyzed as continuous variables. Results: A total of 88 patients was assessed. Two-year OS, LRC, DMFS, and DFS for the entire cohort were 85%, 78%, 81%, and 70%, respectively. Median SUV{sub max} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 15.4 and 12.2, respectively. Median SUV{sub mean} for the primary tumor and lymph nodes was 7 and 5.2, respectively. Median TLG was 770. Increasing pretreatment SUV{sub mean} of the primary tumor was associated with decreased disease-free survival (p = 0.01). Neither SUV{sub max} in the primary tumor or lymph nodes nor TLG was prognostic for any of the clinical endpoints. Patients with pretreatment tumor SUV{sub mean} that exceeded the median value (7) of the cohort demonstrated inferior 2-year DFS relative to patients with SUV{sub mean} {<=} the median value of the cohort, 58% vs. 82%, respectively, p = 0.03. Conclusion: Increasing SUV{sub mean} in the primary tumor was associated with inferior DFS. Although not routinely reported, pretreatment SUV{sub mean} may be a useful prognostic FDG-PET parameter and should be further evaluated prospectively.

Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hoang, Jenny K. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Roach, Michael C.; Chino, Junzo; Yoo, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Turkington, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Graduate Program in Medical Physics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Head-and-Neck Cancer: The Impact of Region of Interest Selection on the Intra- and Interpatient Variability of Pharmacokinetic Parameters  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI-extracted parameters measure tumor microvascular physiology and are usually calculated from an intratumor region of interest (ROI). Optimal ROI delineation is not established. The valid clinical use of DCE-MRI requires that the variation for any given parameter measured within a tumor be less than that observed between tumors in different patients. This work evaluates the impact of tumor ROI selection on the assessment of intra- and interpatient variability. Method and Materials: Head and neck cancer patients received initial targeted therapy (TT) treatment with erlotinib and/or bevacizumab, followed by radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin with synchronous TT. DCE-MRI data from Baseline and the end of the TT regimen (Lead-In) were analyzed to generate the vascular transfer function (K{sup trans}), the extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), and the initial area under the concentration time curve (iAUC{sub 1min}). Four ROI sampling strategies were used: whole tumor or lymph node (Whole), the slice containing the most enhancing voxels (SliceMax), three slices centered in SliceMax (Partial), and the 5% most enhancing contiguous voxels within SliceMax (95Max). The average coefficient of variation (aCV) was calculated to establish intrapatient variability among ROI sets and interpatient variability for each ROI type. The average ratio between each intrapatient CV and the interpatient CV was calculated (aRCV). Results: Baseline primary/nodes aRCVs for different ROIs not including 95Max were, for all three MR parameters, in the range of 0.14-0.24, with Lead-In values between 0.09 and 0.2, meaning a low intrapatient vs. interpatient variation. For 95Max, intrapatient CVs approximated interpatient CVs, meaning similar data dispersion and higher aRCVs (0.6-1.27 for baseline) and 0.54-0.95 for Lead-In. Conclusion: Distinction between different patient's primary tumors and/or nodes cannot be made using 95Max ROIs. The other three strategies are viable and equivalent for using DCE-MRI to measure head and neck cancer physiology.

Craciunescu, Oana I., E-mail: oana.craciunescu@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Yoo, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Cleland, Esi [GECAD Ghana Ltd., Acra (Ghana); Muradyan, Naira [iCAD Inc., Nashua, NH (United States); Carroll, Madeline D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); MacFall, James R.; Barboriak, Daniel P. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Brizel, David M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Concomitant Cisplatin and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: 10-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Phase III Trial (SAKK 10/94)  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the long-term outcome of treatment with concomitant cisplatin and hyperfractionated radiotherapy versus treatment with hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From July 1994 to July 2000, a total of 224 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were randomized to receive either hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone (median total dose, 74.4 Gy; 1.2 Gy twice daily; 5 days per week) or the same radiotherapy combined with two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 consecutive days during weeks 1 and 5). The primary endpoint was the time to any treatment failure; secondary endpoints were locoregional failure, metastatic failure, overall survival, and late toxicity assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Median follow-up was 9.5 years (range, 0.1-15.4 years). Median time to any treatment failure was not significantly different between treatment arms (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2 [95% confidence interval {l_brace}CI{r_brace}, 0.9-1.7; p = 0.17]). Rates of locoregional failure-free survival (HR, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.1-2.1; p = 0.02]), distant metastasis-free survival (HR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.1-2.5; p = 0.02]), and cancer-specific survival (HR, 1.6 [95% CI, 1.0-2.5; p = 0.03]) were significantly improved in the combined-treatment arm, with no difference in major late toxicity between treatment arms. However, overall survival was not significantly different (HR, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.9-1.8; p = 0.11]). Conclusions: After long-term follow-up, combined-treatment with cisplatin and hyperfractionated radiotherapy maintained improved rates of locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and cancer-specific survival compared to that of hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone, with no difference in major late toxicity.

Ghadjar, Pirus, E-mail: pirus.ghadjar@insel.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Switzerland, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Simcock, Mathew [Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research Coordinating Center (SAKK CC), 3008 Bern (Switzerland); Studer, Gabriela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Allal, Abdelkarim S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital Fribourg, Fribourg (Switzerland); Ozsahin, Mahmut [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bernier, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clinique de Genolier, Genolier (Switzerland); Toepfer, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Betz, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Glanzmann, Christoph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Switzerland, 3010 Bern (Switzerland)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A Planned Neck Dissection Is Not Necessary in All Patients With N2-3 Head-and-Neck Cancer After Sequential Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the role of a planned neck dissection (PND) after sequential chemoradiotherapy for patients with head-and-neck cancer with N2-N3 nodal disease. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 90 patients with N2-N3 head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated between 1991 and 2001 on two sequential chemoradiotherapy protocols. All patients received induction and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorocuracil, with or without tirapazamine. Patients with less than a clinical complete response (cCR) in the neck proceeded to a PND after chemoradiation. The primary endpoint was nodal response. Clinical outcomes and patterns of failure were analyzed. Results: The median follow-up durations for living and all patients were 8.3 years (range, 1.5-16.3 year) and 5.4 years (range, 0.6-16.3 years), respectively. Of the 48 patients with nodal cCR whose necks were observed, 5 patients had neck failures as a component of their recurrence [neck and primary (n = 2); neck, primary, and distant (n = 1); neck only (n = 1); neck and distant (n = 1)]. Therefore, PND may have benefited only 2 patients (4%) [neck only failure (n = 1); neck and distant failure (n = 1)]. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for those with a clinical partial response (cPR) undergoing PND (n = 30) was 53%. The 5-year neck control rates after cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR were 90%, 93%, and 78%, respectively (p = 0.36). The 5-year disease-free survival rates for the cCR, cPR{yields}pCR, and cPR{yields}pPR groups were 53%, 75%, and 42%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusion: In our series, patients with N2-N3 neck disease achieving a cCR in the neck, PND would have benefited only 4% and, therefore, is not recommended. Patients with a cPR should be treated with PND. Residual tumor in the PND specimens was associated with poor outcomes; therefore, aggressive therapy is recommended. Studies using novel imaging modalities are needed to better assess treatment response.

Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Choi, Clara Y.H. [Department of Neurosugery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Fee, Willard E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Pinto, Harlan A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quantification of Trade-Off Between Parotid Gland Sparing and Planning Target Volume Underdosages in Clinically Node-Negative Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify the trade-off between parotid gland sparing and planning target volume (PTV) underdosages for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A planning study was performed for 4 patients with either soft palate or tonsil tumors treated with external radiotherapy up to 46 Gy. The trade-off between underdosages in the PTV and sparing of the parotid glands was investigated by systematically varying the optimization objectives for the inverse planning. A new way of presenting dose-volume information allows easy detection of small PTV subvolumes with underdosages that cannot be assessed in conventional cumulative dose-volume histograms. A simple radiobiological model to estimate the control probability for an electively irradiated neck level was developed. Results: The average dose to the parotid glands can decrease by >10 Gy by allowing the PTV to be underdosed in such a way that the radiobiological model predicts a decrease in subclinical disease control probability of (typically) 1% to a few percent. Conclusion: The trade-off between parotid gland sparing and underdosages in the PTV has been quantified by the use of an alternative method to present dose-volume information and by the use of a radiobiological model to predict subclinical disease control probability.

Kruijf, Wilhelmus de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl; Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Levendag, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Patterns of Care and Outcomes Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Older Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) requires a high degree of expertise compared with standard radiation therapy (RT). We performed a retrospective cohort study of Medicare patients treated with IMRT compared with standard RT to assess outcomes in national practice. Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified patients treated with radiation for cancer of the head and neck from 2002 to 2005. We used multivariate Cox models to determine whether the receipt of IMRT was associated with differences in survival. Results: We identified 1613 patients, 33.7% of whom received IMRT. IMRT was not associated with differences in survival: the 3-year overall survival was 50.5% for IMRT vs. 49.6% for standard RT (p = 0.47). The 3-year cancer-specific survival was 60.0% for IMRT vs. 58.8% (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Despite its complexity and resource intensive nature, IMRT use seems to be as safe as standard RT in national community practice, because the use of IMRT did not have an adverse impact on survival.

Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Sharma, Richa [Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC (United States); Makarov, Danil V. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of Urology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Decker, Roy H. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Desai, Rani A. [Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Cramer, Laura D. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at Yale, New Haven, CT (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

DNA Double-Strand Break Analysis by {gamma}-H2AX Foci: A Useful Method for Determining the Overreactors to Radiation-Induced Acute Reactions Among Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Interindividual variability in normal tissue toxicity during radiation therapy is a limiting factor for successful treatment. Predicting the risk of developing acute reactions before initiation of radiation therapy may have the benefit of opting for altered radiation therapy regimens to achieve minimal adverse effects with improved tumor cure. Methods and Materials: DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and its repair kinetics in lymphocytes of head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy was analyzed by counting {gamma}-H2AX foci, neutral comet assay, and a modified version of neutral filter elution assay. Acute normal tissue reactions were assessed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The correlation between residual DSBs and the severity of acute reactions demonstrated that residual {gamma}-H2AX foci in head-and-neck cancer patients increased with the severity of oral mucositis and skin reaction. Conclusions: Our results suggest that {gamma}-H2AX analysis may have predictive implications for identifying the overreactors to mucositis and skin reactions among head-and-neck cancer patients prior to initiation of radiation therapy.

Goutham, Hassan Venkatesh; Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)] [Manipal Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard; Sharan, Krishna [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shiridi Sai Baba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kanive Parashiva, Guruprasad; Kapaettu, Satyamoorthy [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)] [Division of Biotechnology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao, E-mail: satishraomlsc@gmail.com [Division of Radiobiology and Toxicology, Manipal Life Sciences Centre, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Is there a single spot size and grid for intensity modulated proton therapy? Simulation of head and neck, prostate and mesothelioma cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the quality of dose distributions in real clinical cases for different dimensions of scanned proton pencil beams. The distance between spots (i.e., the grid of delivery) is optimized for each dimension of the pencil beam. Methods: The authors vary the {sigma} of the initial Gaussian size of the spot, from {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 3 mm to {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 8 mm, to evaluate the impact of the proton beam size on the quality of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. The distance between spots, {Delta}x and {Delta}y, is optimized on the spot plane, ranging from 4 to 12 mm (i.e., each spot size is coupled with the best spot grid resolution). In our Hyperion treatment planning system (TPS), constrained optimization is applied with respect to the organs at risk (OARs), i.e., the optimization tries to satisfy the dose objectives in the planning target volume (PTV) as long as all planning objectives for the OARs are met. Three-field plans for a nasopharynx case, two-field plans for a prostate case, and two-field plans for a malignant pleural mesothelioma case are considered in our analysis. Results: For the head and neck tumor, the best grids (i.e., distance between spots) are 5, 4, 6, 6, and 8 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. {sigma} {low dose and {sigma}{dose. For the prostate patient, the best grid is 4, 4, 5, 5, and 5 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. Beams with {sigma} > 3 mm did not satisfy our first clinical requirement that 95% of the prescribed dose is delivered to more than 95% of prostate and proximal seminal vesicles PTV. Our second clinical requirement, to cover the distal seminal vesicles PTV, is satisfied for beams as wide as {sigma} = 6 mm. For the mesothelioma case, the low dose PTV prescription is well respected for all values of {sigma}, while there is loss of high dose PTV coverage for {sigma} > 5 mm. The best grids have a spacing of 6, 7, 8, 9, and 12 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The maximum acceptable proton pencil beam {sigma} depends on the volume treated, the protocol of delivery, and optimization of the plan. For the clinical cases, protocol and optimization used in this analysis, acceptable {sigma}s are {<=} 4 mm for the head and neck tumor, {<=} 3 mm for the prostate tumor and {<=} 6 mm for the malignant pleural mesothelioma. One can apply the same procedure used in this analysis when given a ''class'' of patients, a {sigma} and a clinical protocol to determine the optimal grid spacing.

Widesott, Lamberto; Lomax, Antony J.; Schwarz, Marco [AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy); Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Proof of concept for low-dose molecular breast imaging with a dual-head CZT gamma camera. Part I. Evaluation in phantoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a nuclear medicine technology that uses dual-head cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to image functional uptake of a radiotracer, Tc-99m sestamibi, in the breast. An important factor in adoption of MBI in the screening setting is reduction of the necessary administered dose of Tc-99m sestamibi from the typically used dose of 740 MBq to approximately 148 MBq, such that MBI's whole-body effective dose is comparable to that of screening mammography. Methods that increase MBI count sensitivity may allow a proportional reduction in the necessary administered dose. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of two count sensitivity improvement methods on image quality by evaluating count sensitivity, spatial resolution, and lesion contrast in phantom simulations. Methods: Two dual-head CZT-based MBI systems were studied: LumaGem and Discovery NM 750b. Two count sensitivity improvement methods were implemented: registered collimators optimized for dedicated breast imaging and widened energy acceptance window optimized for use with CZT. System sensitivity, spatial resolution, and tumor contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured comparing standard collimation and energy window setting [126-154 keV (+10%, -10%)] with optimal collimation and a wide energy window [110-154 keV (+10%, -21%)]. Results: Compared to the standard collimator designs and energy windows for these two systems, use of registered optimized collimation and wide energy window increased system sensitivity by a factor of 2.8-3.6. Spatial resolution decreased slightly for both systems with new collimation. At 3 cm from the collimator face, LumaGem's spatial resolution was 4.8 and 5.6 mm with standard and optimized collimation; Discovery NM 750b's spatial resolution was 4.4 and 4.6 mm with standard and optimized collimation, respectively. For both systems, at tumor depths of 1 and 3 cm, use of optimized collimation and wide energy window significantly improved CNR compared to standard settings for tumors 8.0 and 9.2 mm in diameter. At the closer depth of 1 cm, optimized collimation and wide energy window also significantly improved CNR for 5.9 mm tumors on Discovery NM 750b. Conclusions: Registered optimized collimation and wide energy window yield a substantial gain in count sensitivity and measurable gain in CNR, with some loss in spatial resolution compared to the standard collimator designs and energy windows used on these two systems. At low-count densities calculated to represent doses of 148 MBq, this tradeoff results in adequate count density and lesion contrast for detection of lesions {>=}8 mm in the middle of a typical breast (3 cm deep) and lesions {>=}6 mm close to the collimator (1 cm deep).

Hruska, Carrie B.; Weinmann, Amanda L.; O'Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

A Comparison of Dose-Response Models for the Parotid Gland in a Large Group of Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The dose-response relationship of the parotid gland has been described most frequently using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. However, various other normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models exist. We evaluated in a large group of patients the value of six NTCP models that describe the parotid gland dose response 1 year after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 347 patients with head-and-neck tumors were included in this prospective parotid gland dose-response study. The patients were treated with either conventional radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Dose-volume histograms for the parotid glands were derived from three-dimensional dose calculations using computed tomography scans. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured before and 1 year after radiotherapy. A threshold of 25% of the pretreatment flow rate was used to define a complication. The evaluated models included the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model, the mean dose model, the relative seriality model, the critical volume model, the parallel functional subunit model, and the dose-threshold model. The goodness of fit (GOF) was determined by the deviance and a Monte Carlo hypothesis test. Ranking of the models was based on Akaike's information criterion (AIC). Results: None of the models was rejected based on the evaluation of the GOF. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model based on the AIC. The TD{sub 50} in these models was approximately 39 Gy. Conclusions: The mean dose model was preferred for describing the dose-response relationship of the parotid gland.

Houweling, Antonetta C., E-mail: A.Houweling@umcutrecht.n [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Dijkema, Tim; Roesink, Judith M. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris H.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, Croningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Eisbruch, Avraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Seitz, Oliver [Department of Oral Maxillofacial and Plastic Facial Surgery, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Roedel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Weiss, Christian, E-mail: christian.weiss@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

Suwinski, Rafal, E-mail: rafals@io.gliwice.p [Department of Radiation Oncology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara [Department of Pathology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Grzegorz, Wozniak [Department of Radiation Oncology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Center of Oncology, Bydgoszcz (Poland); Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski [Department of Radiation Oncology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Dariusz, Lange [Department of Pathology, Center of Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

HEAD INJURY ASSESSMENT IN JUVENILE CHINOOK USING THE ALPHA II-SPECTRIN BIOMARKER: EFFECTS OF PRESSURE CHANGES AND PASSAGE THROUGH A REMOVABLE SPILLWAY WEIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cytoskeletal protein alpha II-spectrin has specifi c neurodegenerative mechanisms that allow the necrotic (injury-induced) and apoptotic (non-injury-induced) pathways of proteolysis to be differentiated in an immunoblot. Consequently, ?II-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) are potential biomarkers for diagnosing traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the following investigation, consisting of two studies, was to evaluate the utility of the spectrin biomarker in diagnosing TBI in fi sh that travel through hydroelectric dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The fi rst study used hyperbaric pressure chambers to simulate the pressure changes that affect fi sh during passage through a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Kaplan turbine. The second study tested the effect of a removable spillway weir (RSW) on the passage of juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). This study was conducted in tandem with a balloon-tag study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Brain samples from fi sh were collected and analyzed using an immunoblot for SBDPs, and imaging software was used to quantify the protein band density and determine the ratio of cleaved protein to total protein. The biomarker analyses found higher SBDP expression levels in fi sh that were exposed to lower pressure nadirs and fi sh that passed through the RSW at a deep orientation. In general, the incidence of injuries observed after treatment positively correlated with expression levels, suggesting that the biomarker method of analysis is comparable to traditional methods of injury assessment. It was also found that, for some treatments, the 110 kDa spectrin fragment (SBDP 110) correlated more strongly with necrotic head injury incidence and mortality rates than did the total cleaved protein or the 120 kDa fragment. These studies will be informative in future decisions regarding the design of turbines and fi sh passage structures in hydroelectric dams and will hopefully contribute to the development of faster and more accurate techniques for diagnosing TBI in fi sh.

Jonason, C.; Miracle, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Clinical Implications of the Tumor Volume Reduction Rate in Head-and-Neck Cancer During Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Organ Preservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the volume reduction rate (VRR) in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) and another 76 with hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) were enrolled in volumetric analysis. All patients received allocated radiotherapy courses. Adaptive computed tomography was done 4 to 5 weeks after the start of IMRT. Primary tumor volume measurement was derived using separate images for the pretreatment gross tumor volume (pGTV) and the interval gross tumor volume. Results: In the OPC group, the pGTV ranged from 6.6 to 242.6 mL (mean, 49.9 mL), whereas the value of the VRR ranged from 0.014 to 0.74 (mean, 0.43). In HPC patients, the pGTV ranged from 4.1 to 152.4 mL (mean, 35.6 mL), whereas the VRR ranged from -1.15 to 0.79 (mean, 0.33). Multivariate analysis of the primary tumor relapse-free survival for OPC revealed three prognostic factors: T4 tumor (p = 0.0001, hazard ratio 7.38), pGTV {>=}20 mL (p = 0.01, hazard ratio 10.61), and VRR =}30 mL (p = 0.001, hazard ratio 2.87) and VRR <0.5 (p = 0.03, hazard ratio 2.25). Conclusion: The VRR is an outcome predictor for local control in OPC and HPC patients treated with IMRT. Those with large tumor volumes or a VRR <0.5 should be considered for a salvage operation or a dose-escalation scheme.

Yang, Shih-Neng [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liao, Chih-Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shang-Wen, E-mail: vincent1680616@yahoo.com.t [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ming-Hsui [Department of Otorhinolarygology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hua, Chun-Hung [Department of Otorhinolarygology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Fang-Jen [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of Microscopic Disease in Oral Tongue Cancer Using Whole-Mount Histopathologic Techniques: Implications for the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To map the distribution of microscopic disease (MD) in head-and-neck cancer by analyzing digital images of whole-mounted serial sections of tongue cancer specimens. Methods and Materials: Ten T1-3 oral tongue cancer specimens were evaluated. The specimens were sliced into 3-mm blocks from which one or more 4-{mu}m slides were taken and digitized to create whole-mounted serial sections. Gross tumor and microscopic disease were digitally contoured on each slide. Lines perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) edge were created at 0.05-mm intervals and the distance between GTV and MD measured. Results: Of 88 slides assessed, 44 (50%) had evidence of MD. Of the 63,809 perpendicular lines drawn along the GTV edges, 2320 (3.6%) encountered microscopic disease along their path. The majority of MD abutted the GTV, and only 26.7% was noncontiguous with the GTV edge. The maximum distance from the border was 7.8 mm. Ninety-nine percent of all MD was within 4.75 mm and 95% was within 3.95 mm of the GTV. Conclusion: In this study we were able to assess the distribution of MD more accurately than has been possible with routine pathologic techniques. The results indicate that when the GTV is correctly identified, there is very little MD to be found outside this volume. This has implications for the volume of tissue resected at surgery and the volume included in the clinical target volume in conformal radiotherapy planning.

Campbell, Sorcha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Poon, Ian, E-mail: Ian.Poon@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Markel, Dan; Vena, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Higgins, Kevin; Enepekides, Dan [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rapheal, Simon; Wong, John; Allo, Ghassan; Morgen, Eric [Department of Pathology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Khaoum, Nader; Smith, Ben; Balogh, Judith; MacKenzie, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Davidson, Jean [Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wang, Dan; Yaffe, Martin [Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Synoptic and Regional Circulation Parameters Associated with the Degree of Convective Shower Activity in South Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar and synoptic data obtained during the Florida Area Cumulus Experiment have been used in an exploratory study to investigate the effects of synoptic and regional circulations on the development of convective activity in south Florida. The ...

Raúl E. López; Patrick T. Gannon Sr.; David O. Blanchard; Christopher C. Balch

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Rainfall Rate and Electric Charge and Size of Raindrops of Six Spring Showers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two ground-based instruments were designed and built in order to accomplish the present research. The first, based on the principle of the induction ring, measures the electric charge as well as the size of the individual raindrops. The other is ...

Serge Chauzy; Serge Despiau

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission is driven by the geomagnetic ?eld. When the showerand driven by the geomagnetic ?eld. The good angularmagnetic ?eld, causing the geomagnetic radiation to almost

Buitink, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cherenkov Radiation from e+e- Pairs and Its Effect on nu e Induced Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5] J. V. Jelley, Cherenkov Radiation and its applications (calculated the Cherenkov radiation from e + e ? pairs as a? 2 [1?? 2 ?(?)]), the radiation is suppressed compared to

Mandal, Sourav K.; Klein, Spencer R.; Jackson, J. David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Long-Lasting Trade-Wind Rain Showers in a Three-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional warm rain model that included microphysics was used to study the reasons for ease of rainfall in Hawaiian clouds and the long-lasting rainfall from certain rainbands. It was found that drop recirculation occurs within these ...

Tsutomu Takahashi

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Terrestrial origin of SNC meteorites and 30 Myr extinctions' shower source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong strengthening of material under high confining pressure and jet nature of outflow from impact craters permit to show meteoroid impacts of >=10E6 Mt TNT equivalent are capable of ejecting rocks up to ~1 km in size from the Earth into space. That permits one to propose the terrestrial origin of some NEA's and SNC meteorites. It is shown the isotopic anomalies of nitrogen, argon and xenon can be related with terrestrial mantle samples. The same applies to the oxygen isotope shifts if one recalls the known manifestations of the kinetic effects of isotopic fractionation.

E. M. Drobyshevski

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

415

Continuous-Course Reirradiation With Concurrent Carboplatin and Paclitaxel for Locally Recurrent, Nonmetastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head-and-Neck  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the efficacy and toxicity of continuous-course, conformal reirradiation with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for the treatment of locally recurrent, nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) in a previously irradiated field. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with continuous course-reirradiation with concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel at the Medical College of Wisconsin and the Clement J. Zablocki VA from 2001 through 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included in the analysis had prior radiation at the site of recurrence of at least 45 Gy. The analysis included patients who received either intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) or three-dimensional conformal RT techniques. All patients received weekly concurrent carboplatin (AUC2) and paclitaxel (30-50 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: Thirty-eight patients with nonmetastatic SCCHN met the entry criteria for analysis. The primary sites at initial diagnosis were oropharyngeal or laryngeal in most patients (66%). Median reirradiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 54-70 Gy). Acute toxicity included Grade 2 neutropenia (5%), Grade 3 neutropenia (15%), and Grade 1/2 thrombocytopenia (8%). No deaths occurred from hematologic toxicity. Chemotherapy doses held (50%) was more prevalent than radiation treatment break (8%). Sixty-eight percent of patients required a gastrostomy tube in follow-up. Significant late toxicity was experienced in 6 patients (16%): 1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 pharyngocutaneous fistula, 3 with osteoradionecrosis, and 1 patient with a lingual artery bleed. Patients treated with three-dimensional conformal RT had more frequent significant late toxicites than patients treated with intensity-modulated RT (44% and 7% respectively, p < 0.05). The median time to progression was 7 months and progression-free rates at 1, 2, and 5 years was 44%, 34%, and 29% respectively. The median overall survival was 16 months. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 54%, 31%, and 20% respectively. Conclusions: Continuous-course, conformal reirradiation with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin has an acceptable toxicity profile and offers a potentially curative option in a subset of patients with few other options.

Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Choong, Nicholas [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wang, Dian; Firat, Selim; Schultz, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Sadasiwan, Chitra [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wong, Stuart, E-mail: Swong@mcw.edu [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Survival for Patients With Node-Positive Head and Neck Cancer: An Analysis by Primary Site and Nodal Stage  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is frequently recommended for node-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary surgery. The impact of RT on survival for various subgroups of node-positive HNSCC has not been clearly demonstrated. Methods and Materials: Within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Database, we identified 5297 patients with node-positive (N1 to N3) HNSCC treated with definitive surgery with or without adjuvant RT between 1988 and 2001. The median follow-up was 4.4 years. Results: Adjuvant RT significantly improved 5-year overall survival (46.3%: 95% confidence interval [CI], 44.7-48.0% for surgery + RT, vs. 35.2%: 95% CI, 32.0-38.5% for surgery alone, p < 0.001) and cancer-specific survival (54.8%: 95% CI, 53.2-56.4% for surgery + RT, vs. 46.2% for surgery alone 95% CI, 42.4-50.0%, p < 0.05). Use of adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor of survival on multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.68-0.83; p < 0.001). Subset analyses demonstrated that adjuvant RT was associated with significantly improved survival for N1 (HR, 0.78; 95% CI; 0.67-0.90; p = 0.001), N2a (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99, p = 0.048) and N2b to N3 nodal disease (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.51-0.75; p < 0.001). Adjuvant RT increased overall survival for node-positive patients with oropharynx (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.57-0.90; p 0.004), hypopharynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.88; p = 0.004), larynx (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.52-0.84; p = 0.001), and oral cavity (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98; p = 0.025) primary tumors. Conclusions: In a large population-based analysis, adjuvant RT significantly improves overall survival for patients with node-positive HNSCC. All nodal stages, including N1, appear to benefit from the addition of RT to definitive surgery.

Kao, Johnny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: johnny.kao@mountsinai.org; Lavaf, Amir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Teng, Marita S. [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Huang, Delphine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Genden, Eric M. [Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the