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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Technical basis and evaluation criteria for an air sampling/monitoring program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air sampling and monitoring programs at DOE facilities need to be reviewed in light of revised requirements and guidance found in, for example, DOE Order 5480.6 (RadCon Manual). Accordingly, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) air monitoring program is being revised and placed on a sound technical basis. A draft technical basis document has been written to establish placement criteria for instruments and to guide the ``retrospective sampling or real-time monitoring`` decision. Facility evaluations are being used to document air sampling/monitoring needs, and instruments are being evaluated in light of these needs. The steps used to develop this program and the technical basis for instrument placement are described.

Gregory, D.C.; Bryan, W.L.; Falter, K.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 50 SLURRY FOR SALTSTONE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, APRIL 2007 SAMPLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results from the characterization of the second quarter April 2007 sampling of Tank 50H for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Six one liter samples were taken in polyethylene bottles to analyze for the WAC contaminants and a 200 mL sample was taken in a steel container for analysis of volatile organic compounds. The information from this characterization will be given to Waste Solidification Engineering personnel to qualify the transfer of aqueous waste to the Saltstone Facility. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) All six of the one liter samples taken in April 2007 from the mixed slurry in Tank 50 have the same compositions within the experimental uncertainty of the analyses. (2) Of the ninety-one process, chemical, and radioactive WAC target or limit contaminants listed in Revision 7 of the 'Waste Acceptance Criteria for Aqueous Waste sent to the Z-Area Saltstone Production Facility', eighty-nine had concentrations that were unequivocally less than the WAC limit or target. (3) The two contaminants whose concentrations could not be shown to be less than their WAC targets were methanol and radioactive Nb-93m. Currently the AD Section of SRNL does not have a method for measuring methanol in caustic solutions. For Nb-93m the results are ambiguous due to possible interferences in the ICP-MS analysis from Zr-93 or Mo-93. (4) Of the six additional chemical and radioactive contaminants requested in the TTR for Saltstone qualification, five were measured or calculated. These were Sb, Be, Tl, along with total beta and gamma. The AD Section does not have a method to measure the 6th contaminant which was the cyanide ion.

Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Evaluation of low flow characteristics of the Vermont Yankee plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiling water reactor (BWR) core flow instrumentation inaccuracies under low-flow conditions have been the subject of both reactor vendor and regulatory communications in response to incidents of the reported core flow being less than the flow corresponding to the natural-circulation line on the power flow map. During single recirculation loop operation, low-flow conditions exist in the idle recirculation loop, and these flow inaccuracies can affect the usefulness of the reported core flow. Accurate core flow indications are needed above 25% power to administer fuel thermal limits and comply with restrictions associated with the potential for thermal-hydraulic instability. While the natural-circulation line on the power flow map is recognized to be a nominal estimate of the flow expected at and near natural-circulation conditions, the boundaries of the stability regions are associated with conditions assumed in safety analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with general design criteria 10 and 12.

Ganther, S.; LeFrancoi, M.; Bergeron, P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus. [PWR; BWR; LMFBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF.

Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Technical bases and guidance for the use of composite soil sampling for demonstrating compliance with radiological release criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidance provides information on methodologies and the technical bases that licensees should consider for incorporating composite sampling strategies into final status survey (FSS) plans. In addition, this guidance also includes appropriate uses of composite sampling for generating the data for other decommissioning site investigations such as characterization or other preliminary site investigations.

Vitkus, Timothy J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

Jack Q. Richardson

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

High performance in low-flow solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low-flow solar hot water heating systems employ flow rates on the order of 1/5 to 1/10 of the conventional flow. Low-flow systems are of interest because the reduced flow rate allows smaller diameter tubing, which is less costly to install. Further, low-flow systems result in increased tank stratification. Lower collector inlet temperatures are achieved through stratification and the useful energy produced by the collector is increased. The disadvantage of low-flow systems is the collector heat removal factor decreases with decreasing flow rate. Many solar domestic hot water systems require an auxiliary electric source to operate a pump in order to circulate fluid through the solar collector. A photovoltaic driven pump can be used to replace the standard electrical pump. PV driven pumps provide an ideal means of controlling the flow rate, as pumps will only circulate fluid when there is sufficient radiation. Peak performance was always found to occur when the heat exchanger tank-side flow rate was approximately equal to the average load flow rate. For low collector-side flow rates, a small deviation from the optimum flow rate will dramatically effect system performance.

Dayan, M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classified Information Security Noncompliance Reporting Criteria January 2012 MANDATORY SECURITY INCIDENT REPORTING Classified information security noncompliances are categorized...

9

NVLAP Common Criteria Testing LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NVLAP Common Criteria Testing LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the Common Criteria Testing accreditation program. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

User Electrical Inspection Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Electronic and Electrical Equipment Inspection Criteria User Electronic and Electrical Equipment Inspection Criteria Any electrical or electronic equipment users bring to the APS will have to be inspected. In some cases, this inspection will be quite simple, e.g., if the equipment has already been inspected by a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) and is used for its designed purpose. Other equipment will require a more thorough inspection (this may include NRTL inspected equipment if it is assembled into an apparatus with other components). The inspection is based on an eight-part list of criteria. Paraphrased, those criteria are: The equipment must be suitable for its intended use (and if appropriate, installation). For example, a heater controller intended to control a 1000W heater cannot be used to control a 2000W heater. The

11

Whole Window Performance Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Criteria This graph shows the relationship between whole window U-factor and center of glass U-factor (U-cog) for two window types for two generic frames from the...

12

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENT CRITERIA The goal of the Research and Development Investment Criteria initiative is to measurably improve the performance of the government's...

13

STANDARD DESIGN CRITERIA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hanford Atomic Production Operation specification gaides for design criteria, structural engineering, civil engineering, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, fire alarm systems, noise control, lighting, railroad construction, corrosion protection, and electrical engineering are presented. Details of this manual are given in TID-4100 (Suppl.). (N.W.R.)

None

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA RANGE DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

15

Research and Development Investment Criteria | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Development Investment Criteria Research and Development Investment Criteria Criteria for research and development. The goal of the Research and Development Investment...

16

FHR Generic Design Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC)–based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

Flanagan, G.F.; Holcomb, D.E.; Cetiner, S.M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

FHR Generic Design Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide an initial, focused reference to the safety characteristics of and a licensing approach for Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs). The document does not contain details of particular reactor designs nor does it attempt to identify or classify either design basis or beyond design basis accidents. Further, this document is an initial attempt by a small set of subject matter experts to document the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs for a larger audience. The document is intended to help in setting the safety and licensing research, development, and demonstration path forward. Input from a wider audience, further technical developments, and additional study will be required to develop a consensus position on the safety and licensing characteristics of FHRs. This document begins with a brief overview of the attributes of FHRs and then a general description of their anticipated safety performance. Following this, an overview of the US nuclear power plant approval process is provided that includes both test and power reactors, as well as the role of safety standards in the approval process. The document next describes a General Design Criteria (GDC) - based approach to licensing an FHR and provides an initial draft set of FHR GDCs. The document concludes with a description of a path forward toward developing an FHR safety standard that can support both a test and power reactor licensing process.

Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

MHD-ETF design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document establishes criteria to be utilized for the design of a pilot-scale (150 to 300 MW thermal) open cycle, coal-fired MHD/steam plant. Criteria for this Engineering Test Facility (ETF) are presented relative to plant siting, plant engineering and operations, MHD-ETF testing, costing and scheduling.

Retallick, F.D.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sample from the 2013-2014 Criteria for Performance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... environmental regulations might include greenhouse gas emissions, carbon ... framework might include implementing a Lean Enterprise System ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Submit Your Criteria Revision Suggestions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Enter your comments directly into the Criteria text (posted online as a Google Doc): Send an e-mail to iday@nist.gov to let us know you'd like to ...

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inqu v Acting Di ector, Off'ke.-of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: '; 4 I &.- WJ Criteria Lead,...

22

Alternative Underwriting Criteria - Using Utility Bill Payment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Underwriting Criteria - Using Utility Bill Payment History as a Proxy for Credit: Case Study on Clean Energy Works Oregon Title Alternative Underwriting Criteria -...

23

Performance Criteria for Residential Zero Energy Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Criteria for Residential Zero Energy Windows Title Performance Criteria for Residential Zero Energy Windows Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number...

24

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria is to establish a minimum State Criteria under the Mississippi Solid Waste Law for all solid waste management...

25

Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Criteria Review and Approach Document 1.0 PURPOSE Subject: Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inqu v Acting Di...

26

Selection Criteria for Demonstration Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selection Criteria: Selection Criteria: Energy Savings: * If a building were to apply this technology, how much energy could it save compared to a "typical" existing building? How much energy could it save compared to a typical "new" building built to the latest (IECC 2007) code? Provide references, calculations, and documentation. * If the technology is a drop-in replacement, how much energy could it save compared to "typical" new equipment? Provide references, calculations, and documentation. Market & Job Creation Potential: * What is the market potential for this technology? * What types of buildings is this technology best suited for? What types of buildings is this technology ill-suited for? * How many US buildings that could potentially benefit from/utilize this technology? What % of U.S.

27

Position paper: Seismic design criteria  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A.

Farnworth, S.K.

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling. [Loss-of-Piping Integrity accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests performed in a small scale water loop showed that voiding oscillations, similar to those observed in sodium, were present in water, as well. An analytical model, appropriate for either sodium or water, was developed and used to describe the water flow behavior. The experimental results indicate that water can be successfully employed as a sodium simulant, and further, that the condensation heat transfer coefficient varies significantly during the growth and collapse of vapor slugs during oscillations. It is this variation, combined with the temperature profile of the unheated zone above the heat source, which determines the oscillatory behavior of the system. The analytical program has produced a model which qualitatively does a good job in predicting the flow behavior in the wake experiment. The amplitude discrepancies are attributable to experimental uncertainties and model inadequacies. Several parameters (heat transfer coefficient, unheated zone temperature profile, mixing between hot and cold fluids during oscillations) are set by the user. Criteria for the comparison of water and sodium experiments have been developed.

Levin, A.E.; Griffith, P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Information criteria for astrophysical model selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model selection is the problem of distinguishing competing models, perhaps featuring different numbers of parameters. The statistics literature contains two distinct sets of tools, those based on information theory such as the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), and those on Bayesian inference such as the Bayesian evidence and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). The Deviance Information Criterion combines ideas from both heritages; it is readily computed from Monte Carlo posterior samples and, unlike the AIC and BIC, allows for parameter degeneracy. I describe the properties of the information criteria, and as an example compute them from WMAP3 data for several cosmological models. I find that at present the information theory and Bayesian approaches give significantly different conclusions from that data.

Andrew R Liddle

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

The room noise criteria (RNC) metric.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent ANSI S12.2:2008 room noise criteria contains both a survey and an engineering method to specify room noise criteria. The methods use A?weighting and extended NC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a laminated metal composite, comprising alternating layers of low flow stress material and high flow stress material, and formed using flow constraining elements around each low flow stress layer; and a method of making same. A composite is a combination of at least two chemically distinct materials with a distinct interface separating the two materials. A metal matrix composite (MMC) is a composite material composed of a metal and a nonmetallic reinforcing agent such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite in continuous or discontinuous fiber, whisker, or discrete particulate form. A laminate is a material composed of several bonded layers. It is possible to have a laminate composed of multi-layers of a single type of material bonded to each other. However, such a laminate would not be considered to be a composite. The term {open_quotes}laminated metal composite{close_quotes} (LMC), as used herein, is intended to include a structural material composed of: (1) layers of metal or metal alloys interleaved with (2) a different metal, a metal alloy, or a metal matrix composite (MMC) containing strengthening agents.

Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio [Center for Integrated Research, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Estimating the Annual Water and Energy Savings in Texas A & M University Cafeterias using Low Flow Pre-Rinse Spray Valves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency of a Pre- Rinse Spray Valve (PRSV) is one of the most cost effective water conservation methods in the Food Services Industry. A significant contributor to this cost efficiency is the reduction in the energy costs required to provide the mandatory hot water. This research paper estimates the potential quantity and dollar value of the water and energy that can be saved annually in Texas A&M University's dining services with the installation of low flow pre-rinse spray valves. The data collection was obtained from four of Texas A&M University's Dining Services facilities. The annual savings were estimated by contrasting the water consumption of the existing T & S Brass B 0107-M PRSVs with the latest and most advanced available low flow T and S Brass B 0107-C PRSV. The annual water consumption of the existing and new PRSVs were predicted by measuring an individual average flow rate for each and observing the number of hours per day the PRSV would be used. The observed and measured values were extrapolated to amount rates to determine cost savings. The dollar value was ascertained using the utility cost data recorded over a semester by the Facilities Coordinator of the Department of Dining Services. The findings of this study show that the water savings from a single PRSV could lead to an estimated annual saving ranging between 46% and 78% of the current operation cost. The T & S Brass B 0107-C PRSV is currently priced between $52- $60 per valve resulting in a payback period ranging between 1.5-6 months per valve. If every valve on campus was replaced, the University could reap a savings in the range of $ 5,400- $22,590 over the 5 year useful life of the valve, having initially invested less than $550.

Rebello, Harsh Varun

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria Classified information security noncompliances are categorized according to the disclosure or potential disclosure of DOE classified information placed at risk. There are two categories of noncompliances that are based on the relative severity of a classified information security incident. The categories are identified by an event category and type. Each of the two categories is further subdivided into three types based on the type of interest (security interest, management interest, and procedural interest). Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria More Documents & Publications Safety and Security Enforcement Coordinator Handbook DOE-STD-1210-2012 HQFMSP Chapter 11, Incidents of Security Concern

35

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.govbbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential...

36

Environmental Radiation Protection, Inspection Criteria, Approach...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is approved for use by the Office of ES&H Evaluations. Subject: Environmental Radiation Protection, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry Director, ffice of...

37

Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the Director of the Office of ES&H Evaluations on (301) 903-5392. Subject: Hazardous Waste Management Inplementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, Evaluations Management Date:...

38

Gas characterization system functional design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the functional design criteria for the gas characterization systems being placed on selected flammable gas watch-list tanks in support of the hydrogen mitigation tests.

Straalsund, E.K.

1995-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sampling – Soil  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as absorbents.

40

Functional design criteria for the retained gas sampler system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) is being developed to capture and analyze waste samples from Hanford Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks to determine both the quantity and composition of gases retained in the waste. The RGSS consists of three main components: the Sampler, Extractor, and Extruder. This report describes the functional criteria for the design of the RGSS components. The RGSS Sampler is based on the WHC Universal Sampler design with modifications to eliminate gas leakage. The primary function of the Sampler is to capture a representative waste sample from a tank and transport the sample with minimal loss of gas content from the tank to the laboratory. The function of the Extruder is to transfer the waste sample from the Sampler to the Extractor. The function of the Extractor is to separate the gases from the liquids and solids, measure the relative volume of gas to determine the void fraction, and remove and analyze the gas constituents.

Wootan, D.W.

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Multi-criteria scheduling of pipeline workflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping workflow applications onto parallel platforms is a challenging problem, even for simple application patterns such as pipeline graphs. Several antagonist criteria should be optimized, such as throughput and latency (or a combination). In this paper, we study the complexity of the bi-criteria mapping problem for pipeline graphs on communication homogeneous platforms. In particular, we assess the complexity of the well-known chains-to-chains problem for different-speed processors, which turns out to be NP-hard. We provide several efficient polynomial bi-criteria heuristics, and their relative performance is evaluated through extensive simulations.

Benoit, Anne; Robert, Yves

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

CFD Analysis for Flow Behavior Characteristics in the Upper Plenum during low flow/low pressure transients for the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas coolant at low pressure exhibits poor heat transfer characteristics. This is an area of concern for the passive response targeted by the Generation IV GCFR design. For the first 24 hour period, the decay heat removal for the GCFR design is dependent on an actively powered blower, which also would reduce the temperature in the fuel during transients, before depending on the passive operation. Natural circulation cooling initiates when the blower is stopped for the final phase of the decay heat removal, as under forced convection the core decay heat is adequately cooled by the running blower. The ability of the coolant to flow in the reverse direction or having recirculation, when the blowers are off, necessitates more understanding of the flow behavior characteristics in the upper plenum. The work done here focuses primarily on the period after the blower has been turned off, as the core is adequately cooled when the blowers are running, thus there was no need to carry out the analysis for the first 24 hours. In order to understand the plume behavior for the GCFR upper plenum several cases were run, with air, helium and helium-air mixture. For each case, the FLUENT was used to characterize the steady state velocity vectors and corresponding temperature in the upper plenum under passive decay heat removal conditions. This study will provide better insight into the plume interaction in the upper plenum at low flow and low pressure conditions.

Piyush Sabharwall; Theron Marshall; Kevan Weaver; Hans Gougar

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

AOCS Criteria M 5-09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approved Chemists AOCS Criteria M 5-09 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads Official Methods and Recommended Practices of the AOCS (Methods) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists fats lab laboratories laboratory lipid Methods Methods book Me

44

AOCS Criteria M 6-09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Laboratories AOCS Criteria M 6-09 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads Official Methods and Recommended Practices of the AOCS (Methods) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists fats lab laboratories laboratory lipid Methods Methods bo

45

Gas characterization monitoring system functional design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the functional design criteria for the Gas Characterization Monitoring Systems (Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems,) to be designed, fabricated and installed on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas.

Schneider, T.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

47

Opening criteria for accelerated paving techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast track paving or accelerated pavement design is the rapid replacement of portland cement concrete pavement, allowing for the reopening to traffic under specific time requirements. The purpose of this research is to develop opening criteria for accelerated paving and implementing these criteria into a set of guidelines for fast track paving. This report is broken into three specific sections; review of practice, an analysis of field and lab research, and finally design guidelines for the opening criteria for accelerated paving techniques. A review of practice was developed to update the reader on the current "state of the art". This review outlines contruction techniques, fast track mix design, pavement design, and joint design. The analysis of field and lab research provides a synopsis of the experimentation used to develop design guidelines for opening criteria. This section includes crack surveys, coring tests, FWD testing, maturity testing, penetration testing and consistency testing. The design guidelines for early opening criteria provides guidelines for use in intersection design. The guideline outlines requirements for design, design of concrete pavement materials, mixture design, construction considerations, and requirements for opening criteria. This document will update the reader on the subject of fast track paving and the methods used to research it. Finally, with a design guidelines the reader will be able to apply the methods of analysis described in the field and lab testing section to create better pavements more efficiently.

Johnson, Jason Leonard

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Anthrax Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

49

Sampling box  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Multi-Criteria Optimisation using Past, Real Time and Predictive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Criteria Optimisation using Past, Real Time and Predictive Performance Benchmarks Title Multi-Criteria Optimisation using Past, Real Time and Predictive Performance...

51

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort Title Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in...

52

U.S. Department of Energy Implements More Stringent Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implements More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR Clothes Washers, Expands CFL Program U.S. Department of Energy Implements More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR Clothes...

53

Production and Handling Slide 32: Full Limit Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full Limit Criteria Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Full Limit Criteria 250F is the maximum temperature to...

54

Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.  

SciTech Connect

We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) DOE has set expectations for implementing criticality safety controls that are selected to provide preventive and/or mitigative functions for specific potential accident scenarios. There are additional expectations for criticality safety controls that are also designated as Specific Administrative Controls (SACs) (see HSS CRAD 64-32). Also, in instances when the review addresses functionality and operability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear facilities specifically required

56

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fuel Reliability Program: Proposed RIA Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC is in the process of finalizing the interim RIA failure criteria published in NUREG-0800, Standard Review Plan, Section 4.2, Fuel System Design, Revision 3. A technical evaluation of the RIA issue has been conducted under the auspices of the EPRI Fuel Reliability Program with the objective of proposing a final version of the interim RIA failure criteria for PCMI processes. The approach used in the technical evaluation combined experimental data from a variety of sources, including integral RIA-si...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A case history comparing noise criteria.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case history of an indoor HVAC noise problem in a new residential building will be presented. Noise measurements collected in the living room and in the bedroom of the impacted living unit will be examined using several of the available noise criteria methods including

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Strong et al ALS FTD consensus criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong et al ALS FTD consensus criteria 1 Version: 20070606 Frontotemporal syndromes in amyotrophic, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USA (5) Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center, San Francisco Kingdom (8) Science Director & Vice President, The ALS Association, Palm Harbor, Florida, U.S.A. (9

Dickerson, Brad

63

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effective criteria for web page changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of similarity metrics have been used to measure the degree of web page changes in the literature. In this paper, we define criteria for web page changes to evaluate the effectiveness of the metrics. Using real web pages and synthesized pages, ...

Shin Young Kwon; Sang Ho Lee; Sung Jin Kim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria This document establishes the guidance and criteria for conducting internal and independent Federal Technical Capability Assessments within the Department. The requirements of this document are applicable to those organizations having safety responsibilities for defense nuclear facilities. This includes both headquarters and field organizations. Regardless of the type of assessment conducted, the objectives and criteria within this document are used as a basis for the assessment. Use of consistent objectives and criteria is necessary to establish baselines and to track and trend performance. FTCP Assessment Guidance and Criteria, 1998 More Documents & Publications Technical Qualification Program and FTCP Assessment CRADs

66

Criteria for SES Positions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Executive Resources » Senior Executive Service (SES) Services » Executive Resources » Senior Executive Service (SES) » Criteria for SES Positions Criteria for SES Positions Initial career appointments to the SES must be made following competitive merit staffing requirements. Agencies must announce SES vacancies that will be filled by initial career appointment to at least all Federal civil service employees. Vacancies are published on the USAJOBS Veteran's preference does not apply to SES selections. An Executive Resources Board (ERB) is convened to conduct the merit staffing process. The ERB reviews the executive qualifications of each eligible candidate and make recommendations to the appointing official concerning the candidates. Upon tentative selection, a Qualifications Review Board (QRB) administered by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM)

67

Reservoir screening criteria for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly designed and executed underbalanced drilling operations can eliminate or significantly reduce formation damage, mud or drill solids invasion, lost circulation, fluid entrainment and trapping effects, and potential adverse reactions of drilling fluids with the reservoir matrix or in-situ reservoir fluids. The key to selecting appropriate reservoir candidates is achieving a balance of technical, safety and economic factors. Not every reservoir is an ideal candidate for an underbalanced drilling operation and in some cases distinct disadvantages may exist in trying to execute an underbalanced drilling operation in comparison to a simpler more conventional overbalanced application. Extensive field experience has played an important role in determining the following key criteria and design considerations that should be examined when evaluating a well. Screening criteria are also provided to help operators ascertain if a given formation is, in fact, a viable underbalanced drilling candidate.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential energy efficiency and the mission of the BBRN. Members are expected to be legally incorporated organizations or institutions, rather than individuals, actively engaged in the field of existing residential building energy efficiency with an ability to impact the market. Members should have the ability and capacity to carry out the requirements for membership (i.e., reporting the annual number of upgrades in their sphere of influence, and associated benefits), and actively engage as a member. Members must actively engage in significant work supporting, studying, researching, reporting, and/or

70

Water Quality Criteria Development for Iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current national water quality criterion for iron — a criterion continuous concentration of 1 mg Fe/L — was derived 25 years ago. Such ambient water quality criteria are typically derived from toxicity tests in which the reagent grade chemical is dissolved in clean laboratory water. However, due to the complexity of iron speciation in freshwater, adverse effects of iron precipitates on habitat quality, and access of organisms to food, standard toxicity assays may not adequately assess the...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

CHANGING RELEASE CRITERIA FROM PAST TO PRESENT  

SciTech Connect

Beginning with the decommissioning of nuclear power plants the release, criteria for radioactive materials has gained importance significantly. After decommissioning and dismantling, most of the residues need not be treated as radioactive waste, since they contain only small amounts of radioactivity. The Karlsruhe Research Center already dismantled two research reactors completely (the Karlstein Super Heated Steam Reactor and the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant), while several additional decommissioning projects are currently in progress. About 70 % of the total waste mass within each project can be released from the area of atomic regulations and licenses. At the Niederaichbach and Karlstein sites the release procedures and the release criteria were determined in the decommissioning license, where issues such as controlling and release values were fixed. Additionally, each step of the release process has to be coordinated with the regulator. Today the general release criteria are contained in the atomic act. Depending on the nature of the material to be released (e.g. building structures or metallic waste), and depending on the further use of the material, such as unrestricted reuse or waste disposal, release values for each nuclide are established. To prepare the release of materials, a release plan including the release measurement results is sent to the regulator, who has to officially approve the concept.

Graf, A.; Valencia, L.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

What Makes a Scientific Research Question Worth Investigating? Students' Epistemic Criteria and Considerations of Contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to  list  criteria  reflecting  functional  utility   than  likely  to  list  criteria  for  epistemic  utility  and  

Berson, Eric

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Living versus non-living criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Living versus non-living criteria Living versus non-living criteria Name: jconner Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What is the criteria for living versus non-living? Is life functions (growth, reproduction, etc.) sufficient or must structure also (cells) be included? Replies: Yes, textbooks are vague as no satisfactory answer has been found. This is probably because we have not tried very hard as life on earth is easy to recognize. As we begin to study outer space, we may need a better definition so we can recognize the very different forms of life that may exist elsewhere. All life forms on earth have deoxyribonucleic acids or ribonucleic acids. These molecules store then information necessary to build the next generation, so as to make more nucleic acid. One could ask whether organisms are merely the means to making more nucleic acids, in the form of genes. Many people have included the criterion of cellular structure in the definition of life but I have never known why. All life depends on other life forms for their reproduction, but viruses are particularly needy. Philosophers have taken some stabs at more general definitions of life, unlike most biologists who are usually satisfied to be able to recognize earth life when they see it. One definition I like is that living things are those that require energy to reproduce; and this reproduction is accomplished with some errors (ie. mutations). These errors distinguish life from inanimate crystals that can grow on themselves. This answer addresses how to define a living species, but ignore the questions of how to determine if any one organism is alive at any given time. That is a different question and one of degree

74

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Microsoft Word - Assessment-B-ProgramCriteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATTACHMENT B ATTACHMENT B PROGRAM ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Identify the following for all sites: Program Management * Number FTE's devoted to Records Management o Full-time Federal and Contractor o Part-time Federal and Contractor Percent of time spent on Records Management duties * Percentage of time each Records Management employee is assigned to: o Program Management o Operations Training/Assistance Schedule Application Records Holding/Storage Area Activities EEOICPA Claims * Monthly Claim Volume Other, specify o Contractor Oversight * Manpower/Support Costs o Series and Grade levels for Federal FTE's o Contractor costs * Records Management Expertise o Federal and Contractor Records-related Training received within the last three

76

Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

Winters, W.I.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

2013-2014 Criteria Coming Soon: Readers Can Expect ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Program will recover the costs of developing and distributing the Criteria, which were previously funded by federal appropriations, through the ...

2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 2: Quality assurance criteria for photovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect

Quality assurance criteria are described for manufacturers and installers of solar photovoltaic tests and applications. Quality oriented activities are outlined to be pursued by the contractor/subcontractor to assure the physical and operational quality of equipment produced is included. In the broad sense, guidelines are provided for establishing a QA organization if none exists. Mainly, criteria is provided to be considered in any PV quality assurance plan selected as appropriate by the responsible Field Center. A framework is established for a systematic approach to ensure that photovoltaic tests and applications are constructed in a timely and cost effective manner.

Koenig, J.C.; Billitti, J.W.; Tallon, J.M.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: ? DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste ? DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) ? DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) ? U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

An extreme-distance approach to multiple criteria ranking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A distance approach based on extreme points, or predefined ideal and anti-ideal points, is proposed to improve on the TOPSIS (Technique for Order Performance [or Ordered Preference] by Similarity to Ideal Solution) method of multiple criteria ranking. ... Keywords: Comparative study, Distance-based ranking, Multiple criteria decision analysis, Multiple criteria ranking, TOPSIS

Ye Chen; D. Marc Kilgour; Keith W. Hipel

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Protocol, Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 Protocol, Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 April 23, 2008 Inspection Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry, April 23, 2008 Emergency planning includes the identification of hazards and threats. A hazards survey is the qualitative portion of the hazards identification process. It briefly describes the potential impacts of emergency events or conditions and summarizes the planning and preparedness requirements that apply. If determined to be required, an EPHA includes the identification and characterization of hazardous materials specific to a facility/site, analyses of potential accidents or events, and evaluation of potential consequences. Protocol, Inspection Criteria - April 23, 2008 More Documents & Publications

83

Application Content and Evaluation Criteria/Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation Criteria/Process Jill Gruber Golden Field Office Department of Energy May 18, 2007 The information presented here is an outline of how the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) may be structured. The final application requirements will be shown in the FOA when it is posted on Grants.gov. The schedule and awards are dependent on future appropriations and may change if future appropriations are lower than expected or in the event of a continuing resolution. DOE Points of Contact DOE Golden Field Office: Jill Gruber, Project Officer Bob Kingsley, Contract Specialist Stephanie Carabajal, Contracting Officer DOE HQ: Pete Devlin, Technology Development Manager Preliminary Application Content * Separate applications for each topic * Title should identify the topic area

84

Biomonitoring test procedures and biological criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Water Environment Federation recently issued a special publication, Biomonitoring in the Water Environment. In this paper, the authors highlight the contents of the chapter 3, Biomonitoring Test Procedures, identify current trends in test procedures and introduce the concept of biological criteria (biocriteria). The book chapter (and this paper) focuses on freshwater and marine chronic and acute toxicity tests used in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits program to identify effluents and receiving waters containing toxic materials in acutely or chronically toxic concentrations. The two major categories of toxicity tests include acute tests and chronic tests. The USEPA chronic tests required in NPDEs permits have been shortened to 7 days by focusing on the most sensitive life-cycle stages; these tests are often referred to as short-term chronic tests. The type of test(s) required depend on NPDES permit requirements, objectives of the test, available resources, requirements of the test organisms, and effluent characteristics such as variability in flow or toxicity. The permit writer will determine the requirements for toxicity test(s) by considering such factors as dilution, effluent variability, and exposure variability. Whether the required test is acute or chronic, the objective of the test is to estimate the safe or no effect concentration which is defined as the concentration which will permit normal propagation of fish and other aquatic life in the receiving waters. In this paper, the authors review the types of toxicity tests, the commonly used test organisms, and the uses of toxicity test data. In addition, they briefly describe research on new methods and the use of biological criteria.

Kszos, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lipschultz, M.J. [City of Las Vegas, NV (United States); Foster, W.E. [Saint Mary`s Coll., Winona, MN (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Screening criteria for microbial for processes  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) has maintained a microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) field project data base since 1985. One of the major goals of this data base is to continue to document characteristics of reservoirs used for MEOR field projects and to assist the US Department of Energy by revising published screening criteria for MEOR processes. Since the last update of this data base in 1987, the number of MEOR field projects entered has increased from 39 to 65. Microbial EOR has been recognized as a potentially cost-effective method, particularly for stripper well production. Stripper wells are particularly in need of cost-effective EOR because independent operators produce about 40% of the total oil recovered, but cannot conduct needed EOR research. Microbial methods for improving oil recovery are potentially cost-effective and particularly well suited to be applied in today's economic climate. The lower price of crude oil as well as a more general acceptance of use of biotechnological processes has probably contributed to this increase. Although in some instances information was unavailable or not reported for each element of the data base, there exists adequate data to demonstrate both the viability and variety of options for using microbial technology for improved oil production. this report updates the data base and provides summary of several of the more important MEOR field experiments conducted during the 1970s and 1980s. 19 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Bryant, R.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation containers  

SciTech Connect

The design criteria currently used in the design of radioactive material (RAM) transportation containers are taken from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME, 1992). These load-based criteria are ideally suited for pressure vessels where the loading is quasistatic and all stresses are in equilibrium with externally applied loads. For impact events, the use of load-based criteria is less supportable. Impact events tend to be energy controlled, and thus, energy-based acceptance criteria would appear to be more appropriate. Determination of an ideal design criteria depends on what behavior is desired. Currently there is not a design criteria for inelastic analysis for RAM nation packages that is accepted by the regulatory agencies. This lack of acceptance criteria is one of the major factors in limiting the use of inelastic analysis. In this paper inelastic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress and strain-energy density will be compared for two stainless steel test units subjected to impacts onto an unyielding target. Two different material models are considered for the inelastic analysis, a bilinear fit of the stress-strain curve and a power law hardening model that very closely follows the stress-strain curve. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate discussion and research into the area of strain-energy density based inelastic analysis acceptance criteria.

Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Microsoft Word - StakeholderInputForm_Criteria.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 (Rev. 1008) U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Administration TRANSMISSION PLANNING CRITERIA Page 1 of Thank you for your interest in the Southwestern Power...

89

Energy Department Announces More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria for ENERGY STAR Refrigerators August 3, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced increased energy efficient...

90

Safety goals and functional performance criteria. [Advanced Reactor Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a possible approach to the development of functional performance criteria to be applied to evolutionary LWR designs. Key safety functions are first identified; then, criteria are drawn up for each individual function, based on the premise that no single function's projected unreliability should be allowed to exhaust the safety goal frequencies. In the area of core damage prevention, functional criteria are cast in terms of necessary levels of redundancy and diversity of critical equipment. In the area of core damage mitigation (containment), functional performance criteria are cast with the aim of mitigating post-core-melt phenomena with sufficient assurance to eliminate major uncertainties in containment performance. 9 refs.

Youngblood, R.W.; Pratt, W.T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Hardin, W.B. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of Regulatory Applications)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

2012 Criteria and Guidelines for the Federal Energy and Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 2012 2012 Criteria & Guidelines For the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2 1. OVERVIEW FEMP provides the services, tools, and expertise to Federal agencies to...

92

NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

Steimke, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear safety criteria and specifications for space nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to define safety criteria which must be met to implement US safety policy for space fission reactors. These criteria provide the bases for decisions on the acceptability of specific mission and reactor design proposals. (JDH)

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Criteria for evaluating group decision-making methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper brings many criteria and many methods under one umbrella and compares them. The schematization given here is a good start and may eventually be improved upon in subsequent revisions by extending the criteria used and by further debating the ... Keywords: Evaluation, Group decision making methods, MCDM

Kirti Peniwati

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Protocol, Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents - July 2013 Protocol, Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents - July 2013 July 2013 Protocol for the Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for the development and maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRADs) used by the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45). The HS-45 CRADS are carefully selected, modified (if required), and referenced in HS-45 appraisal plans. These plans are used to provide an outline of the activities planned to assess the effectiveness of safety and emergency management processes and

96

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Focus Area: Other Biofuels Topics: Training Material Website: www.fao.org/bioenergy/foodsecurity/befsci/en/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/bioenergy-and-food-security-criteria- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This website-created by the Bioenergy and food Security project of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)-provides policymakers and practitioners a set of criteria, indicators, good practices, and policy options for sustainable bioenergy production to

97

Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 Range Design Criteria - June 4, 2012 June 4, 2012 This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations PURPOSE. This document contains design criteria for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) live-fire ranges for use in planning new facilities and major rehabilitation of existing facilities. This document will be approved and maintained by the Office of Security, Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) as a stand-alone document on the HSS website: http://www.hss.doe.gov/SecPolicy/pfs.html. PLANNING FACTORS. All applicable local, State, Federal, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA),

98

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs). This Standard also provides criteria and guidance for the use of industry building codes and voluntary

99

Appendix C: Criteria Review and Approach Documents, National Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix C: Criteria Review and Approach Documents, National Appendix C: Criteria Review and Approach Documents, National Nuclear Security Administration Appendix C: Criteria Review and Approach Documents, National Nuclear Security Administration A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of a table of National Nuclear Security Administration Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) with links to the CRADs. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. Appendix C: Criteria Review and Approach Documents, National Nuclear Security Administration More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

100

CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of Software Used in the Safety Analysis and Design of Defense Nuclear Facilities CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of Software Used in the Safety Analysis and Design of Defense Nuclear Facilities Performance Objective: These guidelines and criteria provide a consistent overall framework for assessment of the processes that are currently in place to ensure that the software being used in the safety analysis and design of the SSCs in defense nuclear facilities is adequate. These reviews will be conducted only on software that is currently in use, not on software that was previously used as part of a safety analysis and design process. Criteria: Custom software developed by DOE, its contractors, or subcontractors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Acceptance sampling methods for sample results verification  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes a statistical sampling method for use during the sample results verification portion of the validation of data packages. In particular, this method was derived specifically for the validation of data packages for metals target analyte analysis performed under United States Environmental Protection Agency Contract Laboratory Program protocols, where sample results verification can be quite time consuming. The purpose of such a statistical method is to provide options in addition to the ``all or nothing`` options that currently exist for sample results verification. The proposed method allows the amount of data validated during the sample results verification process to be based on a balance between risks and the cost of inspection.

Jesse, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

State-wide performance criteria for international safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has relied upon prescriptive criteria to guide safeguards implementation. The prospect of replacing prescriptive safeguards criteria with more flexible performance criteria would constitute a structural change in safeguards and raises several important questions. Performance criteria imply that while safeguards goals will be fixed, the means of attaining those goals will not be explicitly prescribed. What would the performance objectives be under such a system? How would they be formulated? How would performance be linked to higher level safeguards objectives? How would safeguards performance be measured State-wide? The implementation of safeguards under performance criteria would also signal a dramatic change in the manner the Agency does business. A higher degree of flexibility could, in principle, produce greater effectiveness and efficiency, but would come with a need for increased Agency responsibility in practice. To the extent that reliance on prescriptive criteria decreases, the burden of justifying actions and ensuring their transparency will rise. Would there need to be limits to safeguards implementation? What would be the basis for setting such limits? This paper addresses these and other issues and questions relating to both the formulation and the implementation of performance-based criteria.

Budlong-Sylvester, K. W. (Kory W.); Pilat, Joseph F.; Stanbro, W. D. (William D.)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) Water Quality Criteria for Intrastate, Interstate, and Coastal Water (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

104

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

105

Criteria and Conditions for Authorizing Withdrawal, Diversion, and Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria and Conditions for Authorizing Withdrawal, Diversion, and Criteria and Conditions for Authorizing Withdrawal, Diversion, and Storage of Water (Iowa) Criteria and Conditions for Authorizing Withdrawal, Diversion, and Storage of Water (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations

106

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

107

Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Conduct of Operations Criteria, Review, & Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project

108

Safety Basis Criteria & Review Approach Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Basis Criteria & Review Approach Documents Safety Basis Criteria & Review Approach Documents Safety Basis Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Safety Basis - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Safety Basis - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Safety Basis - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Safety Basis - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Safety Basis - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

109

Emergency Management Criteria & Review Approach Documents | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management Criteria & Review Approach Documents Emergency Management Criteria & Review Approach Documents Emergency Management Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Emergency Management - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Emergency Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Emergency Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

110

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 | Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 Who Should Attend This course is mandatory for: SLAC employees and non-employees who need unescorted access to SSRL or LCLS...

112

Department of Energy Announces More Stringent Energy Efficient Criteria for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Stringent Energy Efficient More Stringent Energy Efficient Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Dishwashers Department of Energy Announces More Stringent Energy Efficient Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Dishwashers March 2, 2006 - 11:39am Addthis More Efficient Dishwashers Estimated to Save Consumers over $26 Million Annually WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced more stringent energy efficient criteria for dishwashers carrying the ENERGY STAR® label that could save America families more than $26 million a year. The new ENERGY STAR® criteria will also bring tax credits for the production of energy efficient appliances to manufacturers under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005). "These new ENERGY STAR® requirements will enable consumers to improve energy efficiency at home while also saving on their electricity bill,"

113

CRAD, Safety Systems Inspection Criteria - December 17, 2012 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Inspection Criteria - December 17, 2012 Systems Inspection Criteria - December 17, 2012 CRAD, Safety Systems Inspection Criteria - December 17, 2012 December 17, 2012 Safety Systems Inspection Criteria in implementing Integrated Safety Management, (HSS CRAD 45-11, Rev. 3) The review of Safety Systems will evaluate the effectiveness of programs and processes for engineering design and safety basis, construction and installation, configuration management, surveillance testing, maintenance, operations, cognizant system engineer (CSE) and safety system oversight (SSO), and feedback and improvement of selected safety systems. The review will also evaluate the effectiveness in maintaining the functionality and reliability of these safety systems. The review of Safety Systems will be performed in the context of integrated safety management (ISM), although

114

Energy Department Announces More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Refrigerators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced increased energy efficient criteria for refrigerators carrying the ENERGY STAR® label.  In order to qualify, full-size...

115

The retrofitting of existing buildings for seismic criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the process for retrofitting a building for seismic criteria. It explains the need for a new, performance-based design code to provide a range of acceptable building behavior. It then outlines the ...

Besing, Christa, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non-nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized. Some key documents for understanding Japanese seismic design criteria are also listed with brief descriptions. The paper highlights the design criteria to determine the seismic demand and component capacity in comparison with US criteria, the background studies which have led to the current Japanese design criteria, and a survey of current research activities. More detailed technical descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Design Criteria and Eigensequence Plots for Satellite-Computed Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the “degrees of freedom for signal” is proposed as a design criteria for comparing different designs for satellite and other measuring systems. It is also proposed that certain eigensequence plots be examined at the design stage along ...

Grace Wahba

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Atlantic Subtropical Storms. Part I: Diagnostic Criteria and Composite Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subtropical cyclones (ST) have only recently gained attention as damaging weather systems. A set of criteria for identifying and classifying these systems is introduced here and employed to identify 18 ST cases forming in the 1999–2004 hurricane ...

Jenni L. Evans; Mark P. Guishard

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Worker Safety Training Inpsection Criteria, Approach and Lines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1.0 PURPOSE U.S. Department of Subject: Worker Safety Training HS: HSS CRAD 64-50 Inspection Criteria, Approach, Energy Rev: 0 and Lines of Inquiry Eff. Date: 071 1012009 Office of...

120

Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1673e/i1673e00.pdf Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Screenshot References: Sustainable Woodfuels[1] Overview "This publication assesses the environmental, social and economic issues as well as the legal and institutional frameworks that can ensure the sustainable production of woodfuels from forests, trees outside forests and other sources. The study continues FAO's long interest in wood energy issues and complements the many other FAO reports on wood energy and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tank SY-101 void fraction instrument functional design criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the functional design criteria for design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and installation of a void fraction instrument for Tank SY-101. This instrument will measure the void fraction in the waste in Tank SY-101 at various elevations.

McWethy, L.M.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: repository performance and development criteria. Public draft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, DOE/NWTS-33(3) is one of a series of documents to establish the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program criteria for mined geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. For both repository performance and repository development it delineates the criteria for design performance, radiological safety, mining safety, long-term containment and isolation, operations, and decommissioning. The US Department of Energy will use these criteria to guide the development of repositories to assist in achieving performance and will reevaluate their use when the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues radioactive waste repository rules.

none,

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Reportable Nuclide Criteria for ORNL Waste Management Activities - 13005  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee generates numerous radioactive waste streams. Many of those streams contain a large number of radionuclides with an extremely broad range of concentrations. To feasibly manage the radionuclide information, ORNL developed a reportable nuclide criteria to distinguish between those nuclides in a waste stream that require waste tracking versus those nuclides of such minimal activity that do not require tracking. The criteria include tracking thresholds drawn from ORNL onsite management requirements, transportation requirements, and relevant treatment and disposal facility acceptance criteria. As a management practice, ORNL maintains waste tracking on a nuclide in a specific waste stream if it exceeds any of the reportable nuclide criteria. Nuclides in a specific waste stream that screen out as non-reportable under all these criteria may be dropped from ORNL waste tracking. The benefit of this criteria is to ensure that nuclides in a waste stream with activities which meaningfully affect safety and compliance are tracked, while documenting the basis for removing certain isotopes from further consideration.

McDowell, Kip [ORNL; Forrester, Tim [ORNL; Saunders, Mark Edward [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOE natural phenomenal hazards design and evaluation criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct, and operate DOE facilities so that workers, the general public, and the environment are protected from the impacts of natural phenomena hazards (NPH). Furthermore, DOE has established explicit goals of acceptable risk for NPH performance. As a result, natural phenomena hazard (earthquake, extreme wind, and flood) design and evaluation criteria for DOE facilities have been developed based on target probabilistic performance goals. These criteria include selection of design/evaluation NPH input from probabilistic hazard curves combined with commonly practiced deterministic response evaluation methods and acceptance criteria with controlled levels of conservatism. For earthquake considerations, conservatism is intentionally introduced in specification of material strengths and capacities, in the allowance of limited inelastic behavior, and by a seismic scale factor. Criteria have been developed following a graded approach for several performance goals ranging from that appropriate for normal-use facilities to that appropriate for facilities involving hazardous or critical operations. Performance goals are comprised of qualitative expressions of acceptable behavior and of target quantitative probabilities that acceptable limits of behavior are maintained. The criteria are simple procedures but have a rigorous basis. This paper addresses DOE seismic design and evaluation criteria.

Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Short, S.A. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Kennedy, R.P.; Chander, H. [RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States); Hill, J.R.; Kimball, J.K. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: program objectives, functional requirements, and system performance criteria  

SciTech Connect

At the present time, final repository criteria have not been issued by the responsible agencies. This document describes general objectives, requirements, and criteria that the DOE intends to apply in the interim to the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. These objectives, requirements, and criteria have been developed on the basis of DOE's analysis of what is needed to achieve the National objective of safe waste disposal in an environmentally acceptable and economic manner and are expected to be consistent with anticipated regulatory standards. The qualitative statements in this document address the broad issues of public and occupational health and safety, institutional acceptability, engineering feasibility, and economic considerations. A comprehensive set of criteria, general and project specific, of which these are a part, will constitute a portion of the technical basis for preparation and submittal by the DOE of formal documents to support future license applications for nuclear waste repositories.

None

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Management Assessment Quality Assurance Guidance in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of several guidance documents developed by DOE EM pertaining to environmental restoration and waste management sampling and analysis activities. This guidance contains performance objectives and representative assessment criteria that can be used to conduct management assessments.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sampling at the Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

128

Seismic design and evaluation criteria based on target performance goals  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy utilizes deterministic seismic design/evaluation criteria developed to achieve probabilistic performance goals. These seismic design and evaluation criteria are intended to apply equally to the design of new facilities and to the evaluation of existing facilities. In addition, the criteria are intended to cover design and evaluation of buildings, equipment, piping, and other structures. Four separate sets of seismic design/evaluation criteria have been presented each with a different performance goal. In all these criteria, earthquake loading is selected from seismic hazard curves on a probabilistic basis but seismic response evaluation methods and acceptable behavior limits are deterministic approaches with which design engineers are familiar. For analytical evaluations, conservatism has been introduced through the use of conservative inelastic demand-capacity ratios combined with ductile detailing requirements, through the use of minimum specified material strengths and conservative code capacity equations, and through the use of a seismic scale factor. For evaluation by testing or by experience data, conservatism has been introduced through the use of an increase scale factor which is applied to the prescribed design/evaluation input motion.

Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kennedy, R.P. [Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States); Short, S.A. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Production and Handling Slide 29: UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents UF6 Cylinder Fill Limit Criteria No UF6 cylinder shall be filled...

130

Microsoft Word - Worker Safety and Health Reporting Criteria.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Worker Safety and Health Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Worker Safety and Health Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Worker Safety and Health Noncompliances Associated With Occurrences (DOE Order 232.2) Consult the DOE Order for the full text of each occurrence criterion 1 Reporting Criteria Group Subgroup Occurrence Category and Summary Description 2 1. Operational Emergencies 3 N/A (1) Operational Emergency (2) Alert (3) Site Area Emergency (4) General Emergency 2. Personnel Safety and Health A. Occupational Injuries (1) Fatality/terminal injury (2) Inpatient hospitalization of > 3 personnel (3) Inpatient hospitalization > 5 days (4) > 3 personnel having Days Away, Restricted, or Transferred (DART) cases (5) Serious occupational injury B. Occupational Exposure (1) Fatality/terminal illness or inpatient

131

Criteria Review and Approach Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria Review and Approach Documents Criteria Review and Approach Documents Criteria Review and Approach Documents May 31, 2013 CRAD, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 Criticality Safety Controls Implementation with DOE activities and sites (HSS CRAD 45-18) May 6, 2013 CRAD, Review of Safety Basis Development - May 6, 2013 Review of Safety Basis Development for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Facility (HSS CRAD 45-59, Rev. 0) April 25, 2013 CRAD, Documented Safety Analysis Development - April 23, 2013 Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (LBL Facilities) (HSS CRAD 45-58, Rev. 0) February 1, 2013 CRAD, Review of Safety Basis Development - January 31, 2013 Review of Safety Basis Development for the Savannah River Site Salt Waste

132

Criteria Review and Approach Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight » Safety & Emergency Management Evaluations Oversight » Safety & Emergency Management Evaluations » Criteria Review and Approach Documents Criteria Review and Approach Documents June 10, 2009 CRAD, Performance Based Inspection - June 9, 2009 Performance Based Inspection of Worker Safety and Health Utilizing the ISM Core Functions: Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, (HSS CRAD 64-10, Rev. 2) June 1, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Steel, May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Steel (HSS CRAD 64-16, Rev. 0) June 1, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete (HSS CRAD 64-15, Rev. 0) February 11, 2009 CRAD, Federal Assurance Capability Plan - February 11, 2009

133

Essential Systems Functionality Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Essential Systems Functionality Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Essential Systems Functionality Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 16, 2008 (HSS CRAD 64-11 Rev. 2) Essential Systems Functionality Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 16, 2008 (HSS CRAD 64-11 Rev. 2) The Essential Systems Functionality (ESF) inspection will evaluate the effectiveness of programs and processes for engineering design and safety basis, construction and installation, configuration management, surveillance testing, maintenance, operations, cognizant system engineer (CSE) and safety system oversight (SSO), and feedback and improvement of selected safety systems. This review will evaluate the effectiveness in maintaining the functionality of these safety systems. The ESF review will be performed in the context of integrated safety management (ISM), although

134

Microsoft Word - Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Safety Noncompliance Reporting Criteria (as of January 1, 2012) Nuclear Safety Noncompliances Associated With Occurrences (DOE Order 232.2) Consult the DOE Order for the full text of each occurrence criterion 1 Reporting Criteria Group Subgroup Occurrence Category and Summary Description 2 1. Operational Emergencies 3 N/A (1) Operational Emergency (2) Alert (3) Site Area Emergency (4) General Emergency 2. Personnel Safety and Health C. Fires (1) Fire within primary confinement/containment (2d) Self-extinguishing fires D. Explosions (1) Unplanned explosion within primary confinement/containment 3. Nuclear Safety Basis A. Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) Violations (1) Violation of TSR/Operational Safety Requirement (OSR) Safety Limit (2) Violation of other TSR/OSR requirement

135

Methodology and criteria for siting energy plants in Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study contains a review of energy plant siting criteria, methodologies, guidelines and programs that are being considered today in this country. A preliminary screening approach for siting energy plants in Idaho is presented and a detailed hierarchical classification system for siting criteria has been developed. Methodology for using the criteria is suggested. Experience of a workshop trying to identify problems of implementing a ranking and rating for siting energy plants in the general situation for Idaho is reported. A brief analysis is presented on the needs for regulations and legislation to implement a future program of evaluation that would benefit utilities, the planning agencies, and the regulatory agencies operating within the state of Idaho.

Warnick, C.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development: Implementation handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document covers the second phase of a two-part program. Phase I provided an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. This report (Phase H) provides most of the draft documents that will be necessary for the implementation of a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. These include organizational documents such as articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules of procedure, as well as marketing and educational program documents. In Phase I, a 30-member criteria development committee was established to guide, review and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories. A similar committee was established for Phase II; the criteria implementation committee consisted of 29 members. Twenty-one of the Phase I committee members also served on the Phase II committee, which helped to provide program continuity during Phase II.

Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International, Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Rain sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Bi-criteria Pipeline Mappings for Parallel Image Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping workflow applications onto parallel platforms is a challenging problem, even for simple application patterns such as pipeline graphs. Several antagonistic criteria should be optimized, such as throughput and latency (or a combination). Typical applications include digital image processing, where images are processed in steady-state mode. In this paper, we study the mapping of a particular image processing application, the JPEG encoding. Mapping pipelined JPEG encoding onto parallel platforms is useful for instance for encoding Motion JPEG images. As the bi-criteria mapping problem is NP-complete, we concentrate on the evaluation and performance of polynomial heuristics.

Benoit, Anne; Rehn-Sonigo, Veronika; Robert, Yves

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. The overview is followed by a model program which could serve as the basis for a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. The model covers quality assurance procedures for the testing laboratory and manufacturer, third-party certification and labeling, and testing requirements (performance and reliability). A 30-member Criteria Development Committee was established to guide, review, and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories.

Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Derivation of the New Pressurized Thermal Shock Screening Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of a multi-year, multi-disciplinary effort on the part of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), its contractors, and the nuclear industry, a technical basis has been established to support a risk-informed revision to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) regulations originally promulgated in the mid-1980s. The revised regulations provide alternative (optional) reference-temperature (RT)-based screening criteria, which is codified in 10 CFR 50.61(a). How the revised screening criteria were determined from the results of the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses will be discussed in this paper.

Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Kirk, Mark [NRC; Chou, Hsuing-Wei [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Facility Representative Program: Criteria Review and Approach Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools Surveillance Guides Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Criteria Review and Approach Document This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person. Communications NASA Benchmarks Communications Assessment Plan Configuration Management Configuration Management Assessment Plan Confined Space Confined Spaces Assessment Plan Conduct of Operations Conduct of Operations Assessment Plan Electrical Assessment Electrical Safety Assessment Plan Facility Procedures Verification and Validation of Facility Procedures Assessment Plan Hoisting and Rigging

144

Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1994 National Acdaemy of Sciences study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium`` defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This paper proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options as well defining the ``Standards`` from the report. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials.

Rutherford, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Close, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tolk, K.M.; Mangan, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Selection of Sampling Pumps Used for Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variable frequency drive centrifugal submersible pump, Redi-Flo2a made by Grundfosa, was selected for universal application for Hanford Site groundwater monitoring. Specifications for the selected pump and five other pumps were evaluated against current and future Hanford groundwater monitoring performance requirements, and the Redi-Flo2 was selected as the most versatile and applicable for the range of monitoring conditions. The Redi-Flo2 pump distinguished itself from the other pumps considered because of its wide range in output flow rate and its comparatively moderate maintenance and low capital costs. The Redi-Flo2 pump is able to purge a well at a high flow rate and then supply water for sampling at a low flow rate. Groundwater sampling using a low-volume-purging technique (e.g., low flow, minimal purge, no purge, or micropurgea) is planned in the future, eliminating the need for the pump to supply a high-output flow rate. Under those conditions, the Well Wizard bladder pump, manufactured by QED Environmental Systems, Inc., may be the preferred pump because of the lower capital cost.

Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.; Smith, Ronald M.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Quality Reference Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peer-reviewed fats and oils related performance-based control samples for lab quality assurance and quality control. Quality Reference Samples Certified Reference Materials (CRM) aocs certified Certified Reference Materials chemists CRM fat fats lab labo

147

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information documented on the field data sheets? Yes 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? NA Sample chilling was not required....

148

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

149

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Old and New Rifle, Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ..........................................................6 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

150

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

151

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

152

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

153

Sampling community structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel method, based on concepts from expander graphs, to sample communities in networks. We show that our sampling method, unlike previous techniques, produces subgraphs representative of community structure in the original network. These ... Keywords: clustering, community detection, complex networks, graphs, sampling, social networks

Arun S. Maiya; Tanya Y. Berger-Wolf

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

SQA Site Assessments and Criteria Review and Approach Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SQA Site Assessments and Criteria Review and Approach Documents SQA Site Assessments and Criteria Review and Approach Documents DOE G 414.1-4, Safety Software Guide for use with 10 CFR 830, Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance, was issued June 17. 2005. This Guide, referred to as the DOE Safety Software Quality Assurance (SSQA) Guide, includes Appendix F, a Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) associated with the SSQA requirements in DOE O 414.1C. The criteria in the CRAD apply to all safety software regardless of the safety software definition or software type (acquired or custom). The Lines of Inquiry associated with the CRAD should be customized to fit the DOE approved graded approach and ASME NQA-1-2000 or a standard with an equivalent level of SQA requirements approved by DOE. Since the graded approach and standard(s) approved can vary from site-to-site, there is no single set of Lines of Inquiry that could be developed that would be applicable to all sites.

155

International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test Procedures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test Procedures International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test Procedures in Standards and Labeling Programs for Computer Monitors and Commercial Gas Stoves Title International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test Procedures in Standards and Labeling Programs for Computer Monitors and Commercial Gas Stoves Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6506E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Khanna, Nina, Nan Zhou, David Fridley, and John Romankiewicz Date Published 12/2013 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords Standards and labeling Abstract This report presents a technical review and comparative analysis of existing and/or proposed international mandatory energy performance standards, and voluntary and mandatory energy efficiency labels and test procedures for two products - computer monitors and commercial gas stoves - being considered for revised and new minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) in China. An overview of the scope of international programs, energy efficiency and other energy-related requirements, description and detailed summary table of criteria and procedures in major test standards are presented. In addition, an estimation of potential energy savings if China were to adopt revised MEPS comparable to international levels is provided for computer monitors. A proposed methodology for estimating potential energy savings based on the European Union experience is provided for commercial gas stoves in the absence of available sales or energy consumption data.

156

Comparing non-adequate test suites using coverage criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental question in software testing research is how to compare test suites, often as a means for comparing test-generation techniques. Researchers frequently compare test suites by measuring their coverage. A coverage criterion C provides a set ... Keywords: Coverage criteria, non-adequate test suites

Milos Gligoric, Alex Groce, Chaoqiang Zhang, Rohan Sharma, Mohammad Amin Alipour, Darko Marinov

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Multi-criteria warehouse location selection using Choquet integral  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The location of a warehouse is generally one of the most important and strategic decision in the optimization of logistic systems. Warehouse location is a long-term decision and is influenced by many quantitative and qualitative factors. Among the main ... Keywords: Choquet integral, Fuzzy, Fuzzy measure, Hierarchy, Multi-criteria, Warehouse location

Tufan Demirel; Nihan Çetin Demirel; Cengiz Kahraman

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A Study on Training Criteria for Financial Time Series Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Study on Training Criteria for Financial Time Series Forecasting JingTao YAO Dept of Information on goodness-of-fit which is also the most popular criterion forecasting. How ever, in the context of financial time series forecasting, we are not only concerned at how good the forecasts fit their target. In order

Yao, JingTao

159

Utilize Common Criteria Methodology for Secure Ubiquitous Healthcare Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RFID technology is widely used in healthcare environments to ensure patient safety. Therefore, the testing of RFID tags, such as performance tests and security evaluations, is necessary to ensure inter-operational functional compatibility with standards. ... Keywords: Common criteria, ISO/IEC 15408, RFID, Security assurance, Security evaluation

Yao-Chang Yu; Ting-Wei Hou

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Screening criteria help select formations for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain laboratory screening procedures can help determine the effectiveness of underbalanced drilling in a specific application. These screening criteria can help in analyzing the types of reservoirs which present good applications for underbalanced drilling technology. This paper discusses the types of information that should be obtained for any reservoir prior to designing the underbalanced drilling program for optimum performance.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Petroleum fuel facilities. design manual 22. Final design criteria  

SciTech Connect

Design criteria are presented for use by qualified engineers in designing liquid fueling and dispensing facilities. Included are basic requirements for the design of piping systems, pumps, heaters, and controls; the design of receiving, dispensing, and storage facilities; ballast treatment and sludge removal; corrosion and fire protection; and environmental requirements.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

RADIOLOGICAL CRITERIA FOR LICENSE TERMINATION OF URANIUM RECOVERY FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiological criteria for building surfaces and radionuclides other than radium in soil, for termination of uranium recovery licenses. SUMMARY: In a Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) on SECY-98-084, dated August 11, 1998 (Attachment 1), the Commission indicated that it did not object to the staff's recommendation to use the radium benchmark dose in developing a final rule applicable to uranium recovery licensees. The final rule addresses radiological criteria for decommissioning land and buildings required for license termination for uranium recovery facilities, e.g., uranium mills and in situ leach facilities (ISLs). The final rule will provide a clear and consistent regulatory basis for determining the extent to which lands and structures can be considered to be decommissioned. BACKGROUND: On August 22, 1994 (59 FR 43200), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a proposed rule for comment in the Federal Register, to amend 10 CFR Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Radiation, " to include radiological criteria for decommissioning as subpart E. The proposed rule applied to uranium mill facilities and other NRC licensees, but did not apply to mill tailings disposal or to soil radium cleanup at mills because the radiological criteria for these activities are regulated under 10 CFR Part 40, Appendix A. Some commenters recommended that the rule exempt conventional thorium and uranium mill facilities and ISLs. In SECY-97-046A, dated March 28, 1997, entitled "Final Rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination, " the staff recommended that the final rule indicate that for uranium and thorium mill facilities the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium from soil and buildings must result in a dose no greater than the dose resulting from the cleanup of radium-contaminated soil (benchmark

William D. Travers /s

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Statistical Methods and Tools for Hanford Staged Feed Tank Sampling  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to technically evaluate the current approach to staged feed sampling of high-level waste (HLW) sludge to meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for transfer from tank farms to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The current sampling and analysis approach is detailed in the document titled Initial Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria, 24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014, Revision 0 (Arakali et al. 2011). The goal of this current work is to evaluate and provide recommendations to support a defensible, technical and statistical basis for the staged feed sampling approach that meets WAC data quality objectives (DQOs).

Fountain, Matthew S.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Sampling diffusive transition paths  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Generic sequential sampling for metamodel approximations  

SciTech Connect

Metamodels approximate complex multivariate data sets from simulations and experiments. These data sets often are not based on an explicitly defined function. The resulting metamodel represents a complex system's behavior for subsequent analysis or optimization. Often an exhaustive data search to obtain the data for the metalnodel is impossible, so an intelligent sampling strategy is necessary. While inultiple approaches have been advocated, the majority of these approaches were developed in support of a particular class of metamodel, known as a Kriging. A more generic, cotninonsense approach to this problem allows sequential sampling techniques to be applied to other types of metamodeis. This research compares recent search techniques for Kriging inetamodels with a generic, inulti-criteria approach combined with a new type of B-spline metamodel. This B-spline metamodel is competitive with prior results obtained with a Kriging metamodel. Furthermore, the results of this research highlight several important features necessary for these techniques to be extended to more complex domains.

Turner, C. J. (Cameron J.); Campbell, M. I. (Matthew I.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

170

Beacon Project - Unpredictable Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... or undetected tampering), with the random number generator used for sampling can lead to erroneous estimates of the percentage of faulty parts. ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

171

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... result of neutrons with incident energies higher than ... between the sample position and the detector bank. ... 60 to 300 seconds per energy point and ...

172

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

field procedures? Yes List any Program Directives or other documents, SOPs, instructions. Work Order Letter dated May 1, 2013. Program Directive SHL 2013 01. 2. Were the sampling...

173

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This is achieved by placing a cadmium shield between the sample position and the detector bank. In order to place the ...

174

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sampling system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE AND CRITERIA Federal Technical Capability Panel and the Office of Human Resources and Administration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 September 1998 Federal Technical Capability Program Assessment Guidance and Criteria 1 September 15, 1998 INTRODUCTION The Federal Technical Capability Program provides for the recruitment, deployment, development and retention of federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Department' s missions and responsibilities. The Federal Technical Capability Panel (Panel) reports to the Deputy Secretary and oversees and resolves issues affecting the Federal Technical Capability Program. The Panel periodically assesses the effectiveness of the four functions of the

177

Perform multi-criteria impact analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Perform multi-criteria impact analysis Perform multi-criteria impact analysis Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

178

Congestion Study and Criteria for Designation of NIETC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference on Congestion Study and Designation of NIETC 3/29/06 REK -1 Conference on Congestion Study and Designation of NIETC 3/29/06 REK -1 Robert Kondziolka, P.E. Robert Kondziolka, P.E. Manager, Salt River Project Manager, Salt River Project March 29, 2006 March 29, 2006 Chicago, Illinois Chicago, Illinois How Do NIETC Add Value To How Do NIETC Add Value To Existing Planning & Existing Planning & Siting Siting Processes Processes Public Technical Conference Public Technical Conference DOE Congestion Study and Criteria for DOE Congestion Study and Criteria for Designation of National Interest Electric Designation of National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors Transmission Corridors DOE Technical Conference on Congestion Study and Designation of NIETC 3/29/06 REK -2 Northwest Transmission Assessment Committee Rocky Mountain

179

Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents CRADs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAINING Development of Criteria And Development of Criteria And Review Approach Documents CRADs Readiness Review Official DOE Team Leader Readiness Review Training TRAINING READINESS REVIEW TRAINING Implementation Plan * Prepared by RR Team Leader with assistance of the Team * Documents the process for the RR and rationale for that process * DOE RR should address adequacy of the Contractor RR * On-site visits and discussions often needed in preparation of IP Official DOE Team Leader Readiness Review Training needed in preparation of IP 2 TRAINING READINESS REVIEW TRAINING IP Approval * The IP is approved by the Team Leader * No other approval is required by DOE O425.1D Official DOE Team Leader Readiness Review Training

180

Criteria for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-1070-94 STD-1070-94 Reaffirmed June 2013 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION OF NUCLEAR FACILITY TRAINING PROGRAMS (Formerly Titled: Guidelines for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs) U.S. Department of Energy FSC Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS DOE HDBK-1070-94 Errata June 2013 Table of Changes Page/Section Change Cover Criteria for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs Page ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ Page iii Table of Contents Page iv This DOE Technical Standard is invoked as a requirement by DOE Order 426.2, Personnel Selection, Training, Qualifications and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Functional design criteria 241-AP-102 Flexible Receiver System  

SciTech Connect

A mixer pump was installed in the 1.07 m (42-in.) riser of the central pump pit of tank 241-AP-102 to mitigate potential fluid separation particle sedimentation by mixing the tank`s contents. The mixer pump performed this function until failure. Its removal is now necessary to meet possible tank content removal commitments or other corrective actions. The proposed removal procedure requires a flexible receiver that will provide a barrier to contamination during removal and transfer of the pump to the mixer pump storage container. This document describes the functional design criteria of the flexible receiver. These criteria include the functional and performance requirements of the flexible receiver as a barrier to contamination during normal conditions and contingencies and the instrumentation requirements.

Roblyer, S.P.

1995-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

Release criteria and pathway analysis for radiological remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific activity concentrations were derived for soils contaminated with mixed fission products (MFP), or uranium-processing residues, using the Department of Energy (DOE) pathway analysis computer code RESRAD at four different sites. The concentrations and other radiological parameters, such as limits on background-subtracted gamma exposure rate were used as the basis to arrive at release criteria for two of the sites. Valid statistical parameters, calculated for the distribution of radiological data obtained from site surveys, were then compared with the criteria to determine releasability or need for further decontamination. For the other two sites, RESRAD has been used as a preremediation planning tool to derive residual material guidelines for uranium. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Subbaraman, G.; Tuttle, R.J.; Oliver, B.M. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Devgun, J.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Radiological control criteria for materials considered for recycle and reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting technical analyses to support the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Guidance, Air, Water, and Radiation Division (DOE/EH-232) in developing radiological control criteria for recycling or reuse of metals or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The criteria, framed as acceptable concentrations for release of materials for recycling or reuse, are risk-based and were developed through analysis of generic radiation exposure scenarios and pathways. The analysis includes evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and non-health-related impacts of residual radioactivity on electronics and film. The analysis considers 42 key radionuclides that DOE operations are known to generate and that may be contained in recycled or reused metals or equipment. Preliminary results are compared with similar results reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency, by radionuclide grouping.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wallo, A. III [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

MEOR screening criteria fit 27% of U. S. oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Criteria developed by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (Niper) indicate that 27% of reservoirs in the major oil-producing states of the U.S. have potential for microbial-enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) processes. MEOR has been recognized as a potentially cost-effective method, particularly for recovering additional oil from stripper wells. Niper has conducted both laboratory research and field applications in microbial-enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) since 1983. One of the goals of this research is to maintain a data base of field projects using MEOR technology. The data base provides documentation of characteristics of reservoirs used for MEOR field projects and is used to revise published screening criteria for MEOR processes.

Bryant, R.S. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (US))

1991-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Flammable gas project: Criteria for flammable gas watch list tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flammable Gas Watch List is the listing of tanks that are subject to the provisions of Public Law 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation`` (Appendix A). Tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List are judged to have a serious potential for release of high-level waste due to the ignition of flammable gases released from the waste in the tank. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for identifying and categorizing the Hanford Site high4evel waste tanks to be included on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document also provides criteria on which to base a recommendation to remove tanks from the Flammable Gas Watch List.

Cash, R.J.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

186

Energetic Versus Sthenic Optimality Criteria for Gymnastic Movement Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic synthesis of human movements raises the question of the selection of a suitable performance criterion able to generate proper dynamic behaviors. Two quite different criteria are likely to be appropriate candidates: the minimum effort cost (or sthenic criterion) and the minimum energy cost. The paper is aimed at clarifying the dynamic effects of these two fundamental criteria when considering movements executed with liveliness as they are in gymnastic. It is well known that the former cost generates movements with smooth dynamics. A special attention is devoted to the latter. The optimal control theory shows that minimizing the energy consumption results in actuating inputs of bang-off-bang type producing momentum impulses. When achieving dynamic synthesis, this criterion makes necessary to account for bounds set on driving torques. Moreover, when dealing with one-sided contacts, as in floor handstands, the unilaterality of contact forces must be explicitly accounted for since it tends to be infringed ...

Leboeuf, Fabien; Seguin, Pascal; Lacouture, Patrick

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

SHERRELL, D.L.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

188

2003 CBECS Sample Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Information > Sample Design Technical Information > Sample Design How the Survey Was Conducted 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Sample Design Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted quadrennially by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey is based upon a sample of commercial buildings selected according to the sample design requirements described below. A “building,” as opposed to an “establishment,” is the basic unit of analysis for the CBECS because the building is the energy-consuming unit. The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey conducted since 1979

189

Biological sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

Murphy, Gloria A. (French Camp, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Sample push out fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

Biernat, John L.

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

191

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

192

Design criteria linear power rate-of-rise instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

Studies of reactor safety considerations have demonstrated the need for automatic safety circuit action based on the measured rate of power increase in the power level range from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10 {sup 0} times equilibrium power level. Budget and Preliminary Engineering Studies were performed. This document provides the design criteria for detailed design of the proposed Linear Power Rate-Of-Rise Instrumentation facilities and is applicable to any of the eight IPD reactors.

Herrman, B.W.

1964-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

was not identified at many groundwater locations. 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? Yes 19. Were water levels measured...

195

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

196

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS  

SciTech Connect

Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

197

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises a fluid sampling system which allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped up into a sampling jet of venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decrease, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodicially leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, E.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

202

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

203

Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1020-2012 December 2012 _________________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1020-2002 DOE STANDARD Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1020-2012 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1020-2012 i Foreword Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards

204

Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses.

Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

205

Good policy follows good science: using criteria and indicators for assessing sustainable biofuel production  

SciTech Connect

Developing scientific criteria and indicators should play a critical role in charting a sustainable path for the rapidly developing biofuel industry. The challenge ahead in developing such criteria and indicators is to address the limitations on data and modeling.

Hecht, Alan D [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Shaw, Denice [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Bruins, Randy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Chen, Alice [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Good Policy Follows Good Science Using Criteria and Indicators for Assessing Sustainable Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect

Developing scientific criteria and indicators should play a critical role in charting a sustainable path for the rapidly developing biofuel industry. The challenge ahead in developing such criteria and indicators is to address the limitations on data and modeling.

Hecht, Alan [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Shaw, Denice [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Bruins, Randy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Chen, Alice [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Design criteria document, electrical system, K-Basin essential systems recovery, Project W-405  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Design Criteria Document provides the criteria for design and construction of electrical system modifications for 100K Area that are essential to protect the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel in the K-Basin facilities.

Hoyle, J.R.

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

A D-S theory based AHP decision making approach with ambiguous evaluations of multiple criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an ambiguity aversion principle of minimax regret to extend DS/AHP approach of multi-criteria decision making (MCDM). This extension can analyze the MCDM problems with ambiguous evaluations of multiple criteria. Such evaluations cannot ...

Wenjun Ma; Wei Xiong; Xudong Luo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

Kerr, Kent

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

Concepts for Environmental Radioactive Air Sampling and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radioactive air sampling and monitoring is becoming increasingly important as regulatory agencies promulgate requirements for the measurement and quantification of radioactive contaminants. While researchers add to the growing body of knowledge in this area, events such as earthquakes and tsunamis demonstrate how nuclear systems can be compromised. The result is the need for adequate environmental monitoring to assure the public of their safety and to assist emergency workers in their response. Two forms of radioactive air monitoring include direct effluent measurements and environmental surveillance. This chapter presents basic concepts for direct effluent sampling and environmental surveillance of radioactive air emissions, including information on establishing the basis for sampling and/or monitoring, criteria for sampling media and sample analysis, reporting and compliance, and continual improvement.

Barnett, J. M.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Standard guide for design criteria for plutonium gloveboxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide defines criteria for the design of glovebox systems to be used for the handling of plutonium in any chemical or physical form or isotopic composition or when mixed with other elements or compounds. Not included in the criteria are systems auxiliary to the glovebox systems such as utilities, ventilation, alarm, and waste disposal. Also not addressed are hot cells or open-face hoods. The scope of this guide excludes specific license requirements relating to provisions for criticality prevention, hazards control, safeguards, packaging, and material handling. Observance of this guide does not relieve the user of the obligation to conform to all federal, state, and local regulations for design and construction of glovebox systems. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Performance criteria for center layer of triple glazing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance criteria for center layer of triple glazing Performance criteria for center layer of triple glazing Traditional highly insulating windows are made of three pieces of glass. Alternatively, the center layer can be a thin layer of coated plastic. (See Figure 1). In both cases, the center layer is sealed between two spacers, creating two completely separate spaces, and extending through the edge of the insulating glass unit. Recent research has shown that a simple "convection" barrier, as shown in Figure 2, which does not extend through the edge of the insulating glass unit, is as effective an insulator as traditional designs. Advantages include a simpler and more reliable edge design and potentially reduced manufacturing costs. We have investigated various plastics and edge constraint designs and are now focused on the use of an acrylic layer, between 1mm and 3mm thick. Bent edges will help keep the layer in place (see Figure 3a,b,c). In order to commercialize such a product, several issues remain to be addressed. These issues, as they relate to acrylic, are defined below. Other plastics and designs can still be explored.

214

Packaging design criteria modified fuel spacer burial box. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various Hanford facilities must transfer large radioactively contaminated items to burial/storage. Presently, there are eighteen Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (FSBBs) available on the Hanford Site for transport of such items. Previously, the FSBBS were transported from a rail car to the burial trench via a drag-off operation. To allow for the lifting of the boxes into the burial trench, it will be necessary to improve the packagings lifting attachments and provide structural reinforcement. Additional safety improvements to the packaging system will be provided by the addition of a positive closure system and package ventilation. FSBBs that are modified in such a manner are referred to as Modified Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (MFSBs). The criteria provided by this PDC will be used to demonstrate that the transfer of the MFSB will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by a package meeting offsite transportation requirements. This fulfills the onsite transportation safety requirements implemented in WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. A Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) will be prepared to evaluate the safety of the transfer operation. Approval of the SARP is required to authorize transfer. Criteria are also established to ensure burial requirements are met.

Stevens, P.F.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Evaluation criteria for blog design and analysis of causal relationships using factor analysis and DEMATEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to find the key factors influencing blog design, and explore the causal relationships between the criteria for each factor. Since design is a multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) problem, this study adopts a model which ... Keywords: Blog design, DEMATEL, Factor analysis, Multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM)

Chun-Cheng Hsu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module.

Weidert, R.S.

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

Tait, G.W.C.

1959-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

ITOUGH2 sample problems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a collection of ITOUGH2 sample problems. It complements the ITOUGH2 User`s Guide [Finsterle, 1997a], and the ITOUGH2 Command Reference [Finsterle, 1997b]. ITOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media [Preuss, 1987, 1991a]. The report ITOUGH2 User`s Guide [Finsterle, 1997a] describes the inverse modeling framework and provides the theoretical background. The report ITOUGH2 Command Reference [Finsterle, 1997b] contains the syntax of all ITOUGH2 commands. This report describes a variety of sample problems solved by ITOUGH2. Table 1.1 contains a short description of the seven sample problems discussed in this report. The TOUGH2 equation-of-state (EOS) module that needs to be linked to ITOUGH2 is also indicated. Each sample problem focuses on a few selected issues shown in Table 1.2. ITOUGH2 input features and the usage of program options are described. Furthermore, interpretations of selected inverse modeling results are given. Problem 1 is a multipart tutorial, describing basic ITOUGH2 input files for the main ITOUGH2 application modes; no interpretation of results is given. Problem 2 focuses on non-uniqueness, residual analysis, and correlation structure. Problem 3 illustrates a variety of parameter and observation types, and describes parameter selection strategies. Problem 4 compares the performance of minimization algorithms and discusses model identification. Problem 5 explains how to set up a combined inversion of steady-state and transient data. Problem 6 provides a detailed residual and error analysis. Finally, Problem 7 illustrates how the estimation of model-related parameters may help compensate for errors in that model.

Finsterle, S.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Criteria for Packaging and Storing Uranium-233-Bearing Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3028-2000 3028-2000 July 2000 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR PACKAGING AND STORING URANIUM-233-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3028-2000 iii ABSTRACT This Standard provides guidance for the packaging and long-term (50 years) storage of stabilized, separated uranium-233(

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE Standard Natural Phenomena Hazards Site Characterization Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-94 2-94 March 1994 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS SITE CHARACTERIZATION CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4376, Fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. DOE-STD-1022-94 ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1022-94 REVISED FOREWORD ADDED REFERENCE TO DOE G 420.1-2

222

International Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Energy Comparison of Energy Efficiency Criteria and Test Procedures in Standards and Labeling Programs for Computer Monitors and Commercial Gas Stoves Nina Khanna, Nan Zhou, David Fridley and John Romankiewicz China Energy Group Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory March 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation and Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6506E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any

223

Discreteness of spectrum and positivity criteria for Schrödinger operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a class of necessary and sufficient conditions for the discreteness of spectrum of Schr\\"odinger operators with scalar potentials which are semibounded below. The classical discreteness of spectrum criterion by A.M.Molchanov (1953) uses a notion of negligible set in a cube as a set whose Wiener's capacity is less than a small constant times the capacity of the cube. We prove that this constant can be taken arbitrarily between 0 and 1. This solves a problem formulated by I.M.Gelfand in 1953. Moreover, we extend the notion of negligibility by allowing the constant to depend on the size of the cube. We give a complete description of all negligibility conditions of this kind. The a priori equivalence of our conditions involving different negligibility classes is a non-trivial property of the capacity. We also establish similar strict positivity criteria for the Schr\\"odinger operators with non-negative potentials.

Vladimir Maz'ya; Mikhail Shubin

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Design criteria Drain Rerouting Project 93-OR-EW-2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A--E) in the performance of Title I and II design for the Drain Rerouting Project. The Drain Rerouting project at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee will provide the Y-12 Plant with the capability to reroute particular drains within buildings 9202, 9203 and 9995. Process drains that are presently connected to the storm sewer shall be routed to the sanitary sewer to ensure that any objectionable material inadvertently discharged into process drains will not discharge to East Fork Popular Creek (EFPC) without treatment. The project will also facilitate compliance with the Y-12 Plant`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge permit and allow for future pretreatment of once-through coolant.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

B-spline nonparametric regression models and information criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We consider the use of B-spline nonparametric regression models to analyze data with complex structure. The essential points of model construction in B-splines are the choice of the smoothing parameter and the number of basis functions. We investigate this problem from an information theoretic point of view and introduce a criterion as an estimator of Kullback-Leibler information. We also introduce B-spline nonlinear regression model with discontinuities or with heterogeneous error variances, and apply it to estimate the change points. Real data examples and numerical comparisons are used to examine the properties of the proposed method. Key words and phrases: Nonparametric regression, B-spline, Smoothing parameter, Information criteria, Change point.

Seiya Imoto; Sadanori Konishi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Multi-criteria decision analysis: Limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties  

SciTech Connect

The 2002 Winter Olympics women's figure skating competition is used as a case study to illustrate some of the limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). The paper compares several widely used models for synthesizing the multiple attributes into a single aggregate value. The various MCDA models can provide conflicting rankings of the alternatives for a common set of information even under states of certainty. Analysts involved in MCDA need to deal with the following challenging tasks: (1) selecting an appropriate analysis method, and (2) properly interpreting the results. An additional trap is the availability of software tools that implement specific MCDA models that can beguile the user with quantitative scores. These conclusions are independent of the decision domain and they should help foster better MCDA practices in many fields including systems engineering trade studies.

Kujawski, Edouard

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methods and criteria for safety analysis (FIN L2535)  

SciTech Connect

In response to the NRC request for a proposal dated October 20, 1992, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) submit this proposal to provide contractural assistance for FIN L2535, Methods and Criteria for Safety Analysis,'' as specified in the Statement of Work attached to the request for proposal. The Statement of Work involves development of safety analysis guidance for NRC licensees, arranging a workshop on this guidance, and revising NRC Regulatory Guide 3.52. This response to the request for proposal offers for consideration the following advantages of WSRC in performing this work: Experience, Qualification of Personnel and Resource Commitment, Technical and Organizational Approach, Mobilization Plan, Key Personnel and Resumes. In addition, attached are the following items required by the NRC: Schedule II, Savannah River Site - Job Cost Estimate, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 1, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 2, Project Description.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Methods and criteria for safety analysis (FIN L2535)  

SciTech Connect

In response to the NRC request for a proposal dated October 20, 1992, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) submit this proposal to provide contractural assistance for FIN L2535, ``Methods and Criteria for Safety Analysis,`` as specified in the Statement of Work attached to the request for proposal. The Statement of Work involves development of safety analysis guidance for NRC licensees, arranging a workshop on this guidance, and revising NRC Regulatory Guide 3.52. This response to the request for proposal offers for consideration the following advantages of WSRC in performing this work: Experience, Qualification of Personnel and Resource Commitment, Technical and Organizational Approach, Mobilization Plan, Key Personnel and Resumes. In addition, attached are the following items required by the NRC: Schedule II, Savannah River Site - Job Cost Estimate, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 1, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 2, Project Description.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOE-STD-1066-99; Fire Protection Design Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-99 6-99 July 1999 Superseding DOE-STD-1066-97 DOE STANDARD FIRE PROTECTION DESIGN CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FIRP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1066-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard is approved for use by all DOE elements and their contractors. DOE Standards are part of the DOE Directives System and are issued to provide supplemental

230

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

231

NID Copper Sample Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

NID Copper Sample Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fluid sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

Yeamans, David R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

235

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

236

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

237

Sample holder with optical features  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Energy storage criteria handbook. Final report mar 81-jun 82  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this handbook is to provide information and criteria necessary for the selection and sizing of energy storage technologies for use at U.S. Naval facilities. The handbook gives Naval base personnel procedures and information to select the most viable energy storage options to provide the space conditioning (heating and cooling) and domestic hot water needs of their facility. The handbook may also be used by contractors, installers, designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the energy storage business. The handbook is organized into three major sections: a general section, a technical section, and an example section. While a technical background is assumed for the latter two sections, the general section is simply written and can serve as an introduction to the field of energy storage. The technical section examines the following energy storage technologies: sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, cold storage, thermochemical storage, mechanical storage, pumped hydro storage, and electrochemical storage. The example section is limited to thermal storage and includes examples for: water tank storage, rockbed storage, latent heat storage, and cold water storage.

Hull, J.R.; Cole, R.L.; Hull, A.B.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Labs21 environmental performance criteria Version 2.0  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. The Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC) is a rating system for use by laboratory building project stakeholders to assess the environmental performance of laboratory facilities. Currently, the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED{trademark} Rating System is the primary tool used. However, LEED{trademark} was designed for U.S. commercial office buildings and as such, lacks some attributes essential to the sustainable design of this unique and complex building type. To facilitate widespread use and to avoid ''re-inventing the wheel'' this effort builds on the existing LEED{trademark} Rating System 2.0.

Mathew, Paul A.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Performance objectives and criteria for conducting DOE environmental audits  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the Performance Objectives and Criteria (POC) that have been developed for environmental audits and assessments conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The Environmental POC can serve multiple purposes. Primarily, they are to serve as guidelines for the technical specialists conducted the audits and assessments, and for the team management. The POC can also serve as supporting documents for training of technical discipline specialists and Team Leaders and as bases for DOE programs and field offices and contractors conducting audit or assessment activities or improving environmental protection programs. It must be recognized that not all of the POC will necessarily apply to all DOE facilities. The users of this document must rely upon their knowledge of the facility and their professional judgment, or the judgment of qualified environmental professionals to determine the applicability of each POC. The POC cover eleven technical disciplines: air; surface water and drinking water quality; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; radiation; quality assurance; inactive waste sites and releases; ecological and cultural resources; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); and environmental management systems.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning of existing buildings, or “retrocommissioning” is a systematic process to identify operational and maintenance (O&M) improvements that optimize building performance and ensure that building systems function together efficiently and effectively (Haasl, Sharp 1999). This paper presents a case study of a utility-funded retrocommissioning evaluation on a 125,000 SF office facility in La Mesa, California. The commissioning process consisted of site visits, interviews with facility staff, data collection and analysis, recommendation of energy conservation measures, and verification of savings. The study identified 13 deficiencies and recommended a suite of three O&M measures, one capital improvement measure and five other measures. The measures selected and implemented by the owner resulted in annual projected savings of 238,000 kWh (9.9%) and utility cost savings of $20,000 (6.9%)1, with a simple payback of 0.7 years. The project also demonstrated the value of applying rigorous building selection criteria to obtain cost-effective results. This paper profiles the project and discusses lesson learned.

Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Evaluation of the Science in Support of Human Health Ambient Water Criteria Values for Boron Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the available human health water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds and critically reviewed the science that results in different water quality criteria recommended by different regulatory bodies. Currently, water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds are recommended by several regulatory bodies, including EPA, the World Health Organization, Health Canada, the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, California Department of Public Health, ...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Baldrige 20/20: An Executive?s Guide to the Criteria for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the Baldrige Award between 1988 and 2010 have proven that applying the Baldrige Criteria to the way they run their businesses has led to better ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technology I, II, and III: Criteria for Understanding and Improving the Practice of Instructional Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In an earlier era of instructional technology, researchers proposed a set of criteria to help practitioners understand what assumptions about their work could help them… (more)

McDonald, Jason K 1975-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sampling streaming data with replacement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple random sampling is a widely accepted basis for estimation from a population. When data come as a stream, the total population size continuously grows and only one pass through the data is possible. Reservoir sampling is a method of maintaining ... Keywords: Data stream mining, Random sampling with replacement, Reservoir sampling

Byung-Hoon Park; George Ostrouchov; Nagiza F. Samatova

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

247

Environmental radiation dose criteria and assessment: pathway modeling and surveillance  

SciTech Connect

From nuclear science symposium; San Francisco, California, USA (14 Nov 1973). The controversy in recent years over the extent of the risk to the public from environmental radioactivity attributable to nuclear facilities (in particular nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing facilities) has resulted in a lowering of previously acceptable environmental radiation levels. The proposal by the AEC to limit effluents from light-water-cooled nuclear reactors so that the exposure of any individual in the public would not exceed 5 mR/yr, and the pronouncement by the BEIR Committee that the current environmental radiation protection guides are unnecessarily high, are illustrative. In turn the AEC has issued a Safety Guide calling for considerable refinement in the measuring and reporting of effluents from nuclear power plants, and has only recently issued a counterpart dealing with the measuring and reporting of radioactivity in the environs of nuclear power plants. The EPA has also recently issued a guide for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity. Currently, power reactor operators are being required by the AEC Regulatory Staff to conduct detailed, sensitive environmental surveillance. Much of this appears to be based on extremely conservative assumptions throughout, including doseeffect relationships, exposure situations, pathway models, reconcentration factors and intakes, which cannot be substantiated when examined in the light of current experience in the vicinity of existing power reactors. The expenditures occasioned by the required additional in-plant features necessary to meet the currently proposed effluent release criteria appear difficult to justify on a reasonable basis. Environmental monitoring at the proposed concentration limits appear even more excessive in terms of dollars per man-rem of potential dose commitment. (auth)

Hull, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Asotin Creek ISCO Water Sample Data Summary: Water Year 2002, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pomeroy Ranger District operates 3 automated water samplers (ISCOs) in the Asotin Creek drainage in cooperation with the Asotin Model Watershed. The samplers are located on Asotin Creek: Asotin Creek at the mouth, Asotin Creek at Koch site, and South Fork Asotin Creek above the forks. At the end of Water Year (WY) 2001 we decided to sample from Oct. 1 through June 30 of each water year. This decision was based on the difficulty of obtaining good low flow samples, since the shallow depth of water often meant that instrument intakes were on the bed of the river and samples were contaminated with bed sediments. The greatest portion of suspended sediment is transported during the higher flows of fall and especially during the spring snow runoff period, and sampling the shorter season should allow characterization of the sediment load of the river. The ISCO water samplers collected a daily composite sample of 4 samples per day into one bottle at 6-hour intervals until late March when they were reprogrammed to collect 3 samples per day at 8-hour intervals. This was done to reduce battery use since battery failure had become an ongoing problem. The water is picked up on 24-day cycles and brought to the Forest Service Water Lab in Pendleton, OR. The samples are analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS), conductivity, and turbidity. A total dissolved solids value is estimated based on conductivity. The USGS gage, Asotin Creek at the mouth, No.13335050 has been discontinued and there are no discharge records available for this period.

Peterson, Stacia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sampling Distribution of the Time between Effectively Independent Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sampling distribution of the estimate of the “time between effectively independent samples,” T0, is investigated using Monte-Carlo techniques. It is found to be asymptotically unbiased and normally distributed. Agreement between empirical ...

Daniel Wilks

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Performance testing of aged hydrogen getters against criteria for interim safe storage of plutonium bearing materials.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen getters were tested for use in storage of plutonium-bearing materials in accordance with DOE's Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Bearing Materials. The hydrogen getter HITOP was aged for 3 months at 70 C and tested under both recombination and hydrogenation conditions at 20 and 70 C; partially saturated and irradiated aged getter samples were also tested. The recombination reaction was found to be very fast and well above the required rate of 45 std. cc H2h. The gettering reaction, which is planned as the backup reaction in this deployment, is slower and may not meet the requirements alone. Pressure drop measurements and {sup 1}H NMR analyses support these conclusions. Although the experimental conditions do not exactly replicate the deployment conditions, the results of our conservative experiments are clear: the aged getter shows sufficient reactivity to maintain hydrogen concentrations below the flammability limit, between the minimum and maximum deployment temperatures, for three months. The flammability risk is further reduced by the removal of oxygen through the recombination reaction. Neither radiation exposure nor thermal aging sufficiently degrades the getter to be a concern. Future testing to evaluate performance for longer aging periods is in progress.

Shepodd, Timothy J.; Nissen, April; Buffleben, George M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Multi actor multi criteria analysis (MAMCA) as a tool to support sustainable decisions: State of use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution, the multi actor multi criteria analysis (MAMCA) to evaluate transport projects is presented. This evaluation methodology specifically focuses on the inclusion of the different actors that are involved in a project, the so-called ... Keywords: Multi actor multi criteria analysis, Stakeholders, Transport project appraisal

Cathy Macharis; Laurence Turcksin; Kenneth Lebeau

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Topical Report on Reactivity Initiated Accident: Bases for RIA Fuel and Core Coolability Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revised acceptance criteria have been developed for the response of light water reactor (LWR) fuel under reactivity initiated accidents (RIA). Development of these revisions is part of an industry effort to extend burnup levels beyond currently licensed limits. The revised criteria are proposed for use in licensing burnup extensions or new fuel designs.

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

254

Multi-Criteria Spatial Decision Support System DECERNS: Application to Land Use Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use planning and environmental management often requires an implementation of both geoyspatial information analysis and value-driven criteria within the decision-making process. DECERNS Decision Evaluation in Complex Risk Network Systems is a web-based ... Keywords: DECERNS, GIS, Housing Development, Land-Use Planning, MCDA, Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Spatial Decision Support System, WebSDSS

B. Yatsalo; V. Didenko; A. Tkachuk; G. Gritsyuk; O. Mirzeabasov; V. Slipenkaya; A. Babutski; I. Pichugina; T. Sullivan; I. Linkov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Sensitivity of multi-criteria decision making to linguistic quantifiers and aggregation means  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments in Multi-Criteria (MCDM) and Multi-Expert decision-making allow for using linguistic quantifiers such as 'all', 'most', 'at least half' and similar terms as quantifiers for the decision. Additionally, new methods of aggregating the various ... Keywords: Multi-criteria decision making, Order weighted average method

David Ben-Arieh

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sensitivity of multi-criteria decision making to linguistic quantifiers and aggregation means  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments in Multi-Criteria (MCDM) and Multi-Expert decision-making allow for using linguistic quantifiers such as 'all', 'most', 'at least half' and similar terms as quantifiers for the decision. Additionally, new methods of aggregating the various ... Keywords: multi-criteria decision making, order weighted average method

David Ben-Arieh

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Multi Criteria Analysis for bioenergy systems assessments Thomas Buchholz a,, Ewald Rametsteiner b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a subsequent ratio scale estimation for each criteria usually using a nine-point scale (for a verbal, a bioelectricity system, such as a small-scale wood gasification system providing electricity through a mini grid to the gasification technology and its financial, social, and environmental implications, (iii) identify criteria

Vermont, University of

258

New autoregressive (AR) order selection criteria based on the prediction error estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most important problem in data modeling using the AR model is the order selection. Some AR order selection criteria estimate the prediction error and choose the order that minimizes this estimated prediction error. All of these criteria use the same ... Keywords: Autoregressive model order selection, Least-Squares-Forward method, Prediction error

S. Khorshidi; M. Karimi; A. R. Nematollahi

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Site characterization and hazard assessment criteria for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly summarizes requirements for site characterization and hazard assessment of Natural Phenomena Hazards for compliance with DOE Order 5480.28. The site characterization criteria for NPH evaluation are provided in a draft DOE-STD-1022-XX and the assessment criteria of natural phenomena hazards are provided in draft DOE-STD-1023-XX.

Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Multi-Criteria Scheduling of Pipeline Workflows (and Application To the JPEG Encoder)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mapping workflow applications onto parallel platforms is a challenging problem, even for simple application patterns such as pipeline graphs. Several antagonist criteria should be optimized, such as throughput and latency (or a combination). A typical ... Keywords: JPEG encode pipeline, algorithmic skeletons, complexity results, heterogeneous platforms, heuristics, multi-criteria optimization, pipeline

Anne Benoit; Harald Kosch; Veronika Rehn-Sonigo; Yves Robert

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CRAD, Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities CRAD, Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities Performance Objective: The purpose and scope of this CRAD is to provide a set of consistent assessment criteria and guidelines for the assessment of safety system software and firmware that performs an SC or SS function, as described in the Background section. The scope of the assessment, henceforth, is called "I&C software." Criteria: Existing software attributes such as complexity and importance to safety should be considered when determining the rigor and adequacy of the software QA. Additional guidance is provided in the tailoring sections of

262

U.S. Department of Energy Implements Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Water Heaters U.S. Department of Energy Implements Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Water Heaters April 1, 2008 - 2:48pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced new ENERGY STAR® criteria for water heaters, the first in the history of the program. According to DOE projections, by the end of the fifth year in effect, the new water heater criteria are expected to save Americans approximately $780 million in utility costs, avoid 4.2 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions, and achieve cumulative energy savings of more than 3.9 billion kilowatt-hours and 270 million therms of natural gas. Water heating currently represents up to 17 percent of national residential energy consumption, making it the third largest energy user in homes,

263

Natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria for DOE sites: DOE Standard DOE-STD-1023-95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes hazard assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95) for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. The DOE has established policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE sites and facilities using a graded approach by DOE Order 5480.28. The graded approach is implemented by five performance categories established for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) at DOE facilities based on criteria provided by DOE-STD-1021-93. In applying the design/evaluation criteria of DOE-STD-1020-94 for DOE facilities subjected to one of the natural phenomena hazards, the establishment of design basis load levels consistent with the corresponding performance category is required. This standard provides general criteria as well as specific criteria for natural phenomena hazard assessments to ensure that adequate design basis load levels are established for design and/or evaluation of DOE facilities.

Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Boissonnade, A.C. [and others

1995-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sampling Characteristics of Satellite Orbits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The irregular space-time sampling of any finite region by an orbiting satellite raises difficult questions as to which frequencies and wavenumbers can be determined and which will alias into others. Conventional sampling theorems must be extended ...

Carl Wunsch

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sampling Errors in Seasonal Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limited numbers of start dates and ensemble sizes in seasonal forecasts lead to sampling errors in predictions. Defining the magnitude of these sampling errors would be useful for end users as well as informing decisions on resource ...

Stephen Cusack; Alberto Arribas

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Sampling – Soil - Energy Innovation Portal  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as asbestos.

268

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

269

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

270

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

271

Demonstrating Reliable High Level Waste Slurry Sampling Techniques to Support Hanford Waste Processing - 14194  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HL W) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOC must demonstrate the ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP Waste Acceptance Criteria and Data Quality Objectives. The sampling method employed must support both TOC and WTP requirements. To facilitate information transfer between the two facilities the mixing and sampling demonstrations are led by the One System Integrated Project Team. The One System team, Waste Feed Delivery Mixing and Sampling Program, has developed a full scale sampling loop to demonstrate sampler capability. This paper discusses the full scale sampling loops ability to meet precision and accuracy requirements, including lessons learned during testing. Results of the testing showed that the Isolok(R) sampler chosen for implementation provides precise, repeatable results. The Isolok(R) sampler accuracy as tested did not meet test success criteria. Review of test data and the test platform following testing by a sampling expert identified several issues regarding the sampler used to provide reference material used to judge the Isolok?'s accuracy. Recommendations were made to obtain new data to evaluate the sampler's accuracy utilizing a reference sampler that follows good sampling protocol.

Kelly, Steven E.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

TRU waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to delineate the criteria by which unclassified waste will be accepted for emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and describe the bases upon which these criteria were established. These criteria are not intended to be specifications but rather limits that will allow waste generating and shipping sites to develop their own procedures and specifications for preparation of TRU waste for shipment to the WIPP. These criteria will also allow waste generating sites to plan future facilities for waste preparation that will produce TRU waste forms compatible with WIPP waste emplacement and isolation requirements. These criteria only apply to contract-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste forms and are not intended to apply to beta-gamma wastes, spent fuel, high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), low specific activity (LSA) waste, or forms of radioactive waste for experimental purposes. Specifications for receipt of experimental waste forms will be prepared by the responsible projects in conjunction with the staff of the WIPP project at a later date. In addition, these criteria only apply to waste emplaced in bedded rock salt. Technical bases for these criteria may differ significantly from those for other host rocks. 25 refs. 4 figs., 1 tab.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Waste management project's alternatives: A risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the RBMCA the evaluation criteria are based on the quantitative risk analysis of the project's alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preference to the multi-criteria against the one-criterion evaluation process is discussed. - Abstract: This paper examines the evaluation of a waste management project's alternatives through a quantitative risk analysis. Cost benefit analysis is a widely used method, in which the investments are mainly assessed through the calculation of their evaluation indicators, namely benefit/cost (B/C) ratios, as well as the quantification of their financial, technical, environmental and social risks. Herein, a novel approach in the form of risk-based multi-criteria assessment (RBMCA) is introduced, which can be used by decision makers, in order to select the optimum alternative of a waste management project. Specifically, decision makers use multiple criteria, which are based on the cumulative probability distribution functions of the alternatives' B/C ratios. The RBMCA system is used for the evaluation of a waste incineration project's alternatives, where the correlation between the criteria weight values and the decision makers' risk preferences is analyzed and useful conclusions are discussed.

Karmperis, Athanasios C., E-mail: athkarmp@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Sotirchos, Anastasios, E-mail: anasot@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Aravossis, Konstantinos, E-mail: arvis@mail.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece); Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P., E-mail: itat@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sector of Industrial Management and Operational Research, Athens (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Developing Alternative Low Level Waste Disposal Criteria Per 10 CFR 61.58  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC identified, as a priority, expanding the guidance available for the development of alternative disposal criteria pursuant to Paragraph 61.58 of Part 61 of Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations. This report constitutes the first part of a two-year project to examine the feasibility of alternative criteria and provide a model evaluation demonstrating the formulation of such criteria. The report also examines the radionuclides listed in 10 CFR 61.55 with respect to their properties and indi...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Using the Malcolm Baldridge criteria: a viable tool for assessing organizational change  

SciTech Connect

How does understanding and using the Malcolm Baldrige criteria impact library organizational change? In September 1997, the Los Alarnos National Laboratory Research Library used the criteria to apply for a Quality New Mexico Award (QNMA). This paper will provide a fimdamental background on the Malcolm Baldrige criteria and outline the Library project to apply for the award. The Research Library learned from the project and feedback and has started implementing steps to increase its effectiveness providing viable products and services to its customers. This has been a step forward to strengthen our competitive edge to assure our fiture prosperity within the Laboratory.

Stack, J.M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Selection of Model in Developing Information Security Criteria for Smart Grid Security System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, the "Smart Grid" has emerged as one of the best advanced energy supply chains. This paper looks into the security system of smart grid via the smart planet system. The scope focused on information security criteria that impact on consumer trust and satisfaction. The importance of information security criteria is perceived as the main aspect to impact on customer trust throughout the entire smart grid system. On one hand, this paper also focuses on the selection of the model for developing information security criteria on a smart grid.

Ling, Amy Poh Ai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Sample page | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sample page Sample page Jump to: navigation, search This page has been rated 13[1][2] on the scale of awesomness. This page is awesome! The above text is generated by the SampleTemplate. Try editing it and changing the level of awesomeness to see the template react. Hint: It says something different depending on whether or not the page is at least 5 awesome. This page is related to the following topics[3][4]: References Sample pages Help pages Additional Info Name Sample page Awesomeness 13 Topics (raw) References; Sample pages; Help pages; References ↑ Francis C. Monastero. 2002. An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California. GRC Bulletin. . ↑ EPRI. 12/12/2012. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine

278

Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples  

SciTech Connect

We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sample  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deficits by gouging California energy consumers, must ... to state of the art information technology. ... Industry and organization specific knowledge is ...

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sample State and Local Ballots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sample State and Local Ballots. ... We thank the election officials who have contributed to this effort. State, County/Municipality, Ballot, Election, Date, ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

IWTU Process Sample Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI) requested that Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) analyze various samples collected during June – August 2012 at the Integrated Waste Treatment Facility (IWTU). Samples of IWTU process materials were collected from various locations in the process. None of these samples were radioactive. These samples were collected and analyzed to provide more understanding of the compositions of various materials in the process during the time of the process shutdown that occurred on June 16, 2012, while the IWTU was in the process of nonradioactive startup.

Nick Soelberg

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory.

Provin, Tony

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

HAP sampling at Tidd PFBC  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to sample process streams of the Tidd PFBC plant and to characterize the HAPs associated with those various process streams. The data are comparable to HAP data collected by DOE and EPRI studies at conventional coal-fired utility plants. Twelve sampling locations throughout Tidd PFBC plant were selected to characterize the HAPs in the plant cycle. Sampling was conducted at the input and output of the combustor, before and after the hot gas clean-up (HGCU) and before and after the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Seven solid process streams were sampled including coal and sorbent to the PFBC unit and ash from the PFBC bed and ash collection devices. Service water which is mixed with the coal to make coal paste was the only liquid process stream sampled. The four gas stream samples collected were the inlets and outlets of the HGCU and ESP. Lists are presented for field sampling requirements for gas streams; coal sorbent, and service water; and ash samples. Lists of elements and compounds (inorganic, organic, and radioactive) are also included. The samples have been collected and are being analyzed.

Mudd, M.J.; Dal Porto, P.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Analysis Of The Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 6F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.; Shine, G.

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Analysis of the Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm- 243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite Sample 2, and highest concentrations for Composite Sample 3. The Hg and Mo results suggest possible measurement outliers. However, the magnitudes of the differences between the Hg 95% upper confidence limit (UCL95) results with and without the outlier and the magnitudes of the differences between the Mo UCL95 results with and without the outlier do not appear to have practical significance. It is recommended to remove the potential measurement outliers. Doing so is conservative in the sense of producing a higher UCL95 for Hg and Mo than if the potential outliers were included in the calculations. In contrast to the inorganic results, most of the radionuclides did not demonstrate heterogeneity among the three Tank 6F composite sample characterization results.

Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

U.S. Department of Energy Implements More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Stringent Criteria for More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washers, Expands CFL Program U.S. Department of Energy Implements More Stringent Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washers, Expands CFL Program March 7, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced more stringent criteria for clothes washers and expanded the categories of compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFL) under the ENERGY STAR® label. Based on first-year projected sales data, approximately 1.9 million ENERGY STAR®-qualified clothes washers will be sold, saving American families up to $92.4 million annually on their water and utility bills. CFL products under the ENERGY STAR® label - which include new categories for CFLs that contain less mercury, new candelabra products, and more rigorous testing

288

Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act Advisory Exemptions How to Submit a FOIA Request Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Electronic Reading Room ISC Conventional Reading Rooms Reference Links Privacy Act Categorical Exclusion Determinations Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne Purucker U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Larry Kelly U.S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 P: (865) 576-0885 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The FOIA generally requires that requesters pay fees for processing their requests. In accordance with 5 U.S.C 552(a)(4)(A)(iv), an agency is

289

Feedback and Continuous Improvement Inspection Criteria and Approach - DOE Field Element, December 4, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject: Feedback and HS: HSS CRAD 45-21 U.S. Department of Continuous Improvement Rev: 1 Energy Inspection Criteria and Approach Eff. Date: December 4, 2012 - DOE Field Element Office of Safety and ~ Acting Di lector, Oftrce of Safety Emergency Management Evaluations and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: \ ~~ Ll\ \ &.... ~ Page 1 of 15 Criteria Review and Criteria Lead, Feedback and Approach Document Continuous Improvement Inspection Criteria and Approach - DOE Field Element Date: \:}.. \~ \1 a- 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations' mission is to assess the effectiveness of those environment, safety, and health systems and practices used by field organizations in implementing Integrated Safety

290

Some Criteria of Decidability for Axiomatic Systems in Three-Valued Logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two criteria of decidability for axiomatic systems based on J.Lukasiewicz's three-valued logic are established. Keywords: Luk-consistent theory, Luk-decidable theory, Luk-theory, Lukcomplete theory, three-valued predicate

I. D. Zaslavsky

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Larger Teaching and Learning Development Projects Proposal Criteria (3 pages maximum)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This can, for example, include project specific personnel costs (e.g. RA Larger Teaching and Learning Development Projects Proposal Criteria (3 of project 2. Description of the proposed project, please include the following

292

Substantiation of Thermodynamic Criteria of Explosion Safety in Process of Severe Accidents in Pressure Vessel Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper represents original development of thermodynamic criteria of occurrence conditions of steam-gas explosions in the process of severe accidents. The received results can be used for modelling of processes of severe accidents in pressure vessel reactors.

Skalozubov, V I; Jarovoj, S S; Kochnyeva, V Yu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Substantiation of Thermodynamic Criteria of Explosion Safety in Process of Severe Accidents in Pressure Vessel Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper represents original development of thermodynamic criteria of occurrence conditions of steam-gas explosions in the process of severe accidents. The received results can be used for modelling of processes of severe accidents in pressure vessel reactors.

V. I. Skalozubov; V. N. Vashchenko; S. S. Jarovoj; V. Yu. Kochnyeva

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Assessing the Impacts of Proximity Sounding Criteria on the Climatology of Significant Tornado Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proximity sounding studies typically seek to optimize several trade-offs that involve somewhat arbitrary definitions of how to define a “proximity sounding.” More restrictive proximity criteria, which presumably produce results that are more ...

Corey K. Potvin; Kimberly L. Elmore; Steven J. Weiss

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Truncation Error Estimates for Refinement Criteria in Nested and Adaptive Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Truncation error estimates are considered as criteria for fine-grid placement and movement in nested and adaptive finite-difference atmospheric models. A simple method for calculating the truncation error at any time during an integration is ...

William C. Skamrock

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Criteria and Methods for Performing and Evaluating Solar-Weather Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research criteria and methods are presented for performing and evaluating the growing discipline of solar-weather studies. A clear distinction among preliminary, exploratory, and confirmatory studies is presented, and it is shown that this ...

John A. Flueck; Timothy J. Brown

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Early Site Permit (ESP) Demonstration Program, the "Siting Guide: Site Selection and Evaluation Criteria for an Early Site Permit Application" was initially published in March 1993. It served as a roadmap and tool for applicant use in developing detailed siting plans to support an ESP application. This revision has been prepared to update the site selection process and criteria to reflect current regulatory requirements. The updated Guide also addresses the impact of significant changes in...

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system to ensure limitation of core damage. [LMFBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety-based functional requirements and design criteria for a self-actuated shutdown system (SASS) are derived in accordance with LOA-2 success criteria and reliability goals. The design basis transients have been defined and evaluated for the CDS Phase II design, which is a 2550 MWt mixed oxide heterogeneous core reactor. A partial set of reactor responses for selected transients is provided as a function of SASS characteristics such as reactivity worth, trip points, and insertion times.

Deane, N.A.; Atcheson, D.B.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Analysis of HEU samples from the ULBA Metallurgical Plant  

SciTech Connect

In early March 1994, eight highly enriched uranium (HEU) samples were collected from materials stored at the Ulba Metallurgical Plant in Oskamen (Ust Kamenogorsk), Kazakhstan. While at the plant site, portions of four samples were dissolved and analyzed by mass spectrograph at the Ulba analytical laboratory by Ulba analysts. Three of these mass spectrograph solutions and the eight HEU samples were subsequently delivered to the Y-12 Plant for complete chemical and isotopic analyses. Chemical forms of the eight samples were uranium metal chips, U0{sub 2} powder, uranium/beryllium oxide powder, and uranium/beryllium alloy rods. All were declared by the Ulba plant to have a uranium assay of {approximately}90 wt % {sup 235}U. The uranium/beryllium powder and alloy samples were also declared to range from about 8 to 28 wt % uranium. The chemical and uranium isotopic analyses done at the Y-12 Plant confirm the Ulba plant declarations. All samples appear to have been enriched using some reprocessed uranium, probably from recovery of uranium from plutonium production reactors. As a result, all samples contain some {sup 236}U and {sup 232}U and have small but measurable quantities of plutonium. This plutonium could be the result of either contamination carried over from the enrichment process or cross-contamination from weapons material. It is not the result of direct reactor exposure. Neither the {sup 232}U nor the plutonium concentrations are sufficiently high to provide a significant industrial health hazard. Both are well within established or proposed acceptance criteria for storage at Y-12. The trace metal analyses showed that, with the exception of beryllium, there are no trace metals in any of these HEU samples that pose a significant health hazard.

Gift, E.H.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

303

Interim implementation structure for development of performance criteria and test standards for photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents an implementation structure for the near-term development of performance criteria and test methods for photovoltaic (PV) materials, components, subsystems, and systems. The approach is designed to be responsive to the Photovoltaic Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL-95-590). The project is organized into four tasks: (1) establishment of performance criteria and the development of test methods; (2) development of laboratory accreditation/product certification guidelines; (3) development of validation methodologies; and (4) coordination of the quality assurance effort with consensus standards and code organizations. A schedule and milestones are presented for each task. The appendices provide a brief overview of standards and the standards development process. The philosophy behind this project is to develop industry- and user-established performance criteria, test methods, and accreditation procedures which may then be referred to independent consensus standards organizations for the preparation of consensus standards. The emphasis in execution of this approach will be to develop uniform, fair performance criteria and tests and to avoid rigid, prescriptive criteria. Photovoltaics is an emerging technology; criteria written now must be able to accommodate devices and techniques not yet developed.

Not Available

1979-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location  

SciTech Connect

Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gas sampling in the DST  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of the rock-fluid interactions in the DST will play an important role in understanding the performance of waste package materials and radionuclide transport through the altered zone of a repository. Consequently, the chemistry of fluids and gases originating in the pore space of the rock and the changing compositions observed with time and temperature will be targeted for study in the chemistry boreholes of the DST. The chemical holes have been lined with SEAMIST (Science Engineering Associate Membrane In situ Sampling Technology) liners that allow gas and fluid from the pore spaces of the rock walls to be sampled on-site periodically. The concentrations of certain chemical species in the gases and fluids sampled at those locations will then be analyzed back in the laboratory. The baseline sampling of the rock-pore gases (prior to heater turn- on) is described.

DeLoach, L.; Chairappa, M.; Martinelli, R.; Glassley, B.

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

2001-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

307

BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River Bend Nuclear Power Station, a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, experienced fuel defects during Cycle 11. The failed fuel pins were identified during the subsequent refueling outage. To assist analysis of the fuel failure root cause, crud flake deposit samples were collected for analyses. Results on the morphology and distribution of chemical elements in four tenacious crud flakes that are associated with the fuel failures are reported in EPRI report 1009733, BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation–Riv...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Duplex sampling apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved In the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

Brown, P.E.; Lloyd, R.

1991-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Savannah River Site sample and analysis plan for Clemson Technical Center waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this sampling and analysis plan is to determine the chemical, physical and radiological properties of the SRS radioactive Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) liquid waste stream, to verify that it conforms to Waste Acceptance Criteria of the Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Incineration Facility. Waste being sent to the ETTP TSCA Incinerator for treatment must be sufficiently characterized to ensure that the waste stream meets the waste acceptance criteria to ensure proper handling, classification, and processing of incoming waste to meet the Waste Storage and Treatment Facility`s Operating Permits. This sampling and analysis plan is limited to WSRC container(s) of homogeneous or multiphasic radioactive PCB contaminated liquids generated in association with a treatability study at Clemson Technical Center (CTC) and currently stored at the WSRC Solid Waste Division Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF).

Hagstrom, T.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Improved sample size determination for attributes and variables sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earlier INMM papers have addressed the attributes/variables problem and, under conservative/limiting approximations, have reported analytical solutions for the attributes and variables sample sizes. Through computer simulation of this problem, we have calculated attributes and variables sample sizes as a function of falsification, measurement uncertainties, and required detection probability without using approximations. Using realistic assumptions for uncertainty parameters of measurement, the simulation results support the conclusions: (1) previously used conservative approximations can be expensive because they lead to larger sample sizes than needed; and (2) the optimal verification strategy, as well as the falsification strategy, are highly dependent on the underlying uncertainty parameters of the measurement instruments. 1 ref., 3 figs.

Stirpe, D.; Picard, R.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Preliminary stability criteria for compressed air energy storage in porous media reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the initial phase of a study to establish subsurface design and operating criteria for a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) facility are summarized. The primary objective was to derive a preliminary set of criteria that would help ensure the long term (30 to 40 year) integrity of CAES reservoirs in porous media, such as aquifers or abandoned natural gas reservoirs. In addition, appropriate research and development tasks were to be defined if the current technology was found to be inadequate. Preliminary stability and design criteria for storage of compressed air in porous media were determined on the basis of a survey of the open literature and the experience of experts in industry and universities. The results were separated into two categories: criteria for low temperature air injection (under 200/sup 0/F) and criteria for high temperature air injection (200 to 650/sup 0/F). Results are presented as maximum and/or minimum bounds for a number of parameters such as porosity, permeability, closure, storage pressure, caprock thickness, delta pressure, and caprock slope. One of the prime conclusions derived from an evaluation of the low temperature concept is that the technology currently exists to handle the potential design and operating problems. Therefore, there appears to be no technical roadblocks to the successful demonstration of the CAES concept, and a pilot project could be constructed in the near future.

Stottlemyre, J.A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation An Energy, Greenhouse Gas, and Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection in Life-Cycle Inventories Using Hybrid Approaches,and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses,Criteria Pollutant Inventory of Rail and Air Transportation

Horvath, Arpad; Chester, Mikhail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety requirements. Refer to the SSRL or LCLS Safety Offices for further guidance. Upon Arrival Upon Arrival Once you arrive you must complete training and access forms before accessing the Sample Preparation Laboratories (SPL). All Sample Prep Lab doors are locked with access key codes. Once your SPL

314

Definition: Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a...

315

Definition: Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or...

316

Recommended criteria for retrofit materials and products eligible for tax credit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Energy Administration requested the National Bureau of Standards to develop criteria for retrofitting for possible use by the Internal Revenue Service in implementing the Presidential initiative authorizing tax credit to homeowners. Criteria are recommended for materials and products considered eligible for proposed tax credit for retrofitting one and two family residences to conserve energy. The materials considered include insulation and vapor barriers, storm windows and doors, caulking and weatherstripping, and clock thermostats. A list of these retrofit materials is compiled by generic type and recommendations made on their installation. In addition to recommended criteria for materials and products eligible for tax credit, desired levels of performance for the retrofit materials are presented as a guide to homeowners to achieve maximum benefits in energy conservation through retrofitting. (GRA)

Rossiter, W.J. Jr.; Mathey, R.G.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Worker Safety Training Inpsection Criteria, Approach and Lines of Inquiry, CRAD 64-50  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1.0 PURPOSE 1.0 PURPOSE U.S. Department of Subject: Worker Safety Training HS: HSS CRAD 64-50 Inspection Criteria, Approach, Energy Rev: 0 and Lines of Inquiry Eff. Date: 071 1012009 Office of Independent Within the Office of Independent Oversight, the Ofice of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Evaluations' mission is to assess the performance of environment, safety, and health systems (Integrated Safety Management); programs (Worker Safety and Health Program); and practices. Oversight Criteria Review and Approach Document The focus of this Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) is to evaluate the adequacy of training programs to educate workers on requirements and practices to protect themselves, the public, and the environment fiom the hazards associated with Department of Energy (DOE)

318

An Iterative Rejection Sampling Method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :0 80 7. 28 23 v1 [ he p- ph ] 17 Ju l 2 00 8 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION Cavendish-HEP-08/10 An Iterative Rejection Sampling Method A. Sherstnev Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue... , Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK and Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia, 119992 (on leave) Abstract: In the note we consider an iterative generalisation of the rejection sampling method. In high energy physics...

Sherstnev, A

319

General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of this study is twofold. First aim is to help operators with simple screening criteria which can help them in making certain decisions while going after shale gas reservoirs. A guideline chart has been created with the help of available literature published so far on different shale gas basins across the US. For evaluating potential of a productive shale gas play, one has to be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the parameters affecting the decision to drill a horizontal well or a vertical well in shale gas reservoirs? 2. Will the shale gas well flow naturally or is an artificial lift required post stimulation? 3. What are the considerations for stimulation treatment design in shale gas reservoirs? A comprehensive analysis is presented about different properties of shale gas reservoirs and how these properties can affect the completion decisions. A decision chart presents which decision best answers the above mentioned questions. Secondly, research focuses on production data analysis of Barnett Shale Gas reservoir. The purpose of this study is to better understand production mechanisms in Barnett shale. Barnett Shale core producing region is chosen for the study as it best represents behavior of Barnett Shale. A field wide moving domain analysis is performed over Wise, Denton and Tarrant County wells for understanding decline behavior of the field. It is found that in all of these three counties, Barnett shale field wells could be said to have established pressure communication within the reservoir. We have also studied the effect of thermal maturity (Ro %), thickness, horizontal well completion and vertical well completion on production of Barnett Shale wells. Thermal maturity is found to have more importance than thickness of shale. Areas with more thermal maturity and less shale thickness are performing better than areas with less thermal maturity and more shale thickness. An interactive tool is developed to access the production data according to the leases in the region and some suggestions are made regarding the selection of the sample for future studies on Barnett Shale.

Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR THE BENCH STEAM REFORMER TEST  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing. The type, quantity and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluid bed steam reformer (FBSR). A determination of the adequacy of the FBSR process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the FBSR process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used to test the FBSR process. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the testing criteria.

BANNING DL

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs.

Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Identifying potential repositories for radioactive waste: multiple criteria decision analysis and critical infrastructure systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An approach for the analysis and management of multiple criteria critical infrastructure problems is put forth. Nuclear waste management involves complex tradeoffs under uncertainty. Among all waste either generated by nature or human activities, radioactive nuclear waste is the most toxic to human health and difficult to manage: it is known that some nuclear waste material will be radioactive and potentially dangerous for hundreds of thousands of years. This paper discusses the use of multiple criteria decision analysis techniques such as the analytic hierarchy process for recommending sites to be considered as potential repositories for nuclear waste.

Kouichi Taji; Jason K. Levy; Jens Hartmann; Michelle L. Bell; Richard M. Anderson; Benjamin F. Hobbs; Tom Feglar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Recommended criteria for retrofit materials and products eligible for tax credit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Criteria are recommended for materials and products considered eligible for proposed tax credit for retrofitting one and two family residences to conserve energy. The materials considered include insulation and vapor barriers, storm windows and doors, caulking and weatherstripping, and clock thermostats. A list of these retrofit materials was compiled by generic type and recommendations made on their installation. In addition to recommended criteria for materials and products eligible for tax credit, desired levels of performance for the retrofit materials are presented as a guide to homeowners to achieve maximum benefits in energy conservation through retrofitting.

Rossiter, W.J. Jr.; Mathey, Robert G.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling withingroups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic randomsampling), may be familiar to a lot of people.

Information Center

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

327

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling withingroups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic randomsampling), may be familiar to a lot of people.

Neal Davis

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Volume 2 Appendices: Sample Solicitation and Contracting Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appendices for the report A Guide to Performance Contracting with ESCOs. The appendices include a sample solicitation and contracting document. These templates were adapted from State of Idaho Division of Public Works materials. They do not attempt to identify or address all circumstances or conditions you may encounter or desire. Adapt them to meet your needs. Appendix A contains sample forms related to a Request for Qualifications (RFQ). Sample documents include an RFQ announcement, an RFQ cover letter, a site visit registration form, and an interview announcement. Appendix A also contains examples outlining contract terms, project schedules, evaluation criteria, an Energy Service Company (ESCO) response, and a Technical Facility profile. Appendix B outlines the Commissioning team roles and responsibilities. This agreement covers the Technical Energy Audit and Project Development Agreement, including details of the project, including scope of work and termination terms. Appendix C offers an example of an Energy Performance Contract. The contract outlines the Energy Management Plan agreed upon by the ESCO, including project responsibilities, energy savings measurement and calculation methods, and projected financial performance.

Baechler, Michael C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

An Iterative Rejection Sampling Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the note we consider an iterative generalisation of the rejection sampling method. In high energy physics, this sampling is frequently used for event generation, i.e. preparation of phase space points distributed according to a matrix element squared $|M|^2$ for a scattering process. In many realistic cases $|M|^2$ is a complicated multi-dimensional function, so, the standard von Neumann procedure has quite low efficiency, even if an error reducing technique, like VEGAS, is applied. As a result of that, many of the $|M|^2$ calculations go to ``waste''. The considered iterative modification of the procedure can extract more ``unweighted'' events, i.e. distributed according to $|M|^2$. In several simple examples we show practical benefits of the technique and obtain more events than the standard von Neumann method, without any extra calculations of $|M|^2$.

A. Sherstnev

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

331

A comparative study of model selection criteria for computer vision applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During last three decades many model selection techniques have been developed, many of those have also been employed in computer vision applications. Interestingly, most of those criteria are based upon assumptions that are rarely realised in practical ... Keywords: Model selection, Model-based computer vision, Motion segmentation, Range segmentation

Niloofar Gheissari; Alireza Bab-Hadiashar

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Multi-criteria analysis of wastewater treatment plant design and control scenarios under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment plant control and monitoring can help to achieve good effluent quality, in a complex, highly non-linear process. The Benchmark Simulation Model no. 2 (BSM2) is a useful tool to competitively evaluate plant-wide control on a long-term ... Keywords: Activated sludge model, Anaerobic digestion, Anoxic volume, BSM2, Cascade controller, Monte Carlo simulation, Multi-criteria assessment

L. Benedetti; B. De Baets; I. Nopens; P. A. Vanrolleghem

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Flow in geothermal wells. Part IV. Transition criteria for two-phase flow patterns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed considerations justifying the criteria for transitions between flow patterns are presented. The following are covered: transition from bubble to plug (or slug) flow, transition from plug flow to froth flow, transition from froth to annular mist flow, and model comparisons. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A multi-criteria approach for scheduling semiconductor wafer fabrication facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, we model a semiconductor wafer fabrication process as a complex job shop, and adapt a Modified Shifting Bottleneck Heuristic (MSBH) to facilitate the multi-criteria optimization of makespan, cycle time, and total weighted tardiness ... Keywords: Complex job shop, Multicriteria, Shifting bottleneck

Michele E. Pfund; Hari Balasubramanian; John W. Fowler; Scott J. Mason; Oliver Rose

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Path Selection Criteria for P2P Voice Cheng-Ying Ou, Chia-Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

should be the relay peer? such that the alternative path is better than the default one... 10 #12;A Fundamental QuestionQ Which is the right path selection criteria? Source Rate? Congestion Level? Delay;Two Questions to AddressQ 1 Does delay jitter speaks for all?1. Does delay jitter speaks for all

Huang, Polly

336

GIS-based Multi-Criteria Analysis of Wind Farm Development Henning Sten Hansen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of today's huge wind turbines have to be considered. An obvious answer on these challenges could that the noise from a wind turbine of 60 dB or more is unquestionably annoying, whereas a noise of 20 dB or less national and regional legislation related to wind turbine development. Second, the criteria should

Hansen, René Rydhof

337

Child head injury criteria investigation through numerical simulation of real world trauma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Finite element modelling has been used for decades in the study of adult head injury biomechanics and determination of injury criteria. Interest is recently growing in investigation on pediatric head injury which requires elaboration of biofidelic models ... Keywords: Accident reconstructions, Child head, Finite element modelling, Neurological injuries

Sebastien Roth; Jonathan Vappou; Jean-Sebastien Raul; Rémy Willinger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Steam Generator Tube-Plugging and Tube-Sleeving Criteria: Assessment of Current Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a survey of current utility practices regarding steam generator tube plugging and tube sleeving. It also describes an analytic and experimental evaluation of mechanical strain as a parameter for use in tube-plugging and tube-sleeving criteria.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Supplier selection paradigm: An integrated hierarchical QFD methodology under multiple-criteria environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concurrent engineering approach integrating analytic hierarchy process (AHP) with quality function deployment (QFD) in combination with cost factor measure (CFM) has been delineated to rank and subsequently select candidate-suppliers under multiple, ... Keywords: CFM, Decision support, Hierarchical MCDM, Multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM), Quality function deployment (QFD), Supplier selection

Arijit Bhattacharya; John Geraghty; Paul Young

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Smoothness criteria for Navier-Stokes equations in terms of regularity along the steam lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article is devoted to a regularity criteria for solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of regularity along the stream lines. More precisely, we prove that a suitable weak solution for the Navier-Stokes equations is regular under some constraint on the second derivative of |u| along the stream lines.

Chan, Chi Hin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

BLACK, D.M.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

342

Uncertainties in the effects of burnup and their impact on criticality safety licensing criteria  

SciTech Connect

Current criteria for criticality safety for spent fuel shipping and storage casks are conservative because no credit is permitted for the effects of burnup of the fuel inside the cask. Cask designs that will transport and store large numbers of fuel assemblies (20 or more) must devote a substantial part of their payload to criticality control measures if they are to meet this criteria. The Department of Energy is developing the data necessary to support safety analyses that incorporate the effects of burnup for the next generation of spent fuel shipping casks. The efforts described here are devoted to the development of acceptance criteria that will be the basis for accepting safety analyses. Preliminary estimates of the uncertainties of the effects of burnup have been developed to provide a basis for the consideration of critically safety criteria. The criticality safety margins in a spent fuel shipping or storage cask are dominated by the portions of a fuel assembly that are in low power regions of a reactor core, and the reactor operating conditions are very different from spent fuel storage or transport cask conditions. Consequently, the experience that has been gathered during years of reactor operation does not apply directly to the prediction of criticality safety margins for spent fuel shipping or storage casks. The preliminary estimates of the uncertainties presented in this paper must be refined by both analytical and empirical studies that address both the magnitude of the uncertainties and their interdependence. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Carlson, R.W.; Fisher, L.E.

1990-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

Comparing multiple criteria decision methods to extend a geographical information system on afforestation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of the AFFOREST project (EU 5th Framework Programme for Research & Technological Development) is the development of a spatial decision support system (SDSS) capable of providing advice for policy and planning decisions pertaining to afforestation ... Keywords: Carbon sequestration, Decision support, Environmental performance, GIS, Groundwater recharge, Multiple criteria, Nitrate leaching

S. Gilliams; D. Raymaekers; B. Muys; J. Van Orshoven

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Appendix D Eligibility Criteria for Radiant Barriers Page D-1 2013 Residential Compliance Manual January 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shall meet specific eligibility and installation criteria to be modeled by any ACM and receive energy (stapled) to the bottom surface of the truss/rafter (top chord). A minimum air space shall be maintained of the radiant barrier and the top of the ceiling insulation to allow ventilation air to flow between the roof

345

Diode (LED) Fixture Design and Installation Criteria for Interior and Exterior Lighting Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose. This ETL provides technical guidance and criteria for specifying, designing, and installing LED luminaires for interior and exterior lighting applications at Air Force installations. This ETL does not apply to LED airfield lighting systems, including, but not limited to, taxiway, obstruction, runway edge, threshold, or approach lighting systems

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Application of fuzzy logic for the integration of environmental criteria in ecodesign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ecodesign of a product implies that different potential environmental problems of diverse nature must be considered, apart from the general design criteria (i.e., technical, functional, ergonomic, aesthetic or economical). In this sense, an ecodesign ... Keywords: Ecodesign tool, Ecological Footprint, Environmental Risk Assessment, Fuzzy logic, Life Cycle Assessment

Marta Herva; Amaya Franco-Uría; Eugenio F. Carrasco; Enrique Roca

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Forecasting the Market Penetration of Energy Conservation Technologies: The Decision Criteria for Choosing a Forecasting Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An important determinant of our energy future is the rate at which energy conservation technologies, once developed, are put into use. At Synergic Resources Corporation, we have adapted and applied a methodology to forecast the use of conservation technologies. This paper briefly discusses the observed patterns of the diffusion of new' technologies and the determinants (both sociological and economic) which have been proposed to explain the variation in the diffusion rates. Existing market penetration models are reviewed and their capability to forecast the use of conservation technologies is assessed using a set of criteria developed for this purpose. The reasoning behind the choice of criteria is discussed. The criteria includes the range of hypothesized influences to market penetration that are incorporated into the models and the applicability of the available parameter estimates. The attributes of our methodology and forecasting model choice (a behavioral lag equation developed by Mathtech, Inc.), are displayed using a list of the judgment criteria. This method was used to forecast the use of electricity conservation technologies in industries located in the Pacific Northwest for the Bonneville Power Administration.

Lang, K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Communicative criteria for usability evaluation: experiences from analysing an e-service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today we are primarily using computers for communication. We communicate via computers as professionals and at our spare time. One growing context of computer use is when we as citizens communicating with authorities. This paper suggests communication ... Keywords: design principles, e-services, guidelines, usability criteria

Stefan Cronholm

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Test of Inseparability Criteria for Squeezed Number States of the Radiation Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the efficiency of inseparability criteria in detecting the entanglement properties of two-mode non-Gaussian states of the electromagnetic field. We focus our study on the relevant class of two-mode squeezed number states. These states ...

Fabio Dell'Anno; Silvio De Siena; Fabrizio Illuminati

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Functional Design Criteria plutonium stabilization and handling (PUSH) project W-460  

SciTech Connect

This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) contains information to guide the design of the Stabilization and Packaging Equipment necessary to oxidize and package the remaining plutonium-bearing Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) currently in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) inventory. The FDC also guides the design of vault modifications to allow storage of 3013 packages of stabilized SNM for up to 50 years.

NELSON, D.W.

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

Techniques for multivariate sample design  

SciTech Connect

In this report we consider sampling methods applicable to the multi-product Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report (Form EIA-821) Survey. For years prior to 1989, the purpose of the survey was to produce state-level estimates of total sales volumes for each of five target variables: residential No. 2 distillate, other retail No. 2 distillate, wholesale No. 2 distillate, retail residual, and wholesale residual. For the year 1989, the other retail No. 2 distillate and wholesale No. 2 distillate variables were replaced by a new variable defined to be the maximum of the two. The strata for this variable were crossed with the strata for the residential No. 2 distillate variable, resulting in a single stratified No. 2 distillate variable. Estimation for 1989 focused on the single No. 2 distillate variable and the two residual variables. Sampling accuracy requirements for each product were specified in terms of the coefficients of variation (CVs) for the various estimates based on data taken from recent surveys. The target population for the Form EIA-821 survey includes companies that deliver or sell fuel oil or kerosene to end-users. The Petroleum Product Sales Identification Survey (Form EIA-863) data base and numerous state and commercial lists provide the basis of the sampling frame, which is updated as new data become available. In addition, company/state-level volumes for distillates fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and motor gasoline are added to aid the design and selection process. 30 refs., 50 figs., 10 tabs.

Williamson, M.A.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Building America Best Practices Series Volume 8: Builders Challenge Quality Criteria Support Document  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has posed a challenge to the homebuilding industry—to build 220,000 high-performance homes by 2012. Through the Builders Challenge, participating homebuilders will have an easy way to differentiate their best energy-performing homes from other products in the marketplace, and to make the benefits clear to buyers. This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE to provide guidance to U.S. home builders who want to accept the challenge. To qualify for the Builders Challenge, a home must score 70 or less on the EnergySmart Home Scale (E-Scale). The E-scale is based on the well-established Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index, developed by the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET). The E-scale allows homebuyers to understand – at a glance – how the energy performance of a particular home compares with the performance of others. To learn more about the index and HERS Raters, visit www.natresnet.org. Homes also must meet the Builders Challenge criteria described in this document. To help builders meet the Challenge, guidance is provided in this report for each of the 29 criteria. Included with guidance for each criteria are resources for more information and references for relevant codes and standards. The Builders Challenge Quality Criteria were originally published in Dec. 2008. They were revised and published as PNNL-18009 Rev 1.2 in Nov. 2009. This is version 1.3, published Nov 2010. Changes from the Nov 2009 version include adding a title page and updating the Energy Star windows critiera to the Version 5.0 criteria approved April 2009 and effective January 4, 2010. This document and other information about the Builders Challenge is available on line at www.buildingamerica.gov/challenge.

Baechler, Michael C.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Results of groundwater monitoring and vegetation sampling at Everest, Kansas, in 2009 .  

SciTech Connect

In April 2008, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the existing network of monitoring points at Everest, Kansas (Argonne 2008). The objective of the 2008 investigation was to monitor the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater previously identified in CCC/USDA site characterization and groundwater sampling studies at Everest in 2000-2006 (Argonne 2001, 2003, 2006a,b). The work at Everest is being undertaken on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the oversight of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The findings of the 2008 investigation were as follows: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders demonstrated a consistent pattern of groundwater flow - and inferred contaminant migration - to the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA facility toward the Nigh property, and then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) The range of concentrations and the areal distribution of carbon tetrachloride identified in the groundwater at Everest in April 2008 were generally consistent with previous results. The results of the 2008 sampling (reflecting the period from 2006 to 2008) and the earlier investigations at Everest (representing the period from 2000 to 2006) show that no significant downgradient extension of the carbon tetrachloride plume occurred from 2000 to 2008. (3) The slow contaminant migration indicated by the monitoring data is qualitatively consistent with the low groundwater flow rates in the Everest aquifer unit estimated previously on the basis of site-specific hydraulic testing (Argonne 2006a,b). (4) The April 2008 and earlier sampling results demonstrate that the limits of the plume have been effectively, identified by the existing network of monitoring points and have not changed significantly during the CCC/USDA investigation program. The carbon tetrachloride distribution within the plume has continued to evolve, however, with relatively constant or apparently decreasing contaminant levels at most sampling locations. In response to these findings, the KDHE requested that the CCC/USDA develop a plan for annual monitoring of the groundwater and surface water at Everest, to facilitate continued tracking of the carbon tetrachloride plume at this site (KDHE 2009a). A recommendation for annual sampling (for analyses of VOCs) of 16 existing groundwater monitoring points within and near the identified contaminant migration pathway and surface water sampling at 5 locations along the intermittent creek west (downgradient) of the identified plume was presented by the CCC/USDA (Appendix A) and approved by the KDHE (2009b) for implementation. The monitoring wells will be sampled according to the low-flow procedure, and sample preservation, shipping, and analysis activities will be consistent with previous work at Everest. The annual sampling will continue until identified conditions at the site indicate a technical justification for a change. This report summarizes the results of sampling and monitoring activities conducted at the Everest site since completion of the April 2008 groundwater sampling event (Argonne 2008). The investigations performed during the current review period (May 2008 to October 2009) were as follows: (1) With one exception, the KDHE-approved groundwater and surface water monitoring points were sampled on April 24-27, 2009. In this event, well PT1 was inadvertently sampled instead of the adjacent well MW04. This investigation represents the first groundwater and surface water sampling event performed under the current plan for annual monitoring approved by the KDHE. (2) Ongoing monitoring of the groundwater levels at Everest is performed with KDHE approval. The levels in selected monitoring wells are recorded continuously, by using downhole pre

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Magnetometry with entangled atomic samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theory for the estimation of a scalar or a vector magnetic field by its influence on an ensemble of trapped spin polarized atoms. The atoms interact off-resonantly with a continuous laser field, and the measurement of the polarization rotation of the probe light, induced by the dispersive atom-light coupling, leads to spin-squeezing of the atomic sample which enables an estimate of the magnetic field which is more precise than that expected from standard counting statistics. For polarized light and polarized atoms, a description of the non-classical components of the collective spin angular momentum for the atoms and the collective Stokes vectors of the light-field in terms of effective gaussian position and momentum variables is practically exact. The gaussian formalism describes the dynamics of the system very effectively and accounts explicitly for the back-action on the atoms due to measurement and for the estimate of the magnetic field. Multi-component magnetic fields are estimated by the measurement of suitably chosen atomic observables and precision and efficiency is gained by dividing the atomic gas in two or more samples which are entangled by the dispersive atom-light interaction.

Vivi Petersen; Lars Bojer Madsen; Klaus Molmer

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

60-day waste compatibility safety issue and final results for 244-TX DCRT, grab samples TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three grab samples (TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3) were taken from tank 241- TX-244 riser 8 on November 7, 1995 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on that same day. Samples TX-95-1 and TX-95-2 were designated as supernate liquids, and sample TX-95-3 was designated as a supernate/sludge. These samples were analyzed to support the waste compatibility safety program. Accuracy and precision criteria were met for all analyses. No notifications were required based on sample results. This document provides the analysis to support the waste compatibility safety program.

Esch, R.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Design criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA). Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document provides design criteria which shall be used by the architect-engineer in the Title II detail design of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The design criteria present requirements which the architect-engineer must address in the design of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Spatial ordered weighted averaging: incorporating spatially variable attitude towards risk in spatial multi-criteria decision-making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses a decomposition-analysis-aggregation approach to multi-criteria spatial decision-making and proposes a novel aggregation method applicable to problems of the object-location or suitability for application type, concentrating on methodological ... Keywords: Multi-criteria spatial decision support, Ordered weighted averaging, Spatially variable risk perception, Suitability evaluation

C. K. Makropoulos; D. Butler

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Application of a Multi-Criteria Decision Support Tool in Assessing the Feasibility of Implementing Treated Wastewater Reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater reuse is increasingly becoming an important component of water resources management in many countries. Planning of a sustainable wastewater reuse project involves multi-criteria that incorporate technical, economic, environmental and social ... Keywords: Decision Support Tool, Feasibility Assessment, Multi-Criteria Attributes, Wastewater Reuse

J.R. Adewumi, A.A. Ilemobade, J.E. van Zyl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Model-Based Sampling and Inference  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation James R. Knaub, Jr., Energy Information Administration, EI-53.1 James.Knaub@eia.doe.gov Key Words: Survey statistics, Randomization, Conditionality, Random sampling, Cutoff sampling Abstract: Picking a sample through some randomization mechanism, such as random sampling within groups (stratified random sampling), or, say, sampling every fifth item (systematic random sampling), may be familiar to a lot of people. These are design-based samples. Estimates of means and totals for an entire population may be inferred from such a sample, along with estimation of the amount of error that might be expected. However, inference based on a sample and its (modeled) relationship to other data may be less familiar. If there is enough

360

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Licensing Guide and Sample License  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP TEI:HNOL06Y TRANSFER WORKIN6 6ROUP Lic:en!iing Guide and Sample Lic:en!ie ·~ ICan.u City Plan I OFermilab ~OAK ~RIDGE Nuioul~.

362

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Criteria and Procedures for DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criteria and Procedures for DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program Criteria and Procedures for DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations PART 708 -- DOE CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEE PROTECTION PROGRAM Subpart A -- General Provisions Sec. 708.1--What is the purpose of this regulation? Sec. 708.2--What are the definitions of terms used in this regulation? Sec. 708.3--What employee complaints are covered? Sec. 708.4--What employee complaints are not covered? Sec. 708.5--What employee conduct is protected from retaliation by an employer? Sec. 708.6--What constitutes "a reasonable fear of serious injury?" Sec. 708.7--What must an employee do before filing a complaint based on a retaliation for refusal to participate? Sec. 708.8--Does this regulation apply to pending cases?

363

Safety System Oversight Program Assessment Criteria and Review Approach Document (CRAD), Revision 0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 7 of 7 Safety System Oversight (SSO) Program Implementation Assessment Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRADs) Revision 0 PROGRAM (PGM) OBJECTIVE PGM.1 An effective SSO Program is established by the Field Element Manager to apply engineering expertise to maintain safety system configuration and to assess system condition and effectiveness of safety management program implementation. Criteria PGM.1.1 The SSO Qualification Program is part of the Technical Qualification Program (DOE M 426.1-1A, Chapter III, Section 1, 2.b (1)). PGM.1.2 The SSO Program establishes appropriate training, qualification, and performance requirements for SSO personnel and the supervisors are held accountable for achieving them (DOE M 426.1-1A, Chapter III, Section 1, 2.b

364

Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

502 502 August 2010 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (938 KB) Technical Report Example Procedures for NREL/TP-550-47502 Developing Acceptance-Range August 2010 Criteria for BESTEST-EX Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Prepared under Task No. ARRB.1000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

365

Eligibility criteria for the 1-100 ENERGY STAR score | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eligibility criteria for the 1-100 ENERGY STAR score Eligibility criteria for the 1-100 ENERGY STAR score Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker

366

TVA Contribution...How should Criteria be Applied in the Designation of NIETCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTRIBUTION - CONTRIBUTION - PANEL 3 How Should Criteria be Applied in the Designation of NIETCs David Till TVA 1 DOE Congestion Study Technical Conference, Chicago March 29 2006 How should NIETC's be defined? 1: A solution to significant congestion which cannot be justified by conventional planning/economic criteria 2: A solution to significant congestion which can be conventionally justified, but which is not progressing NIETCs may be inter- or intra-State, inter- or intra-utility and must solve a root cause rather than a symptom 2 NIETC 1: Without conventional justification TVA's Bull Run - Volunteer 500-kV line: Adequate capacity to supply native load reliably Severe constraint to market transfers across TVA 3 10,000 MW transfer capability increase 4 Cumberland- Montgomery Paradise-

367

Criteria for temperature monitoring in ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is relevant to the twenty underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site that have been identified as potentially containing a significant amount of ferrocyanide compounds. Tanks believed to contain > 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide have been classified as Watch List tanks. This report addresses temperature monitoring criteria for the Ferrocyanide Watch List tanks. These criteria must comply with governing regulations to ensure that safe continued storage of the tank wastes is not jeopardized. Temperature monitoring is defined in this report as the routine as the routine continuous measurement of a waste tank temperature with an output that is tied to an actively interrogated information collection system that includes an automated warning of temperature increases beyond the established limits.

Fowler, K.D.; Dukelow, G.T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Microsoft Word - M003 EVALUATION CRITERIA FINAL 9-18-08.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/18/08 9/18/08 1 M003 EVALUATION CRITERIA The Offeror's proposal will be evaluated against the evaluation criteria as they relate to the requirements of the solicitation. (a) Criterion 1 - Approach (TAB 1) Technical Approach: The Government will evaluate and assess the Offeror's understanding of the requirements and feasibility of the proposed technical approach associated with the PBWS requirements identified for this Criterion in Section L. The Government will also evaluate and assess whether the Offeror's technical approach demonstrates a thorough understanding of any technical risks and the Offeror's approach to avoid or minimize those risks. (b) Criterion 2 - Staffing Plan and Program Manager Qualifications (TAB 2): (A) Staffing Plan: The Government will evaluate and assess the

369

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

370

Definition: Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater...

371

Definition: Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system....

372

Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling (Healy, 1970) Exploration Activity Details Location...

373

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Water-Gas Sampling (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples) Redirect page Jump to: navigation,...

374

Grid Points (GridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (GridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (GridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. Synopsis. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet). ... Name. Grid Points (StatGridSampleSet) — Evaluate data on a rectangular grid of points. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water-Gas Sampling edit Details Activities (21) Areas (18) Regions (1)...

377

Category:SamplePages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Category:SamplePages Jump to: navigation, search This category uses the form SampleForm. Note the pluralization. Category names...

378

Fuzzy GIS-based multi-criteria evaluation for U.S. Agave production as a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuzzy GIS-based multi-criteria evaluation for U.S. Agave production as a Fuzzy GIS-based multi-criteria evaluation for U.S. Agave production as a bioenergy feedstock Title Fuzzy GIS-based multi-criteria evaluation for U.S. Agave production as a bioenergy feedstock Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2013 Authors Lewis, Sarah M., Sthephen Gross, Axel Visel, Maggi Kelly, and William R. Morrow Keywords Agave, bioenergy, biofuel, fuzzy logic, geographic information systems, suitability mapping Abstract In the United States, renewable energy mandates calling for increased production of cellulosic biofuels will require a diversity of bioenergy feedstocks to meet growing demands. Within the suite of potential energy crops, plants within the genus Agave promise to be a productive feedstock in hot and arid regions. The potential distri- butions of Agave tequilana and Agave deserti in the United States were evaluated based on plant growth parameters identified in an extensive literature review. A geospatial suitability model rooted in fuzzy logic was developed that utilized a suite of biophysical criteria to optimize ideal geographic locations for this new crop, and several suitability scenarios were tested for each species. The results of this spatially explicit suitability model suggest that there is potential for Agave to be grown as an energy feedstock in the southwestern region of the United States - particularly in Arizona, California, and Texas - and a significant portion of these areas are proximate to existing transportation infrastructure. Both Agave species showed the highest state-level renewable energy benefit in Arizona, where agave plants have the potential to contribute 4.8-9.6% of the states' ethanol consumption, and 2.5-4.9% of its electricity consumption, for A. deserti and A. tequilana, respectively. This analysis supports the feasibility of Agave as a complementary bioenergy feedstock that can be grown in areas too harsh for conventional energy feedstocks.

379

Design-to-Criteria Scheduling: Managing Complexity through Goal-Directed Satisficing y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= Cost D = Duration Subtask Relation Enables NLE Method Task Q (5% 0)(95% .0001) C (100% 0) D (50% 30 AutoSite task into two methods, one that locates the URL and one that issues the query. The enables NLE for an answer, and is only willing to spend $5 on the search. Schedule D is meets the criteria of a client who

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

380

Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber Automotive Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite, which was made by a rapid molding process suitable for high-volume automotive applications, consisted of continuous Thornel T300 fibers (6K tow) in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. The reinforcement was in the form of four {+-}45{sup o} stitch-bonded mats in the following layup: [0/90{sup o}/{+-}45{sup o}]{sub S}. This material is the second in a progression of three candidate thermoset composites to be characterized and modeled as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the industry Automotive Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for large automotive structural components. This document is in two parts. Part I provides the design criteria, and Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects on deformation, strength, and stiffness of cyclic and sustained loads, operating temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris). Guidance is provided for design analysis, time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage tolerance design guidance, including the effects of holes. Chapter 6 provides a brief summary of the design criteria.

Corum, J.M.

2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Duct injection technology prototype development: Scale-up methodology and engineering design criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Duct Injection Technology Prototype Development project is to develop a sound design basis for applying duct injection technology as a post-combustion SO{sub 2} emissions control method to existing, pre-NSPS, coal-fired power plants. This report is divided into five major topics: (1) design criteria; (2) engineering drawings; (3) equipment sizing and design; (4) plant and equipment arrangement considerations; and (5) equipment bid specification guidelines.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electrical and mechanical design criteria for EHV and UHV: overhead transmission lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results are presented of a program devoted to the selection of electrical and mechanical design criteria and parameters for overhead power transmission lines for ac systems rated at from 345 to 1100 kV and for dc systems rated at from 600 to 1200 kV. Information is included on the environmental effects, i.e., audible noise and electric fields, of the lines, mechanical and economic requirements, safety, failures, grounding, and lightning protection. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D. [Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Performance Criteria and Test Plans for Grid Integration of Renewable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution utilities are expected to face challenges in the grid integration of renewable generation as relative numbers and penetration levels increase. This report describes the ongoing development of performance criteria, test protocols and facilities to support the smooth integration of distributed generation (DG). It is specifically aimed at requirements for relatively high penetration of distributed generation, with emphasis on inverters as the primary interfacing device. Brief discussions of exi...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development of HVAC System Performance Criteria Using Factorial Design and DOE-2 Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach is described for the development of Heating, Ventilating, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) System Performance Criteria for the Texas Building Energy Design Standard. This approach integrates a design of experimental methodology and DOE-2 simulation to identify the effects of control parameters on HVAC system energy performance. Three new criteria - transport, plant, and system performance factors-are used as measures of system performance. The procedure has been applied to the development of criteria for a variable-air-volume (VAV) and a constant-air-volume (CAV) system in three Texas climates. The results show that the air distribution system pressure loss, cooling coil exit temperature set-pint, operation of an economizer, and use of dead band controls have significant effects on air transport energy use and total system performance. The selection of control strategies and set-points have a clear impact on energy use. There is also a great energy-saving potential of converting from a CAV to a VAV system.

Hou, D.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Acoustical and Noise Control Criteria and Guidelines for Building Design and Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noise, vibration and acoustical design, construction, commissioning and operation practices influence building cost, efficiency, performance and effectiveness. Parameters for structural vibration, building systems noise, acoustics and environmental noise crossing property boundaries will be presented with brief case studies illustrating noise and vibration problems with successful solutions. Building mechanical, power, and plumbing systems contribute to building operations noise and vibration, which affects building occupants, sensitive installations, and functional uses. Various noise and vibration design criteria, field measurements, design concepts and specifications can be applied in facilities to achieve noise mitigation and vibration control to enhance building operations and reduce tenant or neighbor problems. Concepts for enhancement will be presented that achieve specific program criteria and improve the built environment for occupants and functional uses, including items to incorporate in specifications and construction documents. Concepts relating to noise and vibration control can also reduce short and long-term operations costs and save energy. Acoustical designs can be implemented in new construction to achieve specific requirements for LEED certification in healthcare and educational facilities. Common problems, objective criteria, sensitive installations, and solutions will be presented to offer a basic understanding of effective noise and vibration control for central plant equipment, power systems, transformers, standby generators, and roof mounted HVAC equipment.

Evans, J. B.; Himmel, C. N.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

389

Electrphoretic Sample Excitation Light Assembly.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

Li, Qingbo (State College, PA); Liu, Changsheng (State College, PA)

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sample storage/disposal study  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site`s underground waste tanks since the late 1940`s. Each tank must be analyzed to determine whether it presents any harm to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public or the environment. Analyses of the waste aids in the decision making process in preparation of future tank waste stabilization procedures. Characterization of the 177 waste tanks on the Hanford Site will produce a large amount of archived material. This also brings up concerns as to how the excess waste tank sample material from 325 and 222-S Analytical Laboratories will be handled. Methods to archive and/or dispose of the waste have been implemented into the 222-S and 325 Laboratory procedures. As the amount of waste characterized from laboratory analysis grows, an examination of whether the waste disposal system will be able to compensate for this increase in the amount of waste needs to be examined. Therefore, the need to find the safest, most economically sound method of waste storage/disposal is important.

Valenzuela, B.D.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

Multi-class blue noise sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling is a core process for a variety of graphics applications. Among existing sampling methods, blue noise sampling remains popular thanks to its spatial uniformity and absence of aliasing artifacts. However, research so far has been mainly focused ... Keywords: blue noise, dart throwing, multi-class, poisson hard/soft disk, relaxation, sampling

Li-Yi Wei

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

393

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

394

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

395

NIST_1A 1024 sample_count -i 57202424 sample_n_bytes -i ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST_1A 1024 sample_count -i 57202424 sample_n_bytes -i 2 channel_count -i 1 sample_byte_format -s2 01 sample_rate -i 16000 ...

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer  

SciTech Connect

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

Engh, G. van den

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

399

Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

Van den Engh, G.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

DNFSB 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.2: Safety Quality Assurance Plan and Criteria for the Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-Criteria 2-Criteria Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.2: Software Quality Assurance Plan and Criteria for the Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-2040 November 2003 Software Quality Assurance Criteria for Safety Analysis Codes November 2003 INTENTIONALLY BLANK ii Software Quality Assurance Criteria for Safety Analysis Codes November 2003 FOREWORD This document discusses the Software Quality Assurance plan, and criteria and implementation procedures to be used to evaluate designated, safety-related computer software for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

Technical assessment of workplace air sampling requirements at tank farm facilities. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WHC-CM-1-6 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). It was written to implement DOE N 5480.6 ``US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual`` as it applies to programs at Hanford which are now overseen by WHC. As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition to WHC-CM-1-6, there is HSRCM-1, the ``Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual`` and several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. This document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of Tank Farms` workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

Olsen, P.A.

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Technical assessment of TRUSAF for compliance with work place air sampling. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Technical Work Document is to satisfy WHC-CM-1-6, the ``WHC Radiological Control Manual.`` This first revision of the original Supporting Document covers the period from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 1994. WHC-CM-1-6 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition to WHC-CM-1-6, there is HSRCM-1, the ``Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual`` and several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. this document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of the TRUSAF workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

Butler, J.D.

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Operability test report for core sample truck {number_sign}1 flammable gas modifications  

SciTech Connect

This report primarily consists of the original test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to Core Sample Truck No. One. Included are exceptions, resolutions, comments, and test results. This report consists of the original, completed, test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to the Push Mode Core Sample Truck No. 1. Prior to the Acceptance/Operability test the truck No. 1 operations procedure (TO-080-503) was revised to be more consistent with the other core sample truck procedures and to include operational steps/instructions for the SR weather cover pressurization system. A draft copy of the operations procedure was used to perform the Operability Test Procedure (OTP). A Document Acceptance Review Form is included with this report (last page) indicating the draft status of the operations procedure during the OTP. During the OTP 11 test exceptions were encountered. Of these exceptions four were determined to affect Acceptance Criteria as listed in the OTP, Section 4.7 ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA.

Akers, J.C.

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

406

Method and apparatus for data sampling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

Odell, D.M.C.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) were developed to establish criteria in determining compliance with section 402 (a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rinse on the Sample Pre-Sort Rinse form. 3. Pour and spread the sample evenly onto a U.S. standard soil. Rinse the label over the U.S. standard soil sieve #35 (500µm) in the sink using a water wash bottle, sample ID, waterbody name, collection date, sorter name, and sort dates (start and finish dates). Set

Wilkins, Neal

409

Criteria for greater confinement of radioactive wastes at arid western sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a set of criteria and standards for greater confinement disposal (CCD) of low-level waste as an alternative to shallow land burial or deep geologic disposal for certain types of waste. The criteria and standards are discussed relative to seven major areas: radiation exposure protection, characterization of waste, transportation and handling, site selection, engineering, general facility requirements, and administration. The document addresses the objectives or goals of burial at intermediate depths to provide greater confinement, and its advantages and disadvantages compared to shallow land burial. Additionally, the document describes a generic greater confinement disposal facility (GCDF), and discusses as well as evaluates the various interrelating factors which must be considered in the selection of a viable site and in the development of GCDF design and performance criteria. Methods are developed for evaluating and ranking the importance of the factors based on health and safety, their potential impact on cost, and the uncertainty and/or difficulty in measurement and control of the factors. It also provides the methodology and analysis used to determine the various site-specific waste concentration acceptance standards (in the form of area disposal concentration limits) as well as design and engineering standards. It also illustrates the methodology used to determine the optimal or preferred depth of disposal under expected arid site conditions and alternative wet or irrigated site conditions. In addition, an example calculation demonstrates the application of the waste area concentration limits at an arid or humid GDF in determining the allowable waste inventory capacity of a particular site and the loading capacity of a waste disposal cell.

Card, D.H.; Hunter, P.H.; Adam, J.A.; White, R.B.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Assessment of the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed several tests in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack to determine whether the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides is acceptable. The method followed involved adopting the results of a previously performed test series from a system with a similar configuration, followed by several tests on the actual system to verify the applicability of the previously performed tests. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks include metrics concerning 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity tracer particle concentration.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessment of the 3420 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed several tests in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3420 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack to determine whether the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides is acceptable. The method followed involved adopting the results of a previously performed test series from a system with a similar configuration, followed by several tests on the actual system to verify the applicability of the previously performed tests. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks include metrics concerning 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity tracer particle concentration.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

RESULTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER 2013 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect

This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

Bannochie, C.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

413

Results for the Third Quarter 2012 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical and Radionuclide Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2012 Third Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Information from this characterization will be used by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

Bannochie, C. J.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

RESULTS FOR THE SECOND QUARTER 2013 TANK 50 WAC SLURRY SAMPLE: CHEMICAL AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the 2013 Second Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by Saltstone Facility Engineering (SFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

Bannochie, C.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: design criteria and conceptual design summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a literature survey that describes successful tests of geophysical instruments and their thermal protection systems. The conditions to which an instrument is subjected are formulated into relevant thermal and mechanical design criteria that have proved useful for improving passive thermal protection systems and selecting the preliminary feasibility of active refrigeration systems. A brief summary of the results of a series of conceptual designs on seven different active refrigeration systems is given. The systems are ranked according to feasibility for use in downhole active cooling applications.

Bennett, G.A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser  

SciTech Connect

The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio {Pi}. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at {tau}{sub d} {<=} 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of {tau}{sub d} = 5 - 7, {Pi} = 4 - 8. (lasers)

Mezhenin, A V; Azyazov, V N

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

BWRVIP-53-A: BWR Vessel and lnternals Project, Standby Liquid Control Line Repair Design Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP), formed in June, 1994, is an association of utilities focused exclusively on BWR vessel and internals issues. This BWRVIP report documents criteria which can be used to design a repair for the standby liquid control (SLC) line in a BWR. A previous version of this report was published as BWRVIP-53 (TR-108716). This report (BWRVIP-53- A) incorporates changes proposed by the BWRVIP in response to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Request...

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers.

Uvan Catton; Vijay K. Dhir; Deepanjan Mitra; Omar Alquaddoomi; Pierangelo Adinolfi

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fisk-based criteria to support validation of detection methods for drinking water and air.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support the validation of analytical methods for threat contaminants under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) program. It is designed to serve as a resource for certain applications of benchmark and fate information for homeland security threat contaminants. The report identifies risk-based criteria from existing health benchmarks for drinking water and air for potential use as validation targets. The focus is on benchmarks for chronic public exposures. The priority sources are standard EPA concentration limits for drinking water and air, along with oral and inhalation toxicity values. Many contaminants identified as homeland security threats to drinking water or air would convert to other chemicals within minutes to hours of being released. For this reason, a fate analysis has been performed to identify potential transformation products and removal half-lives in air and water so appropriate forms can be targeted for detection over time. The risk-based criteria presented in this report to frame method validation are expected to be lower than actual operational targets based on realistic exposures following a release. Note that many target criteria provided in this report are taken from available benchmarks without assessing the underlying toxicological details. That is, although the relevance of the chemical form and analogues are evaluated, the toxicological interpretations and extrapolations conducted by the authoring organizations are not. It is also important to emphasize that such targets in the current analysis are not health-based advisory levels to guide homeland security responses. This integrated evaluation of chronic public benchmarks and contaminant fate has identified more than 200 risk-based criteria as method validation targets across numerous contaminants and fate products in drinking water and air combined. The gap in directly applicable values is considerable across the full set of threat contaminants, so preliminary indicators were developed from other well-documented benchmarks to serve as a starting point for validation efforts. By this approach, at least preliminary context is available for water or air, and sometimes both, for all chemicals on the NHSRC list that was provided for this evaluation. This means that a number of concentrations presented in this report represent indirect measures derived from related benchmarks or surrogate chemicals, as described within the many results tables provided in this report.

MacDonell, M.; Bhattacharyya, M.; Finster, M.; Williams, M.; Picel, K.; Chang, Y.-S.; Peterson, J.; Adeshina, F.; Sonich-Mullin, C.; Environmental Science Division; EPA

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

Novel delay-dependent asymptotic stability criteria for neural networks with time-varying delays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of delay-dependent asymptotic stability criteria for neural networks (NNs) with time-varying delays is investigated. An improved linear matrix inequality based on delay-dependent stability test is introduced to ensure a large upper bound ... Keywords: 34K20, 34K25, 37C20, 37C25, 37C75, 37N35, 37N40, 93C10, 93C83, 93D05, 93D20, Delay-dependent, Linear matrix inequality (LMI), Neural networks (NNs), Time-varying delay

Junkang Tian; Dongsheng Xu; Jian Zu

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

NELSEN LA

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

From MC/DC to RC/DC: formalization and analysis of control-flow testing criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter describes an approach to the formalization of existing criteria used in computer systems software testing and proposes a Reinforced Condition/Decision Coverage (RC/DC) criterion. This criterion has been developed from the well-known Modified ...

Sergiy A. Vilkomir; Jonathan P. Bowen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

On Forward-in-Time Differencing for Fluids: Stopping Criteria for Iterative Solutions of Anelastic Pressure Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this note, the authors address the practical issue of selecting appropriate stopping criteria for iterative solutions to the elliptic pressure equation arising in nonoscillatory, forward-in-time Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian anelastic fluid ...

Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz; Vanda Grubis?i?; Len G. Margolin

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Initial Acceptance Criteria Concepts and Data for Assessing Longevity of Low-Voltage Cable Insulations and Jackets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cables installed in nuclear plants have long lives in most applications. However, the service conditions for some applications can cause the jackets and insulations of cables to age more rapidly than normal. It is desirable to have acceptance criteria for continued service of those cables experiencing significant aging. This report establishes a basis for acceptance criteria, provides a method for estimating remaining cable life, and provides aging profiles under various thermal and radiation conditi...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

426

Climate Monitoring from Space: Asynoptic Sampling Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring climate variability from space is considered from the standpoint of satellite sampling. Asynoptic sampling leads to well-defined limits in spatial and temporal resolution which are violated by behavior involving sufficiently small ...

Murry L. Salby

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Metropolis photon sampling with optional user guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Metropolis Photon Sampling (MPS), a visual importance-driven algorithm for populating photon maps. Photon Mapping and other particle tracing algorithms fail if the photons are poorly distributed. Our approach samples light transport paths ...

Shaohua Fan; Stephen Chenney; Yu-chi Lai

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Principles for Sampling Airborne Radioactivity from Stacks  

SciTech Connect

This book chapter describes the special processes involved in sampling the airborne effluents from nuclear faciities. The title of the book is Radioactive Air Sampling Methods. The abstract for this chapter was cleared as PNNL-SA-45941.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Sample Returns Missions in the Coming Decade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the coming decade, several missions will attempt to return samples to Earth from varying parts of the solar system. These samples will provide invaluable insight into the conditions present during the early formation of the solar system, and possibly ...

Desai Prasun N.; Mitcheltree Robert A.; Cheatwood F. McNeil

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Tenant data request: Sample letter | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government resources Tenant data request: Sample letter Use this sample letter to request energy data from your tenants. This is helpful for instances where you want whole-building...

431

Sample holder for x-ray diffractometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample holder for use with x-ray diffractometers with the capability to rotate the sample, as well as to adjust the position of the sample in the x, y, and z directions. Adjustment in the x direction is accomplished through loosening set screws, moving a platform, and retightening the set screws. Motion translators are used for adjustment in the y and z directions. An electric motor rotates the sample, and receives power from the diffractometer.

Hesch, V.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Aerosol Sampling from a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  

Disclosure Number 201202873 Technology Summary ... The present invention enhances the ability to collect such samples, and enables collection of ...

433

Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

Sharifi, Mozafar [Razi University Center for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Baghabrisham 67149, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sharifimozafar@gmail.com; Hadidi, Mosslem [Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: hadidi_moslem@yahoo.com; Vessali, Elahe [Paradise Ave, Azad University, School of Agriculture, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: elahe_vesali@yahoo.com; Mosstafakhani, Parasto [Razi University Centre for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Baghabrisham 67149, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mostafakhany2003@yahoo.com; Taheri, Kamal [Regional office of Water Resource Management, Zan Boulevard, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: taheri.kamal@gmail.com; Shahoie, Saber [Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Kurdistan University, University Boulevard, Sanandadj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: shahoei@yahoo.com; Khodamoradpour, Mehran [Regional office of Climatology, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mehrankhodamorad@yahoo.com

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA OF DOE-STD-1189-2008 APPENDIX A [FULL PAPER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the approach taken by two Fluor Hanford projects for implementing of the seismic design criteria from DOE-STD-1189-2008, Appendix A. The existing seismic design criteria and the new seismic design criteria is described, and an assessment of the primary differences provided. The gaps within the new system of seismic design criteria, which necessitate conduct of portions of work to the existing technical standards pending availability of applicable industry standards, is discussed. Two Hanford Site projects currently in the Control Decision (CD)-1 phase of design have developed an approach to implementation of the new criteria. Calculations have been performed to determine the seismic design category for one project, based on information available in early CD-1. The potential effects of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Appendix A seismic design criteria on the process of project alternatives analysis is discussed. Present of this work is expected to benefit others in the DOE Complex that may be implementing DOE-STD-1189-2008.

OMBERG SK

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermo-mechanical failure criteria for x-ray windows and filters and comparison with experiments  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron x-ray windows are vacuum separators and are usually made of thin beryllium metal. Filters are provided upstream of the window to filter out the soft x-rays to protect the window from overheating and failing. The filters are made of thin carbon products or sometimes beryllium, the same material as the window. Because the window is a vacuum separator, understanding its potential structural failure under thermal load is very important. Current structural failure models for the brazed windows and filters under thermal stresses are not very accurate. Existing models have been carefully examined and found to be inconsistent with the actual failure modes of windows tested. Due to the thinness of the filter/window, the most likely failure mode is thermal buckling. In fact, recent synchrotron tests conducted in Japan on window failures bear out this position. In this paper, failure criteria for filters/windows are proposed, and analyses are performed and compared with the experimental results from various sources. A consistent result is found between the analysis and reported experiments. A series of additional analyses based on the proposed failure criteria is also carried out for filter and window designs for the third generation synchrotron beamline front ends. Comparative results are presented here.

Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Summary of comments received from workshops on radiological criteria for decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning of NRC-licensed facilities. Open public meetings were held during 1993 in Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, and Washington, DC. Interested parties were invited to provide input on the rulemaking issues before the NRC staff develops a draft proposed rule. This report summarizes 3,635 comments categorized from transcripts of the seven workshops and 1,677 comments from 100 NRC docketed letters from individuals and organizations. No analysis or response to the comments is included. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints on the issues related to radiological criteria for site cleanup and decommissioning. The NRC also held public meetings on the scope of the Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) during July 1993. The GEIS meetings were held in Washington, DC., San Francisco, CA, Oklahoma City, OK, and Cleveland, OH. Related comments from these meetings were reviewed and comments which differed substantially from those from the workshops are also summarized in the body of the report. A summary of the comments from the GEIS scoping meetings is included as an Appendix.

Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

W.R. Solonick

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Stability and design criteria studies for compressed air energy storage reservoirs. Progress report, FY 1977.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made during FY-1977 in establishing design criteria to ensure the successful operation and long-term stability of Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) reservoirs in underground porous media, such as aquifers is summarized. The formulation of pertinent criteria is important since the long-term stability of air storage reservoirs is probably the item of greatest risk to the successful demonstration and commercialization of the CAES concept. The study has been divided into four phases: (1) state-of-the-art survey, (2) analytical modeling studies, (3) laboratory studies, and (4) field testing. The first of these phases, the state-of-the-art survey for air storage in porous reservoirs, has been completed on schedule and is reported in Section 2. Sections 3 and 4 are progress reports on Phases 2 and 3. No work has been done on Phase 4. It is planned that the field testing phase of this study will be carried out in conjunction with the Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE/EPRI) CAES Demonstration Program. This phase is not scheduled to begin until FY-1979.

Smith, G.C.; Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wiles, L.E.; Loscutoff, W.V.; Pincus, H.J.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Multi-attribute criteria applied to electric generation energy system analysis LDRD.  

SciTech Connect

This report began with a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve Sandia National Laboratories multidisciplinary capabilities in energy systems analysis. The aim is to understand how various electricity generating options can best serve needs in the United States. The initial product is documented in a series of white papers that span a broad range of topics, including the successes and failures of past modeling studies, sustainability, oil dependence, energy security, and nuclear power. Summaries of these projects are included here. These projects have provided a background and discussion framework for the Energy Systems Analysis LDRD team to carry out an inter-comparison of many of the commonly available electric power sources in present use, comparisons of those options, and efforts needed to realize progress towards those options. A computer aid has been developed to compare various options based on cost and other attributes such as technological, social, and policy constraints. The Energy Systems Analysis team has developed a multi-criteria framework that will allow comparison of energy options with a set of metrics that can be used across all technologies. This report discusses several evaluation techniques and introduces the set of criteria developed for this LDRD.

Kuswa, Glenn W.; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Drennen, Thomas E.; Zuffranieri, Jason V.; Paananen, Orman Henrie; Jones, Scott A.; Ortner, Juergen G. (DLR, German Aerospace, Cologne); Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Valdez, Maximo M.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-flow sampling criteria" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Multi-criteria decision analysis for waste management in Saharawi refugee camps  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to compare different waste management solutions in Saharawi refugee camps (Algeria) and to test the feasibility of a decision-making method developed to be applied in particular conditions in which environmental and social aspects must be considered. It is based on multi criteria analysis, and in particular on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a mathematical technique for multi-criteria decision making (Saaty, T.L., 1980. The Analytic Hierarchy Process. McGraw-Hill, New York, USA; Saaty, T.L., 1990. How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process. European Journal of Operational Research; Saaty, T.L., 1994. Decision Making for Leaders: The Analytic Hierarchy Process in a Complex World. RWS Publications, Pittsburgh, PA), and on participatory approach, focusing on local community's concerns. The research compares four different waste collection and management alternatives: waste collection by using three tipper trucks, disposal and burning in an open area; waste collection by using seven dumpers and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using seven dumpers and three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill. The results show that the second and the third solutions provide better scenarios for waste management. Furthermore, the discussion of the results points out the multidisciplinarity of the approach, and the equilibrium between social, environmental and technical impacts. This is a very important aspect in a humanitarian and environmental project, confirming the appropriateness of the chosen method.

Garfi, M. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: marianna.garfi@mail.ing.unibo.it; Tondelli, S. [DAPT, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Bonoli, A. [DICMA, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, I-40131 Bologna (Italy)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reactor options for disposition of excess weapon plutonium: Selection criteria and decision process for assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE is currently considering a wide range of alternatives for disposition of excess weapon plutonium, including using plutonium in mixed oxide fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been tasked to assist DOE in its efforts to develop a decision process and criteria for evaluating the technologies and reactor designs that have been proposed for the fission disposition alternative. This report outlines an approach for establishing such a decision process and selection criteria. The approach includes the capability to address multiple, sometimes conflicting, objectives, and to incorporate the impact of uncertainty. The approach has a firm theoretical foundation and similar approaches have been used successfully by private industry, DOE, and other government agencies to support and document complex, high impact technology choice decisions. Because of their similarity and relatively simple technology, this report focuses on three light water reactors studied in Phase 1 of the DOE Plutonium Disposition Study. The decision process can be extended to allow evaluation of other reactor technologies and disposition options such as direct disposal and retrievable storage.

Edmunds, T.; Buonpane, L.; Sicherman, A.; Sutcliffe, W.; Walter, C.; Holman, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

U.S. NRC CONFIRMATORY LEVEL 1 PRA SUCCESS CRITERIA ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s standardized plant analysis risk (SPAR) models are used to support a number of risk-informed initiatives. The fidelity and realism of these models are ensured through a number of processes including cross-comparison with industry models, review and use by a wide range of technical experts, and confirmatory analysis. This paper will describe a key activity in the latter arena. Specifically, this paper will describe MELCOR analyses performed to augment the technical basis for confirming or modifying specific success criteria of interest. The analyses that will be summarized provide the basis for confirming or changing success criteria in a specific 3-loop pressurized-water reactor and a Mark-I boiling-water reactor. Initiators that have been analyzed include loss-of-coolant accidents, loss of main feedwater, spontaneous steam generator tube rupture, inadvertent opening of a relief valve at power, and station blackout. For each initiator, specific aspects of the accident evolution are investigated via a targeted set of calculations (3 to 22 distinct accident analyses per initiator). Further evaluation is ongoing to extend the analyses’ conclusions to similar plants (where appropriate), with consideration of design and modeling differences on a scenario-by-scenario basis. This paper will also describe future plans.

Donald Helton; Hossein Esmaili; Robert Buell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Diode (LED) Fixture Design and Installation Criteria for Interior and Exterior Lighting Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose. This ETL provides technical guidance and criteria for specifying, designing, and installing LED luminaires for interior and exterior lighting applications at Air Force installations. It supersedes ETL 10-18 of the same title, dated 13 December 2010. It updates guidance in ETL 10-18 regarding: (1) required calculations for LED investment decisions; (2) retrofit design requirements; (3) applicable prohibitions; and (4) environmental considerations. Requirements in this ETL are mandatory. Deviations require approval from the Air Force Electrical SME, HQ AFCESA/CEOA. Requests for deviations must be coordinated through the MAJCOM before submitting to HQ AFCESA/CEOA. Note: LED applications not specifically addressed in this ETL or Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) 3-530-01, Interior and Exterior Lighting and Controls, require HQ AFCESA/CEOA approval. Note: Use of the name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this ETL does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. Summary of Revisions: Corrected references to applicable ETLs. 2. Application. This ETL does not apply to LED airfield lighting systems, including, but

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Diode (LED) Fixture Design and Installation Criteria for Interior and Exterior Lighting Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose. This ETL provides technical guidance and criteria for specifying, designing, and installing LED luminaires for interior and exterior lighting applications at Air Force installations. It supersedes ETL 12-4 of the same title, dated 17 February 2012. Requirements in this ETL are mandatory. Deviations require approval from the Air Force Electrical SME, AFCEC/COS. Requests for deviations must be coordinated through the MAJCOM before submitting to AFCEC/CO. Note: LED applications not specifically addressed in this ETL or Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) 3-530-01, Interior and Exterior Lighting and Controls, require AFCESA/CEOA approval. Note: Use of the name or mark of any specific manufacturer, commercial product, commodity, or service in this ETL does not imply endorsement by the Air Force. 2. Summary of Revisions: Updates reference (paragraph 4.3). 3. Application. This ETL does not apply to LED airfield lighting systems, including, but not limited to, taxiway, obstruction, runway edge, threshold, or approach lighting

Tyndall Air; Force Base Florida

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Summary of comments received on staff draft proposed rule on radiological criteria for decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an enhanced participatory rulemaking to establish radiological criteria for the decommissioning of NRC licensed facilities. The NRC obtained comments on the scope, issues, and approaches through a series of workshops (57 FR 58727), Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) scoping meetings (58 FR 33570), a dedicated electronic bulletin board system (58 FR 37760), and written submissions. A summary of workshop and scope-meeting comments was published as NUREG/CR-6156. On February 2, 1994, the Commission published in the Federal Register (59 FR 4868) a notice that the NRC staff had prepared a ``staff draft`` proposed rule on radiological criteria for decommissioning. Copies of the staff draft were distributed to the Agreement States, participants in the earlier meetings, and other interested parties for comment. This report summarizes the comments identified from the 96 docketed letters received on the staff draft. No analysis or response is included in this report. The comments reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints. Two subjects on which the commenters were in general agreement were (1) that the enhanced participatory rulemaking should proceed, and (2) that the forthcoming GEIS and guidance documents are needed for better understanding of the draft rule.

Caplin, J.; Page, G.; Smith, D.; Wiblin, C. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Yield criteria for quasibrittle and frictional materials: a generalization to surfaces with corners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convexity of a yield function (or phase-transformation function) and its relations to convexity of the corresponding yield surface (or phase-transformation surface) is essential to the invention, definition and comparison with experiments of new yield (or phase-transformation) criteria. This issue was previously addressed only under the hypothesis of smoothness of the surface, but yield surfaces with corners (for instance, the Hill, Tresca or Coulomb-Mohr yield criteria) are known to be of fundamental importance in plasticity theory. The generalization of a proposition relating convexity of the function and the corresponding surface to nonsmooth yield and phase-transformation surfaces is provided in this paper, together with the (necessary to the proof) extension of a theorem on nonsmooth elastic potential functions. While the former of these generalizations is crucial for yield and phase-transformation condition, the latter may find applications for potential energy functions describing phase-transforming materials, or materials with discontinuous locking in tension, or contact of a body with a discrete elastic/frictional support.

Andrea Piccolroaz; Davide Bigoni

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Boiling Water Reactor Sampling Summary: 2012 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents boiling water reactor (BWR) sampling practices for key reactor water and feedwater parameters. It includes information on analysis methods, sampling frequencies, and compliance with the recommended sampling frequencies in BWRVIP-190: BWR Vessels and Internals Project, BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision (EPRI report 1016579).

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

On random sampling auctions for digital goods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of auctions for digital goods, an interesting Random Sampling Optimal Price auction (RSOP) has been proposed by Goldberg, Hartline and Wright; this leads to a truthful mechanism. Since random sampling is a popular approach for auctions ... Keywords: auction, mechanism design, random sampling

Saeed Alaei; Azarakhsh Malekian; Aravind Srinivasan

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

451

Quality control of chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic analyses of geothermal water samples must meet certain levels of accuracy and reliability to be useful for identifying geochemical processes in hydrothermal systems. Quality control is largely a concern for the analytical laboratory, but the geochemist or reservoir engineer using the chemical data must also be concerned with analytical quality. To test accuracy and reliability of analyses available from laboratories, splits of seven water samples were sent to four stable-isotope laboratories, and splits of five water samples were sent to four chemical laboratories. The analyses of each sample were compared among laboratories, and the differences in analyses were evaluated using criteria developed for this comparison. Isotopic compositions were considered reliable if they deviated from mean values by less than 2{per_thousand}, for hydrogen and by less than 0.15{per_thousand}, for oxygen. Concentrations of each chemical component were considered reliable if they differed from mean values by less than 10%. Chemical analyses were examined for internal consistency by calculating the error in ionic charge balance and the error between ionic charge and electrical conductivity. To be considered internally consistent, chemical analyses must have less than 5% error in charge balance and less than 10% error in conductivity balance. Three isotope laboratories gave consistent compositions of all samples. No chemical laboratory gave consistent analyses of all samples. Recommendations are made that provide the user of isotopic and chemical data with the ability to better evaluate the quality of analyses.

Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement  

SciTech Connect

The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2.

Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C. [Southwest Research Institute (United States)

1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

453

Assessment of the 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20°, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow -angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The 3430 stack was tested in both January and May of 2010 to document the results of several changes that were made to the exhaust system after the January tests. The 3430 stack meets the qualification criteria given in the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliancewith the requirements.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Assessment of the Building 3430 Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Pathway Stack . The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20°, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Pathway stack. Therefore, this new system also meets the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliance to the requirements.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

Buildings characterization sampling plan, Weldon Spring Site  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Buildings Sampling Plan is to provide a systematic approach to characterizing radiological, asbestos and chemical contamination in and around the buildings and structures at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant Site (WSCPS). This sampling plan reviews historical information; identifies data needs; and outlines sampling procedures, quality assurance, data documentation and reporting requirements for the buildings and equipment characterization at the Weldon Spring Site (WSS). The scope of this plan is limited to the buildings, structures, and equipment from the previous operation of the WSCPS. The Buildings Sampling Plan is divided into nine sections: introduction, background, data needs and sampling plan objectives, sampling rationale and procedure, sample analysis, quality assurance, data documentation, reporting requirements, and references. The data needs, sampling rationale and procedures and sample analysis sections of this work plan are subdivided into radiological, asbestos and chemical sections. Because different sampling techniques and analyses will be required for radiological, asbestos and chemical contamination, separate subsections are used. The investigations for each contaminant will be conducted independently. Similar historical and descriptive information is repeated in the subsections, but the perspective and information vary slightly. 24 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Air sampling in the workplace. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides technical information on air sampling that will be useful for facilities following the recommendations in the NRC`s Regulatory Guide 8.25, Revision 1, ``Air sampling in the Workplace.`` That guide addresses air sampling to meet the requirements in NRC`s regulations on radiation protection, 10 CFR Part 20. This report describes how to determine the need for air sampling based on the amount of material in process modified by the type of material, release potential, and confinement of the material. The purposes of air sampling and how the purposes affect the types of air sampling provided are discussed. The report discusses how to locate air samplers to accurately determine the concentrations of airborne radioactive materials that workers will be exposed to. The need for and the methods of performing airflow pattern studies to improve the accuracy of air sampling results are included. The report presents and gives examples of several techniques that can be used to evaluate whether the airborne concentrations of material are representative of the air inhaled by workers. Methods to adjust derived air concentrations for particle size are described. Methods to calibrate for volume of air sampled and estimate the uncertainty in the volume of air sampled are described. Statistical tests for determining minimum detectable concentrations are presented. How to perform an annual evaluation of the adequacy of the air sampling is also discussed.

Hickey, E.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Strom, D.J.; Cicotte, G.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wiblin, C.M. [Advanced Systems Technology, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Status report on the collection and preparation of coal samples for the Ames Laboratory Coal Library  

SciTech Connect

In comparing and evaluating experimental results on coal generated in different laboratories, or even within the same laboratory, it is necessary to begin the work on samples which are reproducibly equivalent. Also, there must be a sufficient store of the material for ongoing investigations. Thus, the problem is difficult because of the heterogeneity of coal, both at the large bulk level and at the microscopic sample level. This affects the capability to assess the significance of discrepancies in experimental results among laboratories, even if the experimental conditions are carefully controlled. In collecting coal samples from a mine or a preparation plant, considerations must be made to assure a representative bulk sampling and to reduce the material into suitable working samples which accurately and reproducibly reflect the composition of the bulk sample. At the collection site, changes in the coal occur immediately upon exposure to air, resulting in marked deterioration of caking properties, solubility, tar yield, heating value, and other properties. This necessitates that measures be followed to preserve the samples in ''inert'' environments as much as possible. Thus, at each point the collection, transportation, preparation, storage, and preservation of the samples must be rigorously controlled and reproducibly implemented. Such precautions are emphasized in descriptions of the Penn State and the Exxon coal collections. This interim report provides information on an approach to establish a coal library at the Ames Laboratory. The coals serve as a collection of well-characterized materials for both the laboratory's own staff and, eventually, for other interested investigators. This report documents our efforts to date and includes the criteria for coal selection, the procedure for coal sampling, and the techniques utilized in the prevention of changes in the coals throughout the period prior to utilization. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Biggs, D.L.; Birlingmair, D.H.; Fisher, R.W.; Greer, R.T.; Kaelin, R.A.; Markuszewski, R.; Smith, B.F.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.; Wheelock, T.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Engineering Design and Safety Basis Inspection Criteria, Inspection Activities, and Lines of Inquiry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight Criteria Review and Approach Document 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Independent Oversight, the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Evaluations' mission is to assess the effectiveness of environment, safety, and health systems and practices used by line and contractor organizations in implementing Integrated Safety Management and to provide clear, concise, and independent evaluations of performance in protecting our workers, the public, and the environment from the hazards associated with Department of Energy (DOE) activities and sites. A key to success is the rigor and comprehensiveness of our process; and as with any process, we continually strive to improve and provide additional value and insight to field operations. Integral to this is our commitment to

459

Specific Administrative Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, CRAD 64-32  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight Criteria Review and Approval Document Within the Office of Independent Oversight, the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Evaluations' mission is to assess the effectiveness of those environment, safety, and health systems and practices used by field organizations in implementing Integrated Safety Management and to provide clear, concise, and independent evaluations of performance in protecting our workers, the public, and the environment from the hazards associated with Department of Energy (DOE) activities and sites. A key to success is the rigor and comprehensiveness of our process; and as with any process, we continually strive to improve and provide additional value and insight to field operations. Integral to this is our commitment to

460

DOE-STD-0100T; DOE Standard Licensed Reactor Nuclear Safety Criteria Applicable to DOE Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00T 00T November 1993 Superseding DOE/NE-0100T April 1991 DOE STANDARD LICENSED REACTOR NUCLEAR SAFETY CRITERIA APPLICABLE TO DOE REACTORS U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 AREA SAFT DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly frorn the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE94005221 CONTENTS

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