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1

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating...

2

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

3

HANFORD'S SIMULATED LOW ACTIVITY WASTE CAST STONE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

Kim, Y.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Partitioning of Rhenium during Melting of Low-activity Waste Glass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Volatile loss of radioactive 99Tc to offgas is a concern with processing the low-activity waste (LAW) at Hanford site in to a ...

5

(FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

6

THE TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY AQUEOUS WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The equipment and treatment methods for processing low-activity aqueous wastes at the Latina nuclear power station are discussed. The effluent treatment plant serves two purposes: purification of cooling pond water and decontamination of aqueous wastes from such outlets as regenerant solutions, active laundry and change houses, decontamination center, coffin washing, and charge machine washing. The treatment process consists of chemical precipitation followed by filtration of the sludges thus produced. The process is then followed by ion exchange on a natural inorganic material such as vermiculite and evaporation. This process produces a decontamination factor of l0/sup 3/ to 10/ sup 4/. (N.W.R.)

Cartwright, A.C.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste  

SciTech Connect

Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of I 00+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory ofthis waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most ofthe leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's...

9

Summary - System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford EM Project: WTP ETR Report Date: November 2008 ETR-18 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review Construction of the facilities of the Hanford site's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) are scheduled for completion in 2017, with radioactive waste processing scheduled to begin in 2019. An estimated 23 to 35 years will then be required to complete high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. However, vitrification of low-activity waste (LAW) may extend the WTP mission duration by decades more if supplemental LAW processing beyond the capacity of the present facility is not incorporated. The purpose of this independent review was to

10

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) WITH HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radioactive Demonstrations Of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) With Hanford Low Activity Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One immobilization technology being considered is Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) which offers a low temperature (700-750?C) continuous method by which wastes high in organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, or other aqueous components may be processed into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The granular waste form produced by co-processing the waste with kaolin clay has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. The FBSR granular product will be monolithed into a final waste form. The granular component is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals such as sodalite. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial, engineering, pilot, and laboratory scales on simulants. Radioactive testing at SRNL commenced in late 2010 to demonstrate the technology on radioactive LAW streams which is the focus of this study.

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Burket, P. R.; Bannochie, C. J.; Daniel, W. G.; Nash, C. A.; Cozzi, A. D.; Herman, C. C.

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

13

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process Systems Hazards Analysis Activity Review, March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review Dates of Activity : 03/18/13 - 03/21/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach

14

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-activity waste grout stabilization development program FY-97 status report  

SciTech Connect

The general purpose of the Grout Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-activity wastes (LAW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LAW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste, (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines, (3) facility decontamination processes, and (4) process equipment waste. Grout formulation studies for sodium-bearing LAW, including decontamination and process equipment waste, continued this fiscal year. A second task was to develop a grout formulation to solidify potential process residual heels in the tank farm vessels when the vessels are closed.

Herbst, A.K.; Marshall, D.W.; McCray, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

WASTE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE RECYCLE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble components are mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, causing uncertainty in its composition, particularly the radionuclide content. This plan will provide an estimate of the likely composition and the basis for it, assess likely treatment technologies, identify potential disposition paths, establish target treatment limits, and recommend the testing needed to show feasibility. Two primary disposition options are proposed for investigation, one is concentration for storage in the tank farms, and the other is treatment prior to disposition in the Effluent Treatment Facility. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Recycle stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of 210,000 years. Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Because {sup 99}Tc has a very long half-life and is highly mobile, it is the largest dose contributor to the Performance Assessment (PA) of the IDF. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Recycle are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. The concentrations of these radionuclides in this stream will be much lower than in the LAW, but they will still be higher than limits for some of the other disposition pathways currently available. Although the baseline process will recycle this stream to the Pretreatment Facility, if the LAW facility begins operation first, this stream will not have a disposition path internal to WTP. One potential solution is to return the stream to the tank farms where it can be evaporated in the 242- A evaporator, or perhaps deploy an auxiliary evaporator to concentrate it prior to return to the tank farms. In either case, testing is needed to evalua

McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Phase 1 immobilized low-activity waste operational source term  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an engineering analysis of the Phase 1 privatization feeds to establish an operational source term for storage and disposal of immobilized low-activity waste packages at the Hanford Site. The source term information is needed to establish a preliminary estimate of the numbers of remote-handled and contact-handled waste packages. A discussion of the uncertainties and their impact on the source term and waste package distribution is also presented. It should be noted that this study is concerned with operational impacts only. Source terms used for accident scenarios would differ due to alpha and beta radiation which were not significant in this study.

Burbank, D.A.

1998-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

17

Vitrification of Three Low-Activity Radioactive Waste Streams from Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a demonstration for British Nuclear Fuels Limited, Incorporated (BNFL), the Immobilization Technology Section (ITS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has produced and characterized three low-activity waste (LAW) glasses from Hanford radioactive waste samples. The three LAW glasses were produced from radioactive supernate samples that had been treated by the Waste Processing Technology Section (WPTS) at SRTC to remove most of the radionuclides. These three glasses were produced by mixing the waste streams with between four and nine glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to between 1120 and 1150 degrees C. Compositions of the resulting glass waste forms were close to the target compositions. Low concentrations of radionuclides in the LAW feed streams and, therefore, in the glass waste forms supported WPTS conclusions that pretreatment had been successful. No crystals were detected in the LAW glasses. In addition, all glass waste forms passed the leach tests that were performed. These included a 20 degrees C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

Ferrara, D.M.; Crawford, C.L.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-level fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the by-product of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste has been stored in underground single and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low and high-activity fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at Hanford until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to issue a Disposal Authorization Statement that would allow the modification of the four existing concrete disposal vaults to provide better access for emplacement of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) containers; filling of the modified vaults with the approximately 5,000 ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers; construction of the first set of next-generation disposal facilities. The performance assessment activity will continue beyond this assessment. The activity will collect additional data on the geotechnical features of the disposal sites, the disposal facility design and construction, and the long-term performance of the waste. Better estimates of long-term performance will be produced and reviewed on a regular basis. Performance assessments supporting closure of filled facilities will be issued seeking approval of those actions necessary to conclude active disposal facility operations. This report also analyzes the long-term performance of the currently planned disposal system as a basis to set requirements on the waste form and the facility design that will protect the long-term public health and safety and protect the environment.

Mann, F.M.

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

19

Initial Selection of Supplemental Treatment Technologies for Hanford's Low-Activity Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years (DOE 2002). A key element of the accelerated cleanup plan was a strategic initiative for acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of "tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (ETP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization." The plan identified specific technologies to be evaluated for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). The objective was to complete required testing and evaluation that would "...bring an appropriate combination of the above technologies to deployment to supplement LAW treatment and immobilization in the WTP to achieve the completion of tank waste treatment by 2028." In concert with this acceleration plan, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology have proposed to accelerate from 2012 to 2005 the Hanford Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone (M-62-08) associated with a final decision on treatment of the balance of tank waste that is beyond the capacity of the currently designed WTP.

Raymond, Richard E.; Powell, Roger W.; Hamilton, Dennis W.; Kitchen, William A.; Mauss, Billie M.; Brouns, Thomas M.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Review of System Planning Technical Review of System Planning for Low-Activity Waste Treatment at Hanford November 2008 Dr. David S. Kosson, Vanderbilt University Dr. David R. Gallay, Logistics Management Institute Dr. Ian L. Pegg, The Catholic University of America Dr. Ray G. Wymer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ret.) Dr. Steven Krahn, U. S. Department of Energy ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The Review Team thanks Mr. Ben Harp, Office of River Protection (ORP), and Mr. James Honeyman, CH2M HILL, for their exceptional support during this review. Mr. Harp was the lead Department of Energy (DOE) representative responsible for organizing reviews held on-site by the Review Team. Mr. Honeyman, and his staff, provided responsive support through technical presentations, telephone conferences, and numerous reference documents.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR HANFORD'S LOW ACTIVITY WASTE AND SECONDARY WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of I-125/129 and Tc-99 to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Ninety six grams of radioactive product were made for testing. The second campaign commenced using SRS LAW chemically trimmed to look like Hanford's LAW. Six hundred grams of radioactive product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Cozzi, A.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Daniel, G.

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

22

DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project  

SciTech Connect

The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-activity waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This statement of work describes the work scope (encompassing definition of new installations and retrofit modifications to four existing grout vaults), to be performed by the Architect-Engineer, in preparation of a conceptual design for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage Facility.

Carlson, T.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING WITH ACUTAL HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTES VERIFYING FBSR AS A SUPPLEMENTARY TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the cleanup mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplementary treatments being considered. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and other secondary wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates/nitrites, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, and/or radio-nuclides like I-129 and Tc-99. Radioactive testing of Savannah River LAW (Tank 50) shimmed to resemble Hanford LAW and actual Hanford LAW (SX-105 and AN-103) have produced a ceramic (mineral) waste form which is the same as the non-radioactive waste simulants tested at the engineering scale. The radioactive testing demonstrated that the FBSR process can retain the volatile radioactive components that cannot be contained at vitrification temperatures. The radioactive and nonradioactive mineral waste forms that were produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process are shown to be as durable as LAW glass.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Bannochie, C.; Daniel, G.; Nash, C.; Cozzi, A.; Herman, C.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

25

X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop XRF analytical methods that provide the rapid turnaround time (with the objective of optimizing the XRF methodology. Three XRF sample methods used for preparing the LAW sub-sample for XRF analysis were studied: direct liquid analysis, dried spot, and fused glass. The direct liquid method was selected because its major advantage is that the LAW can be analyzed directly without any sample alteration that could bias the method accuracy. It also is the fastest preparation technique--a typical XRF measurement could be completed in with percent relative standard deviations (%RSDs) % for most elements in filtered solution. There were some issues with a few elements precipitating out of solution over time affecting the long term precision of the method. Additional research will need to be performed to resolve this sample stability problem. Activities related to methodology optimization in the Phase 1b portion of the study were eliminated as a result of WTP request to discontinue remaining activities due to funding reduction. These preliminary studies demonstrate that developing an XRF method to support the LAW vitrification plant is feasible. When funding is restored for the WTP, it is recommended that optimization of this technology should be pursued.

Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

INITIAL SELECTION OF SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR HANFORDS LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

In 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified specific technologies to be evaluated for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). In concert with this acceleration plan, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology proposed to accelerate--from 2014 to 2006--the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone (M-62-11) associated with a final decision on the balance of tank waste that is beyond the capacity of the WTP. The DOE Office of River Protection tank farm contractor, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL), was tasked with testing and evaluating selected supplemental technologies to support final decisions on tank waste treatment. Three technologies and corresponding vendors were selected to support an initial technology selection in 2003. The three technologies were containerized grout called cast stone (Fluor Federal Services); bulk vitrification (AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc.); and steam reforming (THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC.). The cast stone process applies an effective grout waste formulation to the LAW and places the cement-based product in a large container for solidification and disposal. Unlike the WTP LAW treatment, which applies vitrification within continuous-fed joule-heated ceramic melters, bulk vitrification produces a glass waste form using batch melting within the disposal container. Steam reforming produces a granular denitrified mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. An initial supplemental technology selection was completed in December 2003, enabling DOE and CH2M HILL to focus investments in 2004 on the testing and production-scale demonstrations needed to support the 2006 milestone.

RAYMOND, R.E.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Design requirements document for project W-465, immobilized low activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this design requirements document is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity.

Burbank, D.A.

1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

28

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING FOR TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of fluidized bed steam reforming and its possible application to treat and immobilize Hanford low-activity waste.

HEWITT WM

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

29

BULK VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

ARD KE

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

30

A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

KELLY SE

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

32

TWRS Retrieval and Storage Mission and Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project plan has a twofold purpose. First, it provides a waste stream project plan specific to the River Protection Project (RPP) (formerly the Tank Waste Remediation System [TWRS] Project) Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Disposal Subproject for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) that meets the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-90-01 (Ecology et al. 1994) and is consistent with the project plan content guidelines found in Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement action plan (Ecology et al. 1998). Second, it provides an upper tier document that can be used as the basis for future subproject line-item construction management plans. The planning elements for the construction management plans are derived from applicable U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance documents (DOE Orders 4700.1 [DOE 1992] and 430.1 [DOE 1995a]). The format and content of this project plan are designed to accommodate the requirements mentioned by the Tri-Party Agreement and the DOE orders. A cross-check matrix is provided in Appendix A to explain where in the plan project planning elements required by Section 11.5 of the Tri-Party Agreement are addressed.

BURBANK, D.A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the design and total estimated cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW).

Pickett, W.W.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

Design requirements document for project W-520, immobilized low-activity waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

This design requirements document (DRD) identifies the functions that must be performed to accept, handle, and dispose of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) private treatment contractors and close the facility. It identifies the requirements that are associated with those functions and that must be met. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized Low-Activity Waste disposal facility project (W-520) and provides traceability from the program-level requirements to the project design activity.

Ashworth, S.C.

1998-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feed Composition Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low- Activity Waste Glass Mass J.D. Vienna & D.S. Kim - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory I.L. Pegg - Catholic University of America 1 LAW Glass Loading Limits WTP baseline (LAW Glass Formulation Algorithm) low uncertainty  thoroughly tested accounts for Na, S, Cl, F, Cr, K, and P impacts conservative loading Advanced silicate formulation higher uncertainty than baseline currently accounts for Na and S impacts impacts of other components not specifically tested, but, one can evaluate maxima from testing as a lower bound 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 SO 3 (target) wt% in Glass Na 2 O (target) wt% in Glass SO 3 ≤ 0.77 wt% Na 2 O ≤ 35.875 - 42.5*SO 3 (in wt%) Na 2 O ≤ 21 wt% Na 2 O + 0.66*K

36

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

Pickett, W.W.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Lessons learned from reactive transport modeling of a low-activity waste glass disposal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of reactive chemical transport calculations were conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal ... Keywords: chemical transport, low-level waste, numerical model, unsaturated flow, vadose zone

Diana H. Bacon; B. Peter McGrail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level waste, for disposal is a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

Petersen, C.A.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

MINWALL HJ

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

Preliminary Closure Plan for the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the preliminary plans for closure of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) disposal facility to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. The facility will provide near-surface disposal of up to 204,000 cubic meters of ILAW in engineered trenches with modified RCRA Subtitle C closure barriers.

BURBANK, D.A.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Generic Technical Basis for Implementing a Very Low Level Waste Category for Disposal of Low Activity Radioactive Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has recognized Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) as a category that provides both practical and economic benefits. Implementation of VLLW in the international community has been successfully demonstrated in France and Spain, as described in EPRI report 1024844, Basis for National and International Low Activity and Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) Disposal Classifications. This report presents the technical basis for a waste category of Very Low Level ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

Data Packages for the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment 2001 Version [SEC 1 THRU 5  

SciTech Connect

Data package supporting the 2001 Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Analysis. Geology, hydrology, geochemistry, facility, waste form, and dosimetry data based on recent investigation are provided. Verification and benchmarking packages for selected software codes are provided.

MANN, F.M.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK FARM BLEND) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at 6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Simmons, R. F.; Palethorpe, S. J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

DESIGN OF THE DEMOSNTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

In June 2004, the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) was initiated with the intent to design, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109. The DBVS facility uses In-Container Vitrification{trademark} (ICV{trademark}) at the core of the treatment process. The basic process steps combine liquid low-activity waste (LAW) and glassformers; dry the mixture; and then vitrify the mixture in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. Off-gases are processed through a state-of-the-art air pollution control system including sintered-metal filtration, thermal oxidation, acid gas scrubbing, and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and high-efficiency gas adsorber (HEGA) filtration. Testing has focused on development and validation of the waste dryer, ICV, and sintered-metal filters (SMFs) equipment, operations enhancements, and glass formulation. With a parallel testing and design process, testing has allowed improvements to the DBVS equipment configuration and operating methodology, since its original inception. Design improvements include optimization of refractory panels in the ICV, simplifying glassformer addition equipment, increasing the number of waste feed chutes to the ICV, and adding capability for remote clean-out of piping, In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided an independent review of the entire DBVS process. While the review did not find any fatal flaws, some technical issues were identified that required a re-evaluation of the DBVS design and subsequent changes to the design. A 100 percent design package for the pilot plant will be completed and submitted to DOE for review in early 2008 that incorporates process improvements substantiated through testing and reviews. This paper provides a description of the bulk vitrification process and a discussion of major equipment design changes that have occurred based on full-scale testing over the past two years and DOE reviews.

VAN BEEK JE

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Design requirements document for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the TWRS ILAW Interim Storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity. Technical and programmatic risk associated with the TWRS planning basis are discussed in the Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The design requirements provided in this document will be augmented by additional detailed design data documented by the project.

Burbank, D.A.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Round-robin testing of a reference glass for low-activity waste forms  

SciTech Connect

A round robin test program was conducted with a glass that was developed for use as a standard test material for acceptance testing of low-activity waste glasses made with Hanford tank wastes. The glass is referred to as the low-activity test reference material (LRM). The program was conducted to measure the interlaboratory reproducibility of composition analysis and durability test results. Participants were allowed to select the methods used to analyze the glass composition. The durability tests closely followed the Product Consistency Test (PCT) Method A, except that tests were conducted at both 40 and 90 C and that parallel tests with a reference glass were not required. Samples of LRM glass that had been crushed, sieved, and washed to remove fines were provided to participants for tests and analyses. The reproducibility of both the composition and PCT results compare favorably with the results of interlaboratory studies conducted with other glasses. From the perspective of reproducibility of analysis results, this glass is acceptable for use as a composition standard for nonradioactive components of low-activity waste forms present at >0.1 elemental mass % and as a test standard for PCTS at 40 and 90 C. For PCT with LRM glass, the expected test results at the 95% confidence level are as follows: (1) at 40 C: pH = 9.86 {+-} 0.96; [B] = 2.30 {+-} 1.25 mg/L; [Na] = 19.7 {+-} 7.3 mg/L; [Si] = 13.7 {+-} 4.2 mg/L; and (2) at 90 C: pH = 10.92 {+-} 0.43; [B] = 26.7 {+-} 7.2 mg/L; [Na] = 160 {+-} 13 mg/L; [Si] = 82.0 {+-} 12.7 mg/L. These ranges can be used to evaluate the accuracy of PCTS conducted at other laboratories.

Ebert, W. L.; Wolf, S. F.

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

MINERALIZING, STEAM REFORMING TREATMENT OF HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE (a.k.a. INEEL/EXT-05-02526)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.4 hours of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process achieved essentially complete bed turnover within approximately 40 hours. Samples of mineralized solid product materials were analyzed for chemical/physical properties. SRNL will report separately the results of product performance testing that were accomplished.

A. L. Olson; N. R. Soelberg; D. W. Marshall; G. L. Anderson

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Immobilized low-activity waste site borehole 299-E17-21  

SciTech Connect

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is the group at the Hanford Site responsible for the safe underground storage of liquid waste from previous Hanford Site operations, the storage and disposal of immobilized tank waste, and closure of underground tanks. The current plan is to dispose of immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) in new facilities in the southcentral part of 200-East Area and in four existing vaults along the east side of 200-East Area. Boreholes 299-E17-21, B8501, and B8502 were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site in support of the Performance Assessment activities for the disposal options. This report summarizes the initial geologic findings, field tests conducted on those boreholes, and ongoing studies. One deep (480 feet) borehole and two shallow (50 feet) boreholes were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site. The primary factor dictating the location of the boreholes was their characterization function with respect to developing the geohydrologic model for the site and satisfying associated Data Quality Objectives. The deep borehole was drilled to characterize subsurface conditions beneath the ILAW site, and two shallow boreholes were drilled to support an ongoing environmental tracer study. The tracer study will supply information to the Performance Assessment. All the boreholes provide data on the vadose zone and saturated zone in a previously uncharacterized area.

Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.; Horton, D.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method for disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in new-surface, shallow land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL's tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information are contained in this report, the Near-Field Hydrology Data Package.

PD Meyer; RJ Serne

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK FARM BLEND) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Supplemental Treatment is likely to be required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP’s LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750°C) continuous method by which LAW can be processed irrespective of whether the waste contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be comparable to LAW glass, i.e. leaches Tc-99, Re and Na at <2g/m2 during ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency) durability testing. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product was investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage. Monolithing in an inorganic geopolymer binder, which is amorphous, macro-encapsulates the granules, and the monoliths pass ANSI/ANS 16.1 and ASTM C1308 durability testing with Re achieving a Leach Index (LI) of 9 (the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, IDF, criteria for Tc-99) after a few days and Na achieving an LI of >6 (the Hanford IDF criteria for Na) in the first few hours. The granular and monolithic waste forms also pass the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for all Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) components at the Universal Treatment Standards (UTS). Two identical Benchscale Steam Reformers (BSR) were designed and constructed at SRNL, one to treat non-radioactive simulants and the other to treat actual radioactive wastes. The results from the non-radioactive BSR were used to determine the parameters needed to operate the radioactive BSR in order to confirm the findings of non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale and engineering scale tests and to qualify an FBSR LAW waste form for applications at Hanford. Radioactive testing commenced using SRS LAW from Tank 50 chemically trimmed to look like Hanford’s blended LAW known as the Rassat simulant as this simulant composition had been tested in the non-radioactive BSR, the non-radioactive pilot scale FBSR at the Science Applications International Corporation-Science and Technology Applications Research (SAIC-STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID and in the TTT Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) in Denver, CO. This provided a “tie back” between radioactive BSR testing and non-radioactive BSR, pilot scale, and engineering scale testing. Approximately six hundred grams of non-radioactive and radioactive BSR product were made for extensive testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests performed in 2004 at SAIC-STAR and the engineering scale test performed in 2008 at HRI with the Rassat simulant. The same mineral phases and off-gas species were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing. The granular ESTD and BSR products (radioactive and non-radioactive) were analyzed for to

Jantzen, C. M.; Crawford, C. L.; Bannochie, C. J.; Burket, P. R.; Cozzi, A. D.; Daniel, W. E.; Hall, H. K.; Miller, D. H.; Missimer, D. M.; Nash, C. A.; Williams, M. F.

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment 2001 Version [Formerly DOE/RL-97-69] [SEC 1 & 2  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the planned disposal of the vitrified low-activity fraction of waste presently contained in Hanford Site tanks. The tank waste is the byproduct of separating special nuclear materials from irradiated nuclear fuels over the past 50 years. This waste is stored in underground single- and double-shell tanks. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low-activity and high-level fractions, and then immobilized by vitrification. The US. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The high-level fraction will be stored at the Hanford Site until a national repository is approved. This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to modify the current Disposal Authorization Statement for the Hanford Site that would allow the following: construction of disposal trenches; and filling of these trenches with ILAW containers and filler material with the intent to dispose of the containers.

MANN, F.M.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

60

Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Control Law (Georgia) Waste Control Law (Georgia) Georgia Waste Control Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Waste Control Law makes it unlawful to dump waste in any lakes, streams

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

62

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity, December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Hanford Site the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity December 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background.......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope and Methodology... ................................................................................................................... 1

63

Basis for National and International Low Activity and Very Low Level Waste Disposal Classifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to determine whether the Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) category would be a viable option in the United States, European and U.S. experiences were reviewed in detail.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

65

River Protection Project (RPP) Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document replaces HNF-1517, Rev 2 which is deleted. It incorporates updates to reflect changes in programmatic direction associated with the vitrification plant contract change and associated DOE/ORP guidance. In addition it incorporates the cancellation of Project W-465, Grout Facility, and the associated modifications to Project W-520, Immobilized High-Level Waste Disposal Facility. It also includes document format changes and section number modifications consistent with CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. procedures.

BRIGGS, M.G.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste plan  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-465 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

Latray, D.A.

1998-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB),  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Compilation of TRA Summaries

68

Low activation ferritic alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

1985-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Low activation ferritic alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wa Wa Schem DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Balanc Activity of this techno facilitie are su WTP d Readin The as along w Level ( * Tw 1. 2. The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States aste Trea Labo Why DOE matic of Laser Ab s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including an ces of Facilities y Waste (LAW assessment w ology elements es (LAB, BOF, fficiently matur design, which n ness Level of 6 What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the L wo LAB system . Autosamplin Laser ablati AES/LA-ICP To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen atment a oratory, B E-EM Did This blation Analytical a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com n Analytical Lab s (BOF) operat ) Vitrification F was to identify t s (CTEs) in the

71

Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an acilities No BOF syst Five LAW sy 1. LAW Me 2. LAW Me 3. LAW Of (TRL6) 4. LAW Co and 5. LAW De e team conclud ature to continu What the e assessment Testing the L Emission Sp...

72

Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant LAW Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis _Oct 21-31  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities Dates of Activity : 10/21/13 - 10/31/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) reviewed the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a

74

SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the quenched glasses. However, the waste form failed to meet the vapor hydration test criteria listed in the WTP contract. In addition, the waste loading in the phosphate glasses were not as high as other candidate waste forms. Vitrification of HLW waste as borosilicate glass is a proven process; however the HLW and LAW streams at Hanford can vary significantly from waste currently being immobilized. The ccc glasses show lower release rates for B and Na than the quenched glasses and all glasses meet the acceptance criterion of < 4 g/L. Glass samples spiked with Re{sub 2}O{sub 7} also passed the PCT test. However, further vapor hydration testing must be performed since all the samples cracked and the test could not be performed. The waste loading of the iron phosphate and borosilicate glasses are approximately 20 and 25% respectively. The steam reforming process produced the predicted waste form for both the high and low aluminate waste streams. The predicted waste loadings for the monolithic samples is approximately 39%, which is higher than the glass waste forms; however, at the time of this report, no monolithic samples were made and therefore compliance with the PA cannot be determined. The waste loading in the geopolymer is approximately 40% but can vary with the sodium hydroxide content in the waste stream. Initial geopolymer mixes revealed compressive strengths that are greater than 500 psi for the low aluminate mixes and less than 500 psi for the high aluminate mixes. Further work testing needs to be performed to formulate a geopolymer waste form made using a high aluminate salt solution. A cementitious waste form has the advantage that the process is performed at ambient conditions and is a proven process currently in use for LAW disposal. The Saltstone/Cast Stone formulated using low and high aluminate salt solutions retained at least 97% of the Re that was added to the mix as a dopant. While this data is promising, additional leaching testing must be performed to show compliance with the PA. Compressive strength tests must also be performed on the Cast Ston

Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Single Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) Test Results of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Forms used for LAW Immobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One such immobilization technology being considered is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests at various flow rates have been conducted with the granular products fabricated using these two methods. Results show that the materials exhibit a relatively low forward dissolution rate on the order of 10-3 g/(m2d) with the material made in the laboratory giving slightly higher values.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Strandquist, Sara C.; Dage, DeNomy C.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LAW GLASSES VLS-10R1790-1 FINAL REPORT REV 0 12/1/2010  

SciTech Connect

About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) Facility and LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW pilot melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing the glass waste loading; and (4) Operating the melter at a slightly higher temperature. The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA) and Energy Solutions, Inc. have evaluated several of these potential incremental improvements for ORP in support of its evaluation of WTP LAW facility optimization. Some of these incremental improvements have been tested at VSL including increasing the waste loading, increasing the processing temperature, and increasing the fraction of the sulfur in the feed that is partitioned to the off-gas (in the event that a decision is made to break the present WTP recycle loop). These approaches successfully demonstrated increases in glass production rates and significant increases in sulfate incorporation at the nominal melter operating temperature of 1150 C and at slightly higher than nominal glass processing temperatures. Subsequent tests demonstrated further enhancement of glass formulations for all of the LAW waste envelopes, thereby reducing the amount of glass to be produced by the WTP for the same amount of waste processed. The next phase of testing determined the applicability of these improvements over the expected range of sodium and sulfur concentrations for Hanford LAW. This approach was subsequently applied to an even wider range of LAW wastes types, including those with high potassium concentration. The feasibility of formulating higher waste loading glasses using SnO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in place of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} as glass former additives was also evaluated. The present report provides data from investigation of the effects of magnesium content (up to {approx}10 wt%) on LAW glass properties and from work to identify improved high waste loading glass formulations that meets all processing and product quality requirements for two waste compositions. The scope of testing is detailed in the Test Plan for this work. A glass composition previously developed and tested at VSL for LAW from tank AN-105 (LAWA187) was varied by substituting Mg for other glass former additives such as Ca, B and Si in an attempt to formulate a glass with improved properties, such as higher waste loading and greater sulfur tolerance. The results were used to reformulate another glass (ORPLG9) developed for LAW from tank AP-101 that contains high concentrations of alkalis (Na and K). Glass formulation goals for this waste were to increase the sulfur tolerance of the

KRUGER AA; MULLER IS; JOSEPH I; MATLACK KS; GAN H; PEGG IL

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LAW GLASSES VLS-10R1790-1 FINAL REPORT REV 0 12/1/2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) Facility and LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW pilot melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing the glass waste loading; and (4) Operating the melter at a slightly higher temperature. The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA) and Energy Solutions, Inc. have evaluated several of these potential incremental improvements for ORP in support of its evaluation of WTP LAW facility optimization. Some of these incremental improvements have been tested at VSL including increasing the waste loading, increasing the processing temperature, and increasing the fraction of the sulfur in the feed that is partitioned to the off-gas (in the event that a decision is made to break the present WTP recycle loop). These approaches successfully demonstrated increases in glass production rates and significant increases in sulfate incorporation at the nominal melter operating temperature of 1150 C and at slightly higher than nominal glass processing temperatures. Subsequent tests demonstrated further enhancement of glass formulations for all of the LAW waste envelopes, thereby reducing the amount of glass to be produced by the WTP for the same amount of waste processed. The next phase of testing determined the applicability of these improvements over the expected range of sodium and sulfur concentrations for Hanford LAW. This approach was subsequently applied to an even wider range of LAW wastes types, including those with high potassium concentration. The feasibility of formulating higher waste loading glasses using SnO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in place of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} as glass former additives was also evaluated. The present report provides data from investigation of the effects of magnesium content (up to {approx}10 wt%) on LAW glass properties and from work to identify improved high waste loading glass formulations that meets all processing and product quality requirements for two waste compositions. The scope of testing is detailed in the Test Plan for this work. A glass composition previously developed and tested at VSL for LAW from tank AN-105 (LAWA187) was varied by substituting Mg for other glass former additives such as Ca, B and Si in an attempt to formulate a glass with improved properties, such as higher waste loading and greater sulfur tolerance. The results were used to reformulate another glass (ORPLG9) developed for LAW from tank AP-101 that contains high concentrations of alkalis (Na and K). Glass formulation goals for this waste were to increase the sulfur tolerance of the

KRUGER AA; MULLER IS; JOSEPH I; MATLACK KS; GAN H; PEGG IL

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification  

• Technetium in Hanford tank waste is a significant risk contributor in performance assessments for low activity waste disposal

79

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS MADE FROM HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE (TANK SX-105, TANK AN-103, AND AZ-101/102) BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMATION (FBSR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is a robust technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of radioactive wastes. Applications have been tested at the pilot scale for the high sodium, sulfate, halide, organic and nitrate wastes at the Hanford site, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). Due to the moderate processing temperatures, halides, sulfates, and technetium are retained in mineral phases of the feldspathoid family (nepheline, sodalite, nosean, carnegieite, etc). The feldspathoid minerals bind the contaminants such as Tc-99 in cage (sodalite, nosean) or ring (nepheline) structures to surrounding aluminosilicate tetrahedra in the feldspathoid structures. The granular FBSR mineral waste form that is produced has a comparable durability to LAW glass based on the short term PCT testing in this study, the INL studies, SPFT and PUF testing from previous studies as given in the columns in Table 1-3 that represent the various durability tests. Monolithing of the granular product was shown to be feasible in a separate study. Macro-encapsulating the granular product provides a decrease in leaching compared to the FBSR granular product when the geopolymer is correctly formulated.

Jantzen, C.; Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, G.; Hall, H.; Miller, D.; Missimer, D.; Nash, C.; Williams, F.

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

80

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy DOE-WTP ORP WTP Project Office HLW High-Level Waste Facility HVAC Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning LAB Analytical Laboratory LAW Low-Activity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 18th, 2010. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Journey to Excellence Goal 2 and Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification Salt Waste Processing Initiatives Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations

83

DuraLith Geopolymer Low Temperature Waste Forms  

Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW), mol/L Minor constituents: 129I, 99Tc (HSW), 99Tc, 137Cs (LAW) heavy and other metals Na OH NO 3 Al TOC Si K CO 3 Cl NO 2 PO 4 SO 4

84

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18/10 18/10 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 18th, 2010. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Journey to Excellence Goal 2 and Enhanced Tank Waste Strategy Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Fate of Tc99 at WTP and Current Work on Capture Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Impacts of Feed Composition and Recycle on Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glass Mass Secondary Waste Forms and Technetium Management Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification Salt Waste Processing Initiatives Recap and Conclusions to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet Presentations Tank Closure More Documents & Publications

86

Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

87

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied.

Jantzen, C

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

88

Activity Report for Hanford WTP LAW Melter HA Development, July 31 - August 5, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report HSS Independent Activity Report Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-07-31 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Dates of Activity : 07/31/13 - 08/05/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the hazards analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) system. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, conducted from July 31 to August 5, 2013, was to observe and

89

Activity Report for Hanford WTP LAW Melter HA Development, July 31 - August 5, 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report HSS Independent Activity Report Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-07-31 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Dates of Activity : 07/31/13 - 08/05/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the hazards analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) system. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, conducted from July 31 to August 5, 2013, was to observe and

90

Preliminary Investigation of Sulfur Loading in Hanford LAW Glass  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary estimate was developed for loading limits for high-sulfur low-activity waste (LAW) feeds that will be vitrified into borosilicate glass at the Hanford Site in the waste-cleanup effort. Previous studies reported in the literature were consulted to provide a basis for the estimate. The examination of previous studies led to questions about sulfur loading in Hanford LAW glass, and scoping tests were performed to help answer these questions. These results of these tests indicated that a formulation approach developed by Vienna and colleagues shows promise for maximizing LAW loading in glass. However, there is a clear need for follow-on work. The potential for significantly lowering the amount of LAW glass produced at Hanford (after the initial phase of processing) because of higher sulfur tolerances may outweigh the cost and effort required to perform the necessary testing.

Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Buchmiller, William C.; Ricklefs, Joel S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Integrated electronic waste management in Mexico : law, technology and public policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is electronic waste? Why is it considered a problem? What are the public health implications of its mishandling? The electronic industry, a sector that has experienced one of the highest growth rates of the last decade, ...

Gonzalez Llera, Ricardo, 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2013 March 2013 Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review [HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the restart of the Hazard Analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, on March 18-21, 2013, was to observe and understand the revised approach implemented by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), the contractor responsible for the design and construction of WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of

93

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Waste Treatment and Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - June 2013 June 2013 Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Observation [HIAR-WTP-2013-05-13] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from May 13 - June 28, 2013, at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activity consisted of HSS staff observing a limited portion of the start of the hazard analysis (HA) for WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) Primary Off-gas System. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity was to observe and

94

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - July 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - July 2013 July 2013 Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity [HIAR-WTP-2013-07-31] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from July 31 - August 5, 2013, at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activity consisted of HSS staff observing a limited portion of the hazards analysis (HA) for WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process system. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity was to observe and

95

Melting Hanford LAW into Iron-Phosphate Glass in a CCIM  

SciTech Connect

A vitrification test has been conducted using the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system at the Idaho National Laboratory. The test was conducted to demonstrate the vitrification of a Hanford low activity waste (LAW) that contains relatively large amounts of sulfate and sodium, compared to other radioactive Hanford waste streams. The high sulfate content limits the potential loading of this waste stream in conventional borosilicate glass, so this test demonstrated how this waste stream could be vitrified in an iron-phosphate glass that can tolerate higher levels of sulfate.

Nick Soelberg; Sharna Rossberg

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant Waste Treatment Plant ETR Report Date: March 2006 ETR-1 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 53 million gallons of radioactive waste, separate it into high- and low-activity fractions, and produce canisters of high-level (HLW) glass (left) and containers of low-activity waste (LAW) glass (right). At the time of this review, the Plant was at approximately 70% design and 30% construction completion. The external review objective was to determine how well the WTP would meet its throughput capacities based on the current design,

97

Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity

98

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2013 October 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - October 2013 October 2013 Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities [HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from October 21-31, 2013, at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activity consisted of HSS staff reviewing the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a limited portion of the HA for the

99

Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection Data Package—Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Waste Form  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site in southeast Washington State has 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (ORP 2010). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), through its contractors, is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to convert the radioactive and hazardous wastes into stable glass waste forms for disposal. Within the WTP, the pretreatment facility will receive the retrieved waste from the tank farms and separate it into two treated process streams. These waste streams will be vitrified, and the resulting waste canisters will be sent to offsite (high-level waste [HLW]) and onsite (immobilized low-activity waste [ILAW]) repositories. As part of the pretreatment and ILAW processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed of in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has initiated secondary waste form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is developing data packages to support that down-selection. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilizing and solidifying the liquid secondary wastes. At the Hanford Site, the FBSR process is being evaluated as a supplemental technology for treating and immobilizing Hanford LAW radioactive tank waste and for treating secondary wastes from the WTP pretreatment and LAW vitrification processes.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Westsik, Joseph H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Pires, Richard P.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

100

Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: Feasibility Report -- Agricultural and Forestry Solid Wastes Power Generation Demonstration, December 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report on feasibility of using agricultural and forestry wastes for power generation in China

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

Arlin Olson

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Liquidus Temperature Studies for High Level Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

103

Sodalite-Based Forms for Wastes Containing Actinides and Halides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

104

Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for the Immobilisation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

105

1991 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress. Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress during 1991 of States and compact regions in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity. It has been prepared in response to requirements in Section 7 (b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (the Act). By the end of 1991, 9 compact regions (totaling 42 States) were functioning with plans to establish low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: Appalachian, Central, Central Midwest, Midwest, Northeast, Northwest, Rocky Mountain, Southeast, and Southwestern. Also planning to construct disposal facilities, but unaffiliated with a compact region, are Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Texas, and Vermont. The District of Columbia, New Hampshire, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island and Michigan are unaffiliated with a compact region and do not plan to construct a disposal facility. Michigan was the host State for the Midwest compact region until July 1991 when the Midwest Interstate Compact Commission revoked Michigan`s membership. Only the Central, Central Midwest, and Southwestern compact regions met the January 1, 1992, milestone in the Act to submit a complete disposal license application. None of the States or compact regions project meeting the January 1, 1993, milestone to have an operational low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Also summarized are significant events that occurred in low-level radioactive waste management in 1991 and early 1992, including the 1992 United States Supreme Court decision in New York v. United States in which New York challenged the constitutionality of the Act, particularly the ``take-title`` provision. Summary information is also provided on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1991 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Followup of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency...

107

Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment 2001 Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the site-specific long-term environmental information needed by the DOE to modify the current disposal authorization statement for the Hanford Site.

MANN, F.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sulfate Volatilization in Simulated Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom

109

Preliminary ILAW Formulation Algorithm Description, 24590 LAW RPT-RT-04-0003, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), has contracted with Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to design, construct, and commission the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site (DOE 2000). This plant is designed to operate for 40 years and treat roughly 50 million gallons of mixed hazardous high-level waste (HLW) stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The process involves separating the hight-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions through filtration, leaching, Cs ion exchange, and precipitation. Each fraction will be separately vitrified into borosilicate waste glass. This report documents the initial algorithm for use by Hanford WTP in batching LAW and glass-forming chemicals (GFCs) in the LAW melter feed preparation vessel (MFPV). Algorithm inputs include the chemical analyses of the pretreated LAW in the concentrate receipt vessel (CRV), the volume of the MFPV heel, and the compositions of individual GFCs. In addition to these inputs, uncertainties in the LAW composition and processing parameters are included in the algorithm.

Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DBVS DBVS ETR Report Date: September 2006 ETR-3 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low Activity Waste (LAW) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the safe retrieval, treatment and disposal of 53 million gallons of Hanford radioactive waste. The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed to treat and vitrify the High Level Waste (HLW) fraction in 20-25 years. The WTP is undersized for vitrifying the LAW fraction over the same time frame. The DOE is evaluating Bulk Vitrification as an alternative to increasing the size of the WTP LAW treatment process. Bulk vitrification is an in-container melting

111

Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of representative WTP HLW and LAW glasses over a wide range of temperatures, from the melter operating temperature to the glass transition.

Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

FINAL REPORT TESTING OF IRON PHOSPHATE LAW GLASS (VSL-11R2340-1) 04/25/2011 REV 0 06/10/2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILA W and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The objectives of the work reported herein were to assess the corrosion of Inconel 690 and 693 in the FeP glass developed by MS&T and to measure key high temperature properties of the LAW iron phosphate glass. Specific objectives of these tests were the following: (1) Determination of the extent of corrosion of Inconel 690 and 693 in LAW FeP glass at 1050, 1l00, and 1150 C; (2) Determination of the extent of corrosion of Inconel 690 and 693 in LAW FeP glass in the presence of an electric field; (3) Measurement of the high temperature specific heat of the LAW FeP glass; (4) Measurement of the high temperature density of the LAW FeP glass; (5) Measurement of the high temperature thermal diffusivity of the LAW FeP glass; and (6) Calculation of the high temperature thermal conductivity of the LAW FeP glass from the above three measured properties.

KRUGER AA; GAN H ET AL; JOSEPH I; BEUCHELE AC; FENG Z; WANG C; VIRAGHC; PEGG IL

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hanford Low-Level Waste Form Performance for Meeting Land Disposal Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Immobilized Low-activity waste (ILAW) from the Hanford site will be disposed of in near-surface burial grounds and must be processed into a chemically durable waste form to prevent release of hazardous constituents to the environment. To meet his goal, the LAW will be immobilized in borosilicate glass. the DOE office of River Protection and the Rive Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project have agreed on testing requirements that the immobilized LAW glass must meet to demonstrate chemically durability. Two of the tests are the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). This paper provides results of RPP-WTP PCT and TCLP testing on both actual radioactive and non-radioactive simulant LAW glasses to show they meet the associated land disposal requirements.

Crawford, C.L.

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of the Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations & Criteria is to establish a minimum State Criteria under the Mississippi Solid Waste Law for all solid waste management...

115

Epsilon Metal Waste Form Development for Fission Products in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive Demonstrations of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes · Radionuclide Behavior and Geochemistry in Boom  ...

116

Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- March 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Review [HIAR-WTP-2013-03-18

117

Activity Report for Waste Treatment and Immobilizationi Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Off-gas Process...

118

Testing of Large-Scale ICV Glasses with Hanford LAW Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary glass compositions for immobilizing Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) by the in-container vitrification (ICV) process were initially fabricated at crucible- and engineering-scale, including simulants and actual (radioactive) LAW. Glasses were characterized for vapor hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) responses and crystallinity (both quenched and slow-cooled samples). Selected glasses were tested for toxicity characteristic leach procedure (TCLP) responses, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. This testing showed that glasses with LAW loading of 20 mass% can be made readily and meet all product constraints by a far margin. Glasses with over 22 mass% Na2O can be made to meet all other product quality and process constraints. Large-scale testing was performed at the AMEC, Geomelt Division facility in Richland. Three tests were conducted using simulated LAW with increasing loadings of 12, 17, and 20 mass% Na2O. Glass samples were taken from the test products in a manner to represent the full expected range of product performance. These samples were characterized for composition, density, crystalline and non-crystalline phase assemblage, and durability using the VHT, PCT, and TCLP tests. The results, presented in this report, show that the AMEC ICV product with meets all waste form requirements with a large margin. These results provide strong evidence that the Hanford LAW can be successfully vitrified by the ICV technology and can meet all the constraints related to product quality. The economic feasibility of the ICV technology can be further enhanced by subsequent optimization.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Matyas, Josef; Smith, Donald E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Yeager, John D.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION SUBMERGED BED SCRUBBER CONDENSATE DISPOSITION PROJECT - ABSTRACT # 13460  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an off-gas treatment system secondary liquid waste stream [submerged bed scrubber (SBS) condensate], which is currently planned for recycle back to the WTP Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter. This SBS condensate waste stream is high in Tc-99, which is not efficiently captured in the vitrified glass matrix. A pre-conceptual engineering study was prepared in fiscal year 2012 to evaluate alternate flow paths for melter off-gas secondary liquid waste generated by the WTP LAW facility. This study evaluated alternatives for direct off-site disposal of this SBS without pre-treatment, which mitigates potential issues associated with recycling.

YANOCHO RM; CORCORAN C

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

conservation laws  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation Laws Conservation Laws Conservation Laws - Data Analysis Using Graphs - Histograms - Units or Vectors in Particle Physics In all of physics there are only six conservation laws. Each describes a quantity that is conserved, that is, the total amount is the same before and after something occurs. These laws have the restriction that the system is closed, that is, the system is not affected by anything outside it. Conservation of charge Conservation of momentum Conservation of mass/energy Conservation of angular momentum Conservation of baryons Conservation of leptons Let's review the conservation laws that you know from classical physics. Then, we will describe two particle physics conservation laws. Conservation of Charge This is used all the time in chemistry. The total charge in the system is

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121

1992 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress; Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress States and compact regions made during 1992 in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1992 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to section 7 (b) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act.

NONE

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

EVALUATION OF THE INTEGRATED SOLUBILITY MODEL, A GRADED APPROACH FOR PREDICTING PHASE DISTRIBUTION IN HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the DOE River Protection Project (RPP) is to store, retrieve, treat and dispose of Hanford's tank waste. Waste is retrieved from the underground tanks and delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Waste is processed through a pretreatment facility where it is separated into low activity waste (LAW), which is primarily liquid, and high level waste (HLW), which is primarily solid. The LAW and HLW are sent to two different vitrification facilities and glass canisters are then disposed of onsite (for LAW) or shipped off-site (for HLW). The RPP mission is modeled by the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulator and mass balance model that is used for mission analysis and strategic planning. The integrated solubility model (ISM) was developed to improve the chemistry basis in HTWOS and better predict the outcome of the RPP mission. The ISM uses a graded approach to focus on the components that have the greatest impact to the mission while building the infrastructure for continued future improvement and expansion. Components in the ISM are grouped depending upon their relative solubility and impact to the RPP mission. The solubility of each group of components is characterized by sub-models of varying levels of complexity, ranging from simplified correlations to a set of Pitzer equations used for the minimization of Gibbs Energy.

PIERSON KL; BELSHER JD; SENIOW KR

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

Dissimilar behavior of technetium and rhenium in borosilicate waste glass as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. R. ; LaMont, P. E. "Hanford immobilized low-activity tankstudies with simulated Hanford low-activity waste," PNNL-Darab, J. G. ; Smith, H. D. "Hanford tank waste simulants

Lukens, Wayne W.; McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of HLW and LAW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, such data were collected for four waste glasses representative of those currently projected for treatment of Hanford HLW and LAW streams.

127

NEXT GENERATION MELTER(S) FOR VITRIFICATION OF HANFORD WASTE STATUS AND DIRECTION  

SciTech Connect

Vitrification technology has been selected to treat high-level waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site, the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Savannah River Site (SRS), and low activity waste (LAW) at Hanford. In addition, it may potentially be applied to other defense waste streams such as sodium bearing tank waste or calcine. Joule-heated melters (already in service at SRS) will initially be used at the Hanford Site's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to vitrify tank waste fractions. The glass waste content and melt/production rates at WTP are limited by the current melter technology. Significant reductions in glass volumes and mission life are only possible with advancements in melter technology coupled with new glass formulations. The Next Generation Melter (NGM) program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) to develop melters with greater production capacity (absolute glass throughput rate) and the ability to process melts with higher waste fractions. Advanced systems based on Joule-Heated Ceramic Melter (JHCM) and Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technologies will be evaluated for HLW and LAW processing. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), DOE's tank waste contractor, is developing and evaluating these systems in cooperation with EM-31, national and university laboratories, and corporate partners. A primary NGM program goal is to develop the systems (and associated flowsheets) to Technology Readiness Level 6 by 2016. Design and testing are being performed to optimize waste glass process envelopes with melter and balance of plant requirements. A structured decision analysis program will be utilized to assess the performance of the competing melter technologies. Criteria selected for the decision analysis program will include physical process operations, melter performance, system compatibility and other parameters.

RAMSEY WG; GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; EDGE JA; GARRETT BG

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

SRNL PHASE 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE WTP WASTE QUALIFICATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Project is currently transitioning its emphasis from an engineering design and construction phase toward facility completion, start-up and commissioning. With this transition, the WTP Project has initiated more detailed assessments of the requirements that must be met during the actual processing of the Hanford Site tank waste. One particular area of interest is the waste qualification program. In general, the waste qualification program involves testing and analysis to demonstrate compliance with waste acceptance criteria, determine waste processability, and demonstrate laboratory-scale unit operations to support WTP operations. The testing and analysis are driven by data quality objectives (DQO) requirements necessary for meeting waste acceptance criteria for transfer of high-level wastes from the tank farms to the WTP, and for ensuring waste processability including proper glass formulations during processing within the WTP complex. Given the successful implementation of similar waste qualification efforts at the Savannah River Site (SRS) which were based on critical technical support and guidance from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), WTP requested subject matter experts (SMEs) from SRNL to support a technology exchange with respect to waste qualification programs in which a critical review of the WTP program could be initiated and lessons learned could be shared. The technology exchange was held on July 18-20, 2011 in Richland, Washington, and was the initial step in a multi-phased approach to support development and implementation of a successful waste qualification program at the WTP. The 3-day workshop was hosted by WTP with representatives from the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and SRNL in attendance as well as representatives from the US DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Site Representative office. The purpose of the workshop was to share lessons learned and provide a technology exchange to support development of a technically defensible waste qualification program. The objective of this report is to provide a review, from SRNL's perspective, of the WTP waste qualification program as presented during the workshop. In addition to SRNL's perspective on the general approach to the waste qualification program, more detailed insight into the specific unit operations presented by WTP during the workshop is provided. This report also provides a general overview of the SRS qualification program which serves as a basis for a comparison between the two programs. Recommendations regarding specific steps are made based on the review and SRNL's lessons learned from qualification of SRS low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to support maturation of the waste qualification program leading to WTP implementation.

Peeler, D.; Hansen, E.; Herman, C.; Marra, S.; Wilmarth, B.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

130

Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Resolution of the nation’s high level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfates (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis as related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Resolution of the nation's high-level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research-scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron-phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfate (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, Missouri University of Science and Technology, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Riley, Brian J.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

132

Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant  

SciTech Connect

Resolution of the nation's high-level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research-scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron-phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfate (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, Missouri University of Science and Technology, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Riley, Brian J.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission initial updated baseline summary  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a summary of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval and Disposal Mission Initial Updated Baseline (scope, schedule, and cost), developed to demonstrate Readiness-to-Proceed (RTP) in support of the TWRS Phase 1B mission. This Updated Baseline is the proposed TWRS plan to execute and measure the mission work scope. This document and other supporting data demonstrate that the TWRS Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team is prepared to fully support Phase 1B by executing the following scope, schedule, and cost baseline activities: Deliver the specified initial low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) feed batches in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner to support private contractors` operations starting in June 2002; Deliver specified subsequent LAW and HLW feed batches during Phase 1B in a consistent, safe, and reliable manner; Provide for the interim storage of immobilized HLW (IHLW) products and the disposal of immobilized LAW (ILAW) products generated by the private contractors; Provide for disposal of byproduct wastes generated by the private contractors; and Provide the infrastructure to support construction and operations of the private contractors` facilities.

Swita, W.R.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1989: Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

SciTech Connect

This response is submitted in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (the Act), Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes expenditures made during the calendar year 1989 of surcharge rebates from the July 1, 1986, milestones. Title I of the Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to administer a Surcharge Escrow Account. This account consists of a portion of the surcharge fees paid by generators of low-level radioactive waste in nonsited compacts (regional compacts currently without operating disposal sites) and nonmember States (States without disposal sites that are not members of compacts) to the three States with operating disposal facilities (Nevada, South Carolina, and Washington) (sited States) for using their disposal facilities. In administering the Surcharge Escrow Account, the Act requires DOE to: invest the funds in interest-bearing United States Government securities; determine eligibility of rebates of the funds by evaluating State and compact progress toward developing new disposal sites against milestones set forth in the Act; disburse the collected rebates and interest; assess compliance of rebate expenditures with the limitations prescribed in the Act; and submit a report annually to Congress summarizing rebate expenditures by States and regions. 5 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

137

Waste Treatment Plant and Tank Farm Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This photo shows the Pretreatment Facility control room building pad at the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site. The Low-Activity Waste Facility is in the background.

138

Transmittal of Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Preliminary RAM Analysis Report (formerly PLG-1412)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the preliminary reliability, availability, and maintainability analysis of operations at the ILAW Disposal Facility, Project W-520, to be performed during Phase I activities in support of the WTP

CALMUS, R.B.

2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

139

Borosilicate Glass Formulations for CCIM  

Hanford AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) Hanford AN-105 low-activity waste (LAW) 3. Selection of Wastes Initially focused on Hanford waste streams

140

THE ROLE OF LIQUID WASTE PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN SOLVING THE DOE CLEAN-UP MISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to describe the pretreatment solutions that allow treatment to be tailored to specific wastes, processing ahead of the completion schedules for the main treatment facilities, and reduction of technical risks associated with future processing schedules. Wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River offer challenging scientific and engineering tasks. At both sites, space limitations confound the ability to effectively retrieve and treat the wastes. Additionally, the radiation dose to the worker operating and maintaining the radiochemical plants has a large role in establishing the desired radioactivity removal. However, the regulatory requirements to treat supernatant and saltcake tank wastes differ at the two sites. Hanford must treat and remove radioactivity from the tanks based on the TriParty Agreement and Waste Incidental to Reprocessing (WIR) documentation. These authorizing documents do not specify treatment technologies; rather, they specify endstate conditions. Dissimilarly, Waste Determinations prepared at SRS in accordance with Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act along with state operating permits establish the methodology and amounts of radioactivity that must be removed and may be disposed of in South Carolina. After removal of entrained solids and site-specific radionuclides, supernatant and saltcake wastes are considered to be low activity waste (LAW) and are immobilized in glass and disposed of at the Hanford Site Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) or formulated into a grout for disposal at the Savannah River Site Saltstone Disposal Facility. Wastes stored at the Hanford Site or SRS comprise saltcake, supernate, and sludges. The supernatant and saltcake waste fractions contain primarily sodium salts, metals (e.g., Al, Cr), cesium-137 (Cs-137), technetium-99 (Tc-99) and entrained solids containing radionuclides such as strontium-90 (Sr-90) and transuranic elements. The sludges contain many of the transition metal hydroxides that precipitate when the spent acidic process solutions are rendered alkaline with sodium hydroxide. The sludges contain Sr-90 and transuranic elements. The wastes stored at each site have been generated and stored for over fifty years. Although the majority of the wastes were generated to support nuclear weapons production and reprocessing, the wastes differ substantially between the sites. Table 5 shows the volumes and total radioactivity (including decay daughters) of the waste phases stored in tanks at each site. At Hanford, there are 177 tanks that contain 56.5 Mgal of waste. SRS has 51 larger tanks, of which 2 are closed, that contain 36.5 Mgal. Mainly due to recovery operations, the waste stored at Hanford has less total curies than that stored at Savannah River. The total radioactivity of the Hanford wastes contains approximately 190 MCi, and the total radioactivity of the Savannah River wastes contains 400 MCi.

Wilmarth, B; Sheryl Bush, S

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Cesium Ion Exchange Program at the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will use cesium ion exchange to remove Cs-137 from Low Activity Waste (LAW) down to a maximum activity of 0.3 Ci/m3 in the Immobilized LAW (ILAW) product. The WTP Project baseline for cesium ion exchange is the elutable SuperLig(R) 644 (SL-644) resin (registered trademark of IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT) or a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved equivalent. SL-644 is solely available through IBC Advanced Technologies. The WTP Project is conducting a three-stage process for selecting and qualifying an alternative ion exchange resin. Resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) is being pursued as a potential alternative to SL-644, to provide a backup resin supply. Resin cost relative to SL-644 is a primary driver. Phase I of the testing plan examined the viability of RF resin and recommended that a spherical form of RF resin be examined further. Phases II and III, now underway, include batch testing to determine the isotherm of this resin, kinetics to address the impacts of bead diameter and high sodium feed levels on processing Hanford waste with the resin, and multicycle column testing to determine how temperature and chemical cycling affects waste processing. Phases II and III also examine resin performance against simulated WTP feeds, radiolytic and thermal stability, and scale-up to pilot scale performance. We will discuss early results obtained from Phase II testing here.

CHARLES, NASH

2005-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming of Hanford LAW Using THORsm Mineralizing Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) documented, in 2002, a plan for accelerating cleanup of the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, by at least 35 years. A key element of the plan was acceleration of the tank waste program and completion of ''tank waste treatment by 2028 by increasing the capacity of the planned Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and using supplemental technologies for waste treatment and immobilization.'' The plan identified steam reforming technology as a candidate for supplemental treatment of as much as 70% of the low-activity waste (LAW). Mineralizing steam reforming technology, offered by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC would produce a denitrated, granular mineral waste form using a high-temperature fluidized bed process. A pilot scale demonstration of the technology was completed in a 15-cm-diameter reactor vessel. The pilot scale facility was equipped with a highly efficient cyclone separator and heated sintered metal filters for particulate removal, a thermal oxidizer for reduced gas species and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for residual volatile species capture. The pilot scale equipment is owned by the DOE, but located at the Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID. Pilot scale testing was performed August 2–5, 2004. Flowsheet chemistry and operational parameters were defined through a collaborative effort involving Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and THOR Treatment Technologies personnel. Science Application International Corporation, owners of the STAR Center, personnel performed actual pilot scale operation. The pilot scale test achieved a total of 68.7 hrs of cumulative/continuous processing operation before termination in response to a bed de-fluidization condition. 178 kg of LAW surrogate were processed that resulted in 148 kg of solid product, a mass reduction of about 17%. The process achieved essentially complete bed turnover within approximately 40 hours. Samples of mineralized solid product materials were analyzed for chemical/physical properties. SRNL will report separately the results of product performance testing that were accomplished.

Olson, Arlin L.; Nicholas R Soelberg; Douglas W. Marshall; Gary L. Anderson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

145

Automated Sampling and Sample Pneumatic Transport of High Level Tank Wastes at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development work, and design and engineering tasks performed, to provide a fully automated sampling system for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) project at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA. WTP is being built to enable the emptying and immobilization of highly active waste resulting from processing of irradiated nuclear fuel since the 1940's. The Hanford Tank Wastes are separated into Highly Level Waste (HLW), and Low Active Waste (LAW) fractions, which are separately immobilized by vitrification into borosilicate glass. Liquid samples must be taken of the waste and Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs) before vitrification, and analyzed to insure the glass products will comply with specifications established in the WTP contract. This paper describes the non-radioactive testing of the sampling of the HLW and LAW melter feed simulants that was performed ahead of final equipment design. These trials were essential to demonstrate the effectiveness and repeatability of the integrated sampling system to collect representative samples, free of cross-contamination. Based on existing tried and proven equipment, the system design is tailored to meet the WTP project's specific needs. The design provides sampling capabilities from 47 separate sampling points and includes a pneumatic transport system to move the samples from the 3 separate facilities to the centralized analytical laboratory. The physical and rheological compositions of the waste simulants provided additional challenges in terms of the sample delivery, homogenization, and sample capture equipment design requirements. The activity levels of the actual waste forms, specified as 486 E9 Bq/liter (Cs-137), 1.92 E9 Bq/liter (Co-60), and 9.67 E9 Bq/liter (Eu-154), influenced the degree of automation provided, and justified the minimization of manual intervention needed to obtain and deliver samples from the process facilities to the analytical laboratories. Maintaining high integrity primary and secondary confinement, including during the cross-site transportation of the samples, is a key requirement that is achieved and assured at all times. (authors)

Phillips, C.; Richardson, J. E. [BNG America, 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

SMALL-SCALE MELTER TESTING WITH LAW SIMULANTS TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF HIGHER TEMPERATURE MELTER OPERATIONS - Final Report, VSL-04R49801-1, Rev. 0, 2/13/03, Vitreous State Laboratory, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently in storage in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed of in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHL W product will be directed to the national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) facility and the LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW Pilot Melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing plant availability; (4) Increasing the glass waste loading; (5) Removing sulfate from the LAW stream; (6) Operating the melter at slightly higher temperature; (7) Installing the third LAW melter into the WTP plant; and (8) Other smaller impact changes. The tests describes in this report utilized blended feed (glass formers plus waste simulant) prepared by Optima Chemicals according to VSL specifications. Sufficient feed was prepared to produce nearly two metric tons of glass. Sugar was added (at VSL) to the feed at a ratio of 0.5 (1 mole sucrose per 16 mole NOx). The DM100-WV melter was used in order to provide a direct comparison with the LAW tests previously conducted on the same melter. Two 75-hour melter tests were conducted at two elevated temperatures, 1175 and 1225 C. These tests were preceded by the production of sufficient glass to turn over the melt pool to the target composition. Key operating parameters were held constant to investigate the effects of the operating temperature on processing characteristics, particularly melting rate. At each operating temperature, the feed rate was adjusted to provide a near-complete cold cap 99-100% of melt surface covered with feed. Quantitative measurements of glass production rates, melter operating conditions (temperatures, pressures, power, flows, etc.), and off-gas characteristics (NOx, SO{sub 2}, CO, particulate load and composition, and acid gases) were made for each test.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Perm it Part 2, Permit Condition 2.4. We certify under penalty of law that this...

148

Sources, classification, and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: (1) early definitions of different types (classes) of radioactive waste developed prior to definitions in laws and regulations; (2) sources of different classes of radioactive waste; (3) current laws and regulations addressing classification of radioactive wastes; and requirements for disposal of different waste classes. Relationship between waste classification and requirements for permanent disposal is emphasized; (4) federal and state responsibilities for radioactive wastes; and (5) distinctions between radioactive wastes produced in civilian and defense sectors.

Kocher, D.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite - Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the seventh year of the current grant (DE-FG02-05ER63966) we completed an exhaustive study of cold calcination and began work on the development of tank fill materials to fill empty tanks and control residuals. Cold calcination of low and high NOx low activity waste (LAW) SRS Tank 44 and Hanford AN-107 simulants, respectively with metallic Al + Si powders was evaluated. It was found that a combination of Al and Si powders could be used as reducing agents to reduce the nitrate and nitrite content of both low and high NOx LAW to low enough levels to allow the LAW to be solidified directly by mixing it with metakaolin and allowing it to cure at 90 C. During room temperature reactions, NOx was reduced and nitrogen was emitted as N2 or NH3. This was an important finding because now one can pretreat LAW at ambient temperatures which provides a low-temperature alternative to thermal calcination. The significant advantage of using Al and Si metals for denitration/denitrition of the LAW is the fact that the supernate could potentially be treated in situ in the waste tanks themselves. Tank fill materials based upon a hydroceramic binder have been formulated from mixtures of metakaolinite, Class F fly ash and Class C flue gas desulphurization (FGD) ash mixed with various concentrations of NaOH solution. These harden over a period of hours or days depending on composition. A systematic study of properties of the tank fill materials (leachability) and ability to adsorb and hold residuals is under way.

Grutzeck, Michael

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A mixed waste treatability study will be performed to test the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) technology on SRS Low Activity Waste (LAW) modified to simulate Hanford waste....

151

DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat transfer and glass melting rate. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of {approx}1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HLW waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150 C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage. The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet WTP contract requirements. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization oftank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulfur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste-loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. It is expected that these higher waste loading glasses will reduce the HLW canister production requirement by about 25% or more.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

153

Water, law, science  

SciTech Connect

In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

Narasimhan, T.N.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

154

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Page 2. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the ...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Uniform Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Uniform Laws and Regulations in the areas of legal metrology and engine fuel quality as adopted by the 96th National Conference on ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

158

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

DEVELOPMENT OF A MACRO-BATCH QUALIFICATION STRATEGY FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: ? Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; ? The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; ? The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and ? The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: ? Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; ? Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; ? Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; ? Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and ? Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

Herman, C.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Strip Mine Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the Department of Natural Resources to adopt and promulgate rules and regulations pertaining to strip mining of coal and reclamation, review...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Causal Newton Gravity Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equations of the relativistic causal Newton gravity law for the planets of the solar system are studied in the approximation when the Sun rests at the coordinates origin and the planets do not iteract between each other.

Yury M. Zinoviev

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Potential Conservation Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman, Cheviakov and Ivanova [J. Math. Phys., 2006, V.47, 113505]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of proved statements is considered. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

Michael Kunzinger; Roman O. Popovych

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Selection of a computer code for Hanford low-level waste engineered-system performance assessment. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planned performance assessments for the proposed disposal of low-activity waste (LAW) glass produced from remediation of wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington will require calculations of radionuclide release rates from the subsurface disposal facility. These calculations will be done with the aid of computer codes. The available computer codes with suitable capabilities at the time Revision 0 of this document was prepared were ranked in terms of the feature sets implemented in the code that match a set of physical, chemical, numerical, and functional capabilities needed to assess release rates from the engineered system. The needed capabilities were identified from an analysis of the important physical and chemical processes expected to affect LAW glass corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. This analysis was repeated in this report but updated to include additional processes that have been found to be important since Revision 0 was issued and to include additional codes that have been released. The highest ranked computer code was found to be the STORM code developed at PNNL for the US Department of Energy for evaluation of arid land disposal sites.

McGrail, B.P.; Bacon, D.H.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

165

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulant Studies for Hanford Recycle Solutions Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter will generate...

166

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

167

State Weights and Measures Law  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Pennsylvania Statutes. Rhode Island Statutes. South Dakota Codified Laws and Administrative Rules. Utah Statutes. Vermont Statutes. ...

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

WIPP WASTE MINIMIZATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 Carlsbad, New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 3 2011 Mr. John Kieling , Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environme nt Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter provides the submittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Perm it Part 2, Permit Condition 2.4. We certify under penalty of law that this document and all enclosures were prepared under our direction or supervision according to a system designed to assure that qualified personnel properly gather and evaluate the information submitted

169

Rhenium Solubility in Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glass: Implications for the Processing and Immobilization of Technetium-99  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved to be an arduous task for the researchers in nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State, the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is ~1300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility/retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of the similarity between their ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing Re (0 – 10,000 ppm by mass) were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules in order to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found to predominantly exist as Re (VII) in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of crystalline inclusions that were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The implications of these results on the immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes in borosilicate glasses have been discussed.

McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

On mathematical laws of software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies on the laws and mathematical constraints of softwarehave resulted in fundamental discoveries in computing and software engineeringtoward exploring the nature of software. It was recognized that software isnot constrained by any physical ... Keywords: RTPA, algebraic laws, analysis, computational intelligence, denotational mathematics, generic model of software, laws of meta-processes, laws of process compositions, laws of process relations, mathematical models, modeling, process models, programs, software, software engineering, software science

Yingxu Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, with appropriations acts appended. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This act provides for the development of repositories for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, low-level radioactive wastes, and spent nuclear fuels. In addition, it establishes research and development programs, as well as demonstration programs regarding the disposal of these wastes. This Act consists of the Act of Jan. 7, 1983 (Public Law 97-425; 96 Stat. 2201), as amended by Public Law 100-203 and Public Law 102-486.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

3-Dimensional Flow Modeling of a Proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Ion-Exchange Column Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, it has been assumed that the inlet and outlet low activity waste plenums would be designed such that a nearly uniform velocity profile would be maintained at every axial cross-section (i.e., providing nearly 100 percent use of the resin bed). With this proposed design, we see a LAW outlet distributor that results in significant non-axial velocity gradients in the bottom regions of the bed with the potential to reduce the effectiveness'' of the overall resin bed. The magnitude of this efficiency reduction depends upon how far up-gradient of the LAW outlet these non-axial velocities persist and to what extent a ''dead-zone'' is established beneath the LAW outlet. This can impact loading and elution performance of the ion-exchange facility. Currently, no experimental studies are planned. The primary objective of this work was, through modeling, to assess the fluid dynamic impact on ''effective'' resin volume of the full-scale column based on its normal operation using a recently proposed LAW outlet distributor. The analysis effort was limited to 3-D flow only analyses (i.e., no follow on transport analyses) with 3-D particle tracking to approximate the impact that a nonaxial velocity profile would have on bed ''effectiveness''. Additional analyses were performed to estimate under nominal operating conditions the thermal temperature rise across a loaded resin bed and within its particles. Hydrogen bubble formation is not considered in the heat transfer analysis or in the determination of minimum flowrate. All modeling objectives were met.

ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Waste Form Development for the Solidification of PDCF/MOX Liquid Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site, part of the Department of Energy's nuclear materials complex located in South Carolina, cementation has been selected as the solidification method for high-alpha and low-activity waste streams generated in the planned plutonium disposition facilities. A Waste Solidification Building (WSB) that will be used to treat and solidify three radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility is in the preliminary design stage. The WSB is expected to treat a transuranic (TRU) waste stream composed primarily of americium and two low-level waste (LLW) streams. The acidic wastes will be concentrated in the WSB evaporator and neutralized in a cement head tank prior to solidification. A series of TRU mixes were prepared to produce waste forms exhibiting a range of processing and cured properties. The LLW mixes were prepared using the premix from the preferred TRU waste form. All of the waste forms tested passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. After processing in the WSB, current plans are to dispose of the solidified TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the solidified LLW waste at an approved low-level waste disposal facility.

COZZI, ALEX

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

Waste Form Development for the Solidification of PDCF/MOX Liquid Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site, part of the Department of Energy's nuclear materials complex located in South Carolina, cementation has been selected as the solidification method for high-alpha and low-activity waste streams generated in the planned plutonium disposition facilities. A Waste Solidification Building (WSB) that will be used to treat and solidify three radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility is in the preliminary design stage. The WSB is expected to treat a transuranic (TRU) waste stream composed primarily of americium and two low-level waste (LLW) streams. The acidic wastes will be concentrated in the WSB evaporator and neutralized in a cement head tank prior to solidification. A series of TRU mixes were prepared to produce waste forms exhibiting a range of processing and cured properties. The LLW mixes were prepared using the premix from the preferred TRU waste form. All of the waste forms tested passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. After processing in the WSB, current plans are to dispose of the solidified TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the solidified LLW waste at an approved low-level waste disposal facility.

COZZI, ALEX

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0  

SciTech Connect

Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

Abramowitz, Howard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Brandys, Marek [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Cecil, Richard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; D'Angelo, Nicholas [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Matlack, Keith S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Muller, Isabelle S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Callow, Richard A. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Joseph, Innocent

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11/06/08 11/06/08 Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/06/08 The following documents are associated with the Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting held on November 6th, 2008. Note: (Please contact Steven Ross at steven.ross@em.doe.gov for a HLW Glass Waste Loadings version with animations on slide 6). Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport & Plugging and Mixing Workshop The Way Ahead - West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Liquid Waste Tank Integrity Workshop - 2008 Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals Hanford Tank Waste Residuals HLW Glass Waste Loadings High-Level Waste Corporate Board Performance Assessment Subcommittee More Documents & Publications Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 System Planning for Low-Activity Waste at Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

177

Hyperbolic Conservation Laws The 1D conservation law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hyperbolic Conservation Laws The 1D conservation law wt + f(w)x = 0 (where w and f have m of linearly independent eigenvectors). Then solutions to the conservation law can be viewed in terms of propagating waves. Finite Volume Methods Finite volume methods are conservative by construction. Define

Gardner, Carl

178

APSUO By-laws  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source Users Organization By-laws Advanced Photon Source Users Organization By-laws Name This organization will be called the Advanced Photon Source Users Organization (APSUO). Purpose The purpose of this Organization is to facilitate the availability and effective use of the Advanced Photon Source by the synchrotron radiation research community so that the greatest overall scientific and technical benefits are realized. Organization Membership All badged APS users are APSUO members. Meetings Annual User Meetings will be held at the APS site. The APSUO Steering Committee shall be responsible for the programs of the User Meetings. APSUO members shall receive appropriate advance notice of the Meetings. Steering Committee A Steering Committee will conduct the business of the APSUO. Four members

179

RHENIUM SOLUBILITY IN BOROSILICATE NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROCESSING AND IMMOBILIZATION OF TECHNETIUM-99 (AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION WITH GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT)  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State in the U.S., the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is {approx} 1,300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW sodium borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of previously established similarities in ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing target Re concentrations varying from 0 to10,000 ppm by mass were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 DC. The rhenium was found to be present predominantly as Re7 + in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be {approx}3,000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of alkali perrhenate crystalline inclusions detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Assuming justifiably substantial similarities between Re7 + and Tc 7+ behavior in this glass system, these results implied that the processing and immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes should not be limited by the solubility of 99Tc in borosilicate LAW glasses.

AA KRUGER; A GOEL; CP RODRIGUEZ; JS MCCLOY; MJ SCHWEIGER; WW LUKENS; JR, BJ RILEY; D KIM; M LIEZERS; P HRMA

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

180

ZERO WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with… (more)

Upadhyaya, Luv

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost benefit of caustic recycle for tank waste remediation at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites  

SciTech Connect

The potential cost savings due to the use of caustic recycle used in conjunction with remediation of radioactive underground storage tank waste, is shown in a figure for the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Two cost savings estimates for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case has been made for the Savannah River site. This is due to the Hanford site remediation effort being less mature than that of Savannah River; and consequently, a range of cost savings being more appropriate for Hanford. This range of cost savings (rather than a ingle value) for each case at Hanford is due to cost uncertainties related to the LAW immobilization operation. Caustic recycle Case-1 has been defined as the sodium required to meet al identified caustic needs for the entire Site. Case-2 has been defined as the maximum sodium which can be separated from the low activity waste without precipitation of Al(OH){sub 3}. It has been determined that the potential cost savings at Hanford ranges from $194 M to $215 M for Case-1, and $293 M to $324 M for Case-2. The potential cost savings at Savannah River are $186 M for Case-1 and $281 M for Case-2. A discussion of the uncertainty associated with these cost savings estimates can be found in the Discussion and Conclusions section.

DeMuth, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.; Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Summary of expenditures of rebates from the low-level radioactive waste surcharge escrow account for calendar year 1991. Report to Congress in response to Public Law 99-240  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth report submitted to Congress under section 5(d)(2)(E)(ii)(II) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1985 (the Act). This section of the Act directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to summarize the annual expenditures of funds disbursed from the DOE surcharge escrow account and to assess compliance of these expenditures with the limitations specified in the Act. In addition to placing limitations on the use of these funds, the Act also requires the nonsited compact regions and nonmember States to provide DOE with an itemized report of their expenditures on December 31 of each year in which funds are expended. Within 6 months after receiving the individual reports, the Act requires the Secretary to furnish Congress with a summary of the reported expenditures and an assessment of compliance with the specified usage limitations. This report fulfills that requirement. DOE disbursed funds totaling $15,037,778.91 to the States and compact regions following the July 1, 1986, January 1, 1988, and January 1, 1990, milestones specified in the Act. Of this amount, $3,517,020.56 was expended during calendar year 1991 and $6,602,546.24 was expended during the prior 5 years. At the end of December 1991, $4,918,212.11 was unexpended. DOE has reviewed each of the reported expenditures and concluded that all reported expenditures comply with the spending limitations stated in section 5(d)(2)(E)(i) of the Act.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

184

Solar Easements & Rights Laws | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Easements & Rights Laws Solar Easements & Rights Laws Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential...

185

TUTORIALS: Bragg's Law and Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 8, 2007 ... CITATION: "Bragg's Law and Diffraction: How waves reveal the atomic structure of crystals," Project Java, State University of New York at Stony ...

186

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER WASTE FORMS FOR SODIUM BEARING WASTE AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) processing of Sodium Bearing Waste simulants was performed in December 2006 by THOR{sup sm} Treatment Technologies LLC (TTT) The testing was performed at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) pilot plant facilities in Golden, CO. FBSR products from these pilot tests on simulated waste representative of the SBW at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) were subsequently transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and leach testing. Four as-received Denitration and Mineralization Reformer (DMR) granular/powder samples and four High Temperature Filter (HTF) powder samples were received by SRNL. FBSR DMR samples had been taken from the ''active'' bed, while the HTF samples were the fines collected as carryover from the DMR. The process operated at high fluidizing velocities during the mineralization test such that nearly all of the product collected was from the HTF. Active bed samples were collected from the DMR to monitor bed particle size distribution. Characterization of these crystalline powder samples shows that they are primarily Al, Na and Si, with > 1 wt% Ca, Fe and K. The DMR samples contained less than 1 wt% carbon and the HTF samples ranged from 13 to 26 wt% carbon. X-ray diffraction analyses show that the DMR samples contained significant quantities of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} startup bed. The DMR samples became progressively lower in starting bed alumina with major Na/Al/Si crystalline phases (nepheline and sodium aluminosilicate) present as cumulative bed turnover occurred but 100% bed turnover was not achieved. The HTF samples also contained these major crystalline phases. Durability testing of the DMR and HTF samples using the ASTM C1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT) 7-day leach test at 90 C was performed along with several reference glass samples. Comparison of the normalized leach rates for the various DMR and HTF components was made with the reference glasses and the Low Activity Waste (LAW) specification for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Vitrification Plant (WTP). Normalized releases from the DMR and HTF samples were all less than 1 g/m{sup 2}. For comparison, normalized release from the High-Level Waste (HLW) benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass for Si, Li, Na and B ranges from 2 to 8 g/m{sup 2}. The normalized release specification for LAW glass for the Hanford WTP is 2 g/m{sup 2}. The Toxicity Characteristic Leach Test (TCLP) was performed on DMR and HTF as received samples and the tests showed that these products meet the criteria for the EPA RCRA Universal Treatment Standards for all of the constituents contained in the starting simulants such as Cr, Pb and Hg (RCRA characteristically hazardous metals) and Ni and Zn (RCRA metals required for listed wastes).

Crawford, C; Carol Jantzen, C

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) Missouri Clean Water Law (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The public policy of the state of Missouri is to conserve the waters of the state and to protect, maintain, and improve their quality for public water supplies and for domestic, agricultural, industrial, recreational and other legitimate beneficial uses and for the propagation of wildlife, fish and aquatic life, as well as to provide for the prevention, abatement, and control of new or existing water pollution. No waste may be discharged into

188

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

189

Swedish nuclear waste efforts  

SciTech Connect

After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

Rydberg, J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Integrated AMP-PAN, TRUEX, and SREX Flowsheet Test to Remove Cesium, Surrogate Actinide Elements, and Strontium from INEEL Tank Waste Using Sorbent Columns and Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three unit operations for the removal of selected fission products, actinides, and RCRA metals (mercury and lead) have been successfully integrated and tested for extended run times with simulated INEEL acidic tank waste. The unit operations were ion exchange for Cs removal, followed by TRUEX solvent extraction for Eu (actinide surrogate), Hg, and Re (Tc surrogate) removal, and subsequent SREX solvent extraction for Sr and Pb removal. Approximately 45 L of simulated INTEC tank waste was first processed through three ion exchange columns in series for selective Cs removal. The columns were packed with a composite ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) sorbent. The experimental breakthrough data were in excellent agreement with modeling predictions based on data obtained with much smaller columns. The third column (220 cm3) was used for polishing and Cs removal after breakthrough of the up-stream columns. The Cs removal was >99.83% in the ion exchange system without interference from other species. Most of the effluent from the ion exchange (IX) system was immediately processed through a TRUEX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove europium (americium surrogate), mercury and rhenium (technetium surrogate) from the simulated waste. The TRUEX flowsheet test was performed utilizing 23 stages of 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors. Greater than 99.999% of the Eu, 96.3% of the Hg, and 56% of the Re were extracted from the simulated feed and recovered in the strip and wash streams. Over the course of the test, there was no detectable build-up of any components in the TRUEX solvent. The raffinate from the TRUEX test was stored and subsequently processed several weeks later through a SREX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove strontium, lead, and Re (Tc surrogate) from the simulated waste. The SREX flowsheet test was performed using the same centrifugal contactors used in the TRUEX test after reconfiguration and the addition of three stages. Approximately 99.9% of the Sr, >99.89% of the Pb, and >96.4% of the Re were extracted from the aqueous feed to the SREX flowsheet and recovered in the strip and wash sections. Approximately 41 L of simulated tank waste (based on the volume processed through the TRUEX flowsheet) was processed through the integrated flowsheet and resulted in 175 L of liquid high activity waste (HAW) and 219.6 L of liquid low activity waste (LAW). The HAW fraction would be evaporated, dried and subsequently vitrified for final disposal. Based on current baseline assumptions, including a maximum phosphate loading of 2.5 wt. % in the HAW glass, the flowsheet tested would result in the production 0.195 kg of glass per L of tank waste processed. The LAW fraction would be solidified (via evaporation and denitration) and subsequently grouted. The current baseline assumptions for grouting the LAW stream indicate 0.37 kg of grout would be produced per L of tank waste treated. Under these assumptions, treating the current inventory of ~5E+6 L (5,000 m3) of tank waste would result in 375 m3 of HAW glass and 1,135 m3 of LAW Class A performance grout. The HAW glass volume could be significantly decreased by suitable TRUEX flowsheet modifications.

Herbst, Ronald Scott; Law, Jack Douglas; Todd, Terry Allen; Wood, D. J.; Garn, Troy Gerry; Wade, Earlen Lawrence

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Integrated AMP-PAN, TRUEX, and SREX Flowsheet Test to Remove Cesium, Surrogate Actinide Elements, and Strontium from INEEL Tank Waste Using Sorbent Columns and Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three unit operations for the removal of selected fission products, actinides, and RCRA metals (mercury and lead) have been successfully integrated and tested for extended run times with simulated INEEL acidic tank waste. The unit operations were ion exchange for Cs removal, followed by TRUEX solvent extraction for Eu (actinide surrogate), Hg, and Re (Tc surrogate) removal, and subsequent SREX solvent extraction for Sr and Pb removal. Approximately 45 L of simulated INTEC tank waste was first processed through three ion exchange columns in series for selective Cs removal. The columns were packed with a composite ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) sorbent. The experimental breakthrough data were in excellent agreement with modeling predictions based on data obtained with much smaller columns. The third column (220 cm3) was used for polishing and Cs removal after breakthrough of the up-stream columns. The Cs removal was >99.83% in the ion exchange system without interference from other species. Most of the effluent from the ion exchange (IX) system was immediately processed through a TRUEX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove europium (americium surrogate), mercury and rhenium (technetium surrogate) from the simulated waste. The TRUEX flowsheet test was performed utilizing 23 stages of 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors. Greater than 99.999% of the Eu, 96.3% of the Hg, and 56% of the Re were extracted from the simulated feed and recovered in the strip and wash streams. Over the course of the test, there was no detectable build-up of any components in the TRUEX solvent. The raffinate from the TRUEX test was stored and subsequently processed several weeks later through a SREX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove strontium, lead, and Re (Tc surrogate) from the simulated waste. The SREX flowsheet test was performed using the same centrifugal contactors used in the TRUEX test after reconfiguration and the addition of three stages. Approximately 99.9% of the Sr, >99.89% of the Pb, and >96.4% of the Re were extracted from the aqueous feed to the SREX flowsheet and recovered in the strip and wash sections. Approximately 41 L of simulated tank waste (based on the volume processed through the TRUEX flowsheet) was processed through the integrated flowsheet and resulted in 175 L of liquid high activity waste (HAW) and 219.6 L of liquid low activity waste (LAW). The HAW fraction would be evaporated, dried and subsequently vitrified for final disposal. Based on current baseline assumptions, including a maximum phosphate loading of 2.5 wt. % in the HAW glass, the flowsheet tested would result in the production 0.195 kg of glass per L of tank waste processed. The LAW fraction would be solidified (via evaporation and denitration) and subsequently grouted. The current baseline assumptions for grouting the LAW stream indicate 0.37 kg of grout would be produced per L of tank waste treated. Under these assumptions, treating the current inventory of {approximately}5 E+6 L (5,000 m3) of tank waste would result in 375 m3 of HAW glass and 1,135 m3 of LAW Class A performance grout. The HAW glass volume could be significantly decreased by suitable TRUEX flowsheet modifications.

Herbst, R.S.; Law, J.D.; Todd, T.A.; Wood, D.J.; Garn, T.G.; Wade, E.L.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATOMIC LAW  

SciTech Connect

Since a uniform federal statute hss not been passed in the German Federal Republic, the development of atomic law has centered around the formation of the Federal Ministry for Atomic Affairs, appeal to the German Commission, and the enactment of temporary laws in several of the states. (J.S.R.)

Fischerhof, H.

1958-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

Russell, Lynn

194

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

Firtel, Richard A.

195

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Deactivation of low-activity effluents from atomic electric power plants by selective inorganic sorbents  

SciTech Connect

This article examines some possible technological solutions toward simplifying the processing of waste water from the shower and laundry rooms of nuclear power plants. In particular, the radionuclides /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are considered, which provide the basic contribution to the radioactivity of the effluent from atomic electric power plants. The authors present a schematic diagram of the device for sorption decontamination of the water from the shower and special laundry rooms at the Beloyarsk plant, which is the control site of this experiment. The proposed sorption decontamination unit is characterized by a simple design, occupies little space, and, if automated, can operate virtually without attendance personnel. Charges of 100 liters of sorbent per column, placed simultaneously, are calculated for the processing of a total of 20,000 m/sup 3/ of water, ensuring a decontamination factor with respect to /sup 137/Cs and /sup 134/Cs radionuclides. With the columns operating in series, the decontamination factor with respect to /sup 60/Co is equal to 2, which would satisfy the annual requirements for the processing of waste water form the shower and special laundry rooms of a single atomic power plant with a power level of 100 MW.

Sharygin, L.M.; Moiseev, V.E.; Pyshkin, V.P.; Neshkov, P.F.; Kuz' mina, R.V.; Galkin, V.M.; Bragin, V.B.; Tsekh, A.R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site January 18, 2006 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the waste determination for the treatment and stabilization of low activity salt-waste at the Savannah River Site allowing for significant reductions in environmental and health risks posed by the material. Stored in forty-nine underground tanks, approximately 36 million gallons of radioactive waste is left over from plutonium production during the Cold War. In addition, the department issued an amended Record of Decision and Implementation Plan to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. "Today's announcement clears the way for the removal and treatment of this

198

On second-law efficiency of solar collectors  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, the performance of solar collectors has been examined from the standpoint of energy-balance approach (Hahne, 1985; Francy et al., 1985; Lund, 1985; Satyamurty, 1985; Proctor, 1984a; Proctor; 1984b; Proctor, 1984c). It is important to note that this approach gives a very poor indication of how well a particular energy resource is being utilized by a given system to accomplish a specific objective. For example, it is difficult to examine the performance of solar thermal collectors versus solar-photovoltaic panels, strictly based on the first law of thermodynamics. A photovoltaic panel having ten percent first-law efficiency may be better than a solar collector converting 50 percent of useful energy by raising the water temperature from 30 to 50 C. Thus, it has been necessary to resort to the second law of thermodynamics for evaluation of solar systems, particularly collection devices. The second-law efficiency addresses the quality of energy. The quality of energy may be defined as its available portion; that portion which may be used for producing shaft work. It is important to note that the energy be conserved, but the manner in which energy is used must be examined. To use high quality energy for low-quality energy tasks is wasteful. This type of indication can only be examined from the second-law point of view. In this paper, measurements obtained from an experimental solar collector test facility are presented. Analysis of the performance of two flat-plate thermal solar collectors and one photovoltaic panel are analyzed based on both the first and second law of thermodynamics. The measurements presented, indicate very low second-law efficiency (maximum of 17 percent for photovoltaic panel and 11 percent for solar thermal flat-plate collectors), but are merely used as a vehicle for discussion.

Said, S.A.M.; Zubair, S.M. (King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

200

Conservation and the Law: A Dictionary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation and the Law: A Dictionary By Debra L. DonahueConservation and The Law: A Dictionary. Santa Barbara, CA:to Environment and the Law: A Dictionary (1995), which is a

Johnson, William T.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) Low Level Radioactive Waste Authority (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Program Info State Michigan Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Environmental Quality Federal laws passed in 1980 and 1985 made each state responsible for the low-level radioactive waste produced within its borders. Act 204 of 1987 created the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority (LLRWA) to fulfill state responsibilities under federal law for managing and assuring disposal capacity for the low-level radioactive waste produced in Michigan. The LLRWA began a facility siting process in 1989 under the statutory limits of Act 204. The LLRWA eventually determined that it was impossible to find a

202

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

203

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws governs the operation of solid waste facilities. It seeks to encourage sustainable waste management

204

Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technetium Retention During Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC November 18, 2010 Overview * Tc in borosilcate glass structure * Re as a surrogate for Tc * Summary of previous data on Tc incorporation into LAW glass * Summary of results from ongoing test program * Single-pass retention vs. retention with recycle * Tc volatilization during container filling Tc in LAW Glass Structure * Tc is present as Tc 7+ and Tc 4+ * Tc 7+ is dominant in more oxidized glasses and Tc 4+ is dominant in reduced glasses * Strongly reducing conditions produce Tc 0 * The structure and local environment of Tc in WTP LAW glasses has been investigated by: * Synchrotron X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy * Lukens, McKeown, Buechele, Muller, Shuh, and Pegg, Chem. Mater., 19, 559 (2007)

205

Will Moore's Law Be Sufficient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It seems well understood that supercomputer simulation is an enabler for scientific discoveries, weapons, and other activities of value to society. It also seems widely believed that Mooreýs Law will make progressively more powerful supercomputers ...

Erik P. DeBenedictis

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Louisiana Air Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law states regulations for air quality control and states the powers and duties of the secretary of environmental quality. It provides information about permits and licenses, air quality...

207

Public Law 104-134  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-134 4-134 Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-134) Updated April 30, 1999 The President has signed into law historic legislation having a major impact on the way the Federal Government makes payments and collects its debts. Within the Omnibus Consolidated Rescissions and Appropriations Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-134) is the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996. The legislation provides an excellent opportunity for the Federal Government to move toward its goal of increased electronic commerce and improved cash and debt collection management. It is our intent to expeditiously implement the law to fulfill the Congressional mandate. The Act will enhance debt collection Government-wide, as well as mandate the use of electronic funds transfer (EFT) for Federal payments, allow Federal Reserve Bank

208

Gas Safety Law (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Safety Law (Florida) Gas Safety Law (Florida) Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility MunicipalPublic Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric...

209

Laws & Legal Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resources Laws DOE Administers Guidance & Opinions General Counsel Law Library Research Guides LLRX Provides articles dealing with legal research in a number of subject and...

210

Solar Easements & Rights Laws | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rights Laws Solar Easements & Rights Laws Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings For Heating &...

211

The Readable Delaware General Corporation Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the United States Internal Revenue Code, or any successorunder the United States internal revenue laws and whosesubsequent United States internal revenue law). Subchapter

LoPucki, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solar and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights Law Solar and Wind Easements & Rights Laws & Local Option Solar Rights Law Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed....

213

Waste= Capital.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The evolution of manufacturing practices over the last century has led to the creation of excess waste during the production process, depleting resources and overwhelming… (more)

Stidham, Steve P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;MUSHROOM WASTE MANAGEMENT PROJECT LIQUID WASTE MANAGEMENT PHASE I: AUDIT OF CURRENT PRACTICE The Mushroom Waste Management Project (MWMP) was initiated by Environment Canada, the BC Ministry of solid and liquid wastes generated at mushroom producing facilities. Environmental guidelines

215

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect

This research was intended to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of high-activity tank waste can be evaluated. Primary focus has been on sodium hydroxide separation, with potential Hanford application. Value in sodium hydroxide separation can potentially be found in alternative flowsheets for treatment and disposal of low-activity salt waste. Additional value can be expected in recycle of sodium hydroxide for use in waste retrieval and sludge washing, whereupon additions of fresh sodium hydroxide to the waste can be avoided. Potential savings are large both because of the huge cost of vitrification of the low-activity waste stream and because volume reduction of high-activity wastes could obviate construction of costly new tanks. Toward these ends, the conceptual development begun in the original proposal was extended with the formulation of eight fundamental approaches that could be undertaken for extraction of sodium hydroxide.

Bruce A. Moyer; Alan P. Marchand; Peter V. Bonnesen; Jeffrey C. Bryan; Tamara J. Haverlock

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

217

Conservation laws for the Maxwell-Dirac equations with a dual Ohm's law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a general theorem on conservation laws for arbitrary differential equations proved by Ibragimov, we have derived conservation laws for Dirac's symmetrized Maxwell-Lorentz equations under the assumption that both the electric and magnetic charges obey linear conductivity laws (dual Ohm's law). We find that this linear system allows for conservation laws which are non-local in time.

Nail H. Ibragimov; Raisa Khamitova; Bo Thidé

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation final report and recommendation  

SciTech Connect

Using a formalized Systems Engineering approach, the Latched Idaho Technologies Company developed and evaluated numerous alternatives for treating, immobilizing, and disposing of radioactive liquid and calcine wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Based on technical analysis data as of March, 1995, it is recommended that the Department of Energy consider a phased processing approach -- utilizing Radionuclide Partitioning for radioactive liquid and calcine waste treatment, FUETAP Grout for low-activity waste immobilization, and Glass (Vitrification) for high-activity waste immobilization -- as the preferred treatment and immobilization alternative.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton capacity, it...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Federal Energy Management Program: Laws and Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws and Laws and Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Laws and Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Laws and Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Laws and Regulations on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Laws and Regulations on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Laws and Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Laws and Regulations on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Laws and Regulations EISA 432 Compliance Tracking Track Federal agency progress toward Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 using FEMP's EISA 432 Compliance Tracking

222

Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Law  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

rate - c g is the crack propagation speed - c l is the longitudinal elastic wave speed. - R s is the radius of the volume relieved by the crack, taken as a function of the...

225

Law  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to Census: t cens - Number of Mean-Free Paths to Collision: N mfp - Random Number Seed: R seed - Miscellaneous Attributes: number of collisions, last event, breed, domain, cell,...

226

Law  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

- spatial refinement - Relatively simple interlevel operators - Clean Lagrangian hydro 5LC 2005 rbp. 36 Current Limitations * No support yet for: - Parallel problem...

227

Price's Law on Nonstationary Spacetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study the pointwise decay properties of solutions to the wave equation on a class of nonstationary asymptotically flat backgrounds in three space dimensions. Under the assumption that uniform energy bounds and a weak form of local energy decay hold forward in time we establish a $t^{-3}$ local uniform decay rate (Price's law \\cite{MR0376103}) for linear waves. As a corollary, we also prove Price's law for certain small perturbations of the Kerr metric. This result was previously established by the second author in \\cite{Tat} on stationary backgrounds. The present work was motivated by the problem of nonlinear stability of the Kerr/Schwarzschild solutions for the vacuum Einstein equations, which seems to require a more robust approach to proving linear decay estimates.

Metcalfe, Jason; Tohaneanu, Mihai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Law of Conservation of Muons  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A multiplicative selection rule for mu meson-electron transitions is proposed. A "muon parity" = -1 is considered for the muon and its neutrino, while the "muon parity" for all other particles is +1. The selection rule then states that (-1) exp(no. of initial (-1) parity particles) = (-1) exp(no. of final (-1) parity particles). Several reactions that are forbidden by an additive law but allowed by the multiplicative law are suggested; these reactions include mu{sup +} .> e{sup +} + nu{sub mu} + {ovr nu}{sub e}, e{sup -} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + mu{sup -}, and muonium .> antimuonium (mu{sup +} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + e{sup +}). An intermediate-boson hypothesis is suggested. (T.F.H.)

Feinberg, G.; Weinberg, S.

1961-02-00T23:59:59.000Z

229

Constructing Gender Through Sex Discrimination Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a New Conception of Gender Identity in the Law. ColumbiaMedicine, Re/modeling Gender. Berkeley Women's Law Journal,Review, 26, 1395. Kosbie, J. Gender Identity Expression as

Kosbie, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An Economics-Based Second Law Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Second Law efficiency is a useful parameter for characterizing the energy requirements of a system in relation to the limits of performance prescribed by the Laws of Thermodynamics. However, since energy costs typically ...

Mistry, Karan Hemant

231

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

Conservation laws for a general Lorentz connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive conservation laws for energy-momentum (canonical and dynamical) and angular momentum for a general Lorentz connection.

Poplawski, Nikodem J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Law Enforcement & Emergency Management Liaison | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Law Enforcement & Emergency Management Liaison | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

234

A logical model of private international law  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide a logical analysis of private international law, the body of law establishing when courts of a country should decide a case (jurisdiction) and what legal system they should apply to this purpose (choice of law). A formal model of the resulting ...

Phan Minh Dung; Giovanni Sartor

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Understanding Cement Waste Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009 ... Ongoing nuclear operations, decontamination and decommissioning, salt waste disposal, and closure of liquid waste tanks result in ...

236

Waste Minimization Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About the 1996 International Symposium on Extraction and Processing for the Treatment and Minimization of Wastes: Waste Minimization Contents ...

237

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents environmental regulatory compliance at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste, for the reporting period of April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2004. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with applicable environmental protection laws and regulations implemented by agencies of the federal government and the state of New Mexico.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services (WRES)

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System  

SciTech Connect

Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

Shappert, L.B. (ed.); Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Dixon, L.D. (Dixon (L.D.), Martinez, GA (United States)); Jones, R.H. (Jones (R.H.), Los Gatos, CA (United States)); Klimas, M.J. (USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (United States)); Peterson, R.W

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) is a nationwide study examining the environmental impacts of managing more than 2 million cubic meters of radioactive wastes from past, present, and future DOE activities. The WM PEIS will assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in improving the efficiency and reliability of management of its current and anticipated volumes of radioactive and hazardous wastes and will help DOE continue to comply with applicable laws and regulations and protect workers, public health and safety, and the environment. The WM PEIS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low activated incore instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Instrumentation for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials.

Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Low activated incore instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Instrumentation is described for nuclear reactor head-mounted incore instrumentation systems fabricated of low nuclear cross section materials (i.e., zirconium or titanium). The instrumentation emits less radiation than that fabricated of conventional materials. 9 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

GP-8 LAWS AND REGULATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOP (5-2011) DOP (5-2011) Supersedes (7-2010) issue DECLARATION of OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE PROVIDER GENERAL INFORMATION PURPOSE All Contractors and their lower-tier subcontractors must comply with the Department of Energy's Worker Safety and Health Program regulation, 10 CFR 851, "Worker Safety and Health Program (WSHP). The WSHP enforces worker safety and health requirements including, but not limited to, standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and Workers Compensation Laws as incorporated in the SNL WSHP. APPLICABILITY Contractors at all tiers which meet the applicability criteria must establish and provide comprehensive

244

Simple laws of urban growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By analysing the evolution of the street network of Greater London from the late 1700s to the present, we are able to shed light on the inner mechanisms that lie behind the growth of a city. First we define an object called a city as a spatial discontinuous phenomena, from clustering the density of street intersections. Second, we find that the city growth mechanisms can be described by two logistic laws, hence can be determined by a simple model of urban network growth in the presence of competition for limited space.

Masucci, Paolo; Batty, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Pack-Cementation Process of Iron-Aluminide Coating on China Low Activation Martensitic and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

X. M. Yuan; H. G. Yang; W. W. Zhao; Q. Zhan; Y. Hu; TMT Team

246

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany BREFs and their BATs Next Generation of Waste Fired Power Plants: Getting the most out of your trash Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From

Columbia University

247

Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site The Secretary of Energy is making this 3116 Determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) [1]. This 3116 Determination concerns the disposal of separated, solidified low-activity radioactive salt waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site More Documents & Publications EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site

248

Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site The Secretary of Energy is making this 3116 Determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) [1]. This 3116 Determination concerns the disposal of separated, solidified low-activity radioactive salt waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site More Documents & Publications EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site

249

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Renewable Energy Easements & Rights Laws | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Easements & Rights Laws Renewable Energy Easements & Rights Laws Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar...

251

Borges Dilemma, Fundamental Laws, and Systems Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A well-known folk-law in biology is that there is no general law in biology because of exceptions. In her recent elegant essay E.F. Keller gave a particular nice presentation on the exceptions to rules or laws in biology [1]. Her example of scaling laws was especially illuminative. Nevertheless, for this cherished folk-law the present author is wondering about its exceptions, too. Several examples immediately jump into his minds. One, of course, would be the folk-law itself: It had no exception in biology. This would be a bit disappointing because it would only permit us to work as what the cartographers did in J.L. Borges ’ fable [2]. Though eventually a map as big and as detail as the empire itself might be obtained, one would then ask where is the understanding within such an immense object? More disappointedly, such folk-law is really not biological. It has been used by some philosophers to argue against the unity of science [3]. Another example is distinctively biological and would be more exciting, and the author believes its existence should be not surprising to biologists: Evolution by Variation and Selection by Darwin and Wallace. To the author’s knowledge this dynamical law has no exception in biology. Nevertheless, under the influence of above folk-law this marvelous dynamics has been named Darwin’s principle, just falling short to regard it as a fundamental law [4]. Any scientists and mathematicians would know better

Ping Ao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

253

DOE publishes guide to state and federal laws for ER projects  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has published a guide of federal and state environmental laws and regulations that affect enhanced recovery projects. The primary emphasis of the publication is on prevention and control of air and water pollution, protection of underground water sources, and management of solid wastes. Only laws and regulations that apply specifically to features unique to EOR, such as emissions for steam generators or underground injections of chemicals, are dealt with. The National Environmental Policy Act of 1979, the Coastal Zone Management Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Noise Control Act, prinicpal federal laws affecting the siting or operation of EOR facilities, are listed in the handbook, and requirements under these laws are detailed. Tentative requirements under some environmental laws not yet implemented, such as the Underground Injection Control and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, also are included. The relevant state environmental laws, regulation and permit requirements of 16 major oil-producing states where EOR techniques are important, or could become important, to future oil recovery, are included in the handbook (Alabama, California, Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wyoming).

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Transuranic contaminated waste functional definition and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine the problem(s) of TRU waste classification and to document the development of an easy-to-apply standard(s) to determine whether or not this waste package should be emplaced in a geologic repository for final disposition. Transuranic wastes are especially significant because they have long half-lives and some are rather radiotoxic. Transuranic radionuclides are primarily produced by single or multiple neutron capture by U-238 in fuel elements during the operation of a nuclear reactor. Reprocessing of spent fuel elements attempts to remove plutonium, but since the separation is not complete, the resulting high-activity liquids still contain some plutonium as well as other transuranics. Likewise, transuranic contamination of low-activity wastes also occurs when the transuranic materials are handled or processed, which is primarily at federal facilities involved in R and D and nuclear weapons production. Transuranics are persistent in the environment and, as a general rule, are strongly retained by soils. They are not easily transported through most food chains, although some reconcentration does take place in the aquatic food chain. They pose no special biological hazard to humans upon ingestion because they are weakly absorbed from the gastrointestional tract. A greater hazard results from inhalation since they behave like normal dust and fractionate accordingly.

Kniazewycz, B.G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking  

SciTech Connect

Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidised bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C{sub 2}-C{sub 7}) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that 'waste' FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity.

Salmiaton, A., E-mail: mie@eng.upm.edu.my [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Garforth, A.A. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Medical School Biomedical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical School Biomedical Waste Labware, gloves, pipets, pipet tips Stock cultures, bacterial with or without needles, razor blades, scalpel blades) Key: Pathological waste BL1 & BL2 waste (low risk ­ LR) BL2 waste (moderate risk - MR)/BL3 waste Blood Blood Autoclave Needle box Metal Cart Must either bleach

Cooley, Lynn

257

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Sorting Activity Introduction: This waste sorting game was originally designed to be one have completed the waste sorting activity quickly, no team was able to complete the waste sorting task who were unfamiliar with Dalhousie's waste management system. Goals: The primary goal of the activity

Beaumont, Christopher

258

University of Waste Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Maryland Hazardous And Regulated Waste Procedures Manual Revised July 2001 #12;Review II. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT III. BIOLOGICAL, PATHOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL WASTE (BPMW) MANAGEMENT IV. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLRW) MANAGEMENT V. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES VI. WASTE MINIMIZATION VII

Rubloff, Gary W.

259

The second laws of quantum thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The second law of thermodynamics tells us which state transformations are so statistically unlikely that they are effectively forbidden. Its original formulation, due to Clausius, states that "Heat can never pass from a colder to a warmer body without some other change, connected therewith, occurring at the same time". The second law applies to systems composed of many particles interacting; however, we are seeing that one can make sense of thermodynamics in the regime where we only have a small number of particles interacting with a heat bath. Is there a second law of thermodynamics in this regime? Here, we find that for processes which are cyclic or very close to cyclic, the second law for microscopic systems takes on a very di?erent form than it does at the macroscopic scale, imposing not just one constraint on what state transformations are possible, but an entire family of constraints. In particular, we find a family of free energies which generalise the traditional one, and show that they can never increase. We further find that there are three regimes which determine which family of second laws govern state transitions, depending on how cyclic the process is. In one regime one can cause an apparent violation of the usual second law, through a process of embezzling work from a large system which remains arbitrarily close to its original state. These second laws are not only relevant for small systems, but also apply to individual macroscopic systems interacting via long-range interactions, which only satisfy the ordinary second law on average. By making precise the definition of thermal operations, the laws of thermodynamics take on a simple form with the first law defining the class of thermal operations, the zeroeth law emerging as a unique condition ensuring the theory is nontrivial, and the remaining laws being a monotonicity property of our generalised free energies.

Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Micha? Horodecki; Nelly Huei Ying Ng; Jonathan Oppenheim; Stephanie Wehner

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

260

Corporate Board By-Laws  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2011 May 2011 By-Laws Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Corporate Board Article 1 Name The name shall be the Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance (QA) Corporate Board (hereafter referred to as the Board). Article 2 Mission The Board will serve a leadership role within EM for facilitating, championing, and overseeing the effectiveness of a consistent and graded approach to implementing the corporate QA program, policies and requirements, and disseminating lessons learned and best practices such that a consistent and effective approach to quality is obtained through independently managed federal and contractor QA Programs. The Board will serve as a consensus-building body to facilitate institutionalization of a streamlined and efficient QA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Conservation laws for vacuum tetrad gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ten conservation laws in useful polynomial form are derived from a Cartan form and Exterior Differential System (EDS) for the tetrad equations of vacuum relativity. The Noether construction of conservation laws for well posed EDS is introduced first, and an illustration given, deriving 15 conservation laws of the free field Maxwell Equations from symmetries of its EDS. The Maxwell EDS and tetrad gravity EDS have parallel structures, with their numbers of dependent variables, numbers of generating 2-forms and generating 3-forms, and Cartan character tables all in the ratio of 1 to 4. They have 10 corresponding symmetries with the same Lorentz algebra, and 10 corresponding conservation laws.

Frank B. Estabrook

2005-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Laws and Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laws and Regulations Laws and Regulations Laws and Regulations Federal laws and regulations set multiple energy management requirements for Federal agencies spanning energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, and alternative fuel use. This section outlines Federal energy management authorities through: Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) analyzes energy management authorities and develops rules and guidance to help Federal agencies comply with applicable requirements. Reporting requirements and Federal Government performance reports are also available through: Notices and Rules Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting. EISA 432 Compliance Tracking Track Federal agency progress toward Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 using FEMP's EISA 432

263

Fisher info and thermodynamics' first law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991); B. H. Lavenda, Thermodynamics of Extremes (Al- bion,Fisher information and thermodynamics’ 1st. law A. Plastinotransform (LT) of thermodynamics can be microscopically

Plastino, A; Plastino, A R; Soffer, Bernard H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Solar Easements & Rights Laws | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Solar access provisions in the General Laws of Massachusetts allow for the creation of voluntary solar easements to protect solar exposure and authorizes zoning rules...

265

Solar Easements & Local Option Solar Rights Laws  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Utah's solar easement provisions are similar to easement provisions in many other states. Parties may voluntarily enter into written solar easement contracts that are enforceable by law. An...

266

Patent Harmonization: Creating Uniform Patent Laws  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patent Harmonization: Creating Uniform Patent Laws. David V. Radack. You may have seen or heard the phrase "patent harmonization" used when discussing ...

267

US Retail Pricing Laws and Regulations 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... accessories, intended (1) for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention ... c) Group 3: Frozen ... IDAHO No pricing laws or regulations ...

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Selection of Pretreatment Processes for Removal of Radionuclides from Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Office of River Protection (ORP) located at Hanford Washington has established a contract (1) to design, construct, and commission a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that will treat and immobilize the Hanford tank wastes for ultimate disposal. The WTP is comprised of four major elements, pretreatment, LAW immobilization, HLW immobilization, and balance of plant facilities. This paper describes the technologies selected for pretreatment of the LAW and HLW tank wastes, how these technologies were selected, and identifies the major technology testing activities being conducted to finalize the design of the WTP.

Carreon, R.; Mauss, B. M.; Johnson, M. E.; Holton, L. K.; Wright, G. T.; Peterson, R. A.; Rueter, K. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Democracy, Judicial Attitudes and Heterogeneity: The Civil Versus Common Law Tradition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

law, instead, achieves the 9Implicit in (4) and (5), there is the assumption that both side transfers and collective action costs do not entail social wastes: relaxing it does not change the qualitative message of the model—see footnote 12. Only... the one under the mixed system where bright line rules are used. Discretion will be introduced if ? ?¯, the hybrid tradition prevails. Germany, Switzerland and the Scandinavian countries are examples...

Guerriero, C

270

WIPP waste acceptance criteria and transportation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, USA, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed as a permanent repository for transuranic wastes in the center of a 2,000-foot-thick salt bed situated 2,150 feet underground. Construction of the facility started in 1975, under a congressional act of site selection. In 1979, demonstration of safe disposal at the WIPP was authorized by Public Law 96-164. The operational philosophy and practice at the facility are: (1) start clean -- stay clean, (2) meet or exceed regulatory requirements, and (3) control radiation exposure levels to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Strict safety measures must be taken in the areas of waste preparation, transportation, and facility operation.

Wu, C.F.; Ward, T.R.; Gregory, P.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

272

Waste Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Management Facility ISO 14001 Registered A wide range of wastes are generated during the normal course of business at BNL. These waste streams are common to many businesses...

273

Waste Logic Decommissioning Waste Manager 2.0 Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decommissioning Waste Manager, part of EPRI's Waste Logic series of computer programs, analyzes decommissioning waste cost and volume reduction strategies with the intent of quantifying the existing waste management program for any given waste generator.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solid Waste (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Solid Waste Bureau manages solid waste in the state. The Bureau implements and enforces the rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board.

275

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

276

Recycling Electronic Waste - Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... Joined: 2/13/2007. Below is a link to a website that has articles on recycling electronic waste. http://www.scientificamerican....ectronic-waste- ...

277

International Trade with Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this thesis, trade with waste between developed countries and the third world will be presented to analyze whether waste?trading can create a possible… (more)

Willén, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Law 273.71 California Environmental Law & Policy Issues (Fall 2008) Units: 2 CCN (2Ls/3Ls): 49696:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Instructor's Profile: Mr. Frank is the Executive Director of the California Center from the University of California at Davis in 1974. Following positions as a staff attorney

Kammen, Daniel M.

279

Status of the Fundamental Laws of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe recent progress towards deriving the Fundamental Laws of thermodynamics (the 0th, 1st and 2nd Law) from nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics in simple, yet physically relevant models. Along the way, we clarify some basic thermodynamic notions and discuss various reversible and irreversible thermodynamic processes from the point of view of quantum statistical mechanics.

Walid K. Abou Salem; Juerg Froehlich

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Status of the Fundamental Laws of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe recent progress towards deriving the Fundamental Laws of thermodynamics (the 0 th,1 st, and 2 nd Law) from nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics in simple, yet physically relevant models. Along the way, we clarify some basic thermodynamic notions and discuss various reversible and irreversible thermodynamic processes from the point of view of quantum statistical mechanics. 1

Walid K. Abou Salem; Jürg Fröhlich

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Conservation laws of semidiscrete canonical Hamiltonian equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many evolution partial differential equations which can be cast into Hamiltonian form. Conservation laws of these equations are related to one-parameter Hamiltonian symmetries admitted by the PDEs. The same result holds for semidiscrete Hamiltonian equations. In this paper we consider semidiscrete canonical Hamiltonian equations. Using symmetries, we find conservation laws for the semidiscretized nonlinear wave equation and Schrodinger equation.

Roman Kozlov

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

282

Laws DOE Administers | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws DOE Administers Laws DOE Administers Laws DOE Administers The Department of Energy's (DOE) overarching mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. Laws passed by Congress and signed by the President both define DOE's authorities and set forth DOE's responsibilities. Additionally, a number of Executive Orders issued by the President play a central role in guiding DOE's activities. In the space below, we have provided links to key statutes and executive orders which affect the Department of Energy. For every law, we provide a link to the United States Code (U.S.C.) , which is the codification by

283

High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Level Waste Corporate Board High-Level Waste Corporate Board Meeting Agenda Loews Hotel 1065 West Peachtree St, Atlanta, Georgia November 18, 2010 Time Topic Speaker 7:30 AM Closed Session - ratify Charter Board members 8:30 AM Welcome, Introduction, 2011 focus for HLW Corp Board Shirley Olinger 8:50 AM Introduction to Tc/I in Hanford Flowsheet ï‚· Show flowsheet w/ split locations ï‚· Describe recycle of LAW concept ï‚· Discuss baseline assumptions ï‚· Describe subsequent talks using flowsheet figure Gary Smith 9:15 AM Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant (WTP) ï‚· Tc/I split factors (w/ and w/o recycle) ï‚· Water management (w/ and w/o recycle) Albert Kruger 9:45 AM WTP Melter/Offgas Systems Decontamination Factors ï‚· Re as a stimulant for Tc ï‚· Issues that limit Tc incorporation in LAW glass

284

Waste analysis plan for central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Central Waste Complex which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

Weston, N.L.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

Thomas, L.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DENVER, CO DENVER, CO WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT ACTIVITIES ACTIVITIES O.W. EATON MANAGER, EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OPENING OF NEW ROUTES COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 102 579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL 102-579 WIPP LANDWITHDRAWL ACT OF 1992 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 *MERRTT 1082 EMERGENCY PERSONNEL TRAINED IN 2010 MERRTT *INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *HOSPITAL PREPAREDNESS *MEDICAL EXAMINER DISPATCHER (BETA) *DISPATCHER (BETA) RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR FOR FOR FOR HOSPITAL PERSONNEL HOSPITAL PERSONNEL Based on FEMA Course G-346 iNTRODUCTION 4 Hazardous Materials Accidents Part 1 WIPP EXTERNAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT EXERCISES CONDUCTED E ercise Location Date Exercise Location Date TRANSAX 90 Colorado Springs, Colorado November 8, 1990 1

291

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nuclear waste solidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Public Law 102-392 for Printing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-392 for Printing Public Law 102-392 for Printing Public Law 102-392 for Printing Public Law 102-392 for Printing More Documents & Publications Minutes from the Print and Mail...

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alaska Laws and Incentives for EVs on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives for...

295

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alaska Laws and Incentives for NEVs on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives for...

296

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Eligibility...

297

Business Plan : Residential Solid Waste Collection.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Residential solid waste means all the solid wastes produced in household level, which includes bio-waste, metal, mixed wastes, organic and inorganic waste. The inability of… (more)

Mazengo, Dorice

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Estimating retained gas volumes in the Hanford tanks using waste level measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Safety and environmental concerns surround these tanks and their contents. One such concern is the propensity for the waste in these tanks to generate and trap flammable gases. This report focuses on understanding and improving the quality of retained gas volume estimates derived from tank waste level measurements. While direct measurements of gas volume are available for a small number of the Hanford tanks, the increasingly wide availability of tank waste level measurements provides an opportunity for less expensive (than direct gas volume measurement) assessment of gas hazard for the Hanford tanks. Retained gas in the tank waste is inferred from level measurements -- either long-term increase in the tank waste level, or fluctuations in tank waste level with atmospheric pressure changes. This report concentrates on the latter phenomena. As atmospheric pressure increases, the pressure on the gas in the tank waste increases, resulting in a level decrease (as long as the tank waste is {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} enough). Tanks with waste levels exhibiting fluctuations inversely correlated with atmospheric pressure fluctuations were catalogued in an earlier study. Additionally, models incorporating ideal-gas law behavior and waste material properties have been proposed. These models explicitly relate the retained gas volume in the tank with the magnitude of the waste level fluctuations, dL/dP. This report describes how these models compare with the tank waste level measurements.

Whitney, P.D.; Chen, G.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Miller, N.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Scaling Laws in the Distribution of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research done during the previous century established our Standard Cosmological Model. There are many details still to be filled in, but few would seriously doubt the basic premise. Past surveys have revealed that the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the Universe is far from random: it is highly structured over a vast range of scales. To describe cosmic structures, we need to build mathematically quantifiable descriptions of structure. Identifying where scaling laws apply and the nature of those scaling laws is an important part of understanding which physical mechanisms have been responsible for the organization of clusters, superclusters of galaxies and the voids between them. Finding where these scaling laws are broken is equally important since this indicates the transition to different underlying physics. In describing scaling laws we are helped by making analogies with fractals: mathematical constructs that can possess a wide variety of scaling properties. We must beware, however, of saying that ...

Jones, B J T; Saar, E; Trimble, V; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Martinez, Vicent J.; Saar, Enn; Trimble, Virginia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

General Counsel Law Library | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library. Contact us with any questions: P: (202) 586-4848 F: (202) 586-0865 Law.Library@hq.doe.gov Legislative History The Legislative History Library is also available to GC...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Federal Energy Management Program: Laws & Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws and Regulations Laws and Regulations EISA 432 Compliance Tracking Track Federal agency progress toward Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 using FEMP's EISA 432 Compliance Tracking System. Federal laws and regulations set multiple energy management requirements for Federal agencies spanning energy efficiency, renewable energy, water conservation, and alternative fuel use. This section outlines Federal energy management authorities through: Requirements by Subject: Find regulatory requirements and related guidance by topic area. Requirements by Regulation: Take an in-depth look at individual laws and regulations. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) analyzes energy management authorities and develops rules and guidance to help Federal agencies comply with applicable requirements. Reporting requirements and Federal Government performance reports are also available through:

302

Essays on malpractice law and physician behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation contributes to an understanding of the manner in which various dimensions of malpractice law shape physician behavior and how this behavior, in turn, impacts health outcomes. In Chapter 1, I explore the ...

Frakes, Michael (Michael D.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Essays in empirical law and economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis, which consists of three essays, uses empirical methods to study questions in criminal procedure and employment antidiscrimination law. The first chapter measures the consequences for offenders of expanding ...

Prescott, James J. (James Jondall)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

EIA's Testimony on Federal Tax Laws  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Statement of John S. Cook Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration before the House Committee on Ways and Means Subcommittee on Oversight; United States House of Representatives hearing on federal tax laws; March 5, 2001

Information Center

2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

NEPA and Other Laws | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEPA and Other Laws NEPA and Other Laws NEPA and Other Laws Selected documents providing guidance on the relationship between NEPA and other laws. March 5, 2013 NEPA and CEQA: Integrating State and Federal Environmental Reviews (Draft) The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), in collaboration with the California Governor's Office of Planning and Research, issued on March 5, 2013, a draft handbook on integrating NEPA and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review processes. The guide provides practitioners with an overview of NEPA and CEQA as well as valuable suggestions for developing a single environmental review process that can meet the requirements of both statutes. March 5, 2013 NEPA and NHPA: A Handbook for Integrating NEPA and Section 106 In this document the Council on Environmental Quality and the Advisory

306

Tensorial conservation law for nematic polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the "conservation law" for nematic polymers in tensorial form valid for quadrupolar orientational order in contradistinction to the conservation law in the case of polar orientational order. Due to microscopic differences in the coupling between the orientational field deformations and the density variations for polar and quadrupolar order, we find that respective order parameters satisfy fundamentally distinct constraints. Being necessarily scalar in its form, the tensorial conservation law is obtained straightforwardly from the gradients of the polymer nematic tensor field and connects the spatial variation of this tensor field with density variations. We analyze the differences between the polar and the tensorial forms of the conservation law, present some explicit orientational fields that satisfy this new constraint and discuss the role of singular "hairpins", which do not affect local quadrupolar order of polymer nematics, but nevertheless influence its gradients.

Daniel Sven\\vsek; Gregory M. Grason; Rudolf Podgornik

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

307

Legislation in a Common Law Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Laws’, 262-3, 272-3. Preface to Coke’s Reports (Part 2),Selected Writings of Edward Coke, 1: 41. Commentaries, 1:celebrated jurists as Edward Coke, John Selden, Matthew Hale

Lieberman, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Secondary Waste Form Down Selection Data Package – Ceramicrete  

SciTech Connect

As part of high-level waste pretreatment and immobilized low activity waste processing, liquid secondary wastes will be generated that will be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Facility on the Hanford Site for further treatment. These liquid secondary wastes will be converted to stable solid waste forms that will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility. Currently, four waste forms are being considered for stabilization and solidification of the liquid secondary wastes. These waste forms are Cast Stone, Ceramicrete, DuraLith, and Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer. The preferred alternative will be down selected from these four waste forms. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing data packages to support the down selection process. The objective of the data packages is to identify, evaluate, and summarize the existing information on the four waste forms being considered for stabilization and solidification of the liquid secondary wastes. The information included will be based on information available in the open literature and from data obtained from testing currently underway. This data package is for the Ceramicrete waste form. Ceramicrete is a relatively new engineering material developed at Argonne National Laboratory to treat radioactive and hazardous waste streams (e.g., Wagh 2004; Wagh et al. 1999a, 2003; Singh et al. 2000). This cement-like waste form can be used to treat solids, liquids, and sludges by chemical immobilization, microencapsulation, and/or macroencapsulation. The Ceramicrete technology is based on chemical reaction between phosphate anions and metal cations to form a strong, dense, durable, low porosity matrix that immobilizes hazardous and radioactive contaminants as insoluble phosphates and microencapsulates insoluble radioactive components and other constituents that do not form phosphates. Ceramicrete is a type of phosphate-bonded ceramic, which are also known as chemically bonded phosphate ceramics. The Ceramicrete binder is formed through an acid-base reaction between calcined magnesium oxide (MgO; a base) and potassium hydrogen phosphate (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}; an acid) in aqueous solution. The reaction product sets at room temperature to form a highly crystalline material. During the reaction, the hazardous and radioactive contaminants also react with KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} to form highly insoluble phosphates. In this data package, physical property and waste acceptance data for Ceramicrete waste forms fabricated with wastes having compositions that were similar to those expected for secondary waste effluents, as well as secondary waste effluent simulants from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant were reviewed. With the exception of one secondary waste form formulation (25FA+25 W+1B.A. fabricated with the mixed simulant did not meet the compressive strength requirement), all the Ceramicrete waste forms that were reviewed met or exceeded Integrated Disposal Facility waste acceptance criteria.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

UNEP Handbook for Drafting Laws on Energy Efficiency and Renewable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Handbook for Drafting Laws on Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP Handbook for Drafting Laws on Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

310

Wind Access and Permitting Law | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access and Permitting Law Wind Access and Permitting Law < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Delaware Program Type...

311

Louisiana Water Control Law (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control Law. This law states regulations for water quality control and states the powers and duties of the secretary of environmental quality. It provides information about...

312

Solar and Wind Easements and Rights Laws | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laws Solar and Wind Easements and Rights Laws < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings...

313

Clean Water Partnership Law (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership Law (Minnesota) Clean Water Partnership Law (Minnesota) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility StateProvincial Govt...

314

The Clean Streams Law (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Clean Streams Law (Pennsylvania) The Clean Streams Law (Pennsylvania) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial...

315

A Guide to US Retail Pricing Laws and Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Guide to Retail Pricing Laws and Regulations. US Pricing Laws and Regulations by state. ... Contact New York directly for a complete listing. ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws Solar Easements and Local Option Solar Rights Laws < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government...

317

AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments to:DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges AARP, National Consumer Law...

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

for Alternative Fuel Purchaser on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives for...

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Incentives for Aftermarket Conversions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives for...

320

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Delaware laws and incentives related to HEVs PHEVs. Laws and Regulations State Agency Energy Plan To improve air quality and reduce operating expenses from state vehicle use,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Solar and Wind Easements and Rights Laws and Local Option Solar Rights Law  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Solar and Wind Easements and Rights Laws and Local Option Solar Rights Law Solar and Wind Easements and Rights Laws and Local Option Solar Rights Law < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Oregon has several laws that protect access to solar and wind resources and the use of solar energy systems. Oregon's solar access laws date back to 1979 and state that no person conveying or contracting to convey a property title can include provisions that prohibit the use of solar energy systems

322

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raya James Johnson Rad/Mixed Waste** Steve Bakhtiar – Leadhazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste at the Hazardoustraining. Radioactive and mixed waste generators must take

Waste Management Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Minimization Plan Prepared by: Environmental Health and Safety Department Revised February 2012 #12;Waste Minimization Plan Table of Contents Policy Statement........................................................... 3 Centralized Waste Management Program

324

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

325

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Louisiana Laws and Louisiana Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Louisiana Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Louisiana. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dist. of Columbia Laws Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Dist. of Columbia Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Texas Laws and Texas Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Texas Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Texas. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

329

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pennsylvania Laws and Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ohio Laws and Ohio Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ohio Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ohio Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Ohio. Your Clean Cities coordinator at your

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nebraska Laws and Nebraska Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nebraska Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Nebraska. For more information, contact

332

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Minnesota Laws and Minnesota Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Minnesota Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Minnesota. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

333

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Illinois Laws and Illinois Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Illinois Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Illinois. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

334

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nevada Laws and Nevada Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nevada Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Nevada. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Jersey Laws and Jersey Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type New Jersey Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for New Jersey. Your Clean Cities coordinator

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Massachusetts Laws and Massachusetts Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Massachusetts Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Carolina Laws Carolina Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type North Carolina Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rhode Island Laws and Rhode Island Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Rhode Island Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hawaii Laws and Hawaii Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hawaii Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Hawaii. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alaska Laws and Alaska Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Alaska. For more information, contact your

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Maine Laws and Maine Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Maine Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Maine. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hampshire Laws and Hampshire Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type New Hampshire Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mississippi Laws and Mississippi Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Mississippi Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Mississippi. For more information, contact

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

West Virginia Laws and West Virginia Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: West Virginia Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type West Virginia Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Utah Laws and Utah Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Utah Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Utah. Your Clean Cities coordinator at Utah

346

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Colorado Laws and Colorado Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Colorado Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Colorado. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Arizona Laws and Arizona Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Arizona Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Arizona. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

348

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vermont Laws and Vermont Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vermont Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Vermont. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Laws and State Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Laws and Incentives To view a state's laws and incentives related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles, select a state from the map or menu below. For examples

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Maryland Laws and Maryland Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Maryland Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Maryland. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Montana Laws and Montana Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Montana. For more information, contact your

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Missouri Laws and Missouri Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Missouri Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Missouri. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and State Laws and State Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal and State Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Federal and State Laws and Incentives Find federal and state laws and incentives for alternative fuels and

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kansas Laws and Kansas Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kansas Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Kansas. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alabama Laws and Alabama Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alabama Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Alabama. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane » Laws & Incentives Propane » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Laws and Incentives

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idaho Laws and Idaho Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idaho Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Idaho. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

358

Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dakota Laws and Dakota Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type South Dakota Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

359

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Delaware Laws and Delaware Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Delaware Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Delaware. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Florida Laws and Florida Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Florida Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Florida. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Federal Laws and Federal Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Federal Laws and Incentives Listed below are summaries of all current federal laws, incentives, regulations, and programs related to alternative fuels and vehicles,

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Georgia Laws and Georgia Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Georgia Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Georgia. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Carolina Laws Carolina Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Carolina Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type South Carolina Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Laws and Incentives

365

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Oregon Laws and Oregon Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oregon Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Oregon. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wisconsin Laws and Wisconsin Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wisconsin Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Wisconsin. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

367

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Laws and Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Federal Laws and Incentives Listed below are federal incentives, laws and regulations, funding opportunities, and other federal initiatives related to alternative fuels

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wyoming Laws and Wyoming Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Wyoming. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kentucky Laws and Kentucky Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kentucky Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Kentucky. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

California Laws and California Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type California Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for California. Your Clean Cities coordinator

371

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Oklahoma Laws and Oklahoma Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oklahoma Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Oklahoma. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

New York Laws and New York Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New York Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type New York Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for New York. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

373

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mexico Laws and Mexico Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type New Mexico Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for New Mexico. Your Clean Cities coordinator

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Connecticut Laws and Connecticut Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Connecticut Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Connecticut. Your Clean Cities coordinator

375

Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dakota Laws and Dakota Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Dakota Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type North Dakota Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative

376

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Michigan Laws and Michigan Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Michigan Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Michigan. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tennessee Laws and Tennessee Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Tennessee Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Tennessee. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Indiana Laws and Indiana Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Indiana Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Indiana. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

379

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Iowa Laws and Iowa Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Iowa Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Iowa. Your Clean Cities coordinator at Iowa

380

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Virginia Laws and Virginia Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Virginia Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Virginia. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Washington Laws and Washington Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Washington Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Washington. Your Clean Cities coordinator

382

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Arkansas Laws and Arkansas Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Arkansas Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Arkansas. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

383

Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect

Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Development of Cementitious Waste Forms for Nuclear Waste Immobilization.

385

Cutting Wasteful Spending While Protecting Our Priorities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting Wasteful Spending While Protecting Our Priorities Cutting Wasteful Spending While Protecting Our Priorities Cutting Wasteful Spending While Protecting Our Priorities June 28, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis Aoife McCarthy Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs It is essential for Republicans and Democrats in Congress to work together on a budget that cuts wasteful spending while supporting jobs, the economy, and middle-class families. The President has been clear that he will not sign individual appropriations bills that simply attempt to enact the House Republican budget into law, which would hurt our economy and make draconian cuts to middle class priorities. Instead of reinforcing the Administration's all-of-the-above approach to energy, the House Republican Energy and Water Appropriations bill drastically undermines the work of the Department of Energy. It undermines

386

Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 NOV 1 4 2013 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Sa nta Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transm ittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Pl ant Annua l Waste Minimization Report Dea r Mr. Kieling : The purpose of this letter is to provide you wi th the Waste Isola lion Pilot Plant (W IPP) Annua l Waste Minimi za tion Report. This report is required by and has bee n prepared in accordance with the W IPP Haza rdou s Was te Faci lity Permit Part 2, Perm it Condition 2.4. We certify under penalty of law that this document and all attachmen ts were prepared under our direction or supervision according to a system designed to assure that qualified personnel properly gather and eval uate the information submitted. Based on ou

387

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT Annual Financial Report Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 As required by Section 304(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, Public Law 97-425, the following document is the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's Annual Financial Report for the years ended September 30, 2009 and 2008 as required by Section 302(c)(l) ofNWPA. The information in this report is current only as of September 30, 2009, and does not reflect actions or changes that have occurred since then.

388

LAW Radioactive Coupon CO{sub 2} Decontamination Test  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this test is to confirm that CO{sub 2} blasting is capable of effectively removing smearable contamination from the external surface of the Immobilized Low Activity Waste(ILAW) stainless steel container after glass pouring. The smearable contamination level limits specified in the approved test specification are: (1) 367 Bq/m{sup 2} (220 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}) alpha and 3670 Bq/m{sup 2} (2202 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}) beta-gamma (qualification limits); and (2) 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} alpha and 1000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} beta-gamma (design limits). The removal of smearable contamination from radioactively contaminated coupon was demonstrated by varying the following operating parameters: Nozzle standoff distance; Blast air pressure; Pellet rate; and Nozzle travel speed. Coupons were weighed before and after blasting to determine if the CO{sub 2} blasting process removed measurable amounts of surface material from the coupons. High-speed photography was used to capture images of the pellets exiting the blast nozzle as a means of estimating pellet shape and velocity at the blast nozzle. Bleeding tests were performed to determine if fixed contamination remaining on coupons after blasting ''bleeds out'' and measures as smearable contamination under typical storage conditions and times. The bleeding tests consisted of storing blasted coupons with no detectable smearable contamination for a period of 92 days at 95 F. Coupons were removed at 23-day intervals and re-evaluated for smearable contamination. The radioactive coupon blasting tests consisted of four main subtasks: (1) Coupon preparation; (2) CO{sub 2} blasting; (3) High-speed photography; and (4) Bleeding tests.

May, C.G.

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

390

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Permitting plan for the high-level waste interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of solidified high-level waste (HLW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Solidified HLW consists of canisters containing vitrified HLW (glass) and containers that hold cesium separated during low-level waste pretreatment. The glass canisters and cesium containers will be transported to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-provided transportation cask via diesel-powered tractor trailer. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms; and (2) interim storage and disposal of TWRS immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW). An environmental requirements checklist and narrative was developed to identify the permitting path forward for the HLW interim storage (HLWIS) project (See Appendix B). This permitting plan will follow the permitting logic developed in that checklist.

Deffenbaugh, M.L.

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Transuranic (TRU) Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste with half-lives greater than 20 years, except for (A)...

394

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Transuranic Waste Screener  

The TRU waste screener (TRU-WS) is a multifunctional system for the rapid screening of transuranic material for criticality safety or screening for TRU content in open trays or waste containers.

396

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE) is closing the circle on the generation, management, and disposal of transuranic waste. But the WIPP story is not just about radioactive waste. It is...

397

Immobilization of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010 ... Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms: Michael Ojovan1; Bill Lee2; ... wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... has been vitrifying the Department of Energy's High Level Waste (HLW) at ...

398

Pet Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About 1 million pounds of dog waste is deposited daily in North Texas alone. That's why proper disposal of pet waste can make a big difference in the environment. 5 photos, 2 pages

Mechell, Justin; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

399

LAWS OF NATURE meaning, purpose, and value to things outside  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Cambridge University Press, 1980. Rube, Jane. "The Origins of Scientific 'Law.'" Journal of the History of

Balashov, Yuri V.

400

American and European Ways of Law: Six Entrenched Differences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Administrative Law and Regulation (New York, Marcel Dekker). -------- (1990) ‘How Much Does

Kagan, Robert A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The wild wild waste: e-waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-Waste is a popular, informal name for discarded electronic products such as computers, VCRs, cameras, which have reached the end of their "useful life". Discarded electronic products contain a stew of toxic metals and chemicals such as lead, mercury, ... Keywords: donate, e-waste, ecology, efficiency, environment, green computing, hazardous material, re-use, recycle, reduce, thin-client, upgrade, virtualization

Scott E. Hanselman; Mahmoud Pegah

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A waste canister for storage of nuclear wastes in the form of a solidified glass includes fins supported from the center with the tips of the fins spaced away from the wall to conduct heat away from the center without producing unacceptable hot spots in the canister wall.

Duffy, James B. (Fullerton, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008 and are the authorization documents for this FY2010 Annual Review. Department of Energy Headquarters approval of the 2008 DAS was subject to numerous conditions specified in the document. Two of those conditions are to update the ELLWF closure plan and monitoring plan to align with the conceptual model analyzed in the PA. Both of these conditions were met with the issuance of the PA Monitoring Plan (Millings, 2009a) and the Closure Plan (Phifer et al, 2009a). The PA Monitoring Plan was approved by DOE on July 22, 2009 and the Closure Plan was approved by DOE on May 21, 2009. Both will be updated as needed to remain consistent with the PA. The DAS also specifies that the maintenance plan include activities to resolve each of the secondary issues identified in the DOEHQ review of the 2008 PA that were not completely addressed either with supplemental material provided to the review team or in final revisions to the PA. These outstanding issues were originally documented in the 2008 update of the PA/CA Maintenance Plan (WSRC, 2008a) and in subsequent PA/CA Maintenance Plans (most recently SRNS, 2010a) as required and are actively being worked.

Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mixed Waste Treatment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing integrated mixed waste program, EPRI has documented nuclear utility industry experience in the on-site treatment of mixed waste. This report reviews all available exclusions/exceptions to EPA permitting requirements for environmentally responsible on-site management of mixed waste. Included is a description of emerging mixed waste treatment technologies along with a detailed evaluation of off-site treatment/disposal facilities.

1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Requirements by Law and Regulation on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation

406

Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AR No. 5 Recycle Plastic Waste Recommended Action Separate scrap plastic bag waste from solid waste stream and recycle. This can be accomplished by either arranging for no-cost pick-up of loose waste or by selling baled waste material. Assessment Recommendation Summary Recommended Waste Cost Implementation

Tullos, Desiree

407

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Laws and Incentives Laws and Incentives Advanced Search to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Advanced Search on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Search Search incentives and laws related to alternative fuels and advanced

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen » Laws & Incentives Hydrogen » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

410

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel » Laws & Incentives Biodiesel » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

411

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Laws and Incentives Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Laws and Incentives Data Collection Methods

412

Solar Rights Law | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Solar Rights Law Solar Rights Law < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Delaware Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy In July 2009 Delaware enacted legislation ([http://www.legis.delaware.gov/LIS/LIS145.NSF/b51f4b5053c30a5c85257448004... SS 1 for S.B. 49]) prohibiting private covenants (i.e., homeowner's association rules) restricting the use of solar energy systems on residential rooftops. The law specifically prohibits any "covenant, restriction, or condition contained in a deed, contract or other legal instrument which affects the transfer, sale or any other interest in real property that prohibits or unreasonably restricts the owner of the property from using a roof mounted system for obtaining solar energy on his or her

413

Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I ' I I t Reducing waste, Photoby stcvcchan AMs President Mike Lee (left to right), Point Grey M U recycling given high priority on campus By GAVIN WILSON UBC is taking stepsto reduce waste and encourageGellatly,Vice-President,Administration and Finance,to develop and recommend university policies on waste recycling. Another task force has submitted

Farrell, Anthony P.

414

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

415

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radioactive waste disposal characteristics of candidate tokamak demonstration reactors  

SciTech Connect

Results from the current physics, materials and blanket R and D programs are combined with physics and engineering design constraints to characterize candidate tokamak demonstration plant (DEMO) designs. Blanket designs based on the principal structural materials, breeding materials and coolants being developed for the DEMO were adapted from the literature. Neutron flux and activation calculations were performed, and several radioactive waste disposal indices were evaluated, for each design. Of the primary low-activation structural materials under development in the US, it appears that vanadium and ferritic steel alloys, and possibly silicon carbide, could lead to DEMO designs which could satisfy realistic low-level waste (LLW) criteria, provided that impurities can be controlled within plausible limits. Allowable LLW concentrations are established for the limiting alloying and impurity elements. All breeding materials and neutron multipliers considered meet the LLW criterion.

Hoffman, E.A.; Stacey, W.M.; Hertel, N.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Transgressing the Law: Karma, Theft and Its Punishment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is described as: Having introduced laws where there had been no southern laws and fixed handles where there had been no handles on pots, he [the Zhabdrung] constrained by means of the religious laws like a silken know and pressed down with state laws... taking place within the Bhutanese judiciary. Reflecting a wider appreciation of the need to educate the public at large and an awareness of the increasing complexity of modern Bhutanese law, small workshops and even mini-expeditions to remoter...

Whitecross, Richard W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A crude scaling law for lasertrons  

SciTech Connect

The lasertron is under consideration in several laboratories as a promising new source of high-power microwaves that is competitive with conventional klystrons in its properties - particularly in efficiency. In this note, a crude scaling law for high-power lasertrons is derived based on the observation that the main limiting phenomenon, the phenomenon that curtails the tube's efficiency, is debunching due to longitudinal space-charge forces acting in the electron gun. The scaling law indicates that lasertrons are quite restricted in the power they can generate at high frequencies.

Rees, J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Defamation Law in Bhutan: Some Reflections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Unfortunately for him, his case in the US was thrown out because American law did not allow public figures 10 See, e.g. New York Times v. Sullivan 401 US 265 (1964). 11 The book in question, The Price of Power... in his seventies at the time, died before his suit came up for hearing.12 The Sangay Dorji case Bhutanese law does, like its counterparts in other South Asian countries, allow for both civil and criminal liability to attach to defamatory statements...

Iyer, Venkat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "low-activity waste law" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Second Law Optimization of Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method for optimizing heat exchangers is developed in this paper. It is based on second law efficiency relationships rather than on the traditional heat exchanger effectiveness concept. The cost of energy is based on its availability level rather than on the simple cost of fuel required to meet the exchanger heat duty. Application of the method to a condensing heater shows that the optimum area based on second law efficiency can be quite different from the optimum area computed by the effectiveness method.

Witte, L. C.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

423

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

424

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

425

Study of investigation-derived waste management options. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

USAF is dedicated to the clean up of past releases of hazardous substances at its bases under the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) . Clean up decisions are based upon data produced from investigations. Large amounts of waste may be derived from investigations. Investigation-derived waste (IDW), especially that with a hazardous component, may pose significant health protection and regulatory compliance problems if neglected. This study identifies the status and the need for improvement of IDW management to avoid those problems. Information on the background of IDW management was collected through a review of environmental laws, waste management regulations, and existing guidance. Practical IDW management information was gleaned from conversations with iRP managers at twelve USAF bases around the country. This study revealed that IDW management needs improvement. All bases acknowledged IDW concerns and have adopted various methods to deal with them. However, current methods appear to rely more upon expediency rather than permanence. This study showed that critical protection and compliance issues are being overlooked. Development of specific IDW management guidance may better assure that critical issues are addressed. Waste minimization, Waste management, Environmental management, Nonhazardous wastes, Hazardous material, Solid wastes.

Mountain, B.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Low-level radioactive waste regulation: Science, politics and fear  

SciTech Connect

An inevitable consequence of the use of radioactive materials is the generation of radioactive wastes and the public policy debate over how they will be managed. In 1980, Congress shifted responsibility for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes from the federal government to the states. This act represented a sharp departure from more than 30 years of virtually absolute federal control over radioactive materials. Though this plan had the enthusiastic support of the states in 1980, it now appears to have been at best a chimera. Radioactive waste management has become an increasingly complicated and controversial issue for society in recent years. This book discusses only low-level wastes, however, because Congress decided for political reasons to treat them differently than high-level wastes. The book is based in part on three symposia sponsored by the division of Chemistry and the Law of the American Chemical Society. Each chapter is derived in full or in part from presentations made at these meetings, and includes: (1) Low-level radioactive wastes in the nuclear power industry; (2) Low-level radiation cancer risk assessment and government regulation to protect public health; and (3) Low-level radioactive waste: can new disposal sites be found.

Burns, M.E. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 40–50 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as ‘silt-rich’, ‘mixed’, and ‘quartz-rich’, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock was four-fold that on ‘quartz-rich ’ waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on ‘quartz-rich’ waste rock, but richness greatest on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mixed waste: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E. [eds.] [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Safety and Health

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

Scaling Laws in the Distribution of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research done during the previous century established our Standard Cosmological Model. There are many details still to be filled in, but few would seriously doubt the basic premise. Past surveys have revealed that the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the Universe is far from random: it is highly structured over a vast range of scales. To describe cosmic structures, we need to build mathematically quantifiable descriptions of structure. Identifying where scaling laws apply and the nature of those scaling laws is an important part of understanding which physical mechanisms have been responsible for the organization of clusters, superclusters of galaxies and the voids between them. Finding where these scaling laws are broken is equally important since this indicates the transition to different underlying physics. In describing scaling laws we are helped by making analogies with fractals: mathematical constructs that can possess a wide variety of scaling properties. We must beware, however, of saying that the Universe is a fractal on some range of scales: it merely exhibits a specific kind of fractal-like behavior on those scales. We exploit the richness of fractal scaling behavior merely as an important supplement to the usual battery of statistical descriptors. We review the history of how we have learned about the structure of the Universe and present the data and methodologies that are relevant to the question of discovering and understanding any scaling properties that structure may have. The ultimate goal is to have a complete understanding of how that structure emerged. We are getting close!

Bernard J. T. Jones; Vicent J. Martinez; Enn Saar; Virginia Trimble

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

Observer and Particle Transformations and Newton's Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A frequently confused point in studies of symmetry violation is the distinction between observer and particle transformations. In this work, we consider a model in which a coefficient in the Standard-Model Extension leads to violations of rotation invariance in Newton's second law. The model highlights the distinction between observer and particle transformations.

T. H. Bertschinger; Natasha A. Flowers; Jay D. Tasson

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

ANU COLLEGE OF LAW Dr James Prest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tariff with the PUC for the purchase of excess electricity from an eligible customer-generator, as defined, requires the electrical corporation to make the tariff available to eligible customer, including electrical corporations, as defined. Existing law authorizes the PUC to fix the rates and charges

433

Occupational safety and health law handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

Sarvadi, D.G. [ed.; Keller; Heckman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434