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1

Verification Survey of Rooms 113, 114, and 208 of the Inhalation Toxicology Laboratory, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the verification survey were to confirm that accessible surfaces of the three laboratories meet the DOE’s established criteria for residual contamination. Drain pipes and ductwork were not included within the survey scope.

T.J. Vitkus

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is a Government-owned facility leased and operated by the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) as a private, nonprofit research and testing laboratory. LBERI is an operating subsidiary of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Through September 30, 1996, ITRI was a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Lovelace for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a {open_quotes}Single Program Laboratory{close_quotes} within the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. Work for DOE continues in the privatized ITRI facility under a Cooperative Agreement. At the time of publication, approximately 70% of the Institute`s research is funded by DOE, and the remainder is funded by a variety of Federal agency, trade association, individual industry, and university customers. The principal mission of ITRI is to conduct basic and applied research to improve our understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the respiratory tract, the fate of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, and the means by which data produced in the laboratory can be used to estimate risks to human health. Disorders of the respiratory tract continue to be a major health concern, and inhaled toxicants are thought to contribute substantially to respiratory morbidity. As the country`s largest facility dedicated to the study of basic inhalation toxicology, ITRI provides a national resource of specialized facilities, personnel, and educational activities serving the needs of government, academia, and industry.

Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F. [eds.] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

4

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research...

5

Van de Louw et al. Respiratory Research 2010, 11:38 http://respiratory-research.com/content/11/1/38  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Van de Louw et al. Respiratory Research 2010, 11:38 http://respiratory-research.com/content/11 cardiovascular variability and baroreflex gain in mechanically ventilated patients Andry Van de Louw*1,2, Claire nervous system. During spontaneous breathing, the application of positive end- expiratory pressure (PEEP

Boyer, Edmond

6

deprivation respiratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measured oxidation administration mechanism capacity binding intake pregnancy system deficient quality activity nocturnal treatment duration respiratory daytime pattern circadian normal problem function mechanism baseline disturbance apnoea cat delta analysis temperature parameter shift human states

Yang, Junfeng

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory failure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... in respiratory...

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - associating respiratory health Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Associate of Science - Respiratory Care Course... HLTHST 432 Critical Review of Health Care Research 3 RESPCARE 403 Respiratory Care Theory V 3 RESPCARE... Current Topics...

9

Respiratory Mechanisms of Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Respiratory Mechanisms of Support Nasal Cannula Hi Flow Nasal Cannula CPAP Continuous positive the respiratory system is working to compensate for a metabolic issue so as to normalize the blood pH. HCO3 - 22 uses PIP Mechanical Ventilation: Volume vs. Pressure: Volume Control Pressure Control Cycle Volume Time

Kay, Mark A.

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute upper respiratory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... of...

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory symptoms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... in the...

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory tract Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Summary: not only to sneeze and cough but also to develop severe acute respiratory symptoms is more likely... Name Signs and...

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-associated respiratory disease...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arsenic Health Effects Research Program Collection: Biology and Medicine 13 LAM: A landscape matching algorithm for respiratory data alignment Liangyou Chen, Thomas McKenna,...

14

NICS report links VOCs to respiratory problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Children who live near the chemical plants of Kanawha Valley, WV, suffer more acute and chronic respiratory aliments than those farther away, says a Harvard University School of Public Health report. In the $1-million, five-year study commissioned by the National Institute for Chemical Studies (NICS:Charleston, WV) and funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, proximity to chemical plants that emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was linked to higher incidence of asthma, acute eye irritation, shortness of breath, and chronic cough. The researchers say they adjusted for most other factors, such as parental smoking and petroleum. {open_quotes}The research hypothesis was whether children in the valley had more symptoms,{close_quotes} says NICS president Paul Hill. {open_quotes}Yes, there is a difference.{close_quotes} The study showed that some ailments were up to 28% more prevalent in children in the valley than in other Kanawha County children.

Kirschner, E.

1992-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium-Contaminated Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 4 years of research achievements in this Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project. The research described was conducted by scientists and supporting staff at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI)/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI). All project objectives and goals were achieved. A major focus was on obtaining improved cancer risk estimates for exposure via inhalation to plutonium (Pu) isotopes in the workplace (DOE radiation workers) and environment (public exposures to Pu-contaminated soil). A major finding was that low doses and dose rates of gamma rays can significantly suppress cancer induction by alpha radiation from inhaled Pu isotopes. The suppression relates to stimulation of the body's natural defenses, including immunity against cancer cells and selective apoptosis which removes precancerous and other aberrant cells.

Scott, Bobby R.; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Syrchikov, Victor A., Belyaeva, Zinaida D.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

16

From: Eric Lovelace To: Congestion Study Comments Subject:  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Electrical Resistivityconnie0:59 PM I34 AM To:Deb4:47 AM I

17

MULTISCALE MODELING OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correspond to di®erent mechanical models. The resulting system is described by the NavierŔStokes equation of the respiratory tree into three stages where di®erent models will be exploited and in which the mechanicalMULTISCALE MODELING OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT LEONARDO BAFFICO Laboratoire de Mathematiques N

Maury, Bertrand

18

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY RESPIRATORY CARE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY RESPIRATORY CARE PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK 2013 1.0 Introduction Welcome to the Respiratory Care Program at Northern Kentucky University! We are happy that you have with the Northern Kentucky University Undergraduate Catalog and the Northern Kentucky University Student Handbook

Boyce, Richard L.

19

acidosis respiratory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as a proxy for respiratory across small urban areas or individuals. Keywords: Respiratory health, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Cities,...

20

Elec 331 -Respiratory System SRC: AnatomyWarehouse.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Respiratory System 4 Mechanics of Breathing Lung Visceral Pleura (attached to lung) Parietal Pleura (attachedElec 331 - Respiratory System 1 SRC: AnatomyWarehouse.com C-V / Respiratory System Hot Water #12;Elec 331 - Respiratory System 2 Alveoli Pharynx (throat) Larynx (voice box / Adam's Apple) Trachea

Pulfrey, David L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - asthma research program Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: asthma research program Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program of...

22

Measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in patients on mechanical ventilators's lungs. · Only system capable of convenient, ongoing assessment of respiratory mechanical function is currently widely performed by measuring pressure and flow delivered by a mechanical ventilator. However

Hayden, Nancy J.

23

Modeling the Dynamics of Fermentation and Respiratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, denitrification, and SO4-reduction). The accumulation of acetate as a fermentation product within the plume species, e.g., H2(aq) or acetate, followed by respiration by other groups of organisms where fermentationModeling the Dynamics of Fermentation and Respiratory Processes in a Groundwater Plume of Phenolic

Sheffield, University of

24

REGULAR ARTICLE A Simple Dynamic Model of Respiratory Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Mathematical models are used to understand these interactions and the mechanics of respiratory system better) and introduce some dynamic properties of the respiratory system. The passive elements (rib cage and abdomen not take into account the dynamic component of the system, it appears valid for different respiratory

Fontecave-Jallon, Julie

25

Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELL NANOPARTICLES AND

26

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses in infants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrogen dioxide is an oxidant gas that contaminates outdoor air and indoor air in homes with unvented gas appliances. A prospective cohort study was carried out to test the hypothesis that residential exposure to NO2 increases incidence and severity of respiratory illnesses during the first 18 months of life. A cohort of 1,205 healthy infants from homes without smokers was enrolled. The daily occurrence of respiratory symptoms and illnesses was reported by the mothers every 2 wk. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as lower respiratory tract. Indoor NO2 concentrations were serially measured with passive samplers place in the subjects' bedrooms. In stratified analyses, illness incidence rates did not consistently increase with exposure to NO2 or stove type. In multivariate analyses that adjusted for potential confounding factors, odds ratios were not significantly elevated for current or lagged NO2 exposures, or stove type. Illness duration, a measure of illness severity, was not associated with NO2 exposure. The findings can be extended to homes with gas stoves in regions of the United States where the outdoor air is not heavily polluted by NO2.

Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL spinoff receives NIH grant LANL spinoff receives NIH grant for respiratory disease diagnostic device Mesa Tech has been awarded a grant to develop an inexpensive,...

28

Respiratory and Cardiovascular Adjustments to Exercise in Reptiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

challenges to the respiratory system of reptiles. Incrementing aerobic metabolism above resting levelsRespiratory and Cardiovascular Adjustments to Exercise in Reptiles T.T. GLEESON ' and A.F. BEN NETT all levels of activity (Fig. lb). The mechanism for an- aerobic energy production during exercise

Bennett, Albert F.

29

Multiscale modelling of the respiratory tract C. Grandmont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to different mechanical models. The resulting system is described by the Navier-Stokes equation coupledMultiscale modelling of the respiratory tract L. Baffico C. Grandmont B. Maury§ February 20, 2009 Abstract We propose here a decomposition of the respiratory tree into three stages which correspond

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

INTRODUCTION Insects breathe using a tracheal respiratory system. The tracheal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2293 INTRODUCTION Insects breathe using a tracheal respiratory system. The tracheal system consists of the spiracular valves convectively deliver oxygen to the tissues. The tracheal respiratory system is efficient flow through the tracheal system (Harrison, 2009). During hypoxia, abdominal pumping often increases

Socha, Jake

31

The effects of mechanical ventilation on the development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung illness characterized by inflammation and fluid accumulation in the respiratory system. Historically, ARDS and other forms of respiratory failure have been treated ...

Jia, Xiaoming, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

Richey, Christine [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Chovanec, Peter [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States) [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S. [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 480, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 480, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Basu, Partha [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Stolz, John F., E-mail: stolz@duq.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's penumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's pneumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. Author manuscript A model of ventilation used to interpret newborn lamb respiratory signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanics ; physiology ; Sheep Introduction Respiratory problems are particularly frequent in the neonatal of the neonatal respiratory system is yet available.. Mathematical modeling, which integrates interacting respiratory dynamics. Functionally, the mammalian respiratory system is made of three components: ventilation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory illness Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 2 Why should I cover my cough? Serious respiratory illnesses like influenza, respiratory Summary: Why should I cover...

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute hypoxaemic respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-severe acute respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bacterial respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute hypoxemic respiratory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative respiratory syndromes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory syndrome Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory syndrome-associated Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute viral respiratory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Get extra rest - viral infections take... , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... and others sick 12;Why...

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent respiratory disease Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

San Joaquin Valley College CR BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY Associate of Science -Respiratory Care Course Equivalencies Summary: Current Topics in Respiratory Disease 3 RESPCARE 444...

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute respiratory bronchiolitis Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steps to stay healthy... Summary: , respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), whooping cough and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are spread... influenza. and prevent the...

48

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. (Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

acute respiratory allergen: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

syndrome. METHODS As shown in Figure 1 related to lower respiratory illness (e.g., cough, shortness of breath, pneumonia on x-ray, oxygen Boyer, Edmond 11 Evidence of...

50

BE 508: Quantitative Studies of Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems Spring Semester, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 BE 508: Quantitative Studies of Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems Spring Semester, 2013 of the respiratory system (1 lecture) (Bates, Ch 1) 2. Measurement of respiratory function (2 lectures) (Bates, Ch 2 mechanics (1 lecture) (Bates, Ch 5) 4. Inverse modeling of respiratory mechanics, part 1 (2 lectures) (Bates

Vajda, Sandor

51

A linear time-varying simulation of the respiratory system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A LINEAR TIME-VARYING SIMULATION OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM A Thesis by OSCAR RENATO HERNANDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1993 Major Subject: Health Physics A LINEAR TIME-VARYING SIMULATION OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM A Thesis by OSCAR RENATO HERNANDEZ Approved as to style and content by: Wes y E. Bolch (Chair of Committee) Dan Hig tower (Member) ohn...

Hernandez, Oscar Renato

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Variations of the Respiration Signals for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using the Video Coached Respiration Guiding System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) has been used to minimize the dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer radiotherapy. The present research aims to improve the regularity of respiration in RGRT using a video coached respiration guiding system. In the study, 16 patients with lung cancer were evaluated. The respiration signals of the patients were measured by a real-time position management (RPM) Respiratory Gating System (Varian, USA) and the patients were trained using the video coached respiration guiding system. The patients performed free breathing and guided breathing, and the respiratory cycles were acquired for ~5 min. Then, Microsoft Excel 2010 software was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation for each phase. The standard deviation was computed in order to analyze the improvement in the respiratory regularity with respect to the period and displacement. The standard deviation of the guided breathing decreased to 65.14% in the inhale peak and 71.04% in the exhale peak compared with the...

Lee, Hyun Jeong; Oh, Se An

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health public health agencies. For example, CDC staff are currently studying the effect of outdoor air pollution for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program supports

54

Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

Hu, Yanle, E-mail: yhu@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O'Neil, James P

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Modelling a Respiratory Central Pattern Generator Neuron in Lymnaea stagnalis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling a Respiratory Central Pattern Generator Neuron in Lymnaea stagnalis Sharene D. Bungay, is characterized in part by its ability to take in oxygen both cutaneously and aerially (via its rudi- mentary lung by a 3-neuron central pattern generator (CPG) as depicted in Figure 1. Syed et al. [1, 2] were able

Campbell, Sue Ann

57

Penn State Respiratory Protection Program Requirements Summary Scope and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operations, and during some non-routine or emergency operations such as a spill or leak of a hazardous respirators and evaluating hazards. · Select respiratory protection options. · Conduct fit testing. · Evaluate and do not cause discomfort. · Continually check work areas and operations to identify possible

Maroncelli, Mark

58

Department of Environmental Health and Instructional Safety Respiratory Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Seal Check. 5. Respiratory Fit Testing. 6. Inspection Procedures. 7. Cleaning and Storage Instructions example, to retard spoilage in fruit storage areas), or when oxygen is displaced by a heavier gas or vapor, ammonia, propane, etc. Some processes that use high temperatures (like welding) can involve reactions

de Lijser, Peter

59

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of ocean acidification on respiratory gas exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of ocean acidification on respiratory gas exchange and acid­base balance / Revised: 11 April 2012 / Accepted: 14 April 2012 � Springer-Verlag 2012 Abstract The oceanic carbonate Gill HCO3 - uptake Introduction The earth's oceanic carbonate system (partial pressure of CO2, p

Grosell, Martin

60

INTRODUCTION Insects exchange respiratory gases through a complex network of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3409 INTRODUCTION Insects exchange respiratory gases through a complex network of tracheal tubes through the tracheal system using diffusion alone (Krogh, 1920a; Weis-Fogh, 1964), many species are known to augment gas exchange using convection (Buck, 1962; Miller, 1966a). Two general mechanisms are recognized

Socha, Jake

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult respiratory distress Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

syndrome. Ameri- can Review of Respiratory Disease... . Objectives To ... Source: Solomon, Patty - School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide Collection:...

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - activates non-cftr-dependent respiratory...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Wlodawer, Alexander - Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute Collection: Chemistry ; Biology and Medicine 5 UCSD Respiratory Protection...

63

Analysis of Cardio-respiratory Dynamics during Mental Stress using (Partial) Time-Frequency Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

important to determine the mechanisms un- derlying stress. In this paper, we aim at studying the cardio-respiratory to conduct a combined analysis of the cardio-respiratory system. In this study, we will perform cross timeAnalysis of Cardio-respiratory Dynamics during Mental Stress using (Partial) Time-Frequency Spectra

64

Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (?43%), suboptimal gating setup (?37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (?13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.

Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Yang, Deshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effects of inhalable particles on respiratory health of children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from a second cross-sectional assessment of the association of air pollution with chronic respiratory health of children participating in the Six Cities Study of Air Pollution and Health. Air pollution measurements collected at quality-controlled monitoring stations included total suspended particulates (TSP), particulate matter less than 15 microns (PM15) and 2.5 microns (PM2.5) aerodynamic diameter, fine fraction aerosol sulfate (FSO4), SO2, O3, and No2. Reported rates of chronic cough, bronchitis, and chest illness during the 1980-1981 school year were positively associated with all measures of particulate pollution (TSP, PM15, PM2.5, and FSO4) and positively but less strongly associated with concentrations of two of the gases (SO2 and NO2). Frequency of earache also tended to be associated with particulate concentrations, but no associations were found with asthma, persistent wheeze, hay fever, or nonrespiratory illness. No associations were found between pollutant concentrations and any of the pulmonary function measures considered (FVC, FEV1, FEV0.75, and MMEF). Children with a history of wheeze or asthma had a much higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms, and there was some evidence that the association between air pollutant concentrations and symptom rates was stronger among children with these markers for hyperreactive airways. These data provide further evidence that rates of respiratory illnesses and symptoms are elevated among children living in cities with high particulate pollution. They also suggest that children with hyperreactive airways may be particularly susceptible to other respiratory symptoms when exposed to these pollutants.

Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Stram, D.O.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspirin exacerbated respiratory Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

illness, malaria, measles, tetanus 12... Human Transport of Disease SARS The Cough Heard Round the World Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 2003 1... you - How many...

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggravates respiratory syncytial Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tetrakis(dimethylamino)hafnium P-6280-B Date: February 2005 Copyright 2002, 2004-2005, Praxair Technology, Inc. Page 1 of 8 Summary: aggravate an existing dermatitis. Respiratory...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative respiratory pathway Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Z. Moussavi and M. Aboofazeli Summary: Respiratory Flow Estimation from Tracheal Sound by Adaptive Filters M. Golabbakhsh, Z. Moussavi... % for inspiration and expiration,...

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - allergic respiratory diseases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a health and safety program... ) Hard hat Goggles Hearing protectors Safety boots T-shirts with 4 inch sleeves Respiratory... , including allergic rhinitis (a...

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable respiratory protection Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

not achieved adequate control you will also need to use respiratory protective... USEFUL HSE PUBLICATIONS Breathe freely: A workers' information card on ... Source: Glasgow,...

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - alters respiratory phenotype Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the severity of the respiratory phenotype and associated symptoms in both congenital and late onset central... in enteric nervous system deficits. We observe that the...

72

Respiratory effects of diesel exhaust in salt miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The respiratory health of 259 white males working at 5 salt (NaCl) mines was assessed by questionnaire, chest radiographs, and air and He-O/sup 2/ spirometry. Response variables were symptoms, pneumoconiosis, and spirometry. Predictor variables included age, height, smoking, mine, and tenure in diesel-exposed jobs. The purpose was to assess the association of response measures of respiratory health with exposure to diesel exhaust. There were only 2 cases of Grade 1 pneumoconiosis, so no further analysis was done. Comparisons within the study population showed a statistically significant dose-related association of phlegm and diesel exposure. There was a nonsignificant trend for cough and dyspnea, and no association with spirometry. Age- and smoking-adjusted rates of cough, phlegm, and dyspnea were 145, 159, and 93% of an external comparison population. Percent predicted flow rates showed statistically significant reductions, but the reductions were small and there were no dose-response relations. Percent predicted FEV1 and FVC were about 96% of predicted.

Gamble, J.F.; Jones, W.G.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Compensation du mouvement respiratoire dans les images TEP Respiratory motion correction in PET images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compensation du mouvement respiratoire dans les images TEP Respiratory motion correction in PET itérative. Abstract The quality of the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently limited an integrated system to compensate respiratory motion in PET images. It is based on synchronous acquisition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

Modeling of the oxygen transfer in the respiratory process Sebastien Martin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the acinar periphery. Introduction The respiratory system is designed to achieve two main functions: oxygenModeling of the oxygen transfer in the respiratory process S´ebastien Martin Laboratoire de Math, coupled with a lumped mechanical model for the ventilation process. Objectives. We aim at investigating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

The relationships between metabolic rate and the respiratory, circulatory and cellular mechanisms governing oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationships between metabolic rate and the respiratory, circulatory and cellular mechanisms governing oxygen transport from the respiratory medium to the tissues in air- breathing vertebrates have for albacore (Thunnus alalunga, 82­197mlkg-1). Plasma volume within the primary circulatory system (calculated

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

76

ECG-Derived Respiration: Comparison and New Measures for Respiratory Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECG-Derived Respiration: Comparison and New Measures for Respiratory Variability Devy Widjaja1 During ECG recording, several methods can be applied to derive a respiratory signal from the ECG (EDR signal). In this paper 4 EDR methods, including ECG filtering, R and RS amplitude based techniques

77

Building-associated risk of febrile acute respiratory diseases in Army trainees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne transmission of infectious agents and associations of indoor air pollutants with respiratory illnesses are well documented. We hypothesized that energy conservation measures that tighten buildings also increase risks of respiratory infection among building occupants. At four Army training centers during a 47-month period, incidence rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were compared between basic trainees in modern (energy-efficient design and construction) and old barracks. Rates of febrile acute respiratory disease were significantly higher among trainees in modern barracks (adjusted relative risk estimate, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.46 to 1.56), and relative risks were consistent at the four centers. These results support the hypothesis that tight buildings with closed ventilation systems significantly increase risks of respiratory-transmitted infection among congregated, immunologically susceptible occupants.

Brundage, J.F.; Scott, R.M.; Lednar, W.M.; Smith, D.W.; Miller, R.N.

1988-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessment of Autonomic Control and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Using Point Process Models of Human Heart Beat Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm ...

Chen, Zhe

79

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function were found, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although we found no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology 173S (2010) S65S73 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and control in the insect respiratory system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. IntroductionRespiratory Physiology & Neurobiology 173S (2010) S65­S73 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/resphysiol Review Issues

Socha, Jake

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part I: Health outcomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have carried out a prospective cohort study to test the hypothesis that exposure to nitrogen dioxide increases the incidence and severity of respiratory infections during the first 18 months of life. Between January 1988 and June 1990, 1,315 infants were enrolled into the study at birth and followed with prospective surveillance for the occurrence of respiratory infections and monitoring of nitrogen dioxide concentrations in their homes. The subjects were healthy infants from homes without smokers; they were selected with stratification by type of cooking stove at a ratio of four to one for gas and electric stoves. Illness experience was monitored by a daily diary of symptoms completed by the mother and a telephone interview conducted every two weeks. Illnesses with wheezing or wet cough were classified as involving the lower respiratory tract; all other respiratory illnesses were designated as involving the upper respiratory tract. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide was estimated by two-week average concentrations measured in the subjects' bedrooms with passive samplers. This analysis is limited to the 1,205 subjects completing at least one month of observation; of these, 823 completed the full protocol, contributing 82.8% of the total number of days during which the subjects were under observation. Incidence rates for all respiratory illnesses, all upper respiratory illness, all lower respiratory illnesses, and lower respiratory illness further divided into those with any wheezing, or wet cough without wheezing, were examined within strata of nitrogen dioxide exposure at the time of the illness, nitrogen dioxide exposure during the prior month, and type of cooking stove. Consistent trends of increasing illness incidence rates with increasing exposure to nitrogen dioxide were not evident for either the lagged or unlagged exposure variables.

Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E.; Skipper, B.J.; Cushing, A.H.; Hunt, W.C.; Young, S.A.; McLaren, L.C.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Spirometry variability criteria--association with respiratory morbidity and mortality in a cohort of coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To clarify the association between spirometry variability and respiratory morbidity and mortality, the authors analyzed data for miners examined in the first round of the National Coal Study, 1969-1971, and they compared groups of miners who failed with those who met each of two spirometry variability criteria: a 5% criterion recommended by the American Thoracic Society, and a 200 ml criterion used in prior research studies. Compared with miners who met the 5% criterion (the best two forced vital capacities must be within 5% or 100 ml of one another), the group that failed had a lower mean for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and odds ratios for cough, phlegm, wheeze, shortness of breath, and death of 1.75, 1.67, 1.76, 2.71, and 1.30, respectively. The findings for the 200 ml criterion (the best two FEV1s must be within 200 ml of one another) were somewhat different. The group that failed versus the group that met this criterion had a higher mean for FEV1, and odds ratios for cough, phlegm, wheeze, shortness of breath, and death of 1.13, 1.07, 1.15, 1.43, and 0.94, respectively. Although the findings differ for the two criteria, the findings demonstrate that increased spirometry variability is associated with poorer health.

Kellie, S.E.; Attfield, M.D.; Hankinson, J.L.; Castellan, R.M.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative respiratory path Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than calves. Respiratory catheters (25 mL balloon, 0.17 m2 ) were inserted acutely in sheep (n 2 Source: Federspiel, William J. - Departments of Chemical Engineering, Surgery,...

85

Is breathing in infants chaotic? Dimension estimates for respiratory patterns during quiet sleep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mathematics, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6907; and 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia Small, M., K

Judd, Kevin

86

Linear and nonlinear quantification of respiratory sinus arrhythmia during propofol general anesthesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative evaluation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) may provide important information in clinical practice of anesthesia and postoperative care. In this paper, we apply a point process method to assess dynamic ...

Pierce, Eric T.

87

Passive cigarette smoke, coal heating, and respiratory symptoms of nonsmoking women in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the authors evaluated data from a sample of 973 never-smoking women, ages 20-40, who worked in three similar textile mills in Anhui Province, China. They compared prevalence rates of respiratory symptoms across homes with and without coal heating and homes with different numbers of smokers. Multiple logistic regression models that controlled for age, job title, and mill of employment were also estimated. Respiratory symptoms were associated with combined exposure to passive cigarette smoke and coal heating. Effects of passive cigarette smoke and coal heating on respiratory symptoms appeared to be nearly additive, suggesting a dose-response relationship between respiratory symptoms and home indoor air pollution from these two sources. The prevalence of chest illness, cough, phlegm, and shortness of breath (but not wheeze) was significantly elevated for women living in homes with both smokers and coal heating.

Pope, C.A. III (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)); Xu, X. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

John Widdicombeżs contribution to respiratory physiology and cough: reminiscences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

But urge-to-cough is perplexing. I await confirmation orM, Widdicombe J: Fog-induced cough with impaired respiratoryJ: Desensitization of the cough reflex by exercise and

Chung, Kian Fan; Nadel, Jay A; Fontana, Giovanni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication bias was evident. Estimated attributable risk proportions ranged from 8% to 20%. Residential dampness and mold are associated with substantial and statistically significant increases in both respiratory infections and bronchitis. If these associations were confirmed as causal, effective control of dampness and mold in buildings would prevent a substantial proportion of respiratory infections.

Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Respiratory motion management using audio-visual biofeedback for respiratory-gated radiotherapy of synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion beam delivery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To efficiently deliver respiratory-gated radiation during synchrotron-based pulsed heavy-ion radiotherapy, a novel respiratory guidance method combining a personalized audio-visual biofeedback (BFB) system, breath hold (BH), and synchrotron-based gating was designed to help patients synchronize their respiratory patterns with synchrotron pulses and to overcome typical limitations such as low efficiency, residual motion, and discomfort. Methods: In-house software was developed to acquire body surface marker positions and display BFB, gating signals, and real-time beam profiles on a LED screen. Patients were prompted to perform short BHs or short deep breath holds (SDBH) with the aid of BFB following a personalized standard BH/SDBH (stBH/stSDBH) guiding curve or their own representative BH/SDBH (reBH/reSDBH) guiding curve. A practical simulation was performed for a group of 15 volunteers to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method. Effective dose rates (EDRs), mean absolute errors between the guiding curves and the measured curves, and mean absolute deviations of the measured curves were obtained within 10%–50% duty cycles (DCs) that were synchronized with the synchrotron’s flat-top phase. Results: All maneuvers for an individual volunteer took approximately half an hour, and no one experienced discomfort during the maneuvers. Using the respiratory guidance methods, the magnitude of residual motion was almost ten times less than during nongated irradiation, and increases in the average effective dose rate by factors of 2.39–4.65, 2.39–4.59, 1.73–3.50, and 1.73–3.55 for the stBH, reBH, stSDBH, and reSDBH guiding maneuvers, respectively, were observed in contrast with conventional free breathing-based gated irradiation, depending on the respiratory-gated duty cycle settings. Conclusions: The proposed respiratory guidance method with personalized BFB was confirmed to be feasible in a group of volunteers. Increased effective dose rate and improved overall treatment precision were observed compared to conventional free breathing-based, respiratory-gated irradiation. Because breathing guidance curves could be established based on the respective average respiratory period and amplitude for each patient, it may be easier for patients to cooperate using this technique.

He, Pengbo; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Yan, Yuanlin [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.cn; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Zhao, Ting; Fu, Tingyan; Shen, Guosheng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Daily air pollution effects on children's respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify acute respiratory health effects associated with air pollution due to coal combustion, a subgroup of elementary school-aged children was selected from a large cross-sectional study and followed daily for eight months. Children were selected to obtain three equal-sized groups: one without respiratory symptoms, one with symptoms of persistent wheeze, and one with cough or phlegm production but without persistent wheeze. Parents completed a daily diary of symptoms from which illness constellations of upper respiratory illness (URI) and lower respiratory illness (LRI) and the symptom of wheeze were derived. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured daily for nine consecutive weeks during the eight-month study period. Maximum hourly concentrations of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and coefficient of haze for each 24-hour period, as well as minimum hourly temperature, were correlated with daily URI, LRI, wheeze, and PEFR using multiple regression models adjusting for illness occurrence or level of PEFR on the immediately preceding day. Respiratory illness on the preceding day was the most important predictor of current illness. A drop in temperature was associated with increased URI and LRI but not with increased wheeze or with a decrease in level of PEFR. No air pollutant was strongly associated with respiratory illness or with level of PEFR, either in the group of children as a whole, or in either of the symptomatic subgroups; the pollutant concentrations observed, however, were uniformly lower than current ambient air quality standards.

Vedal, S.; Schenker, M.B.; Munoz, A.; Samet, J.M.; Batterman, S.; Speizer, F.E.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children: a cross-sectional study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of children, a subject of some controversy, a comparative study was undertaken of 2,385 school children who lived in central urban, peripheral urban, and suburban areas. Daily monitoring of sulfur dioxide and total suspended particle concentrations in all areas showed that pollutant concentrations in central and peripheral urban areas were above commonly accepted safety levels for respiratory health, while concentrations in the suburban area were within acceptable limits. A questionnaire administered to each mother assessed environmental exposure to pollutants in the household, the occurrence of respiratory symptoms as well as lung diseases as diagnosed by a physician, and general information. Children were interviewed about smoking habits and any acute respiratory symptoms. Children also performed standard lung function tests. Results showed that children from both urban areas had lessened pulmonary function and a higher prevalence of bronchial secretion with common colds than did those from the suburban area. These differences persisted after corrections for exposure to indoor pollutants, active or passive smoking, socioeconomic status, and sex. Parental cigarette smoking was related to a fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and an increased incidence of acute respiratory illnesses and chronic cough in children. Although boys had higher lung volumes and lower air flow, regression analysis showed no significant influence of the interactions sex-geographic area and sex-smoking on lung function. It was concluded that air pollution has a significant effect on the respiratory health of children.

Spinaci, S.; Arossa, W.; Bugiani, M.; Natale, P.; Bucca, C.; de Candussio, G.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Computational modelling elucidates the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the digestive, reproductive and respiratory systems of vertebrates [1]. Mobile or immotile cilia exist on everyRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Computational modelling elucidates the mechanism of ciliary regulation, nephronophthisis, situs inversus pathology or infertility. The mechanism of cilia beating regulation is complex

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

95

Smoothing of respiratory motion traces for motion-compensated radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The CyberKnife system has been used successfully for several years to radiosurgically treat tumors without the need for stereotactic fixation or sedation of the patient. It has been shown that tumor motion in the lung, liver, and pancreas can be tracked with acceptable accuracy and repeatability. However, highly precise targeting for tumors in the lower abdomen, especially for tumors which exhibit strong motion, remains problematic. Reasons for this are manifold, like the slow tracking system operating at 26.5 Hz, and using the signal from the tracking camera ''as is''. Since the motion recorded with the camera is used to compensate for system latency by prediction and the predicted signal is subsequently used to infer the tumor position from a correlation model based on x-ray imaging of gold fiducials around the tumor, camera noise directly influences the targeting accuracy. The goal of this work is to establish the suitability of a new smoothing method for respiratory motion traces used in motion-compensated radiotherapy. The authors endeavor to show that better prediction--With a lower rms error of the predicted signal--and/or smoother prediction is possible using this method. Methods: The authors evaluated six commercially available tracking systems (NDI Aurora, PolarisClassic, Polaris Vicra, MicronTracker2 H40, FP5000, and accuTrack compact). The authors first tracked markers both stationary and while in motion to establish the systems' noise characteristics. Then the authors applied a smoothing method based on the a trous wavelet decomposition to reduce the devices' noise level. Additionally, the smoothed signal of the moving target and a motion trace from actual human respiratory motion were subjected to prediction using the MULIN and the nLMS{sub 2} algorithms. Results: The authors established that the noise distribution for a static target is Gaussian and that when the probe is moved such as to mimic human respiration, it remains Gaussian with the exception of the FP5000 and the Aurora systems. The authors also showed that the proposed smoothing method can indeed be used to filter noise. The signal's jitter dropped by as much as 95% depending on the tracking system employed. Subsequently, the 3D prediction error (rms) for a prediction horizon of 150 ms on a synthetic signal dropped by up to 37% when using a normalized LMS prediction algorithm (nLMS{sub 2}) and hardly changed when using a MULIN algorithm. When smoothing a real signal obtained in our laboratory, the improvement of prediction was similar: Up to 30% for both the nLMS{sub 2} and the best MULIN algorithm. The authors also found a noticeable increase in smoothness of the predicted signal, the relative jitter dropped by up to 95% on the real signal, and on the simulated signal. Conclusions: In conclusion, the authors can say that preprocessing of marker data is very useful in motion-compensated radiotherapy since the quality of prediction increases. This will result in better performance of the correlation model. As a side effect, since the prediction of a preprocessed signal is also less noisy, the authors expect less robot vibration resulting in better targeting accuracy and less strain on the robot gears.

Ernst, Floris; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, Luebeck SH 23538 (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D CBCT in its current implementation.

Cooper, Benjamin J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Engineering, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT 2605 (Australia); O'Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, P.O.Box 980058, Richmond, Virginia 23298-0058 (United States)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Respiratory-Induced Prostate Motion Using Wavelet Decomposition of the Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking Signal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this work is to characterize and quantify the impact of respiratory-induced prostate motion. Methods and Materials: Real-time intrafraction motion is observed with the Calypso 4-dimensional nonradioactive electromagnetic tracking system (Calypso Medical Technologies, Inc. Seattle, Washington). We report the results from a total of 1024 fractions from 31 prostate cancer patients. Wavelet transform was used to decompose the signal to extract and isolate the respiratory-induced prostate motion from the total prostate displacement. Results: Our results show that the average respiratory motion larger than 0.5 mm can be observed in 68% of the fractions. Fewer than 1% of the patients showed average respiratory motion of less than 0.2 mm, whereas 99% of the patients showed average respiratory-induced motion ranging between 0.2 and 2 mm. The maximum respiratory range of motion of 3 mm or greater was seen in only 25% of the fractions. In addition, about 2% patients showed anxiety, indicated by a breathing frequency above 24 times per minute. Conclusions: Prostate motion is influenced by respiration in most fractions. Real-time intrafraction data are sensitive enough to measure the impact of respiration by use of wavelet decomposition methods. Although the average respiratory amplitude observed in this study is small, this technique provides a tool that can be useful if one moves to smaller treatment margins (?5 mm). This also opens ups the possibility of being able to develop patient specific margins, knowing that prostate motion is not unpredictable.

Lin, Yuting [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California (United States); Liu, Tian; Yang, Xiaofeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University Hospital, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wang, Yuenan [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland (United States); Khan, Mohammad K., E-mail: drkhurram2000@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University Hospital, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Are you protected against Pertussis? Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are you protected against Pertussis? Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. It causes severe coughing spells, vomiting

99

Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. (Univ. of Wageningen (Netherlands))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper-smelter employees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer-mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8045 white-male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial-hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

Lee-Feldstein, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cumulative exposure to arsenic and its relationship to respiratory cancer among copper smelter employees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To explore the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen, the respiratory cancer mortality experience (1938 to 1977) of 8,045 while male smelter employees in Montana was examined relative to cumulative exposure to arsenic trioxide and was compared with that of the white male population of the same region. Exposure to arsenic was estimated for various work areas from industrial hygiene reports of average concentrations present in the smelter. Respiratory cancer mortality was analyzed further by time period of first employment and maximum lifetime exposure to arsenic trioxide. When exposure was estimated with arithmetic means of measured concentrations among men first employed prior to 1925, respiratory cancer mortality increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group, ranging from two to nine times expected; among those first employed in the period 1925 to 1947 it also increased linearly with increasing cumulative exposure group.

Lee-Feldstein, A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Respiratory Oxygen Uptake Is Not Decreased by an Instantaneous Elevation of [CO2], But Is Increased with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a high-resolution dual channel oxygen analyzer within an open gas exchange system to measure respiratoryRespiratory Oxygen Uptake Is Not Decreased by an Instantaneous Elevation of [CO2], But Is Increased an instantaneous reduction of leaf dark respiration measured as CO2 efflux. No known mechanism accounts

DeLucia, Evan H.

104

CFD simulations of enhanced condensational growth (ECG) applied to respiratory drug delivery with comparisons to in vitro data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CFD simulations of enhanced condensational growth (ECG) applied to respiratory drug delivery t Enhanced condensational growth (ECG) is a newly proposed concept for respiratory drug delivery in which and evaluate a CFD model of ECG in a simple tubular geometry with direct comparisons to in vitro results

Frey, Pascal

105

Smoking cessation among coal miners as predicted by baseline respiratory function and symptoms: a 5-year prospective study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prospective analysis was used to test whether respiratory impairment or the presence of respiratory symptoms predicts 5-year cigarette smoking cessation in a sample of 1,118 U.S. white, male, underground coal miners. Miners were examined in 1977 and re-examined in 1982 by NIOSH, and all miners with test abnormalities were so informed by letter. Respiratory impairment was measured by an index of airways obstruction combining the spirometric measures of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 sec (FEV1). Bronchitis symptoms were measured by an index that combined chronic cough (3+ months/year) and chronic phlegm (3 + months/year). Among these coal miners, the presence of chronic respiratory symptoms initially was inversely associated with cigarette smoking cessation. Respiratory impairment, however, was positively associated with cigarette smoking cessation but did not reach statistical significance.

Ames, R.G.; Hall, D.S.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The explosive outbreak and intercontinental spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) shows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The explosive outbreak and intercontinental spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS (Mills and Childs 1998). Monkeypox, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), Lassa fever, Argentine evidence for top-down regulation of zoonotic disease reservoirs Richard S Ostfeld1 and Robert D Holt2

107

Evaluation of Fiber Bundle Rotation for Enhancing Gas Exchange in a Respiratory Assist Catheter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a rotating densely packed bundle of hollow fiber membranes, water and blood gas exchange levels were the concept of an intravenous respiratory assist device, in which a bundle of hollow fiber membranes (HFMs short blind- ended HFMs along its length in a "bottle-brush" configura- tion.11­14 Our group first

Federspiel, William J.

108

Respiratory disease and particulate air pollution in Santiago Chile: Contribution of erosion particles from fine sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August) that make atmospheric conditions highly vulnerable, preventing polluting particles in the airCommentary Respiratory disease and particulate air pollution in Santiago Chile: Contribution pollution Santiago Erosion Sedimentation a b s t r a c t Air pollution in Santiago is a serious problem

109

Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and cases suspicious for tuberculosis among public health clinic patients in Afghanistan,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and diagnostic test results were recorded. Correlates of TB-suggestive symptoms (defined as cough >2 weeks children (age 17 or under). The TB-suggestive symptoms of cough >2 weeks and / or haemoptysis were reported workers. keywords Afghanistan, tuberculosis, respiratory symptoms, cough, sputum smear accuracy

Scharfstein, Daniel

110

Personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide and its association with respiratory illness in Hong Kong  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1985, 362 primary schoolchildren and their 319 mothers were surveyed in Hong Kong to study the possible relationship of air pollution to respiratory illnesses. Using nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) measured by personal samplers as a measure of air pollution, the study aimed to identify the major sources of NO{sub 2} in the indoor environment and see whether its increased presence was associated with respiratory symptoms. The levels of NO{sub 2} among the mothers was found to increase by 21% if dust exposure was reported from the workplace, 18% if they used such cooking fuels as liquid petroleum gas or kerosene, 11% when kitchens did not have ventilating fans, and 10% when incense was burned at home. In terms of respiratory symptoms, an increase in NO{sub 2} levels of 19% was reported among those with allergic rhinitis and 18% among those with chronic cough. The levels of NO2 among children were correlated with levels measured in classrooms, all of which had opened windows so that the NO{sub 2} came from outdoors. No association was found between children's NO{sub 2} levels and respiratory symptoms. With the exception of smoking by the father and the children's NO{sub 2} levels, no association was found between smoking at home and NO{sub 2} levels.

Koo, L.C.; Ho, J.H.; Ho, C.Y.; Matsuki, H.; Shimizu, H.; Mori, T.; Tominaga, S. (Nam Long Hospital (Hong Kong))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of school children exposed to ambient air pollution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to evaluate the health effect of air pollution on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of Korean school children between 7 and 10 years of age during November 1995-January 1996. A standard respiratory symptom questionnaire was administered and spirometry was performed to examine pulmonary function of 121 children in an urban polluted area, Seoul, and of 119 children in non-polluted area, Sokcho, respectively. There was significant difference in the level of pulmonary function [forced expiratory volume in second (FEV{sub 1.0}) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] between exposed groups to polluted area and non-polluted area. Parental smoking was significantly related to respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, and the level of pulmonary function. The observed changes in FEV{sub 1.0} and FVC seemed to relate to home cooking fuel, not to respiratory symptoms. The additional longitudinal work that carefully monitors ambient and indoor air pollution and health effects data should be conducted to confirm these results.

Kim, Yoon Shin; Ko, Ung Ring [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

A realistic coupled nonlinear artificial ECG, BP and respiratory signal generator for assessing noise performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A realistic coupled nonlinear artificial ECG, BP and respiratory signal generator for assessing differential equations is capable of generating realistic synthetic electrocardiograms (ECGs). Open source code with realistic inter-signal coupling between the respiration, BP and ECG time series. The time-varying surface

McSharry, Patrick E.

113

Respiratory Organ Motion and Dosimetric Impact on Breast and Nodal Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To examine the respiratory motion for target and normal structures during whole breast and nodal irradiation and the resulting dosimetric impact. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT data sets of 18 patients with early-stage breast cancer were analyzed retrospectively. A three-dimensional conformal dosimetric plan designed to irradiate the breast was generated on the basis of CT images at 20% respiratory phase (reference phase). The reference plans were copied to other respiratory phases at 0% (end of inspiration) and 50% (end of expiration) to simulate the effects of breathing motion on whole breast irradiation. Dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose, and normal tissue complication probability were evaluated and compared. Results: Organ motion of up to 8.8 mm was observed during free breathing. A large lung centroid movement was typically associated with a large shift of other organs. The variation of planning target volume coverage during a free breathing cycle is generally within 1%-5% (17 of 18 patients) compared with the reference plan. However, up to 28% of V{sub 45} variation for the internal mammary nodes was observed. Interphase mean dose variations of 2.2%, 1.2%, and 1.4% were observed for planning target volume, ipsilateral lung, and heart, respectively. Dose variations for the axillary nodes and brachial plexus were minimal. Conclusions: The doses delivered to the target and normal structures are different from the planned dose based on the reference phase. During normal breathing, the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion is clinically insignificant with the exception of internal mammary nodes. However, noticeable degradation in dosimetric plan quality may be expected for the patients with large respiratory motion.

Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xiangrong.qi@ucdenver.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Merrell, Kenneth; Sood, Amit; Bauer, Anderson; Wilson, J. Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nanotechnology Now -Press Release: "Sandia and UNM lead effort to destroy cancers: Boosting medicine with nanotechnology strengthens drug cocktail many times over" http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=42258[4/21/2011 11:23:41 AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratories, the University of New Mexico, and the UNM Cancer Research and Treatment Center have produced consulting Learn More Lovelace Breast Care Our Breast Care Center is dedicated to the women of NM. #1 Addiction Rehab Center Adult, Addiction Rehab & Detox All Private Rooms, Insurance OK Ads by Google

Brinker, C. Jeffrey

115

Robotic-Lab.COM Nanotechnology boosts anticancer drug cocktail many times over http://www.robotic-lab.com/en/2011/04/22/nanotechnology-boosts-anticancer-drug-cocktail-many-times-over/[5/2/2011 12:11:22 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatments for Lymph Node Cancer today. CancerCenter.com/CareTha... Lovelace Breast Care Our Breast Care, Addiction Rehab & Detox All Private Rooms, Insurance OK TransformationsTreatment.... Lung cancer National Laboratories, the University of New Mexico, and the UNM Cancer Research and Treatment Center have

Brinker, C. Jeffrey

116

A longitudinal study of respiratory symptoms in aluminum potroom workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of occupational work exposure and host factors on the incidence of dyspnea and wheezing as reported in questionnaires was examined in 1,301 new employees in aluminum electrolytic potrooms. The incidence appeared to decrease after 2 yr of exposure, and the estimated probability of development of symptoms was nearly 20% after 4 yr. A total of 105 subjects developed dyspnea and wheezing. Of 78 symptomatic subjects who were interviewed, 76% experienced improvement or absence of symptoms when off work. In 523 subjects who were assigned to specific levels of exposure at the end of follow-up, a dose-response gradient was found between the development of symptoms and fluoride exposure. Increased risk with increasing amounts of tobacco was also observed, but childhood allergy and a family history of asthma were not significantly related to the outcome variable. The authors conclude that both total fluoride exposure and smoking are related to asthmatic symptoms in potroom workers, and the suggestion of a dose-response gradient was found for both variables. However, a causal relationship between fluorides and symptoms should be investigated further by specific bronchial provocation testing and by research for specific antibodies and other immunologic markers.

Kongerud, J.; Samuelsen, S.O. (Department of Thoracic Medicine, Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo (Norway))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A cross-sectional study of secondhand smoke exposure and respiratory symptoms in non-current smokers in the U.S. trucking industry: SHS exposure and respiratory symptoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with chronic phlegm, chronic cough, and any wheeze, defined= 1.00- 2.13) for chronic cough, 1.55 (95% CI = 1.08-2.21)respiratory symptoms, including cough, phlegm and wheeze, in

Laden, Francine; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Garshick, Eric; Hammond, S; Hart, Jaime E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Respiratory survey of North American Indian children living in proximity to an aluminum smelter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explored the relationship of respiratory symptoms and lung function to exposure to ambient air pollution consisting of particulate and gaseous fluorides. The subjects were 253 North American Indian children 11 to 17 yr of age living on the Akwasasne reserve, which is adjacent to an aluminum smelter. Among boys, closing volume (CV/VC%) was increased in those raised closest to the smelter as opposed to those having lived most of their lives farthest from this source of air pollution. In both sexes, there was a significant linear relationship between increasing CV/VC% and the amount of fluoride contained in a spot urine sample. We conclude that exposure to fluoride air pollution in the community may be associated with abnormalities in small airways. The implication of these abnormalities for future respiratory health is unknown.

Ernst, P.; Thomas, D.; Becklake, M.R.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Effect of nitroimidazoles on the oxygen consumption rate and respiratory control ratio of beef heart mitochondria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neurotoxic effect of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has seriously compromised their clinical effectiveness. The authors compare here the effect of MISO and DMM on oxygen consumption in purified beef heart mitochondria. MISO has been found to significantly increase the oxygen consumption rate and decrease the respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria when incubated in the presence of the NAD+ dependent substrate, ..beta..-hydroxybutyrate. DMM has a similar but less pronounced effect than MISO on these respiratory parameters. When mitochondria were incubated in the presence of these radiosensitizers for 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, the oxygen consumption rate was decreased when succinate, a FAD dependent substrate, was added following the incubation. This decrease, which is both time and dosage dependent, is equivalent for MISO and DMM.

Chao, C.F.; Ting, L.; Subjeck, J.R.; Johnson, R.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Respiratory symptoms and lung function in oil mist-exposed workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was registered and ventilatory function was determined in 164 men exposed to oil mist. The average exposure time was 16.2 years. One hundred fifty-nine office workers served as controls. The exposed men reported more respiratory symptoms: 14% of the exposed nonsmokers v. 2% of the nonsmoking controls having cough at least three months a year. There were non significant differences between spirometric measurements and chest roentgenograms of the men exposed to oil mist and those of the office workers. The lung function of 25 nonsmoking exposed men was further examined with other lung function tests. The mean values for closing volume, slope of the alveolar plateau, total lung capacity, residual volume, elastic recoil at various lung volumes, and diffusion capacity did not differ significantly.

Jarvholm, B. (Dept.of Occupational Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden); Bake, B.; Lavenius, B.; Thiringer, G.; Vokmann, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

122

Correlation of gross tumor volume excursion with potential benefits of respiratory gating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the magnitude of thoracic tumor motion can be used to determine the desirability of respiratory gating. Methods and materials: Twenty patients to be treated for lung tumors had computed tomography image data sets acquired under assisted breath hold at normal inspiration (100% tidal volume), at full expiration (0% tidal volume), and under free breathing. A radiation oncologist outlined gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the breath-hold computed tomographic images. These data sets were registered to the free-breathing image data set. Two sets of treatment plans were generated: one based on an internal target volume explicitly formed from assessment of the excursion of the clinical target volume (CTV) through the respiratory cycle, representing an ungated treatment, and the other based on the 0% tidal volume CTV, representing a gated treatment with little margin for residual motion. Dose-volume statistics were correlated to the magnitude of the motion of the center of the GTV during respiration. Results: Patients whose GTVs were >100 cm{sup 3} showed little decrease in lung dose under gating. The other patients showed a correlation between the excursion of the center of the GTV and a reduction in potential lung toxicity. As residual motion increased, the benefits of respiratory gating increased. Conclusion: Gating seems to be advantageous for patients whose GTVs are <100 cm{sup 3} and for whom the center of the GTV exhibits significant motion, provided residual motion under gating is kept small.

Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)]. E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.org; Forster, Kenneth M. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kitamura, Kei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Cardenas, Alex [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Biomathematics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Research Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entries in the natural numbers, into an undergraduate research project. ..... and developing the undergraduate research project described at the end of Section 2,

2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

125

Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

126

Comparison of Rigid and Adaptive Methods of Propagating Gross Tumor Volume Through Respiratory Phases of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Image Data Set  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare three different methods of propagating the gross tumor volume (GTV) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional computed tomography image data set. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography data sets of 20 patients who had undergone definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy to the lung were acquired. The GTV regions of interest (ROIs) were manually delineated on each phase of the four-dimensional computed tomography data set. The ROI from the end-expiration phase was propagated to the remaining nine phases of respiration using the following three techniques: (1) rigid-image registration using in-house software, (2) rigid image registration using research software from a commercial radiotherapy planning system vendor, and (3) rigid-image registration followed by deformable adaptation originally intended for organ-at-risk delineation using the same software. The internal GTVs generated from the various propagation methods were compared with the manual internal GTV using the normalized Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) index. Results: The normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 (SD) for rigid propagation using the in-house software program was identical to the normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 for rigid propagation achieved with the vendor's research software. Adaptive propagation yielded poorer results, with a normalized DSC index of 0.89 {+-} 0.10 (paired t test, p <0.001). Conclusion: Propagation of the GTV ROIs through the respiratory phases using rigid- body registration is an acceptable method within a 1-mm margin of uncertainty. The adaptive organ-at-risk propagation method was not applicable to propagating GTV ROIs, resulting in an unacceptable reduction of the volume and distortion of the ROIs.

Ezhil, Muthuveni [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: veniezhil@hotmail.com; Choi, Bum; Starkschall, George [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bucci, M. Kara [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Vedam, Sastry; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the nature and magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breathe. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them.

Mewhinney, J.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Sun, J.D.; Coons, T.A. (eds.)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Respiratory effort correction strategies to improve the reproducibility of lung expansion measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can be used to make measurements of pulmonary function longitudinally. The sensitivity of such measurements to identify change depends on measurement uncertainty. Previously, intrasubject reproducibility of Jacobian-based measures of lung tissue expansion was studied in two repeat prior-RT 4DCT human acquisitions. Difference in respiratory effort such as breathing amplitude and frequency may affect longitudinal function assessment. In this study, the authors present normalization schemes that correct ventilation images for variations in respiratory effort and assess the reproducibility improvement after effort correction.Methods: Repeat 4DCT image data acquired within a short time interval from 24 patients prior to radiation therapy (RT) were used for this analysis. Using a tissue volume preserving deformable image registration algorithm, Jacobian ventilation maps in two scanning sessions were computed and compared on the same coordinate for reproducibility analysis. In addition to computing the ventilation maps from end expiration to end inspiration, the authors investigated the effort normalization strategies using other intermediated inspiration phases upon the principles of equivalent tidal volume (ETV) and equivalent lung volume (ELV). Scatter plots and mean square error of the repeat ventilation maps and the Jacobian ratio map were generated for four conditions: no effort correction, global normalization, ETV, and ELV. In addition, gamma pass rate was calculated from a modified gamma index evaluation between two ventilation maps, using acceptance criterions of 2 mm distance-to-agreement and 5% ventilation difference.Results: The pattern of regional pulmonary ventilation changes as lung volume changes. All effort correction strategies improved reproducibility when changes in respiratory effort were greater than 150 cc (p < 0.005 with regard to the gamma pass rate). Improvement of reproducibility was correlated with respiratory effort difference (R = 0.744 for ELV in the cohort with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc). In general for all subjects, global normalization, ETV and ELV significantly improved reproducibility compared to no effort correction (p = 0.009, 0.002, 0.005 respectively). When tidal volume difference was small (less than 100 cc), none of the three effort correction strategies improved reproducibility significantly (p = 0.52, 0.46, 0.46 respectively). For the cohort (N = 13) with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc, the average gamma pass rate improves from 57.3% before correction to 66.3% after global normalization, and 76.3% after ELV. ELV was found to be significantly better than global normalization (p = 0.04 for all subjects, and p = 0.003 for the cohort with tidal volume difference greater than 100 cc).Conclusions: All effort correction strategies improve the reproducibility of the authors' pulmonary ventilation measures, and the improvement of reproducibility is highly correlated with the changes in respiratory effort. ELV gives better results as effort difference increase, followed by ETV, then global. However, based on the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the lung expansion rate, a single scaling factor (e.g., global normalization) appears to be less accurate to correct the ventilation map when changes in respiratory effort are large.

Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Christensen, Gary E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Ding, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Bayouth, John E. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: Exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian Rural Communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities in areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV[sub 1.0]), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF[sub 25-75]), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V[sub 50]max). After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P < 0.01) mean decrements of 1.7% in FVC and 1.3% in FEV[sub 1.0] compared with Saskatchewan children, after adjusting for age, sex, weight, standing height, parental smoking, and gas cooking. There were no statistically significant regional differences in the pulmonary flow parameters (P > 0.05). 54 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Stern, B.R.; Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Jones, L.; Kearney, J.; Franklin, C.A. (Environmental Health Directorate, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Respiratory response of the sea anemone Bunodosoma cavernata (Bosc) to changes in temperature and salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Respiratory Rate . 6 2 Analysis of Variance Procedure for 0-2 Hour Average. . . 12 3 Analysis of Variance Procedure for 30 Minutes 13 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Acclimation Temperature 5 Duncan's Multiple Range... Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Experimental Temperature . 15 16 6 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average and Experimental Salinity 17 7 Duncan's Multiple Range Test for 30 Minutes and 0-2 Hour Average...

Retzer, Kent Arnold

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Discriminant analysis of heart valve sounds during respiratory static volume conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Data collection program 28 28 B. Analysis and extraction of parameters 30 VI. C. Analysis of STAVI-TH D. Statistical procedures RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 30 47 53 A. HVS1 data B. HVS2 data C. HVS3 data 60 62 63 viii Chapter Page D. High... RRZ = . 976 RR3 = . 949 Ave "- . 971 FRON AUTONATIC TRAC INC secs pt1 = 13d secs pt2 = 387 secs pt3 = 637 secs ptd = 888 Figure 7. Respiratory Condition 2. 37 2. 7 1 38 VXDIV. OVED EXIT 1= Gmt 2= FFTB 3=Filter SELECT ta RR1 1. 8 . 5...

Hatzopoulos, Stavros D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Feasibility of Respiratory Triggering for MR-Guided Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We obtained clear and reproducible MR fluoroscopic images and temperature maps for MR image-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory information was directly obtained from air-way pressure without a sensor on the chest wall. The trigger signal started scanning of one whole image with a spoiled gradient echo sequence. The delay time before the start of scanning was adjusted to acquire the data corresponding to the k-space center at the maximal expiratory phase. The triggered images were apparently clearer than the nontriggered ones and the location of the liver was consistent, which made targeting of the tumor easy. MR temperature images, which were highly susceptible to the movement of the liver, during microwave ablation using a proton resonance frequency method, could be obtained without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory triggering technique was found to be useful for MR fluoroscopic images and MR temperature monitoring in MR-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia.

Morikawa, Shigehiro, E-mail: morikawa@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Inubushi, Toshiro [Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Ohtsu, Molecular Neuroscience Research Center (Japan); Kurumi, Yoshimasa; Naka, Shigeyuki; Sato, Koichiro; Demura, Koichi; Tani, Tohru [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Surgery (Japan); Haque, Hasnine A [GE-Yokogawa Medical Systems (Japan)

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Respiratory responses of vigorously exercising children to 0. 12 ppm ozone exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in respiratory function have been suggested for children exposed to less than 0.12 ppm ozone (O3) while engaged in normal activities. Because the results of these studies have been confounded by other variables, such as temperature or the presence of other pollutants or have been questioned as to the adequacy of exposure measurements, the authors determined the acute response of children exposed to 0.12 ppm O3 in a controlled chamber environment. Twenty-three white males 8 to 11 yr of age were exposed once to clean air and once to 0.12 ppm O3 in random order. Exposures were for 2.5 h and included 2 h of intermittent heavy exercise. Measures of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and the symptom cough were determined prior to and after each exposure. A significant decline in FEV1 was found after the O3 exposure compared to the air exposure, and it appeared to persist for 16 to 20 h. No significant increase in cough was found due to O3 exposure. Forced vital capacity, specific airways resistance, respiratory frequency, tidal volume, and other symptoms were measured in a secondary exploratory analysis of this study.

McDonnell, W.F. 3d.; Chapman, R.S.; Leigh, M.W.; Strope, G.L.; Collier, A.M.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (USA))

1991-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Respiratory symptoms among glass bottle makers exposed to stannic chloride solution and other potentially hazardous substances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern about upper respiratory tract irritation and other symptoms among workers at a glass bottle manufacturing plant led to an epidemiologic and an industrial hygiene survey. Questionnaire responses from 35 hot end and 53 cold end workers indicated that the incidence of wheezing, chest pain, dyspnea on exertion, and cough was significantly elevated among hot end workers. Among both smokers and nonsmokers, hot end workers reported higher, but not significantly higher, rates of wheezing and chest pain. Among smokers, hot end workers reported significantly higher rates of dyspnea on exertion and cough than did cold end workers. Data suggest that reported exposure to stannic chloride solution likely caused these symptoms. The industrial hygiene survey, conducted when stannic chloride use had been reduced, cleaning had been done, and ventilation improved, focused on measuring air contaminants that might possibly cause symptoms. Levels of hydrogen chloride, which apparently was formed by the combination of stannic chloride and water in the presence of heat, were elevated. The finding of increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms among hot end workers was consistent with this exposure. Recommendations were made to reduce hazardous exposures at this plant. Individuals responsible for occupational health should be aware that relatively benign substances, such as stannic chloride and water, can combine spontaneously to form hazardous substances.

Levy, B.S.; Davis, F.; Johnson, B.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Absence of respiratory effects in subjects exposed to low concentrations of TDI and MDI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One hundred seven subjects from a polyurethane plastic manufacturing plant have been followed over a five-year period with measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and smoking habits. Environmental concentrations of toluene diisocyanate and diphenyl methyl diisocyanate were extensively monitored to provide accurate estimates of the upper-limits of exposure of the subjects. Current mean levels of FEV1 in this population were higher than those predicted for healthy subjects. The five-year change in FEV1 did not exceed that expected from aging. No acute change in FEV1 could be demonstrated over the course of a Monday either before or after a two-week vacation. No improvement in ventilatory function was observed over the vacation period. The presence of cough or sputum was related to smoking but was not related to isocyanate exposure. The results indicate that exposure of workers to extremely low levels of isocyanates (time-weighted average concentrations of the order of 0.001 parts per million (ppm)) is not associated with chronic respiratory symptoms or effects on ventilatory capacity. The results suggest that isocyanates can be controlled to the point of eliminating effects as measured by these techniques.

Musk, A.W.; Peters, J.M.; DiBerardinis, L.; Murphy, R.L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Health effects of acid aerosols on North American children: Respiratory symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examined the respiratory health effects of exposure to acidic air pollution among 13,369 white children 8 to 12 years old from 24 communities in the United States and Canada between 1988 and 1991. Each child`s parent or guardian completed a questionnaire. Air quality and meteorology were measured in each community for a 1-year period. We used a two-stage logistic regression model to analyze the data, adjusting for the period confounding effects of sex, history of allergies, parental asthma, parental education, and current smoking in the home. Children living in the community with the highest levels of particle strong acidity were significantly more likely [odds ratio (OR) = 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.48] to report at least one episode of bronchitis in the past year compared to children living in the least-polluted community. Fine particulate sulfate was also associated with higher reporting of bronchitis (OR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.12-2.42). No other respiratory symptoms were significantly higher in association with any of the air pollutants of interest. No sensitive subgroups were identified. Reported bronchitis, but neither asthma, wheeze, cough, nor phlegm, were associated with levels of particle strong acidity for these children living in a nonurban environment. 26 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Dockery, D.W. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)]|[Channing Lab., Boston, MA (United States); Cunningham, J.; Damokosh, A.I. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Research in Progress The University of Edinburgh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of interactions between nematode and respiratory virus infections" 1 March No RIP 8 March Leticia Alessandri Lung

MacDonald, Andrew

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141

Research Gallery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community...

142

Crosscutting Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to, and encourage, greater synergy among disciplines and across each of the Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) core technology areas. Its mission space is bound by...

143

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 10 November 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: andreas.fahlman@ tamucc.edu We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern of excised pinniped lungs provide a good estimate of total respiratory compliance. Keywords: lung mechanics

144

Effect of xenobiotics on the respiratory activity of rat heart mitochondria and the concomitant formation of superoxide radicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of the xenobiotics atrazine, benzene, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), lindane, toluene, and xylenol on the respiration of isolated rate heart mitochondria were studied. Bioenergetic parameters such as respiratory control (RC) and ATP/oxygen (P/O) values decreased considerably in the presence of these substances, and a concomitant increase of superoxide radical (O[sub 2][sup [minus

Stolze, K.; Nohl, H. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Four-dimensional image-based treatment planning: Target volume segmentation and dose calculation in the presence of respiratory motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe approaches to four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning, including acquisition of 4D-CT scans, target delineation of spatio-temporal image data sets, 4D dose calculations, and their analysis. Methods and Materials: The study included patients with thoracic and hepatocellular tumors. Specialized tools were developed to facilitate visualization, segmentation, and analysis of 4D-CT data: maximum intensity volume to define the extent of lung tumor motion, a 4D browser to examine and dynamically assess the 4D data sets, dose calculations, including respiratory motion, and deformable registration to combine the dose distributions at different points. Results: Four-dimensional CT was used to visualize and quantitatively assess respiratory target motion. The gross target volume contours derived from light breathing scans showed significant differences compared with those extracted from 4D-CT. Evaluation of deformable registration using difference images of original and deformed anatomic maps suggested the algorithm is functionally useful. Thus, calculation of effective dose distributions, including respiratory motion, was implemented. Conclusion: Tools and methods to use 4D-CT data for treatment planning in the presence of respiratory motion have been developed and applied to several case studies. The process of 4D-CT-based treatment planning has been implemented, and technical barriers for its routine use have been identified.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) and Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Chen, George T.Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Willet, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Recent studies have demonstrated that limitations to oxygen transport in lizards occur within both the respiratory and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The lateral flexions of the trunk that occur during this constraint by employing an accessory ventilatory mechanism called the gular pump, thus maintaining oxygen of the main veins in the abdominal compartment. Systemic venous return and ventricular preload are major

Bennett, Albert F.

147

Associations of symptoms related to isocyanate, ureaformol, and formophenolic exposures with respiratory symptoms and lung function in coal miners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The respiratory effects of diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI)-based resins and ureaformol- and formophenolic-based resins, used in coal mining, are unknown. This cross-sectional study of 354 miners evaluated respiratory health in miners with MDI-related symptoms (IS) and ureaformol/formophenolic-related symptoms (UFS). The protocol included clinical examination, chest radiograph, questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, smoking habit, job history, resin handling, and spirometry. Resin handling concerned 27.7% of the miners. IS affected 5.6%, and 1.4% also after work. UFS affected 22.6%, and 2.3% also after work. Wheezing affected 35.6%; chronic cough, expectoration, or bronchitis about 10%; dyspnea 5.4%; and asthma 2.8%. The miners with UFS had significantly more frequent chronic cough, expectoration, chronic bronchitis, dyspnea, and wheezing, whereas those with IS at and after work had markedly lower FVC, FEV1, MMEF, FEF50% and FEF25%. These findings raise the possibility of deleterious effects of exposures to MDI and ureaformol/ ormophenolic resins on respiratory health and lung function in coal miners during their working life.

Bertrand, J.P.; Simon, V.; Chau, N. [Houilleres Bassin Lorraine, Freyming Merlebach (France)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical Characteristics Using a Nonlinear Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating 24-Hour ECG, BP and Respiratory Signals with Realistic Linear and Nonlinear Clinical, London School of Economics, London, UK Abstract A nonlinear model for generating lifelike human ECG it to three ordinary differential equations, the model generates a 24-hour ECG signal. Using both standard

McSharry, Patrick E.

149

A linear, time-varying simulation of the respiratory tract system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These results show that regional deposition efficiencies of inhaled particles are highly dependent on the level of physical activity in all the spectrum of thermodynamic and aerodynamic aerosol particle sizes; also it was shown that for particles in the aerodynamic size range, the values of regional deposition efficiencies at the inner regions of the lung are highly dependent on age. In addition, the shape of regional deposition efficiency curves as a function of particle size have a similar behavior for all ages; thus, any variation of the airway geometry and respiratory physiological parameters such as tidal volumes and breathing frequencies due to age difference do not cause a change in the fundamental mechanisms of deposition. Thus, for all the cases of physical activity and age dependency, the deposition of ultrafine aerosol particles is highly enhanced by diffusive processes in all regions of the respiratory tract, and for very large aerosol size particles this behavior is repeated again due to impaction and sedimentation mechanisms. Although the results presented at this work, are the result of computer simulations based on different sources of experimental data, the structure of the computer simulation code BIODEP is flexible enough to the acquisition of any kind of new experimental information in terms of biokinetic analysis and regional deposition parameters. In addition, since the design of BIODEP was intended for easy access to the users, then with exception of the subroutine DIVPAG, at this moment, the modular design of BIODEP using FORTRAN 77 allows the implementation of all the subroutines of BIODEP to be used in a interactive mode with any microcomputer.

Hernandez, O.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function and symptoms in Mexico City schoolchildren  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of ambient ozone (O3) on respiratory function and acute respiratory symptoms were evaluated in 143 7- to 9-yr-old schoolchildren followed longitudinally at 1- to 2-wk intervals over a period of 6 months at three schools in Pedregal, Mexico City. The maximum O3 level exceeded the World Health Organization guideline of 80 ppb and the U.S. standard of 120 ppb in every week. For an increase from lowest to highest in the mean O3 level during the 48 hr before spirometry (53 ppb), logistic regression estimated relative odds of 1.7 for a child reporting cough/phlegm on the day of spirometry. For the full population, the mean O3 level during the hour before spirometry, not adjusted for temperature and humidity, predicted a significant decrement in FVC but not in FEV1 or FEF25-75. In contrast, the mean O3 level during the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted significant decrements in FEV1 and FEF25-75 but not in FVC. Ozone was consistently associated with a greater decrement in lung function for the 15 children with chronic phlegm as compared with the children without chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or wheeze. Ozone in the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted decrements in FEV1 for children of mothers who were current or former smokers, but not for children of mothers who were never smokers. Many of these effects were reduced in multiple regression analyses including temperature and humidity, as temperature and O3 were highly correlated.

Castillejos, M.; Gold, D.R.; Dockery, D.; Tosteson, T.; Baum, T.; Speizer, F.E. (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-X, Mexico City, (Mexico))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes  

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The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effects of ambient sulfur oxides and suspended particles on respiratory health of preadolescent children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reported here are the results from an ongoing study of outdoor air pollution and respiratory health of children living in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States. The study enrolled 10,106 white preadolescent children between 1974 and 1977 in 3 successive annual visits to each city. Each child received a spirometric examination, and a parent completed a standard questionnaire. Of this cohort, 8,380 children were seen for a second examination 1 yr later. An air pollution monitoring program was begun in each community at about the time of the first examination. For this report, measurements of total suspended particulates (TSP), the sulfate fraction of TSP (TSO/sub 4/), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations at study-affiliated outdoor stations were combined with measurements at other public and private monitoring sites to create a record of TSP, TSO/sub 4/, and SO/sub 2/ concentrations in each of 9 air pollution regions during the 1-yr period preceding each examination and, for TSP, during each child's lifetime up to the time of testing. Across the 6 cities, frequency of cough was significantly associated with the average of 24-h mean concentrations of all 3 air pollutants during the year preceding the health examination (p less than 0.01). Rates of bronchitis and a composite measure of lower respiratory illness were significantly associated with average particulate concentrations (p less than 0.05). In analyses restricted to lifetime residents, these outcomes were significantly associated with measures of lifetime mean TSP concentration. Within the cities, however, temporal and spatial variation in air pollutant concentrations and illness and symptom rates were not positively associated.

Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.; Dockery, D.W.; Spengler, J.D.; Stram, D.O.; Speizer, F.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

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AR Researchers  

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for fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles with an emphasis in cooperative unmanned vehicle research and intelligent remote sensing. Cal Christensen, M.S., P.E., P.M.P Cal...

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Researchers Eric D. Larsen Eric D. Larsen is a mechanical engineer at the Idaho National Laboratorywith 19 years of experience in design and integration of electro-mechanical and...

156

Research departments Materials Research Department  

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and alleviate atmospheric pollution in colla- boration with DMU (the National En- vironmental Research Institute Countries is also part of this department. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department (Formerly

157

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161

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174

Association between occupational exposure to arsenic and neurological, respiratory and renal effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational exposure by inhalation in copper smelter is associated with several subclinical health phenomena. The respiratory tract is usually involved in the process of detoxication of inhaled noxious agents which, as arsenic, can act as inductors of oxidative stress (Lantz, R.C., Hays, A.M., 2006. Role of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced toxicity. Drug Metab. Rev. 38, 791-804). It is also known that irritating fumes affect distal bronchioles of non-ciliated, epithelial Clara cells, which secrete anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive Clara cell protein (CC16) into the respiratory tract. The study group comprised 39 smelters employed at different workplaces in a copper foundry, matched for age and smoking habits with the control group (n = 16). Subjective neurological symptoms (SNS), visual evoked potentials (VEP), electroneurographic (EneG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) results were examined in the workers and the relationships between As concentration in the air (As-Air) and urine (As-U) were assessed. Effects of exposure were expressed in terms of biomarkers: CC16 as early pulmonary biomarker and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}M) in urine and serum and retinol binding protein (RBP) as renal markers, measured by sensitive latex immunoassay. The concentrations of arsenic exceeded about two times the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) (0.01 mg/m{sup 3}). The contents of lead did not exceed the TLV (0.05 mg/m{sup 3}). Low CC16 levels in serum (12.1 {mu}g/l) of workers with SNS and VEP symptoms and highest level As-U (x{sub a} 39.0 {mu}g/l) were noted earliest in relation to occupational time. Moreover, those effects were associated with increased levels of urinary and serum {beta}{sub 2}M and urinary RBP. Results of our study suggested the initiative key role of oxidative stress in triggering the processes that eventually lead to the subclinical effects of arsenic on the nervous system.

Halatek, Tadeusz [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)], E-mail: halatek@imp.lodz.pl; Sinczuk-Walczak, Halina [Outpatient Clinic of Occupational Disease, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Rabieh, Sasan [Faculty of Biology, Chemistry, and Geosciences, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Wasowicz, Wojciech [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of RSV F-mediated membrane fusion and have important implications for the identification of therapeutic strategies and vaccines targeting RSV F protein conformational changes.

Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T. [Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 209 Perry Parkway, Suite 7, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 (United States); Salzwedel, Karl, E-mail: salzwedelkd@niaid.nih.go [Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 209 Perry Parkway, Suite 7, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 (United States)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and diseases in schoolchildren living in a polluted and in a low polluted area in Israel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Second and fifth grade schoolchildren living in two communities with different levels of air pollution were studied. The parents of these children filled out ATS-NHLI health questionnaires. The prevalence of reported respiratory symptoms and pulmonary diseases was found to be significantly higher among children growing up in the polluted community (Ashdod) as compared with the low-pollution area (Hadera). Logistic models fitted for the respiratory conditions which differed significantly between both areas of residence also included background variables that could be responsible for these differences. Relative risk values, which were calculated from the logistic models, were in the range of 1.47 for cough without cold to 2.66 for asthma for children from Ashdod, as compared with 1.00 for children from Hadera.

Goren, A.I.; Hellmann, S.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Research | Energy Frontier Research Centers  

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178

Research | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

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179

Effect of diaphragmatic fatigue on control of the respiratory muscles during CO sub 2 rebreathing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors measured respiratory muscle recruitment and ventilation ({dot V}{sub E}) during CO{sub 2} rebreathing before and after diaphragmatic fatigue in normal subjects. Muscle activity was assessed by measuring pleural, abdominal, and transdiaphragmatic pressures (Ppl, Pab, and Pdi, resp). The results showed that (1) there was a progressive increase in Pdi with increasing end-tidal PCO{sub 2} (P{sub ET}CO{sub 2}); the rate of increase was usually greater before than after fatigue, however, in some it was less because of longer operating length and/or passive stretching of the diaphragm due to strong rib cage muscle (RCM) activity induced by fatigue; (2) Pdi increased mainly due to greater fall in Ppl; {Delta}Pab increased little during CO{sub 2} rebreathing or even decreased with P{sub ET}CO{sub 2} over 50-55 mmHg; this pattern was exaggerated by fatigue; (3) at the end of each trial, the ratio {minus}{Delta}Ppl/{Delta}Pab increased by {approximately}140% before and {approximately}850% after fatigue; (4) CO{sub 2} induced expiratory abdominal muscle activity; and (5) as a group, {dot V}{sub E} and its pattern did not change appreciably with fatigue. The authors conclude that RCM are recruited proportionately more than the diaphragm by CO{sub 2} and that diaphragmatic fatigue shifts the central drive from the fatigued diaphragm to TCM to preserve ventilation.

Yan, S.; Lichros, I.; Macklem, P.T. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Montreal Chest Hospital, Quebec (Canada))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

Relationship of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yield of cigarettes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data from consecutive surveys of the Tucson Epidemiologic Study (1981-1988) were used to evaluate the relationship in cigarette smokers of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide (CO) yields of the cigarette. There were 690 subjects who reported smoking regularly in at least one survey, over age 15. After adjustment for intensity and duration of smoking and for depth of inhalation, the risk of chronic phlegm, cough, and dyspnea were not related to the tar and nicotine yields. In 414 subjects with pulmonary function tested in at least one of the three surveys the spirometric indices used were significantly related to the daily dose of tar, nicotine, and CO (product of the cigarette yield and daily number of cigarettes smoked). The effects were more pronounced for past than for current doses. However, the differentiation of pulmonary function due to various yields of cigarettes was small in comparison to the difference in pulmonary function between smokers and nonsmokers.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Sherrill, D.L.; Paoletti, P.; Lebowitz, M.D. (National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw (Poland))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Daily diaries of respiratory symptoms and air pollution: Methodological issues and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Daily diaries of respiratory symptoms are a powerful technique for detecting acute effects of air pollution exposure. While conceptually simple, these diary studies can be difficult to analyze. The daily symptom rates are highly correlated, even after adjustment for covariates, and this lack of independence must be considered in the analysis. Possible approaches include the use of incidence instead of prevalence rates and autoregressive models. Heterogeneity among subjects also induces dependencies in the data. These can be addressed by stratification and by two-stage models such as those developed by Korn and Whittemore. These approaches have been applied to two data sets: a cohort of school children participating in the Harvard Six Cities Study and a cohort of student nurses in Los Angeles. Both data sets provide evidence of autocorrelation and heterogeneity. Controlling for autocorrelation corrects the precision estimates, and because diary data are usually positively autocorrelated, this leads to larger variance estimates. Controlling for heterogeneity among subjects appears to increase the effect sizes for air pollution exposure. Preliminary results indicate associations between sulfur dioxide and cough incidence in children and between nitrogen dioxide and phlegm incidence in student nurses.

Schwartz, J. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)); Wypij, D.; Dockery D.; Ware, J.; Spengler, J.; Ferris, B. Jr. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)); Zeger, S. (Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of air pollution on children's respiratory health in three Chinese cities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the winter of 1988--1989, parents of 2,789 elementary-school students completed standardized questionnaires. The students were 5--14 y of age and were from three urban districts and one suburban district of three large Chinese cities. The 4-y average ambient levels of total suspended particles in the three cities differed greatly during the period 1985--1988: Lanzhou, 1,067 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; urban Wuhan, 406 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; Guangzhou, 296 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and suburban Wuhan, 191 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The authors constructed unconditional logistic-regression models to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prevalences of several respiratory symptoms and illnesses, adjusted for district, use of coal in the home, and parental smoking status. There was a positive and significant association between total suspended particle levels and the adjusted odds ratios for couch, phlegm, hospitalization for diseases, and pneumonia. This association was derived from only the 1,784 urban children and, therefore, the authors were unable to extrapolate it to the suburban children. The results also indicated that parental smoking status was associated with cough and phlegm, and use of coal in the home was associated only with cough prevalence.

Qian, Z.; Chapman, R.S.; Tian, Q.; Chen, Y.; Lioy, P.J.; Zhang, J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Effects of ozone on the respiratory health, allergic sensitization, and cellular immune system in children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the lasting effects of high ozone concentrations under environmental conditions, we examined the respiratory health, pulmonary function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, allergic sensitization, and lymphocyte subpopulations of 10- to 14-yr-old children. A total of 218 children recruited from an area with high ozone concentrations (Group A) were tested against 281 children coming from an area with low ozone concentrations (Group B). As to subjective complaints, categorized as 'usually cough with or without phlegm,' 'breathlessness,' and 'susceptibility to chest colds,' there was no difference between the two groups. The lung function parameters were similar, but in Group A subjects' bronchial hyperresponsiveness occurred more frequently and was found to be more severe than in Group B (29.4 versus 19.9%, p less than 0.02; PD20 2,100 {plus minus} 87 versus 2,350 {plus minus} 58 micrograms, p less than 0.05). In both groups the number of children who had been suffering from allergic diseases and sensitization to aeroallergens, found by means of the skin test, was the same. Comparison of the total IgE levels showed no difference at all between the two groups. As far as the white blood cells are concerned, the total and differential cell count was the same, whereas lymphocyte subpopulations showed readily recognizable changes.

Zwick, H.; Popp, W.; Wagner, C.; Reiser, K.; Schmoeger, J.B.; Boeck, A.H.; Herkner, K.; Radunsky, K. (Pulmonary Department, Krankenhaus Lainz, Vienna (Austria))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The respiratory health and lung function of Anglo-American children in a smelter town  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooper smelters are large, usually isolated, sources of air pollution. Arizona has several such plants on the periphery of small communities. The smelters emit predominantly sulfur oxides and particulates, and the residents of these communities intermittently are exposed to high concentrations (24-h sulfur dioxide (SO2) . 250 to 500 micrograms/m3) of smelter smoke but little other pollution. This study compared the respiratory health of Anglo-American school children who lived in one smelter community with children living in another small community in Arizona that was free of smelter air pollution. The prevalence of cough, as determined by questionnaire, was 25.6% in the smelter town children and 14.3% in the nonsmelter town children (p less than 0.05). Pulmonary function at the study onset was equal in the two groups. Over the course of the 4 yr of study, lung function growth (measured as actual forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after 4 yr of study minus predicted FEV1) was also equal in the smelter town and nonsmelter town children. These results suggest that children in smelter communities have slightly more cough when compared with children living in other communities, but no differences in initial lung function or lung function at yearly testing over the period of the study.

Dodge, R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Relationship Between the Prevalence of Respiratory Illness and Dermatitis and Infant Diet in the First Year of Life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for asthma and allergic disease since the 12th century when a Jewish physician and philosopher, Maimonides, produced a remedy of Rhazes to ?clear the lungs of moisture, ease respiration and eliminate the cough? (32). The relationship of the environment...-wheezing lower respiratory infections included chest infection, pneumonia, whooping cough, chronic cough, or croup. As a check for reliability and validity of parental reporting of illnesses, the investigators compared 100 hospital medical records against...

Kunz, Lara

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Young SA, et al. 1993. Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory ill-as nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide would occur only inLRI from exposures to nitrogen dioxide (Samet et al. 1993).

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Li, Yupeng [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)] [Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

A multiplexed reverse transcriptase PCR assay for identification of viral respiratory pathogens at point-of-care  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a nucleic acid-based assay that is rapid, sensitive, specific, and can be used for the simultaneous detection of 5 common human respiratory pathogens including influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza type 1 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus group B, C, and E. Typically, diagnosis on an un-extracted clinical sample can be provided in less than 3 hours, including sample collection, preparation, and processing, as well as data analysis. Such a multiplexed panel would enable rapid broad-spectrum pathogen testing on nasal swabs, and therefore allow implementation of infection control measures, and timely administration of antiviral therapies. This article presents a summary of the assay performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Limits of detection are provided for each targeted respiratory pathogen, and result comparisons are performed on clinical samples, our goal being to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the multiplexed assay to the combination of immunofluorescence and shell vial culture currently implemented at the UCDMC hospital. Overall, the use of the multiplexed RT-PCR assay reduced the rate of false negatives by 4% and reduced the rate of false positives by up to 10%. The assay correctly identified 99.3% of the clinical negatives, 97% of adenovirus, 95% of RSV, 92% of influenza B, and 77% of influenza A without any extraction performed on the clinical samples. The data also showed that extraction will be needed for parainfluenza virus, which was only identified correctly 24% of the time on un-extracted samples.

Letant, S E; .Ortiz, J I; Tammero, L; Birch, J M; Derlet, R W; Cohen, S; Manning, D; McBride, M T

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV{sub MIV}s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, {+-}5 mm in geometric extent, and {+-}0.5 {+-} 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: chronic effects of diesel exhaust on the respiratory system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two hundred and eighty-three (283) male diesel bus garage workers from four garages in two cities were examined to determine if there was excess chronic respiratory morbidity related to diesel exposure. The dependent variables were respiratory symptoms, radiographic interpretation for pneumoconiosis, and pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and flow rates). Independent variables included race, age, smoking, drinking, height, and tenure (as surrogate measure of exposure). Exposure-effect relationships within the study population showed no detectable associations of symptoms with tenure. There was an apparent association of pulmonary function and tenure. Seven workers (2.5%) had category 1 pneumoconiosis (three rounded opacities, two irregular opacities, and one with both rounded and irregular). The study population was also compared to a nonexposed blue-collar population. After indirect adjustment for age, race, and smoking, the study population had elevated prevalences of cough, phlegm, and wheezing, but there was no association with tenure. Dyspnea showed a dose-response trend but no apparent increase in prevalence. Mean percent predicted pulmonary function of the study population was greater than 100%, i.e., elevated above the comparison population. These data show there is an apparent effect of diesel exhaust on pulmonary function but not chest radiographs. Respiratory symptoms are high compared to blue-collar workers, but there is no relationship with tenure.

Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Management of Respiratory Motion in Extracorporeal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment in Upper Abdominal Organs: Current Status and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a minimally invasive therapy considered with increased interest for the ablation of small tumors in deeply located organs while sparing surrounding critical tissues. A multitude of preclinical and clinical studies have showed the feasibility of the method; however, concurrently they showed several obstacles, among which the management of respiratory motion of abdominal organs is at the forefront. The aim of this review is to describe the different methods that have been proposed for managing respiratory motion and to identify their advantages and weaknesses. First, we specify the characteristics of respiratory motion for the liver, kidneys, and pancreas and the problems it causes during HIFU planning, treatment, and monitoring. Second, we make an inventory of the preclinical and clinical approaches used to overcome the problem of organ motion. Third, we analyze their respective benefits and drawbacks to identify the remaining physical, technological, and clinical challenges. We thereby consider the outlook of motion compensation techniques and those that would be the most suitable for clinical use, particularly under magnetic resonance thermometry monitoring.

Muller, A., E-mail: arnaud.muller@chu-lyon.fr [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Petrusca, L.; Auboiroux, V. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Valette, P. J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Salomir, R. [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland)] [University of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Switzerland); Cotton, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)] [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Service de Radiologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Research and Development with Full Scale Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the research programs of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct the research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings...

Sijpheer, N.; Bakker, E.J.; Opstelten, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

194

University Research  

Office of Science (SC) Website

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195

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198

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199

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200

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

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202

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203

Research Projects  

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204

PNNL: Research  

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205

Research Areas  

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206

Research Areas  

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207

Research Techniques  

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208

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209

Research | NREL  

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210

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211

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213

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214

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215

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216

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217

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218

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219

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220

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

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222

Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kessler, Marc L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Marsh, Robin B. C [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Balter, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)]. E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

Jawitz, James W.

225

Interfractional Reproducibility of Lung Tumor Location Using Various Methods of Respiratory Motion Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine interfractional reproducibility of the location of lung tumors using respiratory motion mitigation. Methods and Materials: Free-breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data sets and CT data sets during breath hold were acquired weekly for 17 patients undergoing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer. Distances between the center of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and a reproducible bony reference point under conditions of breath hold on end inspiration (EI) and end expiration (EE) and during free breathing on the 0% phase (corresponding to EI) and 50% phase (corresponding to EE) were analyzed for interfractional reproducibility. Systematic uncertainties in tumor location were determined as the difference in distance between the GTV center on the first CT data set and the mean location of GTV centers on the subsequent data sets. Random uncertainties in tumor location were determined as the standard deviation of the distances between the GTV centers and the bony reference points. Margins to account for systematic and random interfractional variations were estimated based on these uncertainties. Results: Mean values of interfractional setup uncertainties were as follows: systematic uncertainties-EI, 0.3 cm; EE, 0.2 cm; 0% phase, 0.3 cm; and 50% phase, 0.3 cm; and random uncertainties-EI, 0.3 cm; EE, 0.3 cm; 0% phase, 0.3 cm; and 50% phase, 0.3 cm. There does not appear to be any correlation between uncertainties and GTV size, but there appears to be a weak positive correlation between uncertainties and the magnitude of GTV excursion. Conclusions: Voluntary breath hold and gating on either EI or EE appear to be equally reliable methods of ensuring the reproducibility of lung tumor position. We recommend setup margins of 0.3 cm if using cone-beam CT or kilovoltage X-ray with fiducials and aligning directly to the tumor and 0.8 cm when aligning to a nearby bony surrogate using cone-beam CT or kilovoltage X-ray.

Starkschall, George, E-mail: gstarksc@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Britton, Keith [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary F.; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A cell based high-throughput screening approach for the discovery of new inhibitors of respiratory syncytial virus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based higsyncytial virus Dong-Hoon Chung1,2, Blake P Moore3,5, Daljit S Matharu4, Jennifer E Golden4, Clinton Maddox3, Lynn Rasmussen3, Melinda I Sosa3, Subramaniam Ananthan3, E Lucile White3, Fuli Jia3,6, Colleen B Jonsson1,2 and William E Severson1* Abstract... syncytial virus. Handbooks in Health Care Co. In Edited by Weisman LE, Groothuis JR. Newtown: PA; 2000:7–23. 18. Hall CB, et al: Aerosolized ribavirin treatment of infants with respiratory syncytial viral infection. a randomized double-blind study. N Engl J...

Chung, Dong-Hoon; Moore, Blake P.; Matharu, Daljit S.; Golden, Jennifer E.; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sosa, Melinda I.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; White, E. Lucile; Jia, Fuli; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Severson, William E.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Air pollutant monitoring for the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and presents the summary results of the air pollutant monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in support of the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study. The full study is examining the effects of chronic exposure to traffic-related pollutants on respiratory health among 3rd and 4th grade children attending ten neighborhood elementary schools in the San Francisco East Bay Area (Hayward, San Leandro and Oakland, CA). The demographically similar schools are located at varying distances from the I-880 and CA-92 freeways. Several schools were selected because they are located within 300 m in the predominant downwind direction (east) from either of the freeways. Measurements of multiple pollutants were made outdoors at the schools over 1-2 week intervals for 14 weeks in spring and eight weeks in fall 2001 using a custom-designed and validated package of commercially available monitoring equipment. Particulate matter was sampled over all hours (24 h per day) or during schools hours only with battery-operated programmable pumps and inlet devices for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}. These pumps were modified to allow for up to 10 days of continuous operation. Fine particle mass and black carbon (BC) were determined from the collected filters. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2}) were measured with passive samplers. Carbon monoxide (CO) was measured continuously with an electrochemical sensor. Gasoline-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured with passive samplers during three 4-week intervals in spring 2001 and two 4-week periods in early 2002. All samplers were deployed in a metal cabinet located outside at each school. Ranges of study average pollutant concentrations (all-hours) at the ten individual schools were: NO{sub x}, 33-68 ppb; NO{sub 2}, 19-31 ppb; PM{sub 10} mass, 27-32 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; PM{sub 2.5} mass, 12-15 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and BC associated with PM{sub 2.5}, 0.6-1.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Although statistical analysis of the data is yet to be performed, some general observations can be made. Absolute pollutant levels varied by season and week, but the simultaneous sampling design allowed for comparisons of concentrations among schools during each interval. Pollutant concentrations at each school were normalized to the sampling period averages among all schools. The normalized concentrations were generally consistent at each school throughout the entire study, suggesting that measured differences represent ongoing conditions and chronic exposures in the vicinities of the schools. Substantially elevated concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC, and somewhat elevated concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} were observed at one school located less than 100 meters to the east of I-880. Normalized concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC were also higher at the three other ''nearby and downwind'' schools relative to those located far from any freeway or other major traffic source. An ancillary monitoring program was implemented to examine the correlation between school-based pollutant measurements and measurements throughout the neighborhoods adjacent to three of the schools. Volunteer households were obtained from among the families of participating schoolchildren. Concentrations of NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2} were measured with passive samplers outside the homes of these volunteers during one of two 1-week periods in spring 2002. Simultaneous measurements were conducted at all ten of the schools and a central monitoring station during each week. The neighborhoods surrounding two schools were predominantly upwind of the I-880 freeway, while the neighborhood surrounding the other school was downwind from I-880. The overall distribution of concentrations observed for the residences near the downwind school appeared to be substantially higher than the regional background concentrations. The variability observed within the neighborhoods appeared to be, at least in part, explained by the proximity of individual residences to the freeway or

Singer, Brett C.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Research and Commercialization Grants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Board of Research and Commercialization Technology provides grants for renewable resource research and development projects, among other types, to be conducted at research and commercialization...

230

Research Library Discontinues OPPIE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Library Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Find more information below. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email The Research Library is...

231

Energy Frontier Research Centers | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Energy Frontier Research Centers SHARE Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials research...

232

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Student Research Fellowships Scientists of Tomorrow #12 medical Provides medical Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research

Bushman, Frederic

233

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ renewable/ November 2010 Sonoma County RESCO A Local Level Approach to Renewable Energy Portfolios. The Issue To address energy usage that contributes to climate change, California has enacted legislation to guide

234

Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution, affects nearly 15 million people in the United States, one-third of them  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimension to our understanding the health effects of air pollution. Contact: Trina Wood, (530) 752-5257 3Effects of Air Pollution on Respiratory Disease Asthma, closely associated with air pollution as a greater understanding of the types of air pollutants that cause the most harm. Seminal findings

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

235

External Research Funding Agreements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 External Research Funding Agreements University Policy No: RH8200 Classification: Research and university employees under Research Funding Agreements. DEFINITIONS 2.00 Research Funding Agreement means funding provided through an agreement with the university to be used for research purposes, whether

Victoria, University of

236

Forest Research: Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

237

Transforming Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming Health Research the first two years National Institute for Health Research Progress For Information R OCR R ef: 0 Gateway R ef: 9298 Title Transforming Health Research the first two years. Health Institute for Health Research Progress Report i Transforming Health Research the first two years National

Diggle, Peter J.

238

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER APRIL 2004­MARCH 2005 REPORT SCHOOL OF OCEAN AND EARTH RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate Pacific Research Center Design by: Susan Yamamoto Printed by: Hagadone Printing Company Photo: Waikiki

Wang, Yuqing

239

RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES Roadmap 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR FRANCE Roadmap 2008 #12;INTRODUCTION European research infrastructures and development, benefiting to Europe's economy and competitiveness. This roadmap for the research infrastructures....................................................................................................6 3. The roadmap: existing and already decided RIs and others at the planning stage

Horn, David

240

BRAZIL RESEARCH INITIATIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy Research Collaboration As a partner of the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC among agricultural researchers and stakeholders around the world. MSU's work with the GLBRC is organized

Liu, Taosheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Research News TEMPLATE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(DOE) Methane Hydrates R&D Program is addressing myriad questions NETL researcher Kelly Rose evaluates a natural gas hydrate research core from India's NGHP-01 natural...

242

Operations Research Analyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The incumbent in this position will serve as an Operations Research Analyst in the Generation Scheduling (PGS). The Operations Research Analyst is responsible for analytical work that involves...

243

Current Testbed Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Current Testbed Research Previous Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

244

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pulsed-power machine. The Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Foundation seeks to advance science and engineering in the areas of radiation effects sciences,...

245

Research at Research Development Services and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· $400M ongoing upgrade · FEL Light Source (~14kW) CEBAF #12;Alternative Energy ·Algal Biodiesel Research

246

Jahresbericht der Research Academy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jahresbericht der Research Academy Leipzig 2008 #12;Inhalt Die Research Academy Leipzig 3 Vorwort Research Academy Leipzig im Aufwind 3 Die Arbeit der RAL-Doktorandenvertretung 2008 4 Fächerübergreifendes Qualifikationsprogramm Die Veranstaltungen der Research Academy Leipzig 2008 5 Seminar ,,Junge Wissenschaft und Praxis" 6

Schüler, Axel

247

Ultracomputer Research Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents significant accomplishments made on the Ultracomputer Research Project during CY92.

Gottlieb, A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Research Councils UK Transforming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research is helping to accelerate the use of green energy technologies. RCUK has played a key role to help combat climate change, accelerate the deployment of green energy technologies and create newResearch Councils UK Transforming our energy future #12;Research funded by the Research Councils

Berzins, M.

249

Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dose–volume histogram indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% ± 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% ± 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 ± 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 ± 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential dosimetric error caused by breathing motion.

Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Bluett, Jaques [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Yi Pei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe, E-mail: rmohan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Research Roadmap Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Roadmap Presentation: euCognition Meeting, Munich 12 Jan 2007 http://www.eucognition.org/six_monthly_meeting_2.htm What's a Research Roadmap For? Why do we need one? How can we produce one? Aaron Sloman ( http.cs.bham.ac.uk/research/projects/cosy/papers/#pr0701 See also the euCognition Research Roadmap project: http://www.eucognition.org/wiki/index.php?title=Research_Roadmap

Sloman, Aaron

251

Polar lipid fatty acids, LPS-hydroxy fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of three Geobacter strains, and variation with electron acceptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polar lipid fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide hydroxy-fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of Geobacter metallireducens str. GS-15, Geobacter sulfurreducens str. PCA, and Geobacter bemidjiensis str. Bem are reported. Also, the lipids of G. metallireducens were compared when grown with Fe3+ or nitrate as electron acceptors and G. sulfurreducens with Fe3+ or fumarate. In all experiments, the most abundant polar lipid fatty acids were 14:0, i15:0, 16:1*7c, 16:1*5c, and 16:0; lipopolysaccharide hydroxyfatty acids were dominated by 3oh16:0, 3oh14:0, 9oh16:0, and 10oh16:0; and menaquinone-8 was the most abundant respiratory quinone. Some variation in lipid proWles with strain were observed, but not with electron acceptor.

Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron; Lovley, Derek; Woodard, Trevor L.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

Daily targeting of liver tumors: Screening patients with a mock treatment and using a combination of internal and external fiducials for image-guided respiratory-gated radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility and accuracy of using a mock treatment to screen suitable patients for respiratory-gated image-guided radiotherapy was investigated. Radio-opaque fiducials implanted adjacent to the liver tumor were used for online positioning to minimize the systematic error in patient positioning. The consistency in the degree of correlation between the external and internal fiducials was analyzed during a mock treatment. This technique could screen patients for gated therapy, reduce setup inaccuracy, and possibly individualize treatment margins.

Krishnan, Sunil; Briere, Tina Marie; Dong Lei; Murthy, Ravi; Ng, Chaan; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Variation in rectal temperature, respiratory rate, and pulse rate of cattle as related to variations in solar radiation, air temperature, wind velocity, and vapor pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIATION IN RECTAL TEMPERATURE, RESPIRATORY RATE, AND PULSE RATE GF CATTLE AS RELATED TO VARIATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION, AIR TEMPERATURE, WIND VELOCITY, AND VAPOR PRESSURE A Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim Quazi Approved as to style... Dissertation By Mohammad Fazlur Rahim tyiazi Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 1955 Major Subject: Genetics ? ?4...

Quazi, Mohammad Fazlur Rahim

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Participant Benefit Booklet July 1, 2011 -June 30, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or Substance Abuse 48 Physician Services 49 Preventive Care 50 Skilled Nursing Facility 53 Smoking Cessation 53 by Lovelace Insurance Company #12;CUSTOMER CARE CENTER ­ 505.727.LOVE (5683) OR 800.808-7363 LOVELACE WORKS 19 UNM Provider Directory 19 Network Providers Outside of New Mexico 20 Lovelace Customer Care

New Mexico, University of

256

2012 MITOCHONDRIA AND CHLOROPLASTS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE & GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 29 - AUGUST 3, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Mitochondria and Chloroplasts will assemble an international group of scientists investigating fundamental properties of these organelles, and their integration into broader physiological processes. The conference will emphasize the many commonalities between mitochondria and chloroplasts: their evolution from bacterial endosymbionts, their genomes and gene expression systems, their energy transducing membranes whose proteins derive from both nuclear and organellar genes, the challenge of maintaining organelle integrity in the presence of the reactive oxygen species that are generated during energy transduction, their incorporation into organismal signaling pathways, and more. The conference will bring together investigators working in animal, plant, fungal and protozoan systems who specialize in cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, physiology, proteomics, genomics, and structural biology. As such, this conference will provide a unique forum that engenders cross-disciplinary discussions concerning the biogenesis, dynamics, and regulation of these key cellular structures. By fostering interactions among mammalian, fungal and plant organellar biologists, this conference also provides a conduit for the transmission of mechanistic insights obtained in model organisms to applications in medicine and agriculture. The 2012 conference will highlight areas that are moving rapidly and emerging themes. These include new insights into the ultrastructure and organization of the energy transducing membranes, the coupling of organellar gene expression with the assembly of photosynthetic and respiratory complexes, the regulatory networks that couple organelle biogenesis with developmental and physiological signals, the signaling events through which organellar physiology influences nuclear gene expression, and the roles of organelles in disease and development.

Barkan, Alice

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

257

Research Network E-Mobility Research Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Mobility Research Network Energy Storage Drive Train Vehicle System Technology (Electrics & Electronics) Materials Chair: ELECTRICAL DRIVES 1. Energy Efficient Electric Drives Improvement of low load efficiency School of Process Science School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science School of Mechanical

Berlin,Technische Universität

258

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification Research BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description Researchers inthe@tamu.edu Skid-mounted gasifier: 1.8 tons-per-day pilot unit Gasification of cotton gin trash The new Texas A

259

University Research Summaries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Idaho National Laboratory published the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office 2001 University Research Summaries. 

260

Xu Zhang's Homepage - Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Interests. Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations; Finite Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods; Immersed Finite Element Methods

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Louisiana Transportation Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

Harms, Kyle E.

262

Researchers Edition 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the thematic priorities "Translational biomedical research and medical techno- logy" and "Renewable Energy of Geneva (UNIGE). UNIGE's researchers annually obtain more than 130 million Swiss Francs, earmarked for research, from sources such as: the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), the European Union (EU

Genčve, Université de

263

The Research Building Blocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Research Building Blocks For Teaching Children to Read Third Edition Put Reading First Kindergarten Through Grade 3 Third Edition #12;#12;The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read Centers Program, PR/Award Number R305R70004, as administered by the Office of Educational Research

Rau, Don C.

264

Graduate Research Scholarships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering Research Council of Canada Master's scholarships (17,5K, one year, non- renewable) Doctoral Research of Canada Master's scholarships (17,5K for one year, non- renewable) Doctoral scholarships (30k scholarships (20K per year, first nine semesters) Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

265

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER Annual Report April 2006 ­ March 2007 School of Ocean Research Center 1 2 The Year's Highlights 3 Research Accomplishments Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Ocean Climate: To understand climate variations in the Pacific and Indian oceans on inter- annual

Wang, Yuqing

266

RESEARCH BUILDING AT NORTHWESTERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;"Our new Biomedical Research Building-intensive medical schools. Perkins+Will has designed a building that will be superbly functional and have great a magnificent 12-story Biomedical Research Building to address this priority. The new 600,000 square foot

Engman, David M.

267

Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-alpha treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells is dependent on TGF-beta but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-alpha treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

Silva-Campa, Erika; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Resendiz, Monica; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Mata-Haro, Veronica [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, A.C. Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Mwangi, Waithaka [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Hernandez, Jesus, E-mail: jhdez@ciad.m [Centro de Investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo, A.C. Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

The South Karelia Air Pollution Study. The effects of malodorous sulfur compounds from pulp mills on respiratory and other symptoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper mills in South Karelia, the southeast part of Finland, are responsible for releasing a substantial amount of malodorous sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and methyl sulfides ((CH3)2S and (CH3)2S2), into ambient air. In the most polluted residential area the annual mean concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan are estimated to be 8 and 2 to 5 micrograms/m3 and the highest daily average concentration 100 and 50 micrograms/m3. The annual mean and highest daily concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are very low. We studied the effects of malodorous sulfur compounds on eye, nasal and respiratory symptoms, and headache in adults. A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire was distributed in February 1987 and responded to by 488 adults living in a severely (n = 198), a moderately (n = 204), and a nonpolluted community (n = 86). This included questions about occurrence of the symptoms of interest during the previous 4 wk and 12 months and individual, behavioral, and other environmental determinants of the symptoms. The response rate was 83%. The odds ratios (OR) for symptoms experienced often or constantly in severely versus nonpolluted and moderately versus nonpolluted communities were estimated in logistic regression analysis controlling potential confounders. The odds ratios for eye (moderate exposure OR 11.70, Cl95% 2.33 to 58.65; severe exposure OR 11.78, Cl95% 2.35 to 59.09) and nasal symptoms (OR 2.01, Cl95% 0.97 to 4.15; OR 2.19, Cl95% 1.06 to 4.55) and cough (OR 1.89, Cl95% 0.61 to 5.86; OR 3.06, Cl95% 1.02 to 9.29) during the previous 12 months were increased, with a dose-response pattern.

Jaakkola, J.J.; Vilkka, V.; Marttila, O.; Jaeppinen, P.H.; Haahtela, T. (South Karelia Allergy and Environment Institute, Espoo (Finland))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Research Affiliates | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELLAffiliates Research

270

Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGalleryAreQuantifyingResearch

271

Research Form | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch Form Research Form

272

Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generator, Separator) is carried out with numerical simulations and tests. Through these thermal and information in nuclear power plants. In addition, research on structural changes induced by high-energy ion subjects. W02 W52 Thermal-Hydraulics of Nuclear Reactors Optimization of thermal-hydraulic performance

Kaji, Hajime

273

18 Research Activities 2012 Research Frontiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the changing process of people's lives under globalization and examine its links with the current socio that understanding India will shed light upon a path towards a diversity-enhancing globalization. INDAS is keen undertakes research on Islamic law and economics, including the recently developed Islamic economy

Takada, Shoji

274

Wind Wildlife Research Meeting X  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The biennial Wind Wildlife Research Meeting provides an internationally recognized forum for researchers and wind-wildlife stakeholders to hear contributed papers, view research posters, and listen...

275

Research News November 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

They also toured several of NETL's laboratories, including the Fuel Cells Lab, Chemical Looping Reactor, and the Supercomputer and Visualization Center. There, NETL's researchers...

276

ORISE: Research and Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(ORISE) assists government agencies and organizations create effective health communication programs that are built on solid research and evaluation. This information helps...

277

INL Research Library Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and licensed subscriptions to provide the scientific and technical resources needed by INL researchers. Because of license restrictions, many of our subscriptions cannot be...

278

Jonathan Montańo: Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Travel Grant 2014-2015, Colombian Student Association at Purdue, May 2014. Graduate School Summer Research Grant, Purdue University, Summer 2012.

279

Photocatalysis Currently, the research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, various surfaces are coated with thin transparent titanium dioxide layers which degrade adhering fatty is a major focus of this research area. Filtration, extraction, chromatography and membrane adsorption

Vollmer, Heribert

280

research 1..8  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Accounts of Chemical Research virtual special issue "2D Nanomaterials beyond 3 Graphene". 4 Michael Naguib and Yury Gogotsi* , 5 Materials Science and Technology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Environmental Research Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

282

National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

283

Research Integrity A Guide for Research Postgraduate Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that all members of the HKU research family are well versed in research integrity. This booklet is intendedResearch Integrity A Guide for Research Postgraduate Students at The University of Hong Kong A publication of the Graduate School #12;Research Integrity: A Guide for Research Postgraduate Students

Tam, Vincent W. L.

284

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation, including SENSE Research School December 2007 #12; QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Quality,byphotocopy- ingorbyanyothermeanswiththepermissionofQANUifthesourceismentioned. #12;3QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Table of contents

Utrecht, Universiteit

285

Photoionization-photoelectron research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photoionization research program is aimed at understanding the basic processes of interaction of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light with atoms and molecules. This research provides valuable information on both thermochemistry and dynamics. Recent studies include atoms, clusters, hydrides, sulfides and an important fluoride.

Berkowitz, J.; Ruscic, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Soil Testing and Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Copyright © 2014 University of Minnesota Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Department of Soil, Water and Climate College of Food payable to the University of Minnesota We also accept the following credit cards: Soil Testing

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

287

International Pacific Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Pacific Research Center APRIL 2007­MARCH 2008 REPORT School of Ocean and Earth Center i Foreword ii iv Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 1 Regional-Ocean Influences 13 Asian by the following broad research themes and goals of the IPRC Science Plan. Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate

Wang, Yuqing

288

Neuroscience Research Funding Contacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizational units Volume 24 November 2014 #12;NIH Awards Initial $46 Million for BRAIN Initiative Research Projects lay the groundwork for visualizing the brain in action On September 14, 2014, the National to support the goals of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotech- nologies (BRAIN

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

289

ENERGY EFFICIENCY RESEARCH POWERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ENERGY EFFICIENCY RESEARCH POWERS THE FUTUREPIER CONTRIBUTES TO JOB GROWTH AND PRIVATE INVESTMENT.Partofthecreditforthese achievementsgoestoCalifornia'suniquePublicInterest EnergyResearch(PIER)Program. Overthepast40years,Californiansincreasedthesizeof their homes and added scores of new energy-using de- vices,fromlargerefrigerators,dishwashers,audioequip- ment

290

Honorary Edition Potato Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2002 Volume 34 Honorary Edition Michigan Potato Research Report Only a few persons have the wisdom single person has done so much for the potato industry. His vision and attention to detail have helped gratitude once more. I am pleased to dedicate the 2002 Michigan Potato Industry Commission Research Report

Douches, David S.

291

RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RESEARCH UPDATE Ecology Division Biotype has changed its name to Ecotype! Following the re-organisation of Forest Research into five science Divisions and three Support Divisions, the former Woodland Ecology Branches to form the new Ecology Division. We decided to give the divisional newsletter a new name (and

292

EPRI's Photovoltaic Research Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Smart inverters 7© 2011 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. · Storage #12 Executive Planning Workshop for a New Northeast Solar Energy Research Center January 11-12, 2011 #12;About sector on behalf of its members energ stakeholders and societ Chauncey Starr · The Electric Power

Homes, Christopher C.

293

A "blind" study of the power spectra analysis of respiratory sounds at the trachea of a sample of pulmonary insufficiency patients and normal subjects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the condition of the lungs. The slow progress is due to: (1) a variety of human factor problems, (2) the limitations of the instrumentation, (3) the lack of total understanding of the mechanism of production of respiratory sounds, and (4) the lack... was a "blind s'tudy The equipment used in the analysis of the magnetic tapes consisted of the following components: 1. Ampex 2200 PM analog tape recorder 2, Datum Time Code Generator/Reader Model 9300 3. 20 Hz, 1800 Hz low pass filters 4. 100 Hz...

Wolf, Brenda Ann

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Research Highlights | JCESR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our VisionResearchResearch

295

Jointly Sponsored Research Program Energy Related Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement, DE-FC26-98FT40323, Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) began in 1998. Over the course of the Program, a total of seventy-seven tasks were proposed utilizing a total of $23,202,579 in USDOE funds. Against this funding, cosponsors committed $26,557,649 in private funds to produce a program valued at $49,760,228. The goal of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program was to develop or assist in the development of innovative technology solutions that will: (1) Increase the production of United States energy resources - coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; (2) Enhance the competitiveness of United States energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; (3) Reduce the nation's dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the United States and regional economies; and (4) Minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Under the JSR Program, energy-related tasks emphasized enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil upgrading and characterization, coal beneficiation and upgrading, coal combustion systems development including oxy-combustion, emissions monitoring and abatement, coal gasification technologies including gas clean-up and conditioning, hydrogen and liquid fuels production, coal-bed methane recovery, and the development of technologies for the utilization of renewable energy resources. Environmental-related activities emphasized cleaning contaminated soils and waters, processing of oily wastes, mitigating acid mine drainage, and demonstrating uses for solid waste from clean coal technologies, and other advanced coal-based systems. Technology enhancement activities included resource characterization studies, development of improved methods, monitors and sensors. In general the goals of the tasks proposed were to enhance competitiveness of U.S. technology, increase production of domestic resources, and reduce environmental impacts associated with energy production and utilization. This report summarizes the accomplishments of the JSR Program.

Western Research Institute

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Research Affiliate Program | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELL

297

Research Teams - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter A B C D E F G H I J KAustinResearch

298

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Solar Energy Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz, Ph.D.Solar Energy Research Facility Photo

299

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch WelcomeSciencePrograms People FacebookMaterialsResearch

300

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Geoscience:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducationStationCSPRecoveryTop LDRD PublicationsMaterialsResearch

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Geoscience:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducationStationCSPRecoveryTop LDRD PublicationsMaterialsResearchProject:

302

NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff Biographies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test andField VerificationPossibleResearch Staff

303

Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Photovoltaic Research Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) at its national laboratory facilities located throughout the country. To encourage further innovation,...

305

Organic Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE funds research and development projects related to organic photovoltaics (OPV) due to the unique benefits it offers. Below are a list of the projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion on...

306

RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT LABORATORY SAFETY AUDITS & COMPLIANCE BIOSAFETY and ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT and MISSION CONTINUITY FIRE PREVENTION and LIFE SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY TRAINING

307

Thin Film Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports research and development of four thin-film technologies on the path to achieving cost-competitive solar energy, including:

308

CURRICULUM VITAE RESEARCH PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURRICULUM VITAE & RESEARCH PLAN Erik Schwartz Sørensen Ph. D. Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Contents Curriculum vitae 3 Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Recent Invited Talks 21 Referees 22 #12; Erik Sørensen February 19, 2001 3 Curriculum vitae

Sørensen, Erik S.

309

Atmospheric Research at BNL  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Brookhaven researcher Peter Daum discusses an international field experiment designed to make observations of critical components of the climate system of the southeastern Pacific. Because elements of this system are poorly understood and poorly represent

Peter Daum

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electric Vehicle Research Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................9 From diesel to electric: a new era in personnel transport for underground coal minesElectric Vehicle Research Group Annual Report 2012 #12;Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................8 C2-25 Electric Vehicle Drivetrain

Liley, David

311

Research Data Management - Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This short (16 slide) presentation "Documentation" explains the need to create documentation using several clear examples of the benefits from good documentation (and what can happen if it is not good), making research reproducible...

Collins, Anna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Research Project Overview Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Project Overview Introduction: 1.What is your topic? 2.What is your question? 3.What do Procedures: 6.What data do you need to test your hypothesis or meet your goal? 7. How do you plan to collect

313

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE Researchers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, environmental studies, history, and engineering. Research programs currently organized in the Center include ...................................................................................................................................1 1.2 Environmental Impacts of Urbanization ............................................... Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716-7381 Email: jbbyrne

Delaware, University of

314

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Postdoctoral Research Awards support EERE’s mission in energy efficiency and renewable energy by offering recent Ph.D. recipients the opportunity...

315

Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE supports crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) research and development efforts that lead to market-ready technologies. Below are a list of the projects, summary of the benefits, and discussion...

316

Universiteit Antwerpen Research Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crash, Denver Airport Baggage) Lives are at stake (e.g., automatic pilot, nuclear power plants vs. Performing a Case Study + Proposition + Unit of Analysis + Threats to Validity Research Methods 3

Nierstrasz, Oscar

317

Deep Research Submarine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Deep Sea Research Submarine (Figure 1) is a modified VIRGINIA Class Submarine that incorporates a permanently installed Deep Sea Operations Compartment (Figure 2). Table 1 summarizes the characteristics of the Deep ...

Woertz, Jeff

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Supporting Your Research at Ohio State Office of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Your Research at Ohio State Office of Research Office of Research Missions: · Strategic Investment Supporting Your Research at Ohio State Office of Research Strategic Investments Food Production and Security ­ Randy Moses · Food, Agricultural, & Environmental Sciences ­ Steve Slack · Law ­ Donald Tobin · Medicine

319

Undergraduate Research Course Approval Student's Name: __________________________ Research Advisor's Name: _______________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Research Course Approval Student's Name: __________________________ Research Advisor performing research with a faculty advisor for Course Credit or Pay? _________ Undergraduates may only work, students are required to submit a research report at the end of the term to their research advisor

Sherrill, David

320

A World of Research REPORT ON RESEARCH 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A World of Research REPORT ON RESEARCH 2007 #12;REPORT ON RESEARCH 2007 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Health 10 Engaging Student Researchers 12 Connecting with the Commonwealth 15 Impacting the World 18, the nation and the world. The Office of the Vice Provost for Research provides services in support

Nagurney, Anna

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fuel Cell Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary In conjunction with the Brown Energy Initiative, research Projects selected for the fuel cell research grant were selected on the following criteria: ? They should be fundamental research that has the potential to significantly impact the nation’s energy infrastructure. ? They should be scientifically exciting and sound. ? They should synthesize new materials, lead to greater insights, explore new phenomena, or design new devices or processes that are of relevance to solving the energy problems. ? They involve top-caliper senior scientists with a record of accomplishment, or junior faculty with outstanding promise of achievement. ? They should promise to yield at least preliminary results within the given funding period, which would warrant further research development. ? They should fit into the overall mission of the Brown Energy Initiative, and the investigators should contribute as partners to an intellectually stimulating environment focused on energy science. Based on these criteria, fourteen faculty across three disciplines (Chemistry, Physics and Engineering) and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory were selected to participate in this effort.1 In total, there were 30 people supported, at some level, on these projects. This report highlights the findings and research outcomes of the participating researchers.

Weber, Peter M. [Brown University] [Brown University

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Center for Information Systems Research Research Briefings 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is comprised of research briefings from the MIT Sloan School of Management's Center for Information Systems Research (CISR). CISR's mission is to perform practical empirical research on how firms generate business ...

ROSS, JEANNE W.

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sandia Combustion Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

University Research Ins0tutes (URIs) Research Centres (RCs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seafarers Interna0onal Research Centre Skills, Knowledge and Organisa0onal performance & Methods (WISERD) Cardiff Interdisciplinary Energy Research Network Wales

Martin, Ralph R.

325

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: John Shelton...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Meeting Posters A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Drilling 1976-2006...

326

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

NREL Buildings Research Video  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Through research, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed many strategies and design techniques to ensure both commercial and residential buildings use as little energy as possible and also work well with the surroundings. Here you will find a video that introduces the work of NREL Buildings Research, highlights some of the facilities on the NREL campus, and demonstrates these efficient building strategies. Watch this video to see design highlights of the Science and Technology Facility on the NREL campus?the first Federal building to be LEED® Platinum certified. Additionally, the video demonstrates the energy-saving features of NRELs Thermal Test Facility. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/buildings/about_research_text_version.html

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Research in actinide chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research studies the behavior of the actinide elements in aqueous solution. The high radioactivity of the transuranium actinides limits the concentrations which can be studied and, consequently, limits the experimental techniques. However, oxidation state analogs (trivalent lanthanides, tetravalent thorium, and hexavalent uranium) do not suffer from these limitations. Behavior of actinides in the environment are a major USDOE concern, whether in connection with long-term releases from a repository, releases from stored defense wastes or accidental releases in reprocessing, etc. Principal goal of our research was expand the thermodynamic data base on complexation of actinides by natural ligands (e.g., OH[sup [minus

Choppin, G.R.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Tansmutation Research program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six years of research was conducted for the United States Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy between the years of 2006 through 2011 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). The results of this research are detailed in the narratives for tasks 1-45. The work performed spanned the range of experimental and modeling efforts. Radiochemistry (separations, waste separation, nuclear fuel, remote sensing, and waste forms) , material fabrication, material characterization, corrosion studies, nuclear criticality, sensors, and modeling comprise the major topics of study during these six years.

Paul Seidler

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

PNNL Coal Gasification Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the goals of PNNL in relation to coal gasification research. The long-term intent of this effort is to produce a syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in materials, catalysts, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, system modifications to increase operational flexibility and reliability or accommodate other fuel sources that can be used for syngas production could be useful.

Reid, Douglas J.; Cabe, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

Research Groups - Cyclotron Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery Research

332

ARM - Research Themes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights Media Contact Hanna GossgovScienceResearch Themes

333

Research | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch AreasResearch Gene Odum forest

334

Resources for Researchers | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch AreasResearch GeneResourcesUser Facilities

335

Sandia National Laboratories: Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolar RegionalClimateResearch Research capabilities_bological_slide

336

CAMD Research Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBESEnergyArchaeologyBylawsSEP 10CAMD Research

337

Estimates of the absorbed fraction of energy for various electron source and target regions in the upper respiratory tract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

airway surfaces, exhibiting localized concentrations at carinal ridge. Further, Hofmann et al. (1991), while studying radon progeny, found that the combined effect of enhanced deposition and reduced clearance at bronchial bifurcations leads... to increased radon progeny doses within branching sites compared with uniformly distributed activity within a given airway generation. Thus, research suggests that particular attention should be paid to the carina when studying deposition of radioactive...

Calvo, Sebastian

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NREL: Transportation Research Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to heavy-duty freight trucks. Female researcher holding coin cell battery. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. Fuel cell electric sports...

339

NREL: Biomass Research - Amie Sluiter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center in Golden, Colorado. Research Interests Amie Sluiter began research in the biomass-to-ethanol field in 1996. She joined the Biomass Analysis Technologies team to...

340

Nuclear Safety Research and Development...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Nuclear Safety Research and Development Proposal Review and Prioritization Process and Criteria Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Office of Nuclear Safety Office of...

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341

RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF April 1, 2004 - March 31, 2005 Faculty and Research Group Leaders Carl A. Gagliardi, Professor of Physics John C. Hardy, Professor of...

342

RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RESEARCH PERSONNEL AND ENGINEERING STAFF April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002 FACULTY AND RESEARCH GROUP LEADERS Carl A. Gagliardi Professor of Physics John C. Hardy Professor of Physics...

343

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is a written agreement between a non-federal partner and Battelle...

344

Cooperative Research & Development Agreements | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CRADA SHARE Cooperative Research and Development Agreement A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) allows non-federal entities (industry, universities,...

345

Saskatchewan Petroleum Research Incentive (SPRI)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Saskatchewan Petroleum Research Incentive is intended to encourage research, development and demonstration of new technologies that facilitate the expanded production of Saskatchewan's oil and...

346

Optimized Algorithms Boost Combustion Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optimized Algorithms Boost Combustion Research Optimized Algorithms Boost Combustion Research Methane Flame Simulations Run 6x Faster on NERSC's Hopper Supercomputer November 25,...

347

Annual Report of Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Department of Defense increased 2.5 percent to $149 million. Funding from the Department of Energy increased;2 Overview.............................. 3 Statistical Snapshot............. 4 Sponsored Research Highlights--from developing sources of renewable energy to improving homeland security. Increasingly, doing so requires

Lee, Dongwon

348

Research Article Phonological Dyslexia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Article Phonological Dyslexia A Test Case for Reading Models Elise Caccappolo-van Vliet,1 words, a type of deficit referred to as phonological dyslexia. We report on 2 individuals with Alzheimer's disease who show phonological dyslexia. Although highly accurate in reading familiar words aloud (even

349

november 2010 Student Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2010 ResearchUc #12;2 UCReseaRch November 2010 Design vs. Dyslexia Reading and retaining information is the challenge faced by the one in five children who has some form of dyslexia. Overcoming movement to increase the reading and retention abilities of children aged 9 to 11 who have dyslexia

Papautsky, Ian

350

Education research Primary Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Education research Primary Science Survey Report December 2011 #12;Primary Science Survey Report, Wellcome Trust 1 Background In May 2009 Key Stage 2 science SATs (Standard Assessment Tests) were abolished fiasco might occur, where the results were delayed and their quality questioned. The loss of science SATs

Rambaut, Andrew

351

National Research Council Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Research Council Canada Institute for Information Technology Conseil national de recherches Canada Institut de technologie de l'information Determining Internet Users' Values for Private in The Second Annual Conference on Privacy, Security and Trust (PST'04). Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

Fleming, Michael W.

352

RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy] [Boston Universiy

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

Research Statement Hantaek Bae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Statement Hantaek Bae Krener Assistant Professor Department of Mathematics, UC Davis Email are not available through classical methods such as the energy methods or comparison arguments. Polymeric Fluids 3. Steve Shkoller: University of California, Davis 4. Animikh Biswas: University of Maryland

Bae, Hantaek

354

Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recalcitrance. Using an integrated approach to solving the challenge of producing biofuel from cellulosic materials, the center will not only provide the scientific basis for affordable and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. BESC researchers have

355

Research Symposium January 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable management. Research in nine villages, provided a comparison of two areas representing a high of the resource. Management of NWFPs in Community Forests may represent a viable option for sustainable management Resources Cornell University Kate Ballantine Soil organic matter accumulation in New York restored wetlands

Walter, M.Todd

356

Powertrain & Vehicle Research Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complexity ·More efficient Vehicles, quicker to market, reduced cost to consumer The Optimisation Task and virtual environments Vehicle baseline testing on rolling road Calibration Control Engine VehiclePowertrain & Vehicle Research Centre Low Carbon Powertrain Development S. Akehurst, EPSRC Advanced

Burton, Geoffrey R.

357

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RESEARCH CENTER APRIL 2005­MARCH 2006 REPORT SCHOOL OF OCEAN AND EARTH Center 1 The Year's Highlights 3 Indo-Pacific Ocean Climate 4 Regional-Ocean Influences 10 Asian Ocean Climate: To understand climate variations in the Pacific and Indian oceans on interannual

Wang, Yuqing

358

Academic Writing Research Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Try a multidisciplinary database Academic Search Elite. Citations to articles. (What is a citationSee over Academic Writing Research Papers Four important things to remember ... 1. Writing/assigned readings Use the Library databases to find relevant JOURNAL articles and other resources Identify

359

Biomass Research Program  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL's mission is to achieve DOE's vision of supplying high-quality raw biomass; preprocessing biomass into advanced bioenergy feedstocks; and delivering bioenergy commodities to biorefineries. You can learn more about research like this at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Kenney, Kevin; Wright, Christopher; Shelton-Davis, Colleen

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

Environmental Research Center to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, sustainable fuels, transportation systems, and solar energy By Sean Nealon On MAY 10, 2012 The world's largest the center has branched out into solar energy and energy storage research, which has created an important and presentations from student alumni on atmospheric processes, emissions, transportation systems and sustainable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

. RESEARCH PAPER . SCIENCE CHINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. RESEARCH PAPER . SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences January 2013, Vol. 56 012104:1­012104:10 doi: 10.1007/s11432-012-4616-5 c Science China Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012 info, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China; 2Beijing Aerospace Control Center, Beijing 100094, China; 3

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

Researching Industries (for Internships)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Researching Companies · Google · Company Websites · CareerSearch · Vault Guides · Hoovers · Crain's Chicago Services · Specialty groups · Company websites #12;Action Steps 1. Prepare for your search: Create do you want to work for our organization? ­ What do you find interesting about our company? ­ Why

Shull, Kenneth R.

363

Research Experience for Undergraduates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· smart grid technology · power markets · electric vehicles · energy harvesting program details · Stipend aboutCURENT's Summer REU Program The Center for Ultra-wide-area Resilient Electric Energy Transmission U.S. colleges or universities the opportunity to perform summer research in the fields of electrical

Tennessee, University of

364

Operations Research + Information Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the equipment they operate to perform most efficiently. The allocation of resources may be represented of the techniques and modeling concepts needed to analyze and design complex systems. As an operations researcher. All business systems are complex and need sophisticated decision-making methods that enable employees

Keinan, Alon

365

IBM Research Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 20, 2009 ... An Efficient Decomposition Algorithm for Static, Stochastic, ... Business Analytics & Mathematical Sciences, IBM Research. 1101 ... such as resource planning, capacity allocation, portfolio analysis, etc. ... bound imposed upon the risk measure for modeling the maximum acceptable risk that one is willing.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Introduction Research Interests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources Projects for Collaboration B. Blais (bblais@bryant.edu) Department of Science and Technology Bryant University Bryant-China University of Geosciences Joint Research - November 2007 B. Blais (bblais@bryant of the Brain Computer interfacing Bayesian Statistics B. Blais (bblais@bryant.edu) Statistics and Environmental

Blais, Brian

367

Research paper Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research paper Introduction The need for protected areas to preserve biodiversity, natural or near. Mostly for economic reasons, protected areas such as natural parks and reserves were often selected of such conservation efforts is the protection of landscapes with (presumed) ecological integrity and naturalness

Bern, Universität

368

TRANSPORTATION Policy Research CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and describes conditions necessary for successful public-private transportation partnerships. The researchers found that effective P3 programs rely on these factors for their success: Enabling Legislation in the process is necessary. Economic Environment: Favorable economic conditions conducive to investment-- from

369

Fifteenth combustion research conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

NONE

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

Qian, Ning

371

Forest Service Research Note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hills fire of October 30-November 1, 1967 showing observation sites, Cleveland National Forest, southernU.S.O.A. Forest Service Research Note PSW-183 ABSTRACT: Two fires burned in the same area was rruch more disastrous than the Pine Hills fire of 1967. The earlier fire claimed 11 lives, and covered

Standiford, Richard B.

372

Biomass Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INL's mission is to achieve DOE's vision of supplying high-quality raw biomass; preprocessing biomass into advanced bioenergy feedstocks; and delivering bioenergy commodities to biorefineries. You can learn more about research like this at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Kenney, Kevin; Wright, Christopher; Shelton-Davis, Colleen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

STRATEGIESEMPLOYERS Basic Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Agriculture Department of Energy Armed Services State and local government laboratories/agencies Public health for laboratory technician or research assistant positions. Choose courses with laboratory components to build year, to learn specialized laboratory techniques. Take a course in grant writing. Earn master's degree

New Hampshire, University of

374

Hypertension Research Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hypertension & Vascular Research Division Department of Internal Medicine Jeffrey L. Garvin, Ph.D. ­ Division Head #12;Prevalence of Hypertension in U.S. Men by Age and Ethnicity 18 ­ 29 30 ­ 39 40 ­ 49 50 Prevalence of High BP Adapted from Burt et al. Hypertension 1995;25:305. 25 50 75 #12;Introduction

Berdichevsky, Victor

375

Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

MĂĽller, Markus

376

Research Councils UK materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ÂŁ170 billion per annum and representing 15 per cent of GDP1 . Research is becoming increasingly focused and optoelectronics, energy storage and advanced structural composites. It could potentially revolutionise the semi. These eight are: Big Data and energy-efficient computing; Satellites and commercial applications of space

Berzins, M.

377

NEUROROBOTICS ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-inspiration, prefrontal cortex INTRODUCTION In controlled environments (e.g., industrial applications), robots can achieve is to liberate robots from controlled industrial settings, and allow them to interact with humans and changingNEUROROBOTICS ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 1 July 2011 doi: 10.3389/fnbot.2011.00001 Robot

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

378

Digital Business RESEARCH BRIEF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of social software, and a July 2009 Prescient digital media survey revealed that 47% of respondents wereCenter for Digital Business RESEARCH BRIEF Volume XIII Number 1 May 2011 2011 MIT Center for Digital Business, A. McAfee Shattering the Myths About Enterprise 2.0 Andrew P. McAfee, Associate Director

379

Cancer Research Beckman Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cancer Research Beckman Institute FOR ADVANCED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY #12;T The medical and scientific worlds have known for many years that in order to truly understand and treat cancer, the fight has and cancerous tumors have to first be visualized at the smallest scales possible, and then treated in the most

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

380

Research Training 22  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of CAE Activity in the Vehicle Development) CAE NV(Noise and vibration) CFD(Computational fluid / Denso / Nissan / Mitsubishi Motors / Mitsubishi Electronics / Toyota Central Research Lab. Group project (Fuel cell Lab., Crash Dummy Lab.) 2.Toyota Motors Co. (Car Production Line, Exhibition Hall ) 3

Takahashi, Ryo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Science & Research Agriculture & Food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Institutions Energy Efficiency Energy Supply Enlargement Enterprise & Jobs Financial Services Health Releases European Commission Presidency PRs Report on Progress under the Co-operation and Verification, Spain and Canada. Fusion research is touted by its proponents as a potential source of cheap, abundant

382

RESEARCH STATEMENT Moulinath Banerjee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a brief description of my research activities since the start of my employment with the Statistics: statistical problems in which neither the standard n rate of convergence is achieved by estimators, nor statistics to make inference on a monotone function. In my dissertation, I established the existence

Banerjee, Moulinath

383

Research in Microchemical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for reforming of liquid fuels such as ammonia or propane into hydrogen for fuel cells at high temperatures Microfluidics for Biology Microreactors and Micro Fuel Cells #12;The Department of Chemical & Biomolecular of specific research projects include development of micro fuel cells as power sources for portable

Ma, Yi

384

Research at the University of Bayreuth Research Priorities // Projects // Achievements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics Research Centre for German and European Energy Law (FER) Institute of Medical Care Management picture: The "Solar Sphere" at the School of Engineering (F. Lechner, 1999) #12;Research at the University Centre for German and European Food Law Research Centre of Food Quality (ForN) Research Centre of Capital

Ullmann, G. Matthias

385

RESEARCH Open Access Introducing the Forensic Research/Reference on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Open Access Introducing the Forensic Research/Reference on Genetics knowledge base, FROG used in forensic teaching, research, and investigations. The Fst value of each CODIS marker tends identification and description. However, online tools and databases that can be used for forensic research

Kidd, Kenneth

386

Base Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June 2009, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed 11 years of research under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40320 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy (OFE) and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). A wide range of diverse research activities were performed under annual program plans approved by NETL in seven major task areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, (6) advanced materials, and (7) strategic studies. This report summarizes results of the 67 research subtasks and an additional 50 strategic studies. Selected highlights in the executive summary illustrate the contribution of the research to the energy industry in areas not adequately addressed by the private sector alone. During the period of performance of the agreement, concerns have mounted over the impact of carbon emissions on climate change, and new programs have been initiated by DOE to ensure that fossil fuel resources along with renewable resources can continue to supply the nation's transportation fuel and electric power. The agreement has addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration while expanding the supply and use of domestic energy resources for energy security. It has further contributed to goals for near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources (e.g., wind-, biomass-, and coal-based electrical generation).

Everett Sondreal; John Hendrikson

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Load research manual. Volume 3. Load research for advanced technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms. In Volume 3, special load research procedures are presented for solar, wind, and cogeneration technologies.

None

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Photonics Research and Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLVâ??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average homeâ??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nationâ??s energy consumption â?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

LANLScience Ultrascale Systems Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Postdocs · Industry researchers In its initial phase USRC will include the following research topics · Industry researchers In its initial phase USRC will include the following research topics as they relate. Key features required are: * Dynamic Response to load - Add servers as load increases, absorb servers

390

John Jackman *First formal research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Studied the kinetics of a dye reaction related to solar energy *Research in the pharmaceutical industry Problems Research Contributions Manufacturing system design Queueing network models Simulation Prediction and estimation of uncertainty Petri Net Models * 4 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Research Problems Research

McCalley, James D.

391

1984 Raptor Research Foundation Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal:  Raptor Research Volume:  17 Issue:  4 (Winter) Section:  Announcements Year:  1983 Pages:  121

392

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE RESEARCH ROADMAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE RESEARCH ROADMAP October 2011 #12;OHSU School of Medicine Research Roadmap internal and external stakeholders and the public. #12;OHSU School of Medicine Research Roadmap October human health and well-being. At the Research Roadmap Retreat in December 2010, I issued a charge

Chapman, Michael S.

393

Managing and Archiving Research Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing and Archiving Research Documents Summary of "Hantering och arkivering av Documents ­ A Handbook for the Research Activity at the University of Gothenburg) #12;Managing and Archiving a method to manage and archive research documents1 . A project group of approximately 20 researchers formed

Johannesson, Henrik

394

UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD FAU Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harriet L.Wilkes Honors College FAU Research Facility Expansion Satellite Utility Plant Chiller Lift

Fernandez, Eduardo

395

NIH Medical Research Scholars Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 NIH Medical Research Scholars Program · A comprehensive, year-long residential research enrichment program for medical, dental, and veterinary students · NIH Intramural Research Program in Bethesda' personal interests and career goals NIH Medical Research Scholars Program -1 · Blends elements of two

Bushman, Frederic

396

for public engagement with research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engagement with schools becomes a standard part of skills development opportunities on offer to researchers

Berzins, M.

397

Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative RESEARCH PORTFOLIO Fall 2008 About SEAri http://seari.mit.edu The Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative brings together a set of sponsored research projects and a consortium of systems engineering leaders from industry, government, and academia. SEAri is positioned within

de Weck, Olivier L.

398

Marketing Strategy Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the research that has been undertaken as background for preparation of a marketing campaign for middle and high school students to increase interest in national security careers at the National Nuclear Security Administration. This work is a part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. Previous research on the development of a properly trained and skilled national security workforce has identified a lack of interest by k-12 students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. Further, participation in these careers by women and minority populations is limited and is not increasing. Added to this are low educational achievement levels in New Mexico, where the marketing campaign will be deployed.

None

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Passive solar buildings research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter covers research advances in passive solar buildings research during the time span from 1982 through 1991. These advances fall within the following categories: (1) short-term energy monitoring, (2) heat transport by natural convection within buildings, and (3) design guidelines and design tools. In short-term energy monitoring, a simulation model of the building is calibrated, based on data taken in a 3-day test. The method accurately predicts performance over an extended period. Heat transport through doorways is characterized for complex situations that arise in passive solar buildings. Simple concepts and models adequately describe the energy transport in many situations of interest. In a new approach, design guidelines are automatically generated for any specific locality. Worksheets or an accompanying computer program allow the designer to quickly and accurately evaluate performance and investigate design alternatives. 29 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

Balcomb, J.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Passive research and practice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Passive-solar applications in buildings are described and examples are given to illustrate how research in the field has been approached. The major emphasis of the research has been on devising mathematical models to characterize heat flow within buildings, on the validation of these models by comparison with test results, and on the subsequent use of the models to investigate the influence of both various design parameters and the weather on system performance. Results from both test modules and monitored buildings are given. Simulation analysis, the development of simplified methods, and systems analysis are outlined. Passive-solar practice is described and the key elements that have led to successful passive-solar applications are discussed.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Membrane Separations Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEMBRANE SEPARATIONS RESEARCH James R. Fair Chemical Engineering Department The University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 ABSTRACT The use of membranes for separating gaseous and liquid mixtures has grown dramatically in the past 15... years. Applications have been dominated by light gas separations and water purification. During this pioneering period, equipment containing the membrane suIfaces has been developed to a point where failures are minimal and the membranes themselves...

Fair, J. R.

403

ORISE: Research Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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404

ORISE: Research and Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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405

Energy Research Abstracts; (USA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) provides abstracting and indexing coverage of all scientific and technical reports and patent applications originated by the US Department of Energy, its laboratories, energy centers, and contractors, as well as theses and conference papers and proceedings issued by these organizations in report form. Audiovisual materials, computer media (magnetic tapes, diskettes, etc.), and engineering drawings are included in this definition. ERA also covers other energy information prepared in report form by federal and state government organizations, foreign governments, and domestic and foreign universities and research organizations, provided that the full text of the document has been received by OSTI. Foreign report information is obtained through the International Energy Agency's fourteen nation Energy Technology Data Exchange, the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Nuclear Information System, or nation-to-nation agreements. The purpose of this publication is to announce documents produced or obtained by DOE that are not so readily available as journal articles, books, or patents. ERA does not cover nonreport literature. The scope of ERA encompasses DOE's research, development, demonstration, and technology programs resulting from its broad charter for energy sources, supplies, safety, environmental impacts, and regulation.

Rutkowski, R.W.; Henline, D.M. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

IBM RESEARCH ZURICH IBM Research Zurich is one of nine IBM research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a strategic part- nership in nanotechnology with ETH Zurich, one of Europe's premier technical universitiesIBM RESEARCH ­ ZURICH IBM Research ­ Zurich is one of nine IBM research laboratories around the globe. The Zurich laboratory was established in 1956. Cutting-edge research and outstanding scientific

407

MONTANA PALLADIUM RESEARCH INITIATIVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: The overarching objective of the Montana Palladium Research Initiative is to perform scientific research on the properties and uses of palladium in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy'Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?s Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The purpose of the research will be to explore possible palladium as an alternative to platinum in hydrogen-economy applications. To achieve this objective, the Initiatives activities will focus on several cutting-edge research approaches across a range of disciplines, including metallurgy, biomimetics, instrumentation development, and systems analysis. Background: Platinum-group elements (PGEs) play significant roles in processing hydrogen, an element that shows high potential to address this need in the U.S. and the world for inexpensive, reliable, clean energy. Platinum, however, is a very expensive component of current and planned systems, so less-expensive alternatives that have similar physical properties are being sought. To this end, several tasks have been defined under the rubric of the Montana Palladium Research Iniative. This broad swath of activities will allow progress on several fronts. The membrane-related activities of Task 1 employs state-of-the-art and leading-edge technologies to develop new, ceramic-substrate metallic membranes for the production of high-purity hydrogen, and develop techniques for the production of thin, defect-free platinum group element catalytic membranes for energy production and pollution control. The biomimetic work in Task 2 explores the use of substrate-attached hydrogen-producing enzymes and the encapsulation of palladium in virion-based protein coats to determine their utility for distributed hydrogen production. Task 3 work involves developing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a real-time, in situ diagnostic technique to characterize PGEs nanoparticles for process monitoring and control. The systems engineering work in task 4 will determine how fuel cells Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?taken as systems behave over periods of time that should show how their reformers and other subsystems deteriorate with time.

Peters, John; McCloskey, Jay; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Snyder, Stuart; Gurney, Brian

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

408

Bryant Postgraduate Research Scholarship BRYANT POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP REGULATIONS 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bryant Postgraduate Research Scholarship 1 BRYANT POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP REGULATIONS 2013 BACKGROUND The D. V. Bryant Trust established Bryant Hall on land leased from the University. Since its inception, Bryant Hall has provided a supportive residential environment for first

Waikato, University of

409

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

410

Research District Seeing Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald (May 2012) - excerpt follows: It’s been a while since I’ve updated you on the Tri-Cities Research District, most certainly not for lack of new activity over the past several months. In fact, much has happened, and there’s more to come. I think many of us see new land development and construction as indicative of current or impending economic growth. So those of you who have ventured into North Richland either via Stevens Drive or George Washington Way lately have probably begun sensing and anticipating that such growth is afoot.

Madison, Alison L.

2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

Research Project Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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412

Research | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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413

Research | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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414

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Webmaster  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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415

ORISE: Faculty Research Experiences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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416

ARM - Research Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights Media Contact Hanna Goss

417

ASU EFRC - Center researchers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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418

Research Facilities | NREL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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419

Research | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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420

Research | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ARM - Research Highlights Summaries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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422

Building | GE Global Research  

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423

CNEEC - Research Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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424

CNEEC - Research Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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425

Connecting | GE Global Research  

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426

Curing | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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427

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Events  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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428

NREL: Research Facilities - Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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429

NREL: Research Facilities - Webmaster  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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430

PDSF Research Groups  

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431

Postdoc Research Day  

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432

Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

NONE

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Lighting Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Lighting Research Program (LRP) needed a solid strategy. · Identify lighting codes and standards problems that require additional R&D, such as outdated lighting energy savings or demand reduction potential. They also identified additional lighting research needs

434

Summer Program for Undergraduate Research Alaska Oregon Research Training Alliance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in SPUR Oregon-Chile International REU Program University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1254 phone (541 Undergraduate Researchers in SPUR (OURS) spur.uoregon.edu Oregon-Chile International REU Program (OC-iREU) spurSummer Program for Undergraduate Research Alaska Oregon Research Training Alliance NSF REU Site

Oregon, University of

435

Researching Industries and Employers WHY RESEARCH A COMPANY?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.fortune.com Google or other search engines - type in the company name and see what comes up Hoover's OnlineResearching Industries and Employers WHY RESEARCH A COMPANY? Company and industry research about a particular industry or company. It will help you decide on the right industry for you

Yang, Eui-Hyeok

436

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER 2006 AGRICULTURAL://www.sidney.ars.usda.gov/state/ North Dakota State University Williston Research Extension Center 14120 Hwy 2 Williston, ND 58801 (701 may have been more or less. Weather Summary Williston, nd Precipitation Temperature Month 2006 Avg

Dyer, Bill

437

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER 2007 AGRICULTURAL Dakota State University Williston Research Extension Center 14120 Hwy 2 Williston, ND 58801 (701) 774-4315 Fax: (701) 774-4307 E-mail: NDSU.Williston.REC@.ndsu.edu http

Dyer, Bill

438

ELSEVIER Brain Research 712 (1996) 293-298 Research report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRAIN RESEARCH ELSEVIER Brain Research 712 (1996) 293-298 Research report Local infusion of brain examined the effects of local infusion of BDNF on the electrophysioiogical activity of serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raph6 nucleus with extracellular single unit recording in vivo. Compared with vehicle-infused

Tepper, James M.

439

Jointly Sponsored Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Gleenglass Swarf Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective: John Sauer, Gleenglass principal, asked for research into innovative uses for a reclaimed glass slurry, also referred to as swarf. Through our research we were to determine a product and a market that could be manufactured using this fully recycled glass swarf. Background: Mr. Sauer receives the swarf from major glass manufacturers as a fine powder glass suspended in an organic dispersant and water. The swarf is produced through an industrial glass cutting process that results in the glass powder dispersed in water and recyclable glass disks; both are used in the project. Mr. Sauer's swarf studio testing has yet to produce any product with a value great enough to justify processing the swarf. Many of these limitations were believed to be due to the unknown composition and characteristics of the swarf as well as the limited lab testing ability of Mr. Sauer in his studio space. Deliverables: 1. The valuable characteristics of the swarf. 2. Products that can be produced with the swarf. 3. Market for developed products. 4. Capital investment needed to create developed product. 5. Any other applications of the swarf that were outside the scope of residential and commercial building material for use in future DOE grant proposals to the glass manufacturing facilities. 6. Additives that could change the color of the final piece to white, gray, or green.

Turo, Laura A.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Ryan, Joseph V.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II.  Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

442

Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds Compiled by Erwin Wodarczak and Melanie Hardbattle Projects series Sous-fonds Description o "Women and Sustainable Development: Canadian Perspectives (UBC Library catalogue) #12;Fonds Description Sustainable Development Research Institute fonds. ­ 1985

Handy, Todd C.

443

Research Summary Wildfires in Wales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relating to arson and its motivations, wildfire research and research into the social drivers of wildfires in partnership and to address the wider social drivers of wildfire arson. o There is low public awareness

444

Environmental research on actinide elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Landscape Research, Knowledge and Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape Research, Knowledge and Change Division of Landscape Architecture SLU Uppsala The Landscape Architect Education 2 Research Themes 3 PhD Students 10 #12; Welcome to the Division of Landscape Architecture! Landscape Architecture is the art

446

22 Research Activities 2012 Informatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Science Computational Astrophysics Theoretical Particle Physics Cognitive Developmental Robotics Society Human Math. Astronomy Physics Robotics The Hakubi Project: Fostering Young Researchers The Hakubi researchers are employed for five years by Kyoto University as associate or assistant professors, during which

Takada, Shoji

447

A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ?2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated from amplitude-based gating are larger and more accurate, at levels that are potentially clinically significant, compared with those from temporal phase-based gating.

Jani, Shyam S., E-mail: sjani@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Dahlbom, Magnus [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Biological Systems Research Staff New  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Staff The INL Biological Systems department employs a workforce of highly talented scientists, including microbiologists, biochemists, molecular biologists, geochemists,...

449

INL@Work Armor Researcher  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL researcher Henry Chu explains how his mechanical engineering skills are being used to create better armor for our military.

Chu, Henry

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Research Administration Index of Commonly Used Acronyms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Property System Review CRADA Cooperative Research and Development Agreement CRS Congressional Research Service CSR

Salama, Khaled

451

Arnold Schwarzenegger, LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;Prepared By: Lighting Research Center Andrew Bierman, Project Lead Troy, New York 12180 Managed ByArnold Schwarzenegger, Governor LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM PROJECT 3.2 ENERGY EFFICIENT LOAD- SHEDDING LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research

452

Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

UNLV Research Foundation PUBLIC NOTICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNLV Research Foundation PUBLIC NOTICE Audit Committee Meeting September 26, 2013 2:00 p.m. ­ 3:00 p.m. Telephone Conferencing Claudine Williams Conference Room UNLV Foundations Building University not appearing on this agenda to the attention of the UNLV Research Foundation Board. The UNLV Research

Hemmers, Oliver

454

Research Report faculty of law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the ageing population in Western Australia. In addition, the Crime Research Centre continues to host. Professor Erika J Techera Dean, Faculty of Law © JOAN COSTA 2013 The University of Western Australia | 01 Research student profile | 07 Crime Research Centre | 09 The Centre for Mining, Energy and Natural

Tobar, Michael

455

Intramural Research Program at NIH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRAINING AND MENTORING in the Intramural Research Program at NIH National Institutes of Health Office of the Director A Guide to #12;TRAINING AND MENTORING in the Intramural Research Program at NIH pleased that "A Guide to Training and Mentoring in the Intramural Research Program at NIH" has taken its

Bandettini, Peter A.

456

Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National&T Department #12;Nuclear Energy Today 435 Operable Power Reactors, 12% electrical generation (100 in US, 19

Ohta, Shigemi

457

Training for Early Career Researchers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training for Early Career Researchers Research Management Training for 16 ­ 17 September 2014 training in an intensive, yet effective workshop form over two days. There is a strong emphasis on European Management Training for Early Career Researchers 16 ­ 17 September 2014 in Hamburg #12;

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

458

ETHICAL CONDUCT IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ETHICAL CONDUCT IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH: A Handbook for Biomedical Graduate Studies Students and Research Fellows Third Edition BIOMEDICAL GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM UNIVERSITY of PENNSYLVANIA #12 that a trainee in biomedical research should be taught to maintain the highest standards of scientific integrity

Plotkin, Joshua B.

459

Army High Performance Computing Research Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science research challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing Research

Prinz, Friedrich B.

460

Accelerator research studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory building related symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the US EPA 100 office-building BASE Study dataset, they conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the relationship between indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (LResp) building related symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. In addition, they tested the hypothesis that certain environmentally-mediated health conditions (e.g., allergies and asthma) confer increased susceptibility to building related symptoms within office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependent associations (p < 0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100 ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average, reduce the prevalence of several building related symptoms by up to 70%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. Building occupants with certain environmentally-mediated health conditions are more likely to experience building related symptoms than those without these conditions (statistically significant ORs ranged from 2 to 11).

Erdmann, Christine A.; Apte, Michael G.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Epidemiological-environemental study of lead acid battery workers. III. Chronic effects of sulfuric acid on the respiratory system and teeth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of long-term exposure to sulfuric acid mist on the teeth and respiratory system were studied in 248 workers in five plants manufacturing lead acid batteries. The prevalence of cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and wheezing as determined by questionnaire were not associated with estimates of cumulative acid exposure. There was only one case of irregular opacities seen on the chest radiographs. There was no statistically significant association of reduced FEV/sub 1/ peak flow, FEF/sub 50/, and FEF/sub 75/ with acid exposure although the higher exposed group had lower mean values. FVC in the high exposure group showed a statistically significant reductioon compared to the low exposure group but there was no significant association when exposure was analyzed as a continuous variable. The ratio of observed to expected prevalence of teeth etching and erosion was about four times greater in the high acid-exposure group. The earliest case of etching occured after 4 months exposure to an estimated average exposure of 0.23 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfuric acid.

Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Hancock, J.; Meckstroth, R.L.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme in Science (UROPS) Research Project Proposal Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme in Science (UROPS) Research Project Proposal Form and programming. #12;Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme in Science (UROPS) Research Project Proposal Research Opportunities Programme in Science (UROPS) Research Project Proposal Form Project No /Academic Yr

Aslaksen, Helmer

465

Post-Doctoral Researcher's Conceptions of Research: A Metaphor Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

countries. Fields of research were mathematics (1 participant), physics (2), chemistry (2), earth sciences (2), engineering (3), biological sciences (2), agriculture (3), health sciences (4), social sciences (1) and humanities (2). The number of years as a... or between academics and non-academic staff or students, can cause misunderstandings that prejudice the communication between the people involved. It is the conception of research that is important in the communication process. Conceptions of research have...

Pitcher, Rod; Akerlind, Gerlese

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Eltron Research & Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report covers technical work conducted under contract DE-FC26-05NT42469 between FY06 Q1 through FY14 Q2. The project evolved through several budget periods, budget revisions and continuation applications. This report covers work performed under the “base” program. In 2010 ARRA funding was added to the project. A separate report covering the ARRA portion of the project was submitted to DOE. The original project was focused on research and development for scale-up of hydrogen separation membrane for a FutureGen type power plant. The work included membrane testing and evaluation of metal alloy flat plates vs. tubes and metal membranes vs. cermet membranes. In addition, economic analysis and process modeling was performed. The original project team included CoorsTek, NORAM, and Praxair. In FY10Q2 a continuation application was filed for conducting a scale-up test at Eastman Chemical. In this part of the project a Subscale Engineering Prototype (SEP) membrane skid was designed, fabricated, and operated on a gasified coal slip-stream on Eastman’s site in Kingsport, TN. Following operation, the project was reorganized and a second continuation application with a new statement of work was initiated in FY12Q1. Finally, based on DOE’s decision not to proceed with a Process Development Unit (PDU) field test, a third continuation application and statement of work was initiated in FY13Q1 to close out the project.

Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard; Faull, John

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Dotson, CW

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

[Medium energy meson research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities of this group are primarily concerned with experiments using the Crystal Barrel Detector. This detector is installed and operating at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. QCD, the modem theory of the strong interaction, is reasonably well understood at high energies, but unfortunately, low-energy QCD is still not well understood, and is far from being adequately tested. The Crystal Barrel experiments are designed to provide some of the tests. The basic line of research involves meson spectroscopy, analyses bearing on the quark and/or gluon content of nuclear states, and the exploration of mechanisms and rules which govern p[bar p] annihilation dynamics. The Crystal Barrel Detector detects and identifies charged and neutral particles with a geometric acceptance close to 100%. The principal component of the detector is an array of 1,380 CsI(TI) crystals. These crystals surround a Jet Drift Chamber (JDC), located in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field, which measures the momentum and dE/dx of charged particles. One of the very interesting physics goals of the detector is a search for exotic mesonic states -- glueballs and hybrids. Annihilation at rest will be studied with both liquid and gaseous hydrogen targets. The gaseous target offers the possibility of triggering on atomic L-shell X rays so that specific initial angular momentum states can be studied.These topics as well as other related topics are discussed in this report.

Crowe, K.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

[Medium energy meson research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities of this group are primarily concerned with experiments using the Crystal Barrel Detector. This detector is installed and operating at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN. QCD, the modem theory of the strong interaction, is reasonably well understood at high energies, but unfortunately, low-energy QCD is still not well understood, and is far from being adequately tested. The Crystal Barrel experiments are designed to provide some of the tests. The basic line of research involves meson spectroscopy, analyses bearing on the quark and/or gluon content of nuclear states, and the exploration of mechanisms and rules which govern p{bar p} annihilation dynamics. The Crystal Barrel Detector detects and identifies charged and neutral particles with a geometric acceptance close to 100%. The principal component of the detector is an array of 1,380 CsI(TI) crystals. These crystals surround a Jet Drift Chamber (JDC), located in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field, which measures the momentum and dE/dx of charged particles. One of the very interesting physics goals of the detector is a search for exotic mesonic states -- glueballs and hybrids. Annihilation at rest will be studied with both liquid and gaseous hydrogen targets. The gaseous target offers the possibility of triggering on atomic L-shell X rays so that specific initial angular momentum states can be studied.These topics as well as other related topics are discussed in this report.

Crowe, K.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Reactor Safety Research Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Sarah Hobdey...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Meeting Posters Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid...

472

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Shane Ardo...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Meeting Posters White Papers on Materials for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting EXPERIENCES ON PID TESTING OF PV MODULES IN 2012...

473

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Jared Clark...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Meeting Posters Biofuels Report Final Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio-Oil Production...

474

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Sarah Cowan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Meeting Posters Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector Nano-structures Thermoelectric Materals - Part 2...

475

Low-rank coal research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Exemplary Student Research Program | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Exploring the Future STEM Home Activites Contact education@anl.gov Exemplary Student Research Program Students present research at Argonne. Students present research at...

477

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Research Areas Research Areas High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP) Research Areas During open solicitations proposals are sought...

478

Emerging Water Heating Technologies Research & Development Roadmap...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Heating Technologies Research & Development Roadmap Emerging Water Heating Technologies Research & Development Roadmap The Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap for Emerging...

479

CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility CMR: Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR)...

480

Researching profitable and sustainable biofuels | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Researching profitable and sustainable biofuels Researching profitable and sustainable biofuels November 2, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Great Lakes Bioenergy Research...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lovelace respiratory research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Oil shale research in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been continued efforts and new emergence in oil shale research in Chine since 1980. In this paper, the studies carried out in universities, academic, research and industrial laboratories in recent years are summarized. The research areas cover the chemical structure of kerogen; thermal behavior of oil shale; drying, pyrolysis and combustion of oil shale; shale oil upgrading; chemical utilization of oil shale; retorting waste water treatment and economic assessment.

Jianqiu, W.; Jialin, Q. (Beijing Graduate School, Petroleum Univ., Beijing (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

DHS Research Experience Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to represent four common classes of pesticides that are currently used in the US. Permethrin (a pyrethrin insecticide), dichlorvos and malathion (organophosphates), imidacloprid (a chloronicotinyl pesticide), and carbaryl (a carbamate) were selected for analysis. Samples were aerosolized either in water (using a plastic nebulizer) or in ethanol (using a glass nebulizer), and the particles entered the SPAMS instrument through a focusing lens stack. The particles then passed through a stage with three tracking lasers that were used to determine each particle's velocity. This velocity was used to calculate when to fire a desorption/ionization (D/I) laser in order to fragment the particle for analysis in a dual polarity time of flight mass spectrometer. Signals were digitized, and then analyzed using LLNL-developed software. We obtained chemical mass spectral signatures for each pesticide, and assigned peaks to the mass spectra based on our knowledge of the pesticides chemical structures. We then proved the robustness of our detection method by identifying the presence of pesticides in two real-world matrices: Raid{trademark} Ant Spray and a flea collar. To sample these, we simply needed to direct aerosolized particles into the SPAMS instrument. The minimal sample preparation required makes SPAMS very attractive as a detector. Essentially, we were able to show that SPAMS is a reliable and effective method for detecting pesticides at extremely low concentrations in a variety of matrices and physical states. The other project that I had the opportunity to be a part of did not involve data collection in the lab; it consisted of analyzing a large amount of data that had already been collected. We got to look at data collected over the course of about two months, when the SPAMS instrument was deployed to a public place. The machine sampled the air and collected spectra for over two months, storing all the spectra and associated data; we then looked at an approximately two-month subset of this data to search for patterns in the types of particles being detected. Essentially, we we

Venkatachalam, V

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

483

avalik kiri hrra: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: of the field, including Charles Babbage, Ada Lovelace, Alan Turing, Claude Shannon, Grace Hopper, John von., Oct. 7 Adddrop deadline (by web) Ada...

484

NREL: Biomass Research - Josh Schaidle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of pyrolysis products to produce fungible transportation fuels. Research Interests Biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals Environmentally-sustainable engineering practices...

485

About the Geocentrifuge Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Facility is being used to improve mathematical models for the movement of fluids and contaminants and long-term performance of engineered caps and barriers used for...

486

Electric utility research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen papers presented at a seminar held by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) at North Carolina State University during October, 1982 represent an opportunity for an exchange of research information among regulators, utility officials, and research planners. The topics range from a regulatory perspective of research and development to a review of new and evolving technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the papers for the Energy Data Base (EDB), Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis.

Not Available

1982-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

487

Idaho National Laboratory Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

General Information In 2013 the Research Library moved to the INL campus and can no longer accommodate visits by the general public. Materials may still be requested via...

488

Retired supercomputers enable student research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

McMillan. Nothing like it in the world A new facility, dedicated Oct. 18 at the Los Alamos Research Park, uses decommissioned Laboratory supercomputers to give systems...

489

Energy Research Project, Review (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The commissioner shall continuously identify, monitor, and evaluate research studies and demonstration projects pertaining to alternative energy and energy conservation systems and methodologies,...

490

University Turbine Systems Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary areas of university research were combustion, aerodynamics/heat transfer, and materials, with a few projects in the area of instrumentation, sensors and life (ISL).

Leitner, Robert; Wenglarz, Richard

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

QESST Engineering Research Center: Revolutionizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QESST Engineering Research Center: Revolutionizing energy for the world Power Systems Energy engineering and the built environment school of electrical, computer and energy engineering biofuels waste

Zhang, Junshan

492

Geothermal Research and Development Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you'll find links to laboratories, universities, and colleges conducting research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy technologies.

493

Energy and Environment Researcher Biographies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

research directorates. Biomass Characterization & Conversion Systems Kenney, Kevin L. Wright, Christopher T. Controls, Simulation & Human Factors Garcia, Humberto E. Rieger, Craig...

494

Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Position in Direct Numerical Simulations of Low-Dimensional Reacting Flows The Combustion EFRC seeks outstanding applicants for the position of post-doctoral research...

495

Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2012 153 Bifurcation analysis of scramjet unstart By I. Jang, J. W. Nichols AND P. Moin 1. Motivation and objectives Scramjet unstart occurs when of unstart is an important limiting factor on the performance of scramjet engines. In the Predictive Science

Wang, Wei

496

NIH REPORTING TO THE PUBLIC Research PortfolioResearch Portfolio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH REPORTING TO THE PUBLIC RePORT: Research PortfolioResearch Portfolio Online Reporting Tool Transparency Accountability Public Trust NIH Regional Seminar on Program Funding and Grants Administration NIH Reporting ­ 2009 1NIH Reporting ­ 2009 Las Vegas, NV ­ June 26, 2009 g g g #12;OPENING THE BLACK

Grishok, Alla

497

Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility: Weining Wang Office: Brauer rules and procedures (a) Accidents and spills for chemicals Not containing Nano-Materials Spills of non for chemicals Containing Nano-Materials In a fume hood small spills of nano-materials in a liquid may

Subramanian, Venkat

498

Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2001 3 Large-eddy simulation of gas turbine, and solver capable of performing large-eddy simulation in geometries as complex as the combustor of a gas-turbine' grids encountered in complex geometries such as the Pratt & Whitney combustor. · Turbulent validations

Apte, Sourabh V.

499

50 Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, .... · Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion had great potential ­ Uncontrolled Thermonuclear fusion demonstrated in 19521 50 Years of Fusion Research Dale Meade Fusion Innovation Research and Energy® Princeton, NJ SOFE 2009 June 1, 2009 San Diego, CA 92101 #12;2 #12;2 #12;3 Fusion Prior to Geneva 1958 · A period of rapid

500

"50" Years of Fusion Research Fusion Innovation Research and Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classified US Program on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Project Sherwood) carried out until 1958 when"50" Years of Fusion Research Dale Meade Fusion Innovation Research and Energy® Princeton, NJ Fi P th SFusion Fire Powers the Sun "W d t if k f i k ""We need to see if we can make fusion work