National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for lotus format energy

  1. Lotus Energy Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: EnergyLloyd,

  2. Lotus Systems GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds, UnitedLibertyLiteHuixinEnergyLorain-Medina RSystems

  3. U-198: IBM Lotus Expeditor Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Laclede GasEfficiency| DepartmentSecurity |Know |1, inUraniumDepartment

  4. V-118: IBM Lotus Domino Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs SearchWater-Savingof Energy 5: Apple iOS BugsPath8:

  5. T-681:IBM Lotus Symphony Multiple Unspecified Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multiple unspecified vulnerabilities in IBM Lotus Symphony 3 before FP3 have unknown impact and attack vectors, related to "critical security vulnerability issues."

  6. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working Group December 12, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis News Media...

  7. Sandia Energy - Particulate Formation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNew CREWOnline

  8. V-147: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute Java Applets V-147: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute Java Applets May 2, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis...

  9. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 28, 2013 -...

  10. Lotus Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgency (IRENA) JumpLiterature Review Home Qinsun'sHill

  11. LotusWorks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguidedand Long BeachLost

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Interim E-QIP Procedures | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Security Symposium OE Releases Second Issue of Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly (April 2012) V-147: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute Java Applets...

  13. Energy-Driven Pattern Formation Robert V. Kohn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy-Driven Pattern Formation Robert V. Kohn Grad Student and Postdoc Seminar April 22, 2011 Robert V. Kohn Energy-Driven Pattern Formation #12;Overview What is energy-driven pattern formation? Hard by singular perturbation Statics: minimum energy scaling laws Dynamics: patterns induced by steepest

  14. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

  15. Recombination energy in double white dwarf formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nandez, Jose L A; Lombardi, James C

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter we investigate the role of recombination energy during a common envelope event. We confirm that taking this energy into account helps to avoid the formation of the circumbinary envelope commonly found in previous studies. For the first time, we can model a complete common envelope event, with a clean compact double white dwarf binary system formed at the end. The resulting binary orbit is almost perfectly circular. In addition to considering recombination energy, we also show that between 1/4 and 1/2 of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejected material. We apply this new method to the case of the double-white dwarf system WD 1101+364, and we find that the progenitor system at the start of the common envelope event consisted of a $\\sim1.5M_\\odot$ red giant star in a $\\sim 30$ day orbit with a white dwarf companion.

  16. On the Endogenous Formation of Energy Efficient Cooperative Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown III, Donald R.

    On the Endogenous Formation of Energy Efficient Cooperative Wireless Networks Fatemeh Fazel and D nodes can be used as cooperative relays to reduce the transmission energy required to reliably deliver and cooperative pairings can be assigned to optimize the overall energy efficiency of the network. In networks

  17. Galaxy Formation and Evolution. II. Energy Balance, Star Formation and Feed-back

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulvio Buonomo; Giovanni Carraro; Cesare Chiosi; Cesario Lia

    1999-09-13

    In this paper we present a critical discussion of the algorithms commonly used in N-body simulations of Galaxy Formation to deal with the energy equation governing heating and cooling, to model star formation and the star formation rate, and to account for energy feed-back from stars. First, we propose our technique for solving the energy equation in presence of heating and cooling, which includes some difference with respect to the standard semi-implicit technique. Second, we examine the current criteria for the onset of the star formation activity. We suggest a new approach, in which star formaiton is let depend on the total mass density - baryonic (gas and stars) and dark matter - of the system and on the metal-dependent cooling efficiency. Third, we check and discuss the separate effects of energy (and mass) feed-back from several sources - namely supernovae, stellar winds from massive stars, and UV flux from the same objects. All the simulations are performed in the framework of the formation and evolution of a disk galaxy. We show that the inclusion of these physical phenomena has a signigicant impact on the evolution of the galaxy model.

  18. Structure formation in the presence of dark energy perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. R. Abramo; R. C. Batista; L. Liberato; R. Rosenfeld

    2007-11-28

    We study non-linear structure formation in the presence of dark energy. The influence of dark energy on the growth of large-scale cosmological structures is exerted both through its background effect on the expansion rate, and through its perturbations as well. In order to compute the rate of formation of massive objects we employ the Spherical Collapse formalism, which we generalize to include fluids with pressure. We show that the resulting non-linear evolution equations are identical to the ones obtained in the Pseudo-Newtonian approach to cosmological perturbations, in the regime where an equation of state serves to describe both the background pressure relative to density, and the pressure perturbations relative to the density perturbations as well. We then consider a wide range of constant and time-dependent equations of state (including phantom models) parametrized in a standard way, and study their impact on the non-linear growth of structure. The main effect is the formation of dark energy structure associated with the dark matter halo: non-phantom equations of state induce the formation of a dark energy halo, damping the growth of structures; phantom models, on the other hand, generate dark energy voids, enhancing structure growth. Finally, we employ the Press-Schechter formalism to compute how dark energy affects the number of massive objects as a function of redshift.

  19. Property:DataFormat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOfficesCollaborators JumpData Comparison

  20. Category:Formatting Templates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy014771°,NorthCLEANElkins, WVFOAFFlow

  1. Tribal Utility Formation Forum | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Laclede GasEfficiency| DepartmentSecurity |Know | Department of5 Pueblo

  2. Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faber, Felix; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an Ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix by using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a data set of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consi...

  3. Structure formation in inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, R.C. [Escola de Cincias e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Caixa Postal 1524, 59072-970, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil); Pace, F., E-mail: rbatista@ect.ufrn.br, E-mail: francesco.pace@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    We study the impact of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the linear and non-linear regimes of structure formation. In these models the energy density of dark energy is non-negligible at high redshifts and the fluctuations in the dark energy component can have the same order of magnitude of dark matter fluctuations. Since two basic approximations usually taken in the standard scenario of quintessence models, that both dark energy density during the matter dominated period and dark energy fluctuations on small scales are negligible, are not valid in such models, we first study approximate analytical solutions for dark matter and dark energy perturbations in the linear regime. This study is helpful to find consistent initial conditions for the system of equations and to analytically understand the effects of Early Dark Energy and its fluctuations, which are also verified numerically. In the linear regime we compute the matter growth and variation of the gravitational potential associated with the Integrated Sachs-Wolf effect, showing that these observables present important modifications due to Early Dark Energy fluctuations, though making them more similar to the ?CDM model. We also make use of the Spherical Collapse model to study the influence of Early Dark Energy fluctuations in the nonlinear regime of structure formation, especially on ?{sub c} parameter, and their contribution to the halo mass, which we show can be of the order of 10%. We finally compute how the number density of halos is modified in comparison to the ?CDM model and address the problem of how to correct the mass function in order to take into account the contribution of clustered dark energy. We conclude that the inhomogeneous Early Dark Energy models are more similar to the ?CDM model than its homogeneous counterparts.

  4. PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Lotus Domino/Notes System |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergy EEREPlateau Training System

  5. Structure formation in modified gravity models alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Koyama

    2006-01-10

    We study structure formation in phenomenological models in which the Friedmann equation receives a correction of the form $H^{\\alpha}/r_c^{2-\\alpha}$, which realize an accelerated expansion without dark energy. In order to address structure formation in these model, we construct simple covariant gravitational equations which give the modified Friedmann equation with $\\alpha=2/n$ where $n$ is an integer. For $n=2$, the underlying theory is known as a 5D braneworld model (the DGP model). Thus the models interpolate between the DGP model ($n=2, \\alpha=1$) and the LCDM model in general relativity ($n \\to \\infty, \\alpha \\to 0$). Using the covariant equations, cosmological perturbations are analyzed. It is shown that in order to satisfy the Bianchi identity at a perturbative level, we need to introduce a correction term $E_{\\mu \

  6. Structure formation in modified gravity models alternative to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyama, K

    2006-01-01

    We study structure formation in phenomenological models in which the Friedmann equation receives a correction of the form $H^{\\alpha}/r_c^{2-\\alpha}$, which realize an accelerated expansion without dark energy. In order to address structure formation in these model, we construct simple covariant gravitational equations which give the modified Friedmann equation with $\\alpha=2/n$ where $n$ is an integer. For $n=2$, the underlying theory is known as a 5D braneworld model (the DGP model). Thus the models interpolate between the DGP model ($n=2, \\alpha=1$) and the LCDM model in general relativity ($n \\to \\infty, \\alpha \\to 0$). Using the covariant equations, cosmological perturbations are analyzed. It is shown that in order to satisfy the Bianchi identity at a perturbative level, we need to introduce a correction term $E_{\\mu \

  7. Investigation of the formation and energy density of high-current pulsed electron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daichi, Yoshiaki; WANG, ZHIGANG; Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sano, Sadao

    2007-01-01

    of the formation and energy density of high-current pulsednot clear about the energy density of HCPEB under differentof HCPEB and its energy density. Then, effects of argon gas

  8. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Energy Optical Pulse Formation Yong-Won Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    - 1 - Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Energy Optical Pulse Formation Yong-Won Song Center-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Energy Optical Pulse Formation Authors: Yong-Won Song, Shinji Yamashita, Shigeo for Energy Materials Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791, Korea E-mail: ysong

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of an anti-H(O) lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus seeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Martil, Daiana Evelin [Programa de Ps-graduao em Biofsica Molecular, Departamento de Fsica, UNESP, So Jos do Rio Preto, SP 15054-000 (Brazil); Cavada, Benildo Sousa [BioMol-Lab UFC, Caixa Postal 6043, 60.455-970, Fortaleza-CE (Brazil); Azevedo, Walter Filgueira Jr de, E-mail: walter.junior@pucrs.br [Faculdade de Biocincias-PUCRS, Av. Ipiranga 6681, Porto Alegre-RS, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Programa de Ps-graduao em Biofsica Molecular, Departamento de Fsica, UNESP, So Jos do Rio Preto, SP 15054-000 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The seed lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA) has been crystallized. The best crystals grew over several days and were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method at a constant temperature of 293 K. The seed lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA) has been crystallized. The best crystals grew over several days and were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method at a constant temperature of 293 K. A complete structural data set was collected at 2.00 resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. LTA crystals were found to be monoclinic, belonging to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.89, b = 65.83, c = 102.53 , ? = ? = 90, ? = 92. Molecular replacement yielded a solution with a correlation coefficient and R factor of 34.4 and 51.6%, respectively. Preliminary analysis of the molecular-replacement solution indicates a new quaternary association in the LTA structure. Crystallographic refinement is under way.

  10. Gibbs Free Energy of Formation of Zircon from Measurement of Solubility in H2O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    Gibbs Free Energy of Formation of Zircon from Measurement of Solubility in H2O Robert C. Newton, Illinois 60439 We exploited the large difference in the solubility of SiO2 and ZrO2 in H2O to constrain. However, its refractory character hinders precise de- termination of its Gibbs energy of formation,1,2 DG

  11. Application-specific network management for energy-aware streaming of popular multimedia formats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    Application-specific network management for energy-aware streaming of popular multimedia formats requirements, they do not offer any energy savings for multimedia streams over 56 kbps. The potential energy, an application-specific server side traffic shaping mech- anism can offer good energy saving for all the stream

  12. Category:Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALFacebook iconFormation

  13. A Coalition Formation Game for Energy-efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    A Coalition Formation Game for Energy-efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio). In this paper, we study energy-efficient cooperative multi-channel spectrum sensing in CRNs. We first propose a cooperative spectrum sensing and accessing (CSSA) scheme for all the secondary users (SUs). The SUs

  14. Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    term, i.e. the contribution to the total energy from the valence electron density. Consequently we needRelation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne Wallenius a,b,*, Par Olsson b , Christina Lagerstedt a a Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, KTH

  15. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Daniel J B

    2015-01-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis (Hayward & Smith 2015) by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultra-violet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealised conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line-of-sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star forma...

  16. Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGeminiEnergyHawaii | Open EnergyStudy of the

  17. Do high energy astrophysical neutrinos trace star formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emig, Kimberly; Windhorst, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory has provided the first map of the high energy (~ 0.01 -- 1 PeV) sky in neutrinos. Since neutrinos propagate undeflected, their arrival direction is an important identifier for sources of high energy particle acceleration. Reconstructed arrival directions are consistent with an extragalactic origin, with possibly a galactic component, of the neutrino flux. We present a statistical analysis of positional coincidences of the IceCube neutrinos with known astrophysical objects from several catalogs. For the brightest gamma-ray emitting blazars and for Seyfert galaxies, the number of coincidences is consistent with the random, or "null", distribution. Instead, when considering starburst galaxies with the highest flux in gamma-rays and infrared radiation, up to n = 8 coincidences are found, representing an excess over the ~4 predicted for the null distribution. The probability that this excess is realized in the null case, the p-value, is p = 0.042. This value falls to p = 0.003 for ...

  18. Decentralised stable coalition formation among energy consumers in the smart grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    or micro-storage the individual user consumption. Alter- natively, in this demonstration we propose individual con- sumer demand by automatically controlling home domestic or micro-storage devices [3, 4Decentralised stable coalition formation among energy consumers in the smart grid (Demonstration

  19. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary and Crystalline Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Mike S.; Detwiler, Russell L.; Lao, Kang; Serajian, Vahid; Elkhoury, Jean; Diessl, Julia; White, Nicky

    2012-12-13

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. The primary objectives of this DOE research effort are to develop and document optimum design configurations and operating practices to produce geothermal power from hot permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations using advanced horizontal well recirculation systems. During Phase I of this research project Terralog Technologies USA and The University of California, Irvine (UCI), have completed preliminary investigations and documentation of advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. We have also identified significant geologic resources appropriate for application of such technology. The main challenge for such recirculation systems is to optimize both the design configuration and the operating practices for cost-effective geothermal energy recovery. These will be strongly influenced by sedimentary formation properties, including thickness and dip, temperature, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, permeability, and porosity; and by working fluid properties.

  20. Influence of Cohesive Energy and Chain Stiffness on Polymer Glass Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Sheng Xu; Karl F. Freed

    2014-09-24

    The generalized entropy theory is applied to assess the joint influence of the microscopic cohesive energy and chain stiffness on glass formation in polymer melts using a minimal model containing a single bending energy and a single (monomer averaged) nearest neighbor van der Waals energy. The analysis focuses on the combined impact of the microscopic cohesive energy and chain stiffness on the magnitudes of the isobaric fragility parameter $m_P$ and the glass transition temperature $T_g$. The computations imply that polymers with rigid structures and weak nearest neighbor interactions are the most fragile, while $T_g$ becomes larger when the chains are stiffer and/or nearest neighbor interactions are stronger. Two simple fitting formulas summarize the computations describing the dependence of $m_P$ and $T_g$ on the microscopic cohesive and bending energies. The consideration of the combined influence of the microscopic cohesive and bending energies leads to the identification of some important design concepts, such as iso-fragility and iso-$T_g$ lines, where, for instance, iso-fragility lines are contours with constant $m_P$ but variable $T_g$. Several thermodynamic properties are found to remain invariant along the iso-fragility lines, while no special characteristics are detected along the iso-$T_g$ lines. Our analysis supports the widely held view that fragility provides more fundamental insight for the description of glass formation than $T_g$.

  1. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jrg; Anglil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 ? 8) ?10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Anglil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln?J{sup ?}/? is scaled by ln?S/?, where the supersaturation ratio is S, ? is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ?} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  2. Formation of hypernuclei in high energy reactions within a covariant transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Gaitanos; H. Lenske; U. Mosel

    2009-04-14

    We investigate the formation of fragments with strangeness degrees of freedom in proton- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at high relativistic energies. The model used is a combination of a dynamical transport model and a statistical approach of fragment formation. We discuss in detail the applicability and limitations of such a hybrid model by comparing data on spectator fragmentation at relativistic $SIS/GSI$-energies. The theoretical results are analyzed in terms of spectator fragmentation with strangeness degrees of freedom such as the production of single-$\\Lambda-{}^{3,4,5}He$ hypernuclei. We provide theoretical estimates on the spectra and on inclusive cross sections of light hypernuclei, which could be helpful for future experiments on hypernuclear physics at the new GSI- and J-PARC-facilities.

  3. Alternating minimal energy approach to ODEs and conservation laws in tensor product formats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolgov, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    We propose an algorithm for solution of high-dimensional evolutionary equations (ODEs and discretized time-dependent PDEs) in tensor product formats. The solution must admit an approximation in a low-rank separation of variables framework, and the right-hand side of the ODE (for example, a matrix) must be computable in the same low-rank format at a given time point. The time derivative is discretized via the Chebyshev spectral scheme, and the solution is sought simultaneously for all time points from the global space-time linear system. To compute the solution adaptively in the tensor format, we employ the Alternating Minimal Energy algorithm, the DMRG-flavored alternating iterative technique. Besides, we address the problem of maintaining system invariants inside the approximate tensor product scheme. We show how the conservation of a linear function, defined by a vector given in the low-rank format, or the second norm of the solution may be accurately and elegantly incorporated into the tensor product metho...

  4. Possibility of DCC formation in pp collisions at LHC energy via reaction-diffusion equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partha Bagchi; Arpan Das; Srikumar Sengupta; Ajit M. Srivastava

    2015-08-31

    There are indications of formation of a thermalized medium in high multiplicity pp collisions at LHC energy. It is possible that such a medium may reach high enough energy density/temperature so that a transient stage of quark-gluon plasma, where chiral symmetry is restored, may be achieved. Due to rapid 3-dimensional expansion, the system will quickly cool undergoing spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking transition. We study the dynamics of chiral field, after the symmetry breaking transition, for such an event using reaction-diffusion equation approach which we have recently applied for studying QCD transitions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We show that the interior of such a rapidly expanding system is likely to lead to the formation of a single large domain of disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) which has been a subject of intensive search in earlier experiments. We argue that large multiplicity pp collisions naturally give rise to required boundary conditions for the existence of slowly propagating front solutions of reaction-diffusion equation with resulting dynamics of chiral field leading to the formation of a large DCC domain.

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by XALT Energy LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about development of large format...

  6. Using geothermal energy to heat a portion of a formation for an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pieterson, Roelof; Boyles, Joseph Michael; Diebold, Peter Ulrich

    2010-06-08

    Methods of using geothermal energy to treat subsurface formations are described herein. Methods for using geothermal energy to treat a subsurface treatment area containing or proximate to hydrocarbons may include producing geothermally heated fluid from at least one subsurface region. Heat from at least a portion of the geothermally heated fluid may be transferred to the subsurface treatment area to heat the subsurface treatment area. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

    2012-09-30

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

  8. The imprint of rapid star formation quenching on the spectral energy distributions of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesla, L; Elbaz, D; Boissier, S; Buat, V; Charmandaris, V; Schreiber, C; Bthermin, M; Baes, M; Boquien, M; De Looze, I; Fernndez-Ontiveros, J A; Pappalardo, C; Spinoglio, L; Viaene, S

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] In high density environment, the gas content of galaxies is stripped, leading to a rapid quenching of their star formation activity. This dramatic environmental effect is generally not taken into account in the SFHs usually assumed to perform spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of these galaxies, yielding to a poor fit of their stellar emission and, consequently, a biased estimate of the SFR. We aim at reproducing the SFH of galaxies that underwent a rapid star formation quenching using a truncated delayed SFH that we implemented in the SED fitting code CIGALE. We show that the ratio between the instantaneous SFR and the SFR just before the quenching ($r_{SFR}$) is well constrained as long as rest frame UV data are available. This SED modelling is applied to the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS) containing isolated galaxies and sources falling in the dense environment of the Virgo cluster. The latter are HI-deficient due to ram pressure stripping. We show that the truncated delayed SFH success...

  9. Basic criteria for formation of growth twins in high stacking fault energy metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K. Y.; Zhang, X. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bufford, D.; Chen, Y.; Liu, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Wang, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2013-10-28

    Nanotwinned metals received significant interest lately as twin boundaries may enable simultaneous enhancement of strength, ductility, thermal stability, and radiation tolerance. However, nanotwins have been the privilege of metals with low-to-intermediate stacking fault energy (SFE). Recent scattered studies show that nanotwins could be introduced into high SFE metals, such as Al. In this paper, we examine several sputter-deposited, (111) textured Ag/Al, Cu/Ni, and Cu/Fe multilayers, wherein growth twins were observed in Al, Ni, and face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe. The comparisons lead to two important design criteria that dictate the introduction of growth twins in high SFE metals. The validity of these criteria was then examined in Ag/Ni multilayers. Furthermore, another twin formation mechanism in high SFE metals was discovered in Ag/Ni system.

  10. Inter-Machine Comparison of the Termination Phase and Energy Conversion in Tokamak Disruptions with Runaway Current Plateau Formation and Implications for ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inter-Machine Comparison of the Termination Phase and Energy Conversion in Tokamak Disruptions with Runaway Current Plateau Formation and Implications for ITER

  11. Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.

    2013-04-29

    Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

  12. Magnetic Energy Flows during the Current Quench and Termination of Disruptions with Runaway Current Plateau Formation in JET and Implications for ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetic Energy Flows during the Current Quench and Termination of Disruptions with Runaway Current Plateau Formation in JET and Implications for ITER

  13. Scale-dependent Energy Transfer Rate as a Tracer for Star Formation in Cosmological N-Body Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hoeft; J. P. Muecket; P. Heide

    2002-01-14

    We investigate the energy release due to the large-scale structure formation and the subsequent transfer of energy from larger to smaller scales. We calculate the power spectra for the large-scale velocity field and show that the coupling of modes results in a transfer of power predominately from larger to smaller scales. We use the concept of cumulative energy for calculating which energy amount is deposited into the small scales during the cosmological structure evolution. To estimate the contribution due to the gravitational interaction only we perform our investigations by means of dark matter simulations. The global mean of the energy transfer increases with redshift $\\sim (z+1)^{3}$; this can be traced back to the similar evolution of the merging rates of dark matter halos. The global mean energy transfer can be decomposed into its local contributions, which allows to determine the energy injection per mass into a local volume. The obtained energy injection rates are at least comparable with other energy sources driving the interstellar turbulence as, e.g. by the supernova kinetic feedback. On that basis we make the crude assumption that processes causing this energy transfer from large to small scales, e.g. the merging of halos, may contribute substantially to drive the ISM turbulence which may eventually result in star formation on much smaller scales. We propose that the ratio of the local energy injection rate to the energy already stored within small-scale motions is a rough measure for the probability of the local star formation efficiency applicable within cosmological large-scale n-body simulations.

  14. Investigation of the mechanism of impurity assisted nanoripple formation on Si induced by low energy ion beam erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyiloth Vayalil, Sarathlal; Gupta, Ajay; Roth, Stephan V.; Ganesan, V.

    2015-01-14

    A detailed mechanism of the nanoripple pattern formation on Si substrates generated by the simultaneous incorporation of pure Fe impurities at low energy (1?keV) ion beam erosion has been studied. To understand and clarify the mechanism of the pattern formation, a comparative analysis of the samples prepared for various ion fluence values using two complimentary methods for nanostructure analysis, atomic force microscopy, and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering has been done. We observed that phase separation of the metal silicide formed during the erosion does not precede the ripple formation. It rather concurrently develops along with the ripple structure. Our work is able to differentiate among various models existing in the literature and provides an insight into the mechanism of pattern formation under ion beam erosion with impurity incorporation.

  15. Geopressured Geothermal Resource and Recoverable Energy Estimate for the Wilcox and Frio Formations, Texas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2011-10-01

    An estimate of the total and recoverable geopressured geothermal resource of the fairways in the Wilcox and Frio formations is made using the current data available. The flow rate of water and methane for wells located in the geopressured geothermal fairways is simulated over a 20-year period utilizing the TOUGH2 Reservoir Simulator and research data. The model incorporates relative permeability, capillary pressure, rock compressibility, and leakage from the bounding shale layers. The simulations show that permeability, porosity, pressure, sandstone thickness, well spacing, and gas saturation in the sandstone have a significant impact on the percent of energy recovered. The results also predict lower average well production flow rates and a significantly higher production of natural gas relative to water than in previous studies done from 1975 to 1980. Previous studies underestimate the amount of methane produced with hot brine. Based on the work completed in this study, multiphase flow processes and reservoir boundary conditions greatly influence the total quantity of the fluid produced as well as the ratio of gas and water in the produced fluid.

  16. Formation of Superdense Hadronic Matter in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba0-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01

    We present the detail of a newly developed relativistic transport model (ART 1.0) for high energy heavy-ion collisions. Using this model, we first study the general collision dynamics between heavy ions at the AGS energies. ...

  17. Gibbs and Helmholtz energies of formation of sI clathrate hydrates from CO$_2$, CH$_4$ and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. S. Glavatskiy; T. J. H. Vlugt; S. Kjelstrup

    2013-07-26

    We determine thermodynamic stability conditions in terms of Helmholtz and Gibbs energies for sI clathrate hydrates with CH$_4$ and CO$_2$ at 278 K. Helmholtz energies are relevant for processing from porous rocks (constant volume), while Gibbs energies are relevant for processing from layers on the ocean floor (constant pressure). We define three steps leading to hydrate formation, and find Helmholtz energy differences from molecular simulations for two of them using grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations at constant temperature and volume; while the third step was calculated from literature data. The Gibbs energy change for the same steps are also determined. From the variations in the total Helmholtz and Gibbs energies we suggest thermodynamic paths for exchange of CH$_4$ by CO$_2$ in the isothermal hydrate, for constant volume or pressure, respectively. We show how these paths for the mixed hydrate can be understood from single-component occupancy isotherms, where CO$_2$, but not CH$_4$, can distinguish between large and small cages. The strong preference for CH$_4$ for a range of compositions can be explained by these.

  18. Understanding the Fundamental Properties of Dark Matter and Dark Energy in Structure Formation and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Richard S.

    2012-09-30

    The program was concerned with developing and verifying the validity of observational methods for constraining the properties of dark matter and dark energy in the Universe.

  19. Formation, disruption and energy output of Population III X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Taeho; Perna, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    The first astrophysical objects shaped the cosmic environment by reionizing and heating the intergalactic medium (IGM). In particular, X-rays are very efficient at heating the IGM before it became completely ionized, an effect that can be measured through the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen. High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), known to be prolific X-ray sources in star-forming galaxies at lower redshifts, are prime candidates for driving the thermal evolution of the IGM at redshifts $z > 20$. Despite their importance, the formation efficiency of HMXBs from the first stellar populations is not well understood---as such, their collective X-ray emission and the subsequent imprint on the 21 cm signature are usually evaluated using free parameters. Using $N$-body simulations, we estimate the rate of HMXB formation via mutual gravitational interactions of nascent, small groups of the first stars (Pop III stars). We run two sets of calculations: one in which stars form in small groups of five in nearly Keplerian initia...

  20. Native File Formats and PDFs on Websites Outside of the Energy.gov Drupal Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Websites and applications outside the Energy.gov Drupal environment should follow these requirements when linking to non-HTML resources or native files like PDFs or Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files.

  1. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32054, Taiwan (China); Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Muoz Caro, G. M.; Jimnez-Escobar, A., E-mail: aciaravella@astropa.unipa.it [Centro de Astrobiologa (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, Torrejn de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  2. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy 1Energy 1ofExceeding 500Wh/L |

  3. The role of couplings in nuclear rainbow formation at energies far above the barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, D.; Linares, R.; and others

    2012-10-20

    A study of the {sup 16}O+{sup 28}Si elastic and inelastic scattering is presented in the framework of Coupled Channel theory. The Sao Paulo Potential is used in the angular distribution calculations and compared with the existing data at 75 MeV bombarding energy. A nuclear rainbow pattern is predicted and becomes more clear above 100 MeV.

  4. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

  5. File:Minorpermforms format 8-30-04.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdfgasp 03.pdf JumpGerak.pdfEnergyMFSAMinorpermforms

  6. Age of the Coso Formation Inyo County California | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan1986) |Water andAgar, SouthAgawam,of

  7. Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

    2007-08-20

    We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

  8. On the formation of energy spectra of synchrotron X-rays and inverse Compton gamma-rays in binary systems with luminous optical stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Khangulyan; F. Aharonian

    2005-03-23

    In this paper we study formation broad band energy spectra of electrons due to synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton (IC) scattering. The effect of transition of IC cooling from the Thomson regime to the Klein-Nishina regime can be very significant in the environments where radiation density dominates over the magnetic field density. We discuss impact of this effect on the formation of synchrotron and IC radiation components of TeV electrons in binary systems with very luminous optical stars. Such a scenario can be realized, for example, at the wind termination shock of the pulsar in PSR B1259-63/SS2883 or in the jets of microquasars. The calculations are based on the solution of Boltzmann equation using precise differential Compton cross-section.

  9. NEWS & VIEWS PATTERN FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    no apologies for investing energy into problems of specific application to a particular process in nature, and having the curiosity to want to find out how they work. The general public, and especially children flow/surface growth system in a rarely explored region of parameter space for such pattern formation

  10. A preliminary report on the photoionization efficiency spectrum, ionization energy and heat of formation of Br{sub 2}O; and the appearance energy of BrO{sup +} (Br{sub 2}O)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorn, R.P. Jr.; Monks, P.S.; Stief, L.J.; Kuo, S.C.; Zhang, Z.; Klemm, R.B.

    1995-08-01

    We report experimental results for the photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectrum of Br{sub 2}O along with the ionization energy (derived form the ionization threshold) and the appearance energy (AE) of BrO{sup +} (Br{sub 2}O). A value for the heat of formation of Br{sub 2}O is derived form the AE result. Experiments were performed by employing a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) apparatus coupled to beamline U-11 at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  11. Formation, characterization and dynamics of onion like carbon structures from nanodiamonds using reactive force-fields for electrical energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kent, Paul R; Mochalin, Vadym N

    2011-01-01

    We simulate the experimentally observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion-like carbon nanostructures, also called carbon onions, at different temperatures, using reactive force fields. The simulations include long-range Coulomb and van der Waals interactions. Our results suggest that long-range interactions play a crucial role in the phase-stability and the graphitization process. Graphitization is both enthalpically and entropically driven and can hence be controlled with temperature. The outer layers of the nanodiamond have a lower kinetic barrier toward graphitization irrespective of the size of the nanodiamond and graphitize within a few-hundred picoseconds, with a large volume increase. The inner core of the nanodiamonds displays a large size-dependent kinetic barrier, and graphitizes much more slowly with abrupt jumps in the internal energy. It eventually graphitizes by releasing pressure and expands once the outer shells have graphitized. The degree of transformation at a particular temperature is thereby determined by a delicate balance between the thermal energy, long-range interactions, and the entropic/enthalpic free energy gained by graphitization. Upon full graphitization, a multi-shell carbon nanostructure appears, with a shell-shell spacing of about {approx}3.4 {angstrom} for all sizes. The shells are highly defective with predominantly five- and seven-membered rings to curve space. Larger nanodiamonds with a diameter of 4 nm can graphitize into spiral structures with a large ({approx}29-atom carbon ring) pore opening on the outermost shell. Such a large one-way channel is most attractive for a controlled insertion of molecules/ions such as Li ions, water, or ionic liquids, for increased electrochemical capacitor or battery electrode applications.

  12. Formation, characterization, and dynamics of onion-like carbon structures for electrical energy storage from nanodiamonds using reactive force fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, P.; Kent, P. R. C.; Mochalin, V.

    2011-10-01

    We simulate the experimentally observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion-like carbonnanostructures, also called carbon onions, at different temperatures, using reactive force fields. The simulations include long-range Coulomb and van der Waals interactions. Our results suggest that long-range interactions play a crucial role in the phase-stability and the graphitization process. Graphitization is both enthalpically and entropically driven and can hence be controlled with temperature. The outer layers of the nanodiamond have a lower kinetic barrier toward graphitization irrespective of the size of the nanodiamond and graphitize within a few-hundred picoseconds, with a large volume increase. The inner core of the nanodiamonds displays a large size-dependent kinetic barrier, and graphitizes much more slowly with abrupt jumps in the internal energy. It eventually graphitizes by releasing pressure and expands once the outer shells have graphitized. The degree of transformation at a particular temperature is thereby determined by a delicate balance between the thermal energy, long-range interactions, and the entropic/enthalpic free energy gained by graphitization. Upon full graphitization, a multi-shell carbonnanostructure appears, with a shell-shell spacing of about ~3.4 for all sizes. The shells are highly defective with predominantly five- and seven-membered rings to curve space. Larger nanodiamonds with a diameter of 4 nm can graphitize into spiral structures with a large (~29-atom carbon ring) pore opening on the outermost shell. Such a large one-way channel is most attractive for a controlled insertion of molecules/ions such as Li ions, water, or ionic liquids, for increased electrochemical capacitor or battery electrode applications.

  13. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ?0.5moreeV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.less

  14. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ?0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.

  15. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  16. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1991-08-27

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation. 9 figures.

  17. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1991-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation.

  18. Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Eshel Ben

    Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks in water and aqueous solutions We present the idea that the anomalous effects of rf-treatments of water and aqueous solution resulted from-bubble exchange interactions. These exchange interactions are mediated by the ordering of the water molecules

  19. New Particle Formation Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, JN; McMurry, PH

    2015-01-01

    The scientific foci of the New Particle Formation Study were the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols and the impacts of newly formed particles on cloud processes. Specifically, we planned to: (1) to identify the species and mechanisms responsible for the initial steps of new particle formation, i.e., the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters; (2) investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; (3) investigate the contribution of other surface area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth; (4) create a comprehensive dataset related to new particle formation and growth that can be used as input for our own thermodynamic models as well as the modeling efforts by our Department of Energy (DOE) Aerosol Life Cycle working group collaborators; (5) characterize the increase of the number and activity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) due to particle formation and growth; (6) determine the regional extent of new particle formation to address the role that atmospheric transport plays in determining the impacts, if any, of new particle formation on cloud number and properties.

  20. S-OO bond dissociation energies and enthalpies of formation of the thiomethyl peroxyl radicals CH{sub 3}S(O){sub n}OO (n=0,1,2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salta, Zoi; Kosmas, Agnie Mylona; Lesar, Antonija

    2014-10-06

    Optimized geometries, S-OO bond dissociation energies and enthalpies of formation for a series of thiomethyl peroxyl radicals are investigated using high level ab initio and density functional theory methods. The results show that the S-OO bond dissociation energy is largest in the methylsulfonyl peroxyl radical, CH{sub 3}S(O){sub 2}OO, which contains two sulfonic type oxygen atoms followed by the methylthiyl peroxyl radical, CH{sub 3}SOO. The methylsulfinyl peroxyl radical, CH{sub 3}S(O)OO, which contains only one sulfonic type oxygen shows the least stability with regard to dissociation to CH{sub 3}S(O)+O{sub 2}. This stabilization trend is nicely reflected in the variations of the S-OO bond distance which is found to be shortest in CH{sub 3}S(O){sub 2}OO and longest in CH{sub 3}S(O)OO.

  1. Accuracy of density functional theory in predicting formation energies of ternary oxides from binary oxides and its implication on phase stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hautier, Geoffroy

    The evaluation of reaction energies between solids using density functional theory (DFT) is of practical importance in many technological fields and paramount in the study of the phase stability of known and predicted ...

  2. Carbon nanotube formation by laser direct writing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Su, H.-C.; Tsai, C.-M.; Liu, K.-L.; Chen, G.-D.; Huang, R.-H.; Yew, T.-R.

    2008-07-14

    This letter presents carbon nanotube (CNT) formation by laser direct writing using 248 nm KrF excimer pulsed laser in air at room temperature, which was applied to irradiate amorphous carbon (a-C) assisted by Ni catalysts underneath for the transformation of carbon species into CNTs. The CNTs were synthesized under appropriate combination of laser energy density and a-C thickness. The growth mechanism and key parameters to determine the success of CNT formation were also discussed. The demonstration of the CNT growth by laser direct writing in air at room temperature opens an opportunity of in-position CNT formation at low temperatures.

  3. Planet formation and migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John C B Papaloizou; Caroline Terquem

    2005-11-28

    We review the observations of extrasolar planets, ongoing developments in theories of planet formation, orbital migration, and the evolution of multiplanet systems.

  4. Shocks, Star Formation, and the JWST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusdorf, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is constantly evolving due to unremitting injection of energy in various forms. Energetic radiation transfers energy to the ISM: from the UV photons, emitted by the massive stars, to X- and $\\gamma$-ray ones. Cosmic rays are another source of energy. Finally, mechanical energy is injected through shocks or turbulence. Shocks are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of galaxies. They are associated to star formation (through jets and bipolar outflows), life (via stellar winds), and death (in AGB stellar winds or supernovae explosion). The dynamical processes leading to the formation of molecular clouds also generate shocks where flows of interstellar matter collide. Because of their ubiquity, the study of interstellar shocks is also a useful probe to the other mechanisms of energy injection in the ISM. This study must be conducted in order to understand the evolution of the ISM as a whole, and to address various questions: what is the peculiar chemistry associated to shocks, and ...

  5. Notes on Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the field of star formation at a level suitable for graduate students or advanced undergraduates in astronomy or physics. The structure of the book is as follows. The first two chapters begin with a discussion of observational techniques, and the basic phenomenology they reveal. The goal is to familiarize students with the basic techniques that will be used throughout, and to provide a common vocabulary for the rest of the book. The next five chapters provide a similar review of the basic physical processes that are important for star formation. Again, the goal is to provide a basis for what follows. The remaining chapters discuss star formation over a variety of scales, starting with the galactic scale and working down to the scales of individual stars and their disks. The book concludes with a brief discussion of the clearing of disks and the transition to planet formation. The book includes five problem sets, complete with solutions.

  6. Word formation in Thadou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haokip, Pauthang

    2014-01-01

    As stated above, compound words of Thadou are mostlyNote that the resulting new words are always nouns. a. b. c.bad (negative) Haokip: Word formation in Thadou a. -sa ?

  7. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  9. The initial conditions of isolated star formation. V: ISOPHOT imaging and the temperature and energy balance of pre-stellar cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Ward-Thompson; P. Andre; J. M. Kirk

    2001-09-11

    ISO data taken with the long-wavelength imaging photo-polarimeter ISOPHOT are presented of 18 pre-stellar cores at three far-infrared wavelengths - 90, 170 and 200 microns. Most of the cores are detected clearly at 170 and 200 but only one is detected strongly at 90 microns, indicating that mostly they are very cold, with typical temperatures of only 10-20K. Colour temperature images are constructed for each of the cores. Most of the cores are seen to be either isothermal, or to have associated temperature gradients from the core centres to their edges, with all except one being cooler at the centre. We compare the data with previous ISOCAM absorption data and calculate the energy balance for those cores in common between the two samples. We find that the energy radiated by each core in the far-IR is similar to that absorbed at shorter wavelengths. Hence there is no evidence for a central heating source in any of the cores - even those for which previous evidence for core contraction exists. This is all consistent with external heating of the cores by the local interstellar radiation field, confirming their pre-stellar nature.

  10. A Recipe for Galaxy Formation Shaun Cole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfonso Aragon-Salamanca; Carlos S. Frenk; Julio F. Navarro; Stephen E. Zepf

    1994-02-01

    We present a detailed prescription for how galaxy formation can be modelled in hierarchical theories of structure formation. Our model incorporates the formation and merging of dark matter halos, the shock heating and radiative cooling of baryonic gas gravitationally confined in these halos, the formation of stars regulated by the energy released by evolving stars and supernovae, the merging of galaxies within dark matter halos, and the spectral evolution of the stellar populations that are formed. The procedure that we describe is very flexible and can be applied to any hierarchical clustering theory. We explore the effects of varying the stellar initial mass function, star formation rates and galaxy merging. The results we compare with an extensive range of observational data, including the B and K galaxy luminosity functions, galaxy colours, the Tully-Fisher relation and galaxy number counts.These data strongly constrain the models and enable the relative importance of each of the physical process to be assessed. We present a broadly successful model defined by a plausible choice of parameters. This fiducial model produces a much more acceptable luminosity function than most previous studies. This is achieved through a modest rate of galaxy mergers and strong suppression of star formation in halos of low circular velocity. However, it fails to produce galaxies as red as many observed ellipticals and, compared with the observed Tully-Fisher relation, the model galaxies have circular velocities which are too large. ** uuencoded compressed postscript file containing all text and figures.**

  11. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth J. Barton; Jacob A. Arnold; Andrew R. Zentner; James S. Bullock; Risa H. Wechsler

    2007-08-21

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to ``field'' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than ``field'' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N=2 halos) and a control sample of isolated galaxies (N=1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M_Bj ~ 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context. (Abridged.)

  12. DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Energetics of Swimming and Flying in Formation Formation movement during swimming and flying has been hypothesized to reduce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Frank

    been hypothesized to reduce an individual animal's energy expenditure. Individuals in a formation by vorticity shed from leading animals can be used to lowerthe drag and energy expenditure ontrailing energy savings in fish schools is a diamond shape. Vorticity shed from rigid bodies, such as cars

  14. General relativity and cosmic structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamek, Julian; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations are a versatile tool providing insight into the complicated process of structure formation in cosmology. This process is mainly governed by gravity, which is the dominant force on large scales. To date, a century after the formulation of general relativity, numerical codes for structure formation still employ Newton's law of gravitation. This approximation relies on the two assumptions that gravitational fields are weak and that they are only sourced by non-relativistic matter. While the former appears well justified on cosmological scales, the latter imposes restrictions on the nature of the "dark" components of the Universe (dark matter and dark energy) which are, however, poorly understood. Here we present the first simulations of cosmic structure formation using equations consistently derived from general relativity. We study in detail the small relativistic effects for a standard {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology which cannot be obtained within a purely Newtonian framework. Our particle-mesh N...

  15. Emptiness Formation Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Crawford; Stephen Ng; Shannon Starr

    2014-12-30

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-$1/2$ Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a $d$-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order $\\exp(-c L^{d+1})$ where $L$ is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the $d=1$ case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case $d \\geq 2$ are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  16. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    downloadsmonitoring-and-mentoring Download Great Energy Debate Students evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the major energy sources in an innovative debate format....

  18. A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

    2006-01-01

    cushion gas for natural gas storage. Energy & Fuels, 2003; [demonstrate CO 2 Storage with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR).formations and storage/enhanced recovery projects in gas

  19. Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,PevafersaMapFile JumpTesting Techniques Jump

  20. Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTLTechnology Srl Jump to:source History

  1. Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavy ElectricalsFTLTechnology Srl Jump to:source HistoryFacebook icon

  2. Petroleum Engineering 321 Formation Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements to estimate hydrocarbon reserves and petrophysical properties of the formation such as porosity Description: Introduction to well-log interpretation for formation evaluation of hydrocarbon, net pay thickness, water/hydrocarbon saturation, permeability, and saturation-dependent capillary

  3. Naked Singularity formation in scalar field collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rituparno Goswami; Pankaj S Joshi

    2004-10-28

    We construct here a class of collapsing scalar field models with a non-zero potential, which result in a naked singularity as collapse end state. The weak energy condition is satisfied by the collapsing configuration. It is shown that physically it is the rate of collapse that governs either the black hole or naked singularity formation as the final state for the dynamical evolution. It is seen that the cosmic censorship is violated in dynamical scalar field collapse.

  4. NETL Report format template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantification of Risk Profiles for Atmosphere and Groundwater 25 January 2013 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-003-2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of...

  5. Quantum origin of an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Quantum origin of an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation D. Babikov *, B.K. Kendrick, R mechanical calculations of the J 0 energies and lifetimes of the metastable states of ozone on a new effect in the reaction that forms ozone because of their role in the energy transfer mechanism, in which

  6. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, 1-1, Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Nozawa, Takaya, E-mail: takami@post.kek.jp, E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp, E-mail: takaya.nozawa@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  7. General relativity and cosmic structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Adamek; David Daverio; Ruth Durrer; Martin Kunz

    2015-09-05

    Numerical simulations are a versatile tool providing insight into the complicated process of structure formation in cosmology. This process is mainly governed by gravity, which is the dominant force on large scales. To date, a century after the formulation of general relativity, numerical codes for structure formation still employ Newton's law of gravitation. This approximation relies on the two assumptions that gravitational fields are weak and that they are only sourced by non-relativistic matter. While the former appears well justified on cosmological scales, the latter imposes restrictions on the nature of the "dark" components of the Universe (dark matter and dark energy) which are, however, poorly understood. Here we present the first simulations of cosmic structure formation using equations consistently derived from general relativity. We study in detail the small relativistic effects for a standard {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology which cannot be obtained within a purely Newtonian framework. Our particle-mesh N-body code computes all six degrees of freedom of the metric and consistently solves the geodesic equation for particles, taking into account the relativistic potentials and the frame-dragging force. This conceptually clean approach is very general and can be applied to various settings where the Newtonian approximation fails or becomes inaccurate, ranging from simulations of models with dynamical dark energy or warm/hot dark matter to core collapse supernova explosions.

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    i=2 Wisconsin Focus on Energy Description: Target Group:Format: Contact: URL: Energy advisors offer free servicesidentify and evaluate energy-saving opportunities, recommend

  9. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  10. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  11. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  12. RAPID DUST FORMATION IN NOVAE: THE SPEED CLASSFORMATION TIMESCALE CORRELATION EXPLAINED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, S. C.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Evans, A.; Zubko, V.; Shafter, A. W.

    2013-11-10

    Observations show that the time of onset of dust formation in classical novae depends strongly on their speed class, with dust typically taking longer to form in slower novae. Using empirical relationships between speed class, luminosity and ejection velocity, it can be shown that dust formation timescale is expected to be essentially independent of speed class. However, following a nova outburst the spectrum of the central hot source evolves, with an increasing proportion of the radiation being emitted short-ward of the Lyman limit. The rate at which the spectrum evolves also depends on the speed class. We have therefore refined the simple model by assuming photons at energies higher than the Lyman limit are absorbed by neutral hydrogen gas internal to the dust formation sites, therefore preventing these photons reaching the nucleation sites. With this refinement the dust formation timescale is theoretically dependent on speed class and the results of our theoretical modification agree well with the observational data. We consider two types of carbon-based dust, graphite and amorphous carbon, with both types producing similar relationships. Our results can be used to predict when dust will form in a nova of a given speed class and hence when observations should optimally be taken to detect the onset of dust formation.

  13. Mechanism of membrane tube formation induced by adhesive nanocomponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ari?, Andela

    2015-01-01

    We report numerical simulations of membrane tubulation driven by large colloidal particles. Using Monte Carlo simulations we study how the process depends on particle size, concentration and binding strength, and present accurate free energy calculations to sort out how tube formation compares with the competing budding process. We find that tube formation is a result of the collective behavior of the particles adhering on the surface, and it occurs for binding strengths that are smaller than those required for budding. We also find that long linear aggregates of particles forming on the membrane surface act as nucleation seeds for tubulation by lowering the free energy barrier associated to the process.

  14. Spontaneous Superlattice Formation in Nanorods through PartialCation Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis O.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-03-14

    Lattice mismatch strains are widely known to controlnanoscale pattern formation in heteroepitaxy, but such effects have notbeen exploited in colloidal nanocrystal growth. We demonstrate acolloidal route to synthesizing CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices throughpartial cation exchange. Strain induces the spontaneous formation ofperiodic structures. Ab initio calculations of the interfacial energy andmodeling of strain energies show that these forces drive theself-organization. The nanorod superlattices exhibit high stabilityagainst ripening and phase mixing. These materials are tunablenear-infrared emitters with potential applications as nanometer-scaleoptoelectronic devices.

  15. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as regenerated cellulose) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  16. On flame kernel formation and propagation in premixed gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisazadeh-Far, Kian; Metghalchi, Hameed [Northeastern University, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Parsinejad, Farzan [Chevron Oronite Company LLC, Richmond, CA 94801 (United States); Keck, James C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Flame kernel formation and propagation in premixed gases have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments have been carried out at constant pressure and temperature in a constant volume vessel located in a high speed shadowgraph system. The formation and propagation of the hot plasma kernel has been simulated for inert gas mixtures using a thermodynamic model. The effects of various parameters including the discharge energy, radiation losses, initial temperature and initial volume of the plasma have been studied in detail. The experiments have been extended to flame kernel formation and propagation of methane/air mixtures. The effect of energy terms including spark energy, chemical energy and energy losses on flame kernel formation and propagation have been investigated. The inputs for this model are the initial conditions of the mixture and experimental data for flame radii. It is concluded that these are the most important parameters effecting plasma kernel growth. The results of laminar burning speeds have been compared with previously published results and are in good agreement. (author)

  17. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces Formation of Nuclear Energy Tribal Working

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesyEducationNevada | Department ofDepartment of|Group |

  18. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  19. Collisionless Weibel shocks: Full formation mechanism and timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Stockem, A. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Institut fr Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitt Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Narayan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Silva, L. O. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless shocks in plasmas play an important role in space physics (Earth's bow shock) and astrophysics (supernova remnants, relativistic jets, gamma-ray bursts, high energy cosmic rays). While the formation of a fluid shock through the steepening of a large amplitude sound wave has been understood for long, there is currently no detailed picture of the mechanism responsible for the formation of a collisionless shock. We unravel the physical mechanism at work and show that an electromagnetic Weibel shock always forms when two relativistic collisionless, initially unmagnetized, plasma shells encounter. The predicted shock formation time is in good agreement with 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of counterstreaming pair plasmas. By predicting the shock formation time, experimental setups aiming at producing such shocks can be optimised to favourable conditions.

  20. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOEs National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETLs 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuousmoreformation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.less

  1. Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-01

    Researchers at DOEs National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETLs 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.

  2. Use-driven concept formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Marie)

    2010-01-01

    When faced with a complex task, humans often identify domain-specific concepts that make the task more tractable. In this thesis, I investigate the formation of domain-specific concepts of this sort. I propose a set of ...

  3. Brown dwarf formation Gilles Chabrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joergens, Viki

    : not observed ! Constraints on BD formation/ejection by disk instability: magnetic field No B (pure hydro accretion - Collapse of a cloud -> starts forming small N-body clusters of small (~10-3 Msol

  4. Cross Domain Mathematical Concept Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steel, Graham; Colton, Simon; Bundy, Alan; Walsh, Toby

    2000-01-01

    Many interesting concepts in mathematics are essentially "cross-domain" in nature, relating objects from more than one area of mathematics, e.g. prime order groups. These concepts are often vital to the formation of a ...

  5. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  6. Controlled Irradiative Formation of Penitentes Vance Bergeron,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betterton, Meredith D.

    , further growth of height can occur by melting. The penitentes initially appear as small structures (3 mm in troughs and surface instability [13]. Penitente formation alters glacial energy balances and therefore (dew point below 0 C), where melting is disfavored and abla- tion proceeds by sublimation [4

  7. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, A., E-mail: a.gao@utwente.nl; Lee, C. J.; Bijkerk, F. [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein, The Netherlands and XUV Optics Group, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-07

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy lower than 80?eV. After e-beam irradiation, it is found that the D peak, I(D), appears in the Raman spectrum, indicating defect formation in graphene. The evolution of I(D)/I(G) follows the amorphization trajectory with increasing irradiation dose, indicating that graphene goes through a transformation from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline and then further to amorphous carbon. Further, irradiation of graphene with increased water partial pressure does not significantly change the Raman spectra, which suggests that, in the extremely low energy range, e-beam induced chemical reactions between residual water and graphene are not the dominant mechanism driving defect formation in graphene. Single layer graphene, partially suspended over holes was irradiated with EUV radiation. By comparing with the Raman results from e-beam irradiation, it is concluded that the photoelectrons, especially those from the valence band, contribute to defect formation in graphene during irradiation.

  8. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Angeles Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation AOrganic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation by Chun-multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design,

  9. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents &...

  10. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  11. Archosaur remains from the Otter Sandstone Formation (Middle Triassic, late Anisian) of Devon, southern UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    . Introduction The Middle Triassic Otter Sandstone Formation of the south coast of Devon has been a source-bearing maxilla and mandible are robust, and could survive transport in high-energy streams better than some The new jaw comes from the Otter Sandstone Formation (OSF) at Port Royal, Sidmouth (Fig. 1), one

  12. Formation of ozone: Metastable states and anomalous isotope effect Dmitri Babikov,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Formation of ozone: Metastable states and anomalous isotope effect Dmitri Babikov,a) Brian K for an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation is given in terms of the energy transfer mechanism, where the metastable states of ozone are formed first, and then stabilized by collisions with other atoms. Unusual

  13. Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    the potential impacts on plant capacity resulting from cloud formation within or downwind of the solar chimney. Ideally, renewable energy power plants convert energy from naturally occurring thermal or kinetic sources technology for converting solar energy into electricity that has shown promise in recent years is the so

  14. FED, the Font "EDitor" and Font Formats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Joseph D.

    This memo describes FED, a program used for compiling and inspecting fonts: AST font format, a text format which can be used to create and edit fonts: and KST font format, the binary format used by SCRIMP, TJ6, and PUB.

  15. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electronlattice coupling.

  16. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  17. The Epoch of Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raul Jimenez

    2001-10-09

    I present a biased review of when the epoch of formation of galaxies (both disks and ellipticals) maybe took place. I base my arguments in simple (mostly) analytic models that have been recently developed to reproduce most of the observed photometric, chemical and dynamical properties of galaxies both at low and high redshift.

  18. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  19. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  20. Loop formation in graphitic nanoribbon edges using furnace heating or Joule heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Xiaoting

    Here the authors report the use of either furnace heating or Joule heating to pacify the exposed graphene edges by loop formation in a novel graphitic nanoribbonmaterial, grown by chemical vapor deposition. The edge energy ...

  1. DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide storage in geologic formations.

  2. DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy today announced 11 projects valued at $75.5 million aimed at increasing scientific understanding about the potential of promising geologic formations to safely and permanently store carbon dioxide (CO2).

  3. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    use with DOE M 435.1-1 Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses U.S. DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. A study of secondary ion formation from sodium salts using cluster-SIMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Vanessa

    1998-01-01

    fastest growing surface analysis techniques. The formation of secondary ions from two ternary salts, [] and [], was studied using cluster-SIMs. Various primary ions at different energies and coincidence counting techniques were used to determine...

  5. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  6. On conduction, cooling flows and galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian, A C; Morris, R G

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the universal gas fraction in clusters of galaxies, we estimate that the effective thermal conductivity required to balance radiative cooling in the cores, where the gas temperature is 3-10keV, is about one tenth of the Spitzer rate. This confirms that thermal conduction can be important for the energy balance provided that it is not highly suppressed by magnetic fields in the gas. We determine the global effective conductivity in a sample of 29 clusters using published X-ray data on the inferred cooling rates and show that most lie between one and one tenth of the Spitzer rate. More work on the profiles in cooling flow clusters is required to test the conduction hypothesis further. We examine the possibility that conduction operates during galaxy formation, and show that it provides a simple explanation for the upper-mass cutoff in galaxy masses.

  7. On conduction, cooling flows and galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Fabian; L. M. Voigt; R. G. Morris

    2002-06-25

    On the basis of the universal gas fraction in clusters of galaxies, we estimate that the effective thermal conductivity required to balance radiative cooling in the cores, where the gas temperature is 3-10keV, is about one tenth of the Spitzer rate. This confirms that thermal conduction can be important for the energy balance provided that it is not highly suppressed by magnetic fields in the gas. We determine the global effective conductivity in a sample of 29 clusters using published X-ray data on the inferred cooling rates and show that most lie between one and one tenth of the Spitzer rate. More work on the profiles in cooling flow clusters is required to test the conduction hypothesis further. We examine the possibility that conduction operates during galaxy formation, and show that it provides a simple explanation for the upper-mass cutoff in galaxy masses.

  8. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient ?-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmoreand simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.less

  9. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find what youSummerEmployment Opportunities Thank you forEnergy

  10. ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean' System09 EMABMay 200810 U.S.

  11. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  12. 1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP OXYGEN DEFECT FORMATION AND HYDROGEN EFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States BACKGROUND THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP was partially supported by a DOE grant through United Solar Ovonics, Inc., under the Solar America Initiative

  13. J. Phys. Chem. Solids Pergamon Press 1967. Vol. 28, pp. 2061-2065. Printed in Great Britain. RELATION OF VACANCY FORMATION AND MIGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    . RELATION OF VACANCY FORMATION AND MIGRATION ENERGIES TO THE DEBYE TEMPERATURE IN SOLIDS H. R. GLYDE School) Abstract-A derivation of the relation between the vacancy formation energy E,, the migration energy E of the potential, to a property E,, which depends on the absolute magnitude or depth of the potential. (q

  14. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  15. Controlled Irradiative Formation of Penitentes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Bergeron; C. Berger; M. D. Betterton

    2006-01-24

    Spike-shaped structures are produced by light-driven ablation in very different contexts. Penitentes 1-4 m high are common on Andean glaciers, where their formation changes glacier dynamics and hydrology. Laser ablation can produce cones 10-100 microns high with a variety of proposed applications in materials science. We report the first laboratory generation of centimeter-scale snow and ice penitentes. Systematically varying conditions allows identification of the essential parameters controlling the formation of ablation structures. We demonstrate that penitente initiation and coarsening requires cold temperatures, so that ablation leads to sublimation rather than melting. Once penitentes have formed, further growth of height can occur by melting. The penitentes intially appear as small structures (3 mm high) and grow by coarsening to 1-5 cm high. Our results are an important step towards understanding and controlling ablation morphologies.

  16. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  17. Shock Formation in Lovelock Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey S. Reall; Norihiro Tanahashi; Benson Way

    2014-09-12

    We argue that Lovelock theories of gravity suffer from shock formation, unlike General Relativity. We consider the propagation of (i) a discontinuity in curvature, and (ii) weak, high frequency, gravitational waves. Such disturbances propagate along characteristic hypersurfaces of a "background" spacetime and their amplitude is governed by a transport equation. In GR the transport equation is linear. In Lovelock theories, it is nonlinear and its solutions can blow up, corresponding to the formation of a shock. We show that this effect is absent in some simple cases e.g. a flat background spacetime, and demonstrate its presence for a plane wave background. We comment on weak cosmic censorship, the evolution of shocks, and the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime, in Lovelock theories.

  18. Membrane adhesion and domain formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Weikl; Reinhard Lipowsky

    2007-09-23

    We review theoretical results for the adhesion-induced phase behavior of biomembranes. The focus is on models in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic sheets with embedded adhesion molecules. We present several mechanism that lead to the formation of domains during adhesion, and discuss the time-dependent evolution of domain patterns obtained in Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulated pattern dynamics has striking similarities to the pattern evolution observed during T cell adhesion.

  19. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Eells, Janis T.

    2005-02-01

    Published abstract: Calcium formate is a water-soluble salt of an essential mineral nutrient with potential for use as a dietary calcium supplement. Formate ion is a product of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism, but sustained high plasma formate...

  20. The small and the beautiful: How the star formation law affects galactic disk structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Harald

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of different analytical parameterizations and fit functions for the local star formation rate in AMR simulations of an isolated disk galaxy with the Nyx code. Such parameterizations express the star formation efficiency as function of the local turbulent Mach number and viral parameter. By employing the method of adaptively refined large eddy simulations, we are able to evaluate these physical parameters from the numerically unresolved turbulent energy associated with the grid scale. We consider both single and multi free-fall variants of star formation laws proposed by Padoan & Nordlund, Hennebelle & Chabrier, and Krumholz & McKee. We find that the global star formation rate and the relation between the local star formation rate and the gas column density is reproduced in agreement with observational constraints by all multi free-fall models of star formation. Some models with obsolete calibration or a single free-fall time scale, however, result in an overly clumpy d...

  1. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the formation of molecular hydrogen and its deuterated forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, DIpen; Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip K

    2015-01-01

    $H_2$ is the most abundant interstellar species. Its deuterated forms ($HD$ and $D_2$) are also significantly abundant. Huge abundances of these molecules could be explained by considering the chemistry occurring on the interstellar dust. Because of its simplicity, Rate equation method is widely used to study the formation of grain-surface species. However, since recombination efficiency of formation of any surface species are heavily dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, Monte Carlo method would be best method suited to take care of randomness of the processes. We perform Monte Carlo simulation to study the formation of $H_2$, $HD$ and $D_2$ on interstellar ices. Adsorption energies of surface species are the key inputs for the formation of any species on interstellar dusts but binding energies of deuterated species are yet to known with certainty. A zero point energy correction exists between hydrogenated and deuterated species which should be considered while modeling the chemistry on the ...

  3. Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-08-25

    The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

  4. XML Format for SESAME and LEOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durrenberger, J K; Neely, J R; Sterne, P A

    2009-04-29

    The objective of this document is to describe the XML format used by LLNL and LANL to represent the equation-of-state and related material information in the LEOS and SESAME data libraries. The primary purpose of this document is to describe a specific XML format for representing EOS data that is tailored to the nature of the underlying data and is amenable to conversion to both legacy SESAME and LEOS binary formats. The secondary purpose is to describe an XML format that lends itself to a 'natural' representation in a binary file format of the SESAME, pdb or hdf5 form so that this format and related tools can be used for the rapid and efficient development and implementation of prototype data structures. This document describes the XML format only. A working knowledge of LEOS and SESAME formats is assumed.

  5. Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

    2007-01-01

    Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

  6. Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

  7. La cl informatique Formation Word XP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    La cl informatique Formation Word XP Aide-mmoire Hiver 2004 #12;#12;Formation Word XP Hiver 2004 1. PRSENTATION DE L'INTERFACE DE MICROSOFT WORD XP................ 1 1.1. L'interface gnrale

  8. Proportional structural effects of formative indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, George R.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Rigdon, Ed E.

    2009-03-15

    that are proportional to their effects on the formative construct itself. This constraint has important implications for developing and testing formative models. This study demonstrates the existence of the constraint, shows that researchers must consider...

  9. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  10. Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays Daniel W. Kwon and David W. Miller February 2005 SSL # 2-05 #12;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays By DANIEL W. KWON S;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays by DANIEL W. KWON Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics

  11. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martn, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}?110 M{sub ?} yr{sup 1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (? 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (?{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (?{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ?50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ?150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-? relation.

  12. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  13. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  14. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rio, Yvon

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  15. Investigation and Analysis of Summer Energy Consumption of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings in Xi'an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, B.; Yan, Z.; Gui, Z.; He, J.

    2006-01-01

    Tests and questionnaire surveys on the summer energy consumption structure of 100 energy efficient residential buildings have been performed in a certain residential district in Xi'an, China. The relationship between the formation of the energy...

  16. Dynamical Treatment of Virialization Heating in Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Wang; Tom Abel

    2007-09-11

    In a hierarchical picture of galaxy formation virialization continually transforms gravitational potential energy into kinetic energies of the baryonic and dark matter. For the gaseous component the kinetic, turbulent energy is transformed eventually into internal thermal energy through shocks and viscous dissipation. Traditionally this virialization and shock heating has been assumed to occur instantaneously allowing an estimate of the gas temperature to be derived from the the virial temperature defined from the embedding dark matter halo velocity dispersion. As the mass grows the virial temperature of a halo grows. Mass accretion hence can be translated into a heating term. We derive this heating rate from the extended Press Schechter formalism and demonstrate its usefulness in semi-analytical models of galaxy formation. Our method explicitly conserves energy unlike the previous impulsive heating assumptions. Our formalism can trivially be applied in all current semi-analytical models as the heating term can be computed directly from the underlying merger trees. Our analytic results for the first cooling halos and the transition from cold to hot accretion are in agreement with numerical simulations.

  17. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  18. Coke formation in visbreaking process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, T.Y. )

    1987-04-01

    Visbreaking is a mild cracking process primarily used to reduce residual oil viscosity and thus decrease the amount of cutter stock required for blending to heavy fuels specification. It can also be used to produce incremental quantities of gasoline, middle distillates and catalytic cracker feeds. This process was widely used in the 1930s and 1940s and became obsolete until a few years ago. When the need for increased conversion of residues to light products became desirable, visbreaking offered economic advantages to many refining schemes - especially in Western Europe. Between 1978-1981, Exxon brought on stream seven visbreakers ranging from 1900 to 9100 tons/SD capacity. In January 1983, the world-wide visbreaking capacity was over 2 MM B/SD. The visbreaking process and its application in refinery operations have been well described. In general, the process economics improve as the process severity is increased but it is limited by coke formation in the process. For this reason, they have studied the kinetics of coke formation in the visbreaking process.

  19. Format and Content Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    use with DOE M 435.1-1 Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE G 435.1-3 i DRAFT...

  20. Austin Energy- Commercial New Construction Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Austin Energy offers incentives for the construction and major renovation of commercial buildings within its service territory. The program rewards customers by using a tiered payment format, which...

  1. Star Formation and the ISM in Four Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Young; L. van Zee; K. Y. Lo; R. C. Dohm-Palmer; M. E. Beierle

    2003-04-14

    We present new, high sensitivity VLA observations of HI in four dwarf galaxies (UGCA 292, GR8, DDO 210, and DDO 216) and we use these data to study interactions between star formation and the interstellar medium. HI velocity dispersions and line shapes in UGCA 292, GR8, and DDO 210 show that these three galaxies contain both warm and cool or cold HI phases. The presence of the cold neutral medium is indicated by a low-dispersion (3--6 km/s) HI component or by the Gauss-Hermite shape parameter h_4 > 0. Contrary to expectations, we find no trend between the incidence of the low-dispersion (colder) phase and the star formation rate in five dwarf galaxies. The colder HI phase may be a necessary ingredient for star formation, but it is clearly not sufficient. However, there is a global trend between the star formation rate of a galaxy and the incidence of asymmetric HI profiles. This trend probably reflects kinetic energy input from young massive stars. Numerical simulations show that the effects of rotational broadening (finite angular resolution) are minimal for these galaxies. Simulations are also used to estimate the errors in the column densities of the high-dispersion and the low-dispersion HI phases.

  2. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  3. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  4. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  5. Formation of helical ion chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramil Nigmatullin; Adolfo del Campo; Gabriele De Chiara; Giovanna Morigi; Martin B. Plenio; Alex Retzker

    2015-08-25

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of the linear to zigzag structural phase transition exhibited by an ion chain confined in a trap with periodic boundary conditions. The transition is driven by reducing the transverse confinement at a finite quench rate, which can be accurately controlled. This results in the formation of zigzag domains oriented along different transverse planes. The twists between different domains can be stabilized by the topology of the trap and under laser cooling the system has a chance to relax to a helical chain with nonzero winding number. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain a large sample of possible trajectories for different quench rates. The scaling of the average winding number with different quench rates is compared to the prediction of the Kibble-Zurek theory, and a good quantitative agreement is found.

  6. Methanol Masers and Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Sobolev; A. B. Ostrovskii; M. S. Kirsanova; O. V. Shelemei; M. A. Voronkov; A. V. Malyshev

    2006-01-12

    Methanol masers which are traditionally divided into two classes provide possibility to study important parts of the star forming regions: Class~II masers trace vicinities of the massive YSOs while class~I masers are likely to trace more distant parts of the outflows where newer stars can form. There are many methanol transitions which produce observed masers. This allows to use pumping analysis for estimation of the physical parameters in the maser formation regions and its environment, for the study of their evolution. Extensive surveys in different masing transitions allow to conclude on the values of the temperatures, densities, dust properties, etc. in the bulk of masing regions. Variability of the brightest masers is monitored during several years. In some cases it is probably caused by the changes of the dust temperature which follow variations in the brightness of the central YSO reflecting the character of the accretion process. A unified catalogue of the class II methanol masers consisting of more than 500 objects is compiled. Analysis of the data shows that: physical conditions within the usual maser source vary considerably; maser brightness is determined by parameters of some distinguished part of the object - maser formation region; class II methanol masers are formed not within the outflows but in the regions affected by their propagation. It is shown that the "near" solutions for the kinematic distances to the sources can be used for statistical analysis. The luminosity function of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers is constructed. It is shown that improvement of the sensitivity of surveys can increase number of detected maser sources considerably.

  7. Energy Week presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Topics covered include: energy security; clean energy and low carbon; energy for growth and poverty reduction in Africa; financing of energy efficiency; SMEs for decentralised energy service provision; potential for biofuels in developing countries; clean energy and sustainable development; clean energy finance and private equity funds; power generation and low carbon technologies; beyond traditional finance; rehabilitation and emission control in thermal power plants; and carbon finance. The presentations are mainly in ppt (Power Point) or pdf (Acrobat) format. Some videos of the conference are also available on the website.

  8. Comet tail formation: Giotto observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Johnstone, A.; Coates, A.; Heath, J.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.; Winningham, J.D.; Thomsen, M.; Bryant, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The process of mass loading of the solar wind by cometary ions, which forms comet tails, has been observed throughout the coma of comet Halley. Three distinct regimes were found where the nature of the energy and momentum coupling between solar wind and cometary ions is different. Outside the bow shock, where there is little angular scattering of the freshly ionized particles, the coupling is described by the simple pickup trajectory and the energy is controlled by the angle between the flow and the magnetic field. Just inside the bow shock, there is considerable scattering accompanied by another acceleration process which raises some particle energies well above the straightforward pickup value. Finally, closer to the nucleus, the amount of scattering decreases and the coupling is once more controlled by the magnetic field direction. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Formation of Cooper pairs as a consequence of exchange interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Dolgopolov

    2015-04-13

    The pairing of two electrons with antiparallel spins may minimize the energy of each of the paired electrons. Thus the exchange interaction and the Pauli Exclusion Principle cause a bond between two electrons in a crystal. This can be proved analyzing the energy of each conduction electron in the field of a crystal on assumption that all other kinds of magnetic spin ordering in the crystal are weak. The superconductivity in a metallic crystal occurs only if conduction electrons before the pairing are put closely on the Fermi surface in the momentum space. The motion of conduction electrons in the crystal may disturb the formation of Cooper pairs, because the kinetic energy of the motion is usually much larger than the energy gap of superconductor. The conduction electrons as standing waves have a zero momentum, hence their momentums are synchronous; consequently the formation of Cooper pairs is more probable than in case of electrons with nonzero momentums. The total momentum of the pair of two electrons as standing waves is zero.

  10. Homogeneous Hydrogenation of CO? to Methyl Formate Utilizing Switchable Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Mahendra; Linehan, John C.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Van Der Eide, Edwin F.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2014-09-15

    Capture of CO? and subsequent hydrogenation allows for base/alcohol-catalyzed conversion of CO? to methylformate in one pot. The conversion of CO? proceeds via alkylcarbonates, to formate salts and then formate esters, which can be catalyzed by base and alcohol with the only byproduct being water. The system operates at mild conditions (300 psi H?, 140 C). Reactivity is strongly influenced by temperature and choice of solvent. In the presence of excess of base (DBU) formate is predominant product while in excess of methanol methyl formate is major product. 110 C yields formate salts, 140 C promotes methylformate. The authors acknowledge internal Laboratory Directed Re-search and Development (LDRD) funding from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Solvent-quality dependent contact formation dynamics in proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Prasanta

    2015-01-01

    The mean time of contact formation between two ends of a protein chain shows power law dependence with respect to the number of residues, $\\tau_{CF} \\sim N^{\\alpha}$. Fluorescence quenching measurements based on triplet-triplet energy transfer show variation in the value of scaling exponent $\\alpha$ for different protein-solvent systems. Here, starting from a non-Markovian diffusion equation supplemented with an exponential sink term that accounts for the energy transfer reaction between donor and acceptor groups, we calculate the mean time of contact formation using the Wilemski-Fixman closure approximation. The non-Markovian diffusion-reaction equation includes the effects of solvent quality and hydrodynamic interaction in a mean-field fashion. It shows that the contact formation dynamics is mainly governed by two time scales, the reciprocal of the intrinsic rate of quenching $(k_0^{ET})^{-1}$, and the relaxation time $\\tau_0 = \\eta b^3/k_B T$ of the coarse-grained residue of an effective size $b$ with solv...

  12. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  13. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  14. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  15. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao-Qing Feng; Gen-Ming Jin; Jun-Qing Li; Werner Scheid

    2007-10-17

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  16. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  17. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  18. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  19. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  20. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  1. Revealing Charge Density Wave Formation in the LaTe2 System by Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    energy electron di?raction (LEED). CDW formation is driven1D CDW materials. ARPES and LEED data were taken on LaTe 2by TEM, Fig. 4a shows LEED taken on the sample surface. As

  2. Solar System Processes Underlying Planetary Formation, Geodynamics, and the Georeactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2007-01-02

    Only three processes, operant during the formation of the Solar System, are responsible for the diversity of matter in the Solar System and are directly responsible for planetary internal-structures, including planetocentric nuclear fission reactors, and for dynamical processes, including and especially, geodynamics. These processes are: (i) Low-pressure, low-temperature condensation from solar matter in the remote reaches of the Solar System or in the interstellar medium; (ii) High-pressure, high-temperature condensation from solar matter associated with planetary-formation by raining out from the interiors of giant-gaseous protoplanets, and; (iii) Stripping of the primordial volatile components from the inner portion of the Solar System by super-intense solar wind associated with T-Tauri phase mass-ejections, presumably during the thermonuclear ignition of the Sun. As described herein, these processes lead logically, in a causally related manner, to a coherent vision of planetary formation with profound implications including, but not limited to, (a) Earth formation as a giant gaseous Jupiter-like planet with vast amounts of stored energy of protoplanetary compression in its rock-plus-alloy kernel; (b) Removal of approximately 300 Earth-masses of primordial gases from the Earth, which began Earth's decompression process, making available the stored energy of protoplanetary compression for driving geodynamic processes, which I have described by the new whole-Earth decompression dynamics and which is responsible for emplacing heat at the mantle-crust-interface at the base of the crust through the process I have described, called mantle decompression thermal-tsunami; and, (c)Uranium accumulations at the planetary centers capable of self-sustained nuclear fission chain reactions.

  3. Format requirements of thermal neutron scattering data in a nuclear data format to succeed the ENDF format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-03-31

    In November 2012, the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup 38 (WPEC-SG38) began with the task of developing a nuclear data format and supporting infrastructure to replace the now nearly 50 year old ENDF format. The first step in this process is to develop requirements for the new format and infrastructure. In this talk, I will review the status of ENDF's Thermal Scattering Law (TSL) formats as well as support for this data in the GND format (from which the new format is expected to evolve). Finally, I hope to begin a dialog with members of the thermal neutron scattering community so that their data needs can be accurately and easily accommodated by the new format and tools, as captured by the requirements document. During this discussion, we must keep in mind that the new tools and format must; Support what is in existing data files; Support new things we want to put in data files; and Be flexible enough for us to adapt it to future unanticipated challenges.

  4. Chaos in Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker Hoffmann; Simon L. Grimm; Ben Moore; Joachim Stadel

    2015-08-04

    Terrestrial planets are thought to be the result of a vast number of gravitational interactions and collisions between smaller bodies. We use numerical simulations to show that practically identical initial conditions result in a wide array of final planetary configurations. This highly chaotic behaviour questions the predictability of different scenarios for the formation and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems in general. However, multiple realisations of the same initial conditions can be used to predict certain global statistics. We present two sets of numerical experiments that quantify this behaviour. Firstly, we demonstrate that simulations with slightly displaced particles are completely divergent after ~500 years, irrespective of initial displacement, particle number, and code accuracy. If a single planetesimal is moved by less than one millimetre, then a different set of planets results -- this timescale for chaotic divergence decreases with increasing particle number. Secondly, we show final planetary configurations of initially similar simulations with and without giant planets after evolving them for ~148 Myr. We find that the same simulations including giant planets tend to generate higher mass planets at lower semi-major axes than simulations without gas giants. This prediction can be tested with forthcoming observational programs. By extracting outliers in the observations, we cautiously predict that Kepler-10, Kepler-9, 61 Vir, HD 134060, and HD 51608 may host as yet undetected giant planets.

  5. Format for Federal Register Notice

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services » ProgramPolicySenateFlyer, Title VIFormat for Federal

  6. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    grids,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2011, 95(5),layer,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2013, 113,thickness,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2013,

  7. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    grids,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2011, 95(5),thickness,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2013,analysis,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, [130] J.

  8. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Yang Yang, Energy and Environmental Science, 6, 2714-2720 (structures, Energy and Environmental Science, 2013, 6,applications,? Energy & Environmental Science, 2012, 5(11),

  9. The Estimation of Heats of Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Declassified Atomic Energy Commission Report CC-3307, Oct.Lorg~en, Declassified Atomic Energy Commission Report BC~82,Lofgren, Deciassified Atomic Energy Commission Report BC-85,

  10. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    solar cells, Advanced Energy Materials, 2011, 1(5), 771-collecting grids,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells,laboratory stability studies, Energy Technology, 2014. [

  11. The Ratio of Retrograde to Prograde Orbits: A Test for Kuiper Belt Binary Formation Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilke E. Schlichting; Re'em Sari

    2008-07-03

    With the discovery of Kuiper Belt binaries that have wide separations and roughly equal masses new theories were proposed to explain their formation. Two formation scenarios were suggested by Goldreich and collaborators: In the first, dynamical friction that is generated by a sea of small bodies enables a transient binary to become bound ($L^2s$ mechanism); in the second, a transient binary gets bound by an encounter with a third body ($L^3$ mechanism). We show that these different binary formation scenarios leave their own unique signatures in the relative abundance of prograde to retrograde binary orbits. This signature is due to stable retrograde orbits that exist much further out in the Hill sphere than prograde orbits. It provides an excellent opportunity to distinguish between the different binary formation scenarios observationally. We predict that if binary formation proceeded while sub-Hill velocities prevailed, the vast majority of all comparable mass ratio binaries have retrograde orbits. This dominance of retrograde binary orbits is a result of binary formation via the $L^2s$ mechanism, or any other mechanism that dissipates energy in a smooth and gradual manner. For super-Hill velocities binary formation proceeds via the $L^3$ mechanism which produces a roughly equal number of prograde and retrograde binaries. These predictions assume that subsequent orbital evolution due to dynamical friction and dynamical stirring of the Kuiper belt did not alter the sense of the binary orbit after formation.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    industry/bestpractices/software.html Pump System Assessmentpump user Format: Downloadable software Contact: U.S. Department of Energy URL: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/industry/

  13. Formation of Cooper pairs in quantum oscillations of electrons in plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2009-01-01

    We study low energy quantum oscillations of electron gas in plasma. It is shown that two electrons participating in these oscillations acquire additional negative energy when they interact by means of a virtual plasmon. The additional energy leads to the formation a Cooper pair and possible existence of the superconducting phase in the system. We suggest that this mechanism supports slowly damping oscillations of electrons without any energy supply. Basing on our model we put forward the hypothesis the superconductivity can occur in a low energy ball lightning.

  14. Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control Hoam Chung and S. Shankar Sastry for teams of helicopters. However, the potential for accidents is greatly increased when helicopter teams to the problem of helicopter formations comprised of heterogenous vehicles. The disturbance attenuation property

  15. FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waddington, Ian

    FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY Deborah B. Haarsma 1 , R. Bruce Partridge 1 , Ian 85287­1504 USA Abstract. Faint extragalactic radio sources provide important information about the global history of star formation. Sensitive radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and other fields

  16. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  17. Robot Behavior Adaptation for Formation Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    1 Robot Behavior Adaptation for Formation Maintenance Maite López-Sánchez maite@maia.ub.es WAI): ­1 or 2 reference robots to follow ­keeping fixed angle (formation property) ­and fixed distance d (separation distance) · related to robot visibility range, speed or reaction capabilities Basic behaviors I

  18. First Structure Formation and the First Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael L. Norman; Tom Abel; Greg Bryan

    2000-05-11

    We discuss the results of recent 3D simulations of first structure formation in relationship to the formation of the first stars. On the basis of a new, high-resolution AMR simulation (spatial dynamic range = 30,000,000), we conclude that the first stars are likely to be massive.

  19. 1.6 Policy Development & Format Page 1 of 3 Policy Development & Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    1.6 Policy Development & Format Page 1 of 3 Policy Development & Format Original Implementation: July 16, 2013 Last Revision: None A. POLICY FORMAT Each policy will have a title that is concise but descriptive. Each policy is indexed with a numeric indicator which indicates the position of the entry within

  20. On spontaneous formation of current sheets: Untwisted magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, R. [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur-313001 (India); National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States); Low, B. C.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    This is a study of the spontaneous formation of electric current sheets in an incompressible viscous fluid with perfect electrical conductivity, governed by the magnetohydrodynamic Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical solutions to two initial value problems are presented for a three-dimensional, periodic, untwisted magnetic field evolving, with no change in magnetic topology under the frozen-in condition and at characteristic fluid Reynolds numbers of the order of 500, from a nonequilibrium initial state with the fluid at rest. The evolution converts magnetic free energy into kinetic energy to be all dissipated away by viscosity so that the field settles into a minimum-energy, static equilibrium. The solutions demonstrate that, as a consequence of the frozen-in condition, current sheets must form during the evolution despite the geometric simplicity of the prescribed initial fields. In addition to the current sheets associated with magnetic neutral points and field reversal layers, other sheets not associated with such magnetic features are also in evidence. These current sheets form on magnetic flux surfaces. This property is used to achieve a high degree of the frozen-in condition in the simulations, by describing the magnetic field entirely in terms of the advection of its flux surfaces and integrating the resulting governing equations with a customized version of a general-purpose high-resolution (viz., nonoscillatory) hydrodynamical simulation code EULAG [J. M. Prusa et al., Comput. Fluids 37, 1193 (2008)]. Incompressibility imposes the additional global constraint that the flux surfaces must evolve with no change in the spatial volumes they enclose. In this approach, current sheet formation is demonstrated graphically by the progressive pressing together of suitably selected flux surfaces until their separation has diminished below the minimal resolved distance on a fixed grid. The frozen-in condition then fails in the simulation as the field reconnects through an effecting numerical resistivity. The principal results are related to the Parker theory of current-sheet formation and dissipation in the solar corona.

  1. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  2. Microsoft Word - Final Report - FORMATTED

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May2.docTechnicalBARACK OBAMA AND JOE BIDEN: This

  3. Heating and jet formation by colliding shocks in solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, T.; Ryutova, M.P.; Covington, J. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Ryutova, M.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/IGPP, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fludra, A. [Space Science Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United States)

    1999-06-01

    We show that ubiquitous small-scale magnetic flux {open_quotes}tubes{close_quotes} constantly emerging from subsurface layers, may cause the formation of plasma jets and a sporadic excess of temperature near the solar surface. Photospheric network magnetic elements collide and reconnect, creating a sling-shot effect which generates complex 3D shock waves with the curved surface. Self-focusing of these shocks occurs as they propagate upward in the rarefied atmosphere. Depending on the geometry of the shock collision, highly concentrated energy may be either converted entirely into heat or into strong jets, or be distributed between the two. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy An Introduction to the 2010 Fuel Cell Pre a d t ade o a to educe Advancing Presidential Priorities Energy efficiency and renewable energy, cleanest, Recovery Act energy projectsfastest energy source energy efficiency Double renewable energy

  5. Coulomb effects on the formation of proton halo nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Jie Liang; Yan-Song Li; Fu-Guo Deng; Xi-Han Li; Bao-An Bian; Feng-Shou Zhang; Zu-Hua Liu; Hong-Yu Zhou

    2007-08-01

    The exotic structures in the 2s_{1/2} states of five pairs of mirror nuclei ^{17}O-^{17}F, ^{26}Na-^{26}P, ^{27}Mg-^{27}P, ^{28}Al-^{28}P and ^{29}Si-^{29}P are investigated with the relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory and the single-particle model (SPM) to explore the role of the Coulomb effects on the proton halo formation. The present RMF calculations show that the exotic structure of the valence proton is more obvious than that of the valence neutron of its mirror nucleus, the difference of exotic size between each mirror nuclei becomes smaller with the increase of mass number A of the mirror nuclei and the ratios of the valence proton and valence neutron root-mean-square (RMS) radius to the matter radius in each pair of mirror nuclei all decrease linearly with the increase of A. In order to interpret these results, we analyze two opposite effects of Coulomb interaction on the exotic structure formation with SPM and find that the contribution of the energy level shift is more important than that of the Coulomb barrier for light nuclei. However, the hindrance of the Coulomb barrier becomes more obvious with the increase of A. When A is larger than 34, Coulomb effects on the exotic structure formation will almost become zero because its two effects counteract with each other.

  6. Inhomogeneous structure formation may alleviate need for accelerating universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan Hansson; Jesper Lindkvist

    2009-06-18

    When taking the real, inhomogeneous and anisotropic matter distribution in the semi-local universe into account, there may be no need to postulate an accelerating expansion of the universe despite recent type Ia supernova data. Local curvatures must be integrated (over all space) to obtain the global curvature of the universe, which seems to be very close to zero from cosmic microwave background data. As gravitational structure formation creates bound regions of positive curvature, the regions in between become negatively curved in order to comply with a vanishing global curvature. The actual dynamics of the universe is altered due to the self-induced inhomogeneities, again more prominently so as structure formation progresses. Furthermore, this negative curvature will increase as a function of time as structure formation proceeds, which mimics the effect of "dark energy" with negative pressure. Hence, the "acceleration" may be merely a mirage. We make a qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis, using newtonian gravity corrected for special relativistic effects, which works surprisingly well, to corroborate and illustrate/visualize these statements. This article may be seen as a plea to start taking seriously the observed inhomogeneous distribution and the nonlinearities of nonperturbative general relativity, and their impact on the dynamics and behavior of the cosmos.

  7. Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2 RadiometerRafaelAnalysis (Conference)

  8. Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures Jump to:45

  9. Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zircaloy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -

  10. Formatting PDFs for the Web | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescent Lamp BallastsActivities,Joining of

  11. Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption6 1 AprilMMaples 2011 EIA

  12. Energy and Financial Markets Overview: Crude Oil Price Formation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption6 1 AprilMMaples 2011

  13. Star Formation in the Local Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lada, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Studies of molecular clouds and young stars near the sun have provided invaluable insights into the process of star formation. Indeed, much of our physical understanding of this topic has been derived from such studies. Perhaps the two most fundamental problems confronting star formation research today are: 1) determining the origin of stellar mass and 2) deciphering the nature of the physical processes that control the star formation rate in molecular gas. As I will briefly outline here, observations and studies of local star forming regions are making particularly significant contributions toward the solution of both these important problems.

  14. Loop formation in polymers in crowded environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Haydukivska; V. Blavatska

    2015-11-12

    We analyze the probability of a single loop formation in a long flexible polymer chain in disordered environment in $d$ dimensions. The structural defects are considered to be correlated on large distances $r$ according to a power law $\\sim r^{-a}$. Working within the frames of continuous chain model and applying the direct polymer renormalization scheme, we obtain the values of critical exponents governing the scaling of probabilities of loop formation with various positions along the chain as function of loops length. Our results quantitatively reveal that the presence of structural defects in environment decreases the probability of loop formation in polymer macromolecules.

  15. Nonprice incentives and energy conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asensio, OI; Delmas, MA

    2015-01-01

    wireless sensor network, we gave consumers real-time access to detailed, appliance-level in- formation about their home electricitywireless energy metering technology at a residential housing community in Los Angeles. We measured electricity

  16. Electric-utility DSM programs: Terminology and reporting formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E. ); Sabo, C. )

    1991-10-01

    The number, scope, effects, and costs of electric-utility demand-site management programs are growing rapidly in the United States. Utilities, their regulators, and energy policy makers need reliable information on the costs of, participation in, and energy and load effects of these programs to make informed decisions. In particular, information is needed on the ability of these programs to cost-effectively provide energy and capacity resources that are alternatives to power plants. This handbook addresses the need for additional and better information in two ways. First, it discusses the key concepts associated with DSM-program types, participation, energy and load effects, and costs. Second, the handbook offers definitions and a sample reporting form for utility DSM programs. The primary purpose in developing these definitions and this form is to encourage consistency in the collection and reporting of data on DSM programs. To ensure that the discussions, reporting formats, and definitions will be useful and used, development of this handbook was managed by a committee, with membership from electric utilities, state regulatory commissions, and the US Department of Energy. Also, this data-collection form was pretested by seven people from six utilities, who completed the form for nine DSM programs.

  17. Understanding the Factors Affecting the Formation of Carbonyl Iron Electrodes in Rechargeable Alkaline Iron Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Yang, B; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2012-01-01

    Rechargeable iron-based alkaline batteries such as iron - air and nickel - iron batteries are attractive for large-scale electrical energy storage because iron is inexpensive, globally-abundant and environmentally-friendly. Further, the iron electrode is known for its robustness to repeated charge/discharge cycling. During manufacturing these batteries are charged and discharged 20 to 50 times during which the discharge capacity of the iron electrode increases gradually and attains a stable value. This process of achieving stable capacity is called formation. In this study we have focused our efforts on understanding the effect of electrode design on formation. We have investigated the role of wetting agent, pore-former additive, and sulfide additive on the formation of carbonyl iron electrodes. The wetting agent increased the rate of formation while the pore-former additive increased the final capacity. Sodium sulfide added to the electrolyte worked as a de-passivation agent and increased the final discharge capacity. We have proposed a phenomenological model for the formation process that predicts the rate of formation and final discharge capacity given the design parameters for the electrode. The understanding gained here will be useful in reducing the time lost in formation and in maximizing the utilization of the iron electrode. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.021301jes] All rights reserved.

  18. Formation of the intermediate baryon systems in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A Kravchakova; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; S. M. Saleem; Y. H. Huseynaliyev; S Vokal; A. S. Vodopianov; O. B. Abdinov

    2007-12-17

    The centrality experiments indicate regime change and saturation in the behavior of some characteristics of the secondary particles emitted in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies. The phenomenon has a critical character. The simple models do not explain the effect. We suppose that the responsible mechanism to explain the phenomenon could be the formation and decay of the intermediate baryon systems. Such systems could be formed as a result of nucleon percolation in compressed baryonic matter. Formation of big percolation cluster may change the properties of the medium, e.g., it could lead to the changing its transparency. This could be used to get a signal of the intermediate baryonic system formation. We consider two signals to identify the formation of the intermediate baryon systems: the critical changing of transparency of the strongly interacting matter and the enhancement of light nuclei production with increase in centrality.

  19. The NeXus data format

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Bjrn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Mnnicke, David; et al

    2015-01-30

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitionsmorefor the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data.less

  20. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  1. Electromagnetic formation flight dipole solution planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweighart, Samuel A. (Samuel Adam), 1977-

    2005-01-01

    Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF) describes the concept of using electromagnets (coupled with reaction wheels) to provide all of the necessary forces and torques needed to maintain a satellite's relative position and ...

  2. Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

    2009-01-01

    Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

  3. Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2005-01-01

    Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

  4. Kinetics of acrylamide formation in potato chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granda, Claudia Esthela

    2006-08-16

    Acrylamide is considered a carcinogen in animals and a possible carcinogen in humans. It has been found in starch rich foods cooked at high temperatures. Vacuum frying (10 Torr) was studied as a possible alternative to reduce acrylamide formation...

  5. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benner, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    NV~ August 25-29, 1980 HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-catalyzed reduction of CO to hydrocarbons Tropscb. Among theof CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain

  6. Quarkonium formation time in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taesoo Song; Che Ming Ko; Su Houng Lee

    2015-02-19

    We calculate the quarkonium formation time in relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the space-time correlator of heavy quark vector currents in a hydrodynamics background with the initial nonequilibrium stage expanding only in the longitudinal direction. Using in-medium quarkonia properties determined with the heavy quark potential taken to be the free energy from lattice calculations and the fact that quarkonia can only be formed below their dissociation temperatures due to color screening, we find that $\\Upsilon$(1S), $\\Upsilon$(2S), $\\Upsilon$(3S), $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi^\\prime$ are formed, respectively, at 1.2, 6.6, 8.8, 5.8, and 11.0 fm/c after the quark pair are produced in central Au+Au collisions at the top energy of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and these times become shorter in semi-central collisions. We further show, as an example, that including the effect of formation time enhances appreciably the survivability of $\\Upsilon$(1S) in the produced hot dense matter.

  7. THE FORMATION AND ERUPTION OF SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. Z., E-mail: yzzhang@spaceweather.ac.cn [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Following the two-stage catastrophic flux rope model presented by Zhang et al., we investigate how magnetic flux emergence affects the formation and evolution of solar quiescent prominences. The magnetic properties of the flux rope are described with its toroidal magnetic flux per radian ?{sub p} and poloidal flux ?{sub ?}, and ?{sub p} is defined as the emerging strength (ES) of the magnetic flux. After the first catastrophe, the quiescent prominences are supported by the vertical current sheet and located in cavities below the curved transverse current sheet in the inner corona, for which both ES and ?{sub ?} are in the certain ranges. We calculate the strength range as 0.25 < ES < 0.50 for the quadrupolar field, and obtain the equation ?{sub p}?{sub ?} = const., that is, the relationship between ?{sub p} and ?{sub ?} of the emerging flux for which the quiescent prominences are formed in the inner corona. After the second catastrophe, the quiescent prominences would either fall down onto the solar surface or erupt as an important part of coronal mass ejections. During the eruption of the quiescent prominences, most of the magnetic energy in the flux rope is lost, and less than half of the energy loss of the rope is released in the form of Alfvn waves. We argue that there would be two important conditions required for the formation and eruption of solar quiescent prominences, a complicated source region and emerging toroidal magnetic flux that exceeds a critical strength.

  8. Modelling and control of satellite formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaddi, Veera Venkata Sesha Sai

    2004-09-30

    erent satellites in a formation. To achieve the various mission objectives it is necessary for a formation to recongure itself periodically. An analytical impulsive control scheme has been developed for this purpose. This control scheme has the distinct advantage... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.4.2 Impulsive Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.5 Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1.6 Nonlinearity and Eccentricity Perturbations . . . . . . . . 18 1.7 Linear and Nonlinear Controllers...

  9. Situ microbial plugging process for subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

    1985-12-17

    Subterranean paths of water flow are impeded or changed by the facilitation of microbial growth therein. Either indigenous bacterial growth may be stimulated with nutrients or the formation may be first seeded with bacteria or their spores which inhibit fluid flow after proliferation. These methods and bacteria are usable to alter the flow of water in a waterflooded oil formation and to impede the outflow of contaminated water.

  10. Implementing Feedback in Simulations of Galaxy Formation: A Survey of Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Thacker; H. M. P. Couchman

    2000-01-15

    We present a detailed investigation of different approaches to modeling feedback in simulations of galaxy formation. Gas-dynamic forces are evaluated using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) while star formation and supernova feedback are included using a three parameter model which determines the star formation rate normalization, feedback energy and lifetime of feedback regions. The star formation rate is calculated using a Lagrangian Schmidt Law for all gas particles which satisfy temperature, density and convergent flow criteria. Feedback is incorporated as thermal heating of the ISM. We compare the effects of distributing this energy over the smoothing scale or depositing it on a single particle. Radiative losses are prevented from heated particles by adjusting the density used in radiative cooling. We test the models on the formation of galaxies from cosmological initial conditions and also on isolated Milky Way and dwarf galaxies. Extremely violent feedback is necessary to produce a gas disk with angular momentum remotely close to that of observed disk galaxies. This is a result of the extreme central concentration of the dark halos in the sCDM model, and the pervasiveness of the core-halo angular momentum transport mechanism. We emphasize that the disks formed in hierarchical simulations are partially a numerical artifact produced by the minimum mass scale of the simulation acting as a highly efficient `support' mechanism. Disk formation is strongly affected by the treatment of dense regions in SPH, which along with the difficulty of representing the hierarchical formation process, means that realistic simulations of galaxy formation require far higher resolution than currently used.

  11. Star formation relations in nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Neal J. II; Heiderman, Amanda; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2014-02-20

    We test some ideas for star formation relations against data on local molecular clouds. On a cloud by cloud basis, the relation between the surface density of star formation rate and surface density of gas divided by a free-fall time, calculated from the mean cloud density, shows no significant correlation. If a crossing time is substituted for the free-fall time, there is even less correlation. Within a cloud, the star formation rate volume and surface densities increase rapidly with the corresponding gas densities, faster than predicted by models using the free-fall time defined from the local density. A model in which the star formation rate depends linearly on the mass of gas above a visual extinction of 8 mag describes the data on these clouds, with very low dispersion. The data on regions of very massive star formation, with improved star formation rates based on free-free emission from ionized gas, also agree with this linear relation.

  12. Formation of TiO{sub 2} nanorods by ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, X. D.; Ren, F., E-mail: fren@whu.edu.cn; Cai, G. X.; Hong, M. Q.; Xiao, X. H.; Wu, W.; Liu, Y. C.; Li, W. Q.; Ying, J. J.; Jiang, C. Z. [School of Physics and Technology, Center for Ion Beam Application and Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-05-14

    Ion beam irradiation is a powerful method to fabricate and tailor the nanostructured surface of materials. Nanorods on the surface of single crystal rutile TiO{sub 2} were formed by N{sup +} ion irradiation. The dependence of nanorod morphology on ion fluence and energy was elaborated. With increasing ion fluence, nanopores grow in one direction perpendicular to the surface and burst finally to form nanorods. The length of nanorods increases with increasing ion energy under same fluence. The development of the nanorod structure is originated from the formation of the nanopores while N{sub 2} bubbles and aggregation of vacancies were responsible for the formation of nanopores and nanorods. Combining C{sup +} ion irradiation and post-irradiation annealing experiments, two qualitative models are proposed to explain the formation mechanism of these nanorods.

  13. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2011, 95(5), 1339-heterojunction organic solar cells,? Solar Energy MaterialsSolar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, 2013, 113, 85-89. [

  14. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    solar cells, Advanced Energy Materials, 2011, 1(5), 771-collecting grids,? Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells,layer, Advanced Energy Materials, 2012, 2(8), 945-949. [

  15. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    current collecting grids,? Solar Energy Materials and Solarcountries of the European Union,? Solar Energy, 2014, M. A.physics and devices,? Solar Energy: The State of the Art, L.

  16. TIMESCALES ON WHICH STAR FORMATION AFFECTS THE NEUTRAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stilp, Adrienne M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Warren, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, CSS Building, Room 1024, Stadium Drive, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Ott, Juergen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Turbulent neutral hydrogen (H I) line widths are often thought to be driven primarily by star formation (SF), but the timescale for converting SF energy to H I kinetic energy is unclear. As a complication, studies on the connection between H I line widths and SF in external galaxies often use broadband tracers for the SF rate, which must implicitly assume that SF histories (SFHs) have been constant over the timescale of the tracer. In this paper, we compare measures of H I energy to time-resolved SFHs in a number of nearby dwarf galaxies. We find that H I energy surface density is strongly correlated only with SF that occurred 30-40 Myr ago. This timescale corresponds to the approximate lifetime of the lowest mass supernova progenitors ({approx}8 M{sub Sun }). This analysis suggests that the coupling between SF and the neutral interstellar medium is strongest on this timescale, due either to an intrinsic delay between the release of the peak energy from SF or to the coherent effects of many supernova explosions during this interval. At {Sigma}{sub SFR} > 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, we find a mean coupling efficiency between SF energy and H I energy of {epsilon} = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 using the 30-40 Myr timescale. However, unphysical efficiencies are required in lower {Sigma}{sub SFR} systems, implying that SF is not the primary driver of H I kinematics at {Sigma}{sub SFR} < 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}.

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Modeling Fracture Formation on Growing Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Modeling Fracture Formation on Growing Surfaces by Pavol Federl A THESIS Fracture Formation on Growing Surfaces" submitted by Pavol Federl in partial fulfillment This thesis describes a framework for modeling fracture formation on differentially growing, bi- layered

  18. COMMISSARIAT A L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES DRHRS / SCP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    COMMISSARIAT A L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES DRHRS / SCP BUREAU DES STAGES DE LONGUE DUREE EN ENTREPRISE LAURENCE LOURS / CEA Saclay 01.69.08.20.90 stages@cea.fr http://www.cea.fr/ressources_humaines/stages_et_formation_en_alternance le site Internet du CEA : http://www.cea.fr/ressources_humaines/stages_et_formation_en_alternance

  19. Fusion Energy: Visions of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy conversion Direct energy conversion No $$$ turbines Why Is Aneutronic Fusion Cheap? #12;Dense Star Formation REPRODUCING NATURAL INSTABILITIES Solar Flares #12;Energy (X-rays, Ion Beams) CaptureFusion Energy: Visions of the Future Dec. 10-11, 2013 FOCUS FUSION Cheap, Clean, Safe & Unlimited

  20. 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelman, R.

    2013-10-01

    This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2012 provides facts and figures in a graphical format on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced water power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

  1. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  2. A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

  3. DECOUPLED ENERGY STABLE SCHEMES FOR PHASE-FIELD ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-02-27

    design easy-to-implement, energy stable numerical schemes. For the ...... Basaran, Formation of beads-on-a-string structures during break-up of viscoelastic fila-.

  4. Clean Firetube Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces, Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Clean Firetube Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces The prevention of scale formation in firetube boilers can result in substantial energy savings. Scale deposits occur when...

  5. Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

  6. Formation and Stability of Impurity "Snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Formation and Stability of Impurity "Snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Formation and Stability of Impurity "Snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas Authors:...

  7. Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Title: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source...

  8. Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential Means to Control the Impact on DPF Performance and Engine Efficiency Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms...

  9. The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of...

  10. Formation of water and methanol in star forming molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ankan Das; Kinsuk Acharyya; Sonali Chakrabarti; Sandip Kumar Chakrabarti

    2008-06-29

    We study the formation of water and methanol in the dense cloud conditions to find the dependence of its production rate on the binding energies, reaction mechanisms, temperatures, and grain site number. We wish to find the effective grain surface area available for chemical reaction and the effective recombination timescales as functions of grain and gas parameters. We used a Monte Carlo simulation to follow the chemical processes occurring on the grain surface. We find that the formation rate of various molecules is strongly dependent on the binding energies. When the binding energies are high, it is very difficult to produce significant amounts of the molecular species. Instead, the grain is found to be full of atomic species. The production rates are found to depend on the number density in the gas phase. We show that the concept of the effective grain surface area, which we introduced in our earlier work, plays a significant role in grain chemistry. We compute the abundance of water and methanol and show that the results strongly depend on the density and composition in the gas phase, as well as various grain parameters. In the rate equation, it is generally assumed that the recombination efficiencies are independent of the grain parameters, and the surface coverage. Presently, our computed parameter $\\alpha$ for each product is found to depend on the accretion rate, the grain parameters and the surface coverage of the grain. We compare our results obtained from the rate equation and the one from the effective rate equation, which includes $\\alpha$. At the end we compare our results with the observed abundances.

  11. ACCELERATE ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 ofDensified Large Square Bale Format

  12. Comparison of methods for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in saline formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, Angela L. [U.S. DOE; Bromhal, Grant S. [U.S. DOE; Strazisar, Brian [U.S. DOE; Rodosta, Traci D. [U.S. DOE; Guthrie, William J. [U.S. DOE; Allen, Douglas E. [ORISE; Guthrie, George D. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary estimates of CO{sub 2} storage potential in geologic formations provide critical information related to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) technologies to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. Currently multiple methods to estimate CO{sub 2} storage and multiple storage estimates for saline formations have been published, leading to potential uncertainty when comparing estimates from different studies. In this work, carbon dioxide storage estimates are compared by applying several commonly used methods to general saline formation data sets to assess the impact that the choice of method has on the results. Specifically, six CO{sub 2} storage methods were applied to thirteen saline formation data sets which were based on formations across the United States with adaptations to provide the geologic inputs required by each method. Methods applied include those by (1) international efforts the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (Bachu et al., 2007); (2) United States government agencies U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (US-DOE-NETL, 2012) and United States Geological Survey (Brennan et al., 2010); and (3) the peer-reviewed scientific community Szulczewski et al. (2012) and Zhou et al. (2008). A statistical analysis of the estimates generated by multiple methods revealed that assessments of CO{sub 2} storage potential made at the prospective level were often statistically indistinguishable from each other, implying that the differences in methodologies are small with respect to the uncertainties in the geologic properties of storage rock in the absence of detailed site-specific characterization.

  13. In situ oxidation of subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

    2011-01-11

    Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

  14. Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01

    Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

  15. The Formation of Primordial Luminous Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Ripamonti; Tom Abel

    2005-07-06

    In these lecture notes we review the current knowledge about the formation of the first luminous objects. We start from the cosmological context of hierarchical models of structure formation, and discuss the main physical processes which are believed to lead to primordial star formation, i.e. the cooling processes and the chemistry of molecules (especially H2) in a metal-free gas. We then describe the techniques and results of numerical simulations, which indicate that the masses of the first luminous objects are likely to be much larger than that of present-day stars. Finally, we discuss the scenario presented above, exposing some of the most interesting problems which are currently being investigated, such as that of the feedback effects of these objects.

  16. Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Robert R.

    Planet Formation: Planet Formation: Evolution of The Solar NebulaEvolution of The Solar Nebula #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar Nebula 1.1. Nebula collapses into a disk 2000 KTemperatures near the Sun reach 2000 K #12;Evolution of the Solar NebulaEvolution of the Solar

  17. Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT 001113 AP Old O/S A/P NonResCk 0000 General 000000 General #12;Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program

  18. Formation Word/ExcelFormation Word/Excel Prsentateur:Prsentateur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    11 Formation Word/ExcelFormation Word/Excel Prsentateur:Prsentateur: Christian Desrochers partir de Word 2002. De lgres diffrences peuventWord 2002. De lgres diffrences peuvent survenir avec une version de Wordsurvenir avec une version de Word diffrente.diffrente. #12;33 Objectifs de la

  19. Factors of paleosol formation in a Late Cretaceous eolian sand sheet paleoenvironment, Marlia Formation, Southeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Formation, Southeastern Brazil Patrick Francisco Fhr Dal' B a, , Giorgio Basilici a , Rmulo Simes), Brazil b IG Universidade Federal do Par, 66075-110, Belm (PA), Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i Late Cretaceous The Marlia Formation, which crops out in southeastern Brazil, is interpreted as a Late

  20. Increasing gas hydrate formation temperature for desalination of high salinity produced water with secondary guests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, Jong-Ho [ORISE; Seol, Yongkoo [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from ?2 C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

  1. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Rubin, Vera C.; Jzsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = 22 to 23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep H? images. We combine these H? images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. H? traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of H? further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  2. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  3. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  4. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  5. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  6. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    industry/bestpractices/software.html Pump System Assessmentpump user Format: Downloadable software Contact: U.S. Department of Energy URL: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/industry/

  8. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy 2010 Fuel Cell Project Kick-off Dr. Dimitrios, 2010September 28, 2010 #12;Administration's Clean Energy Goals Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012

  9. Electromagnetic radiation due to naked singularity formation in self-similar gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitsuda, Eiji; Yoshino, Hirotaka; Tomimatsu, Akira

    2005-04-15

    Dynamical evolution of test fields in background geometry with a naked singularity is an important problem relevant to the Cauchy horizon instability and the observational signatures different from black hole formation. In this paper we study electromagnetic perturbations generated by a given current distribution in collapsing matter under a spherically symmetric self-similar background. Using the Green's function method, we construct the formula to evaluate the outgoing energy flux observed at the future null infinity. The contributions from 'quasinormal' modes of the self-similar system as well as 'high-frequency' waves are clarified. We find a characteristic power-law time evolution of the outgoing energy flux which appears just before naked singularity formation and give the criteria as to whether or not the outgoing energy flux diverges at the future Cauchy horizon.

  10. Electromagnetic radiation due to naked singularity formation in self-similar gravitational collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eiji Mitsuda; Hirotaka Yoshino; Akira Tomimatsu

    2005-05-10

    Dynamical evolution of test fields in background geometry with a naked singularity is an important problem relevant to the Cauchy horizon instability and the observational signatures different from black hole formation. In this paper we study electromagnetic perturbations generated by a given current distribution in collapsing matter under a spherically symmetric self-similar background. Using the Green's function method, we construct the formula to evaluate the outgoing energy flux observed at the future null infinity. The contributions from "quasi-normal" modes of the self-similar system as well as "high-frequency" waves are clarified. We find a characteristic power-law time evolution of the outgoing energy flux which appears just before naked singularity formation, and give the criteria as to whether or not the outgoing energy flux diverges at the future Cauchy horizon.

  11. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Governato, Fabio [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ?CDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ?}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup }dark mass ejected per unit stellar massranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, ? ? dlog M/dlog R ? 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup 1} in the inner 1kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  12. Ralf Klessen: Lecture 2: 27.12.2006 Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klessen,Ralf

    efficiencyefficiency? How do globalglobal properties of the galaxy influence star formation (a locallocal process

  13. Distributed Control of Formation Flying Spacecraft Built on OA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the potential for creating fuel-efficient formation configurations rele- vant to future magnetospheric space

  14. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

    2011-01-11

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  15. Database (Report) of U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of a database, in Excel format, listing CHP installations incorporating thermal energy storage or turbine inlet cooling.

  16. Coalescence model for Theta_c pentaquark formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Karliner; Bryan R. Webber

    2005-01-14

    We present a model for the formation of the charmed pentaquark Theta_c in hard scattering processes such as deep inelastic scattering, e^+e^- annihilation, and high-energy p pbar collisions. The model assumes that the cross section for Theta_c formation is proportional to the rate of production of p D^{*-} (or pbar D^{*+}) pairs in close proximity both in momentum space and in coordinate space. The constant of proportionality is determined from the Theta_c cross section in deep inelastic scattering as reported by the H1 experiment. The HERWIG Monte Carlo is used to generate simulated DIS events and also to model the space-time structure of the final state. Requiring the proton and the D^* be within a 100 MeV mass window and separated by a spacelike distance of no more than 2 fm, we find that a large "coalescence enhancement factor" F_co \\sim 10 is required to account for the H1 signal. The same approach is then applied in order to estimate the number and characteristics of Theta_c events produced at LEP and the Tevatron.

  17. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  18. Composition Mixing during Blue Straggler Formation and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric L. Sandquist; Michael Bolte; Lars Hernquist

    1996-09-25

    We use smoothed-particle hydrodynamics to examine differences between direct collisions of single stars and binary star mergers in their roles as possible blue straggler star formation mechanisms. We find in all cases that core helium in the progenitor stars is largely retained in the core of the remnant, almost independent of the type of interaction or the central concentration of the progenitor stars. We have also modelled the subsequent evolution of the hydrostatic remnants, including mass loss and energy input from the hydrodynamical interaction. The combination of the hydrodynamical and hydrostatic models enables us to predict that little mixing will occur during the merger of two globular cluster stars of equal mass. In contrast to the results of Proctor Sills, Bailyn, & Demarque (1995), we find that neither completely mixed nor unmixed models can match the absolute colors of observed blue stragglers in NGC 6397 at all luminosity levels. We also find that the color distribution is probably the crucial test for explanations of BSS formation - if stellar collisions or mergers are the correct mechanisms, a large fraction of the lifetime of the straggler must be spent away from the main sequence. This constraint appears to rule out the possibility of completely mixed models. For NGC 6397, unmixed models predict blue straggler lifetimes ranging from about 0.1 to 4 Gyr, while completely mixed models predict a range from about 0.6 to 4 Gyr.

  19. Gas and Star Formation in the Circinus Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For, Bi-Qing; Jarrett, Tom

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the Circinus Galaxy, investigating its star formation, dust and gas properties both in the inner and outer disk. To achieve this, we obtained high-resolution Spitzer mid-infrared images with the IRAC (3.6, 5.8, 4.5, 8.0 micron) and MIPS (24 and 70 micron) instruments and sensitive HI data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the 64-m Parkes telescope. These were supplemented by CO maps from the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST). Because Circinus is hidden behind the Galactic Plane, we demonstrate the careful removal of foreground stars as well as large- and small-scale Galactic emission from the Spitzer images. We derive a visual extinction of Av = 2.1 mag from the Spectral Energy Distribution of the Circinus Galaxy and total stellar and gas masses of 9.5 x 10^{10} Msun and 9 x 10^9 Msun, respectively. Using various wavelength calibrations, we find obscured global star formation rates between 3 and 8 Msun yr^{-1}. Star forming regions in the inner spira...

  20. Passive film formation on 316L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Pitt, C.H.; Wadsworth, M.E.

    1981-10-01

    The polarization behavior of 316L stainless steel has been studied in deaerated sodium sulfate solutions of various pH values. Potentiodynamic, potentiostatic and galvanostatic methods were used for a kinetic study of the formation and growth of passive films. For the film composition analysis, Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and ESCA techniques were also employed. Anodic polarization curves show that current increases as pH decreases and temperature increases. The activation energy for the reaction in the active region was determined to be 10.8 Kcal/mole. From potentiostatic experiments, three stages for passive film formation were observed: the initial active-passive transition, the logarithmic growth of the film and the parabolic growth of the film. The logarithmic relation is expressed and the parabolic relation written. The depth profile concentration of elements in the film by AES showed chromium enrichment at the surface except for the specimen treated at 0.9V (SCE), where iron was the dominant element in the film. The relative amount of Fe/sup 2 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ on the film surface analyzed by ESCA was not different for specimens anodized at 0.18V and 0.58V.

  1. Formation mechanism of the secondary building unit in a chromium terephthalate metal-organic framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantu Cantu, David; McGrail, B. Peter; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2014-11-25

    Based on density functional theory calculations and simulation, a detailed mechanism is presented on the formation of the secondary building unit (SBU) of MIL-101, a chromium terephthalate metal-organic framework (MOF). SBU formation is key to MOF nucleation, the rate-limiting step in the formation process of many MOFs. A series of reactions that lead to the formation of the SBU of MIL-101 is proposed in this work. Initial rate-limiting reactions form the metal cluster with three chromium (III) atoms linked to a central bridging oxygen. Terephthalate linkers play a key role as chromium (III) atoms are joined to linker carboxylate groups prior to the placement of the central bridging oxygen. Multiple linker addition reactions, which follow in different paths due to structural isomers, are limited by the removal of water molecules in the first chromium coordination shell. The least energy path is identified were all linkers on one face of the metal center plane are added first. A simple kinetic model based on transition state theory shows the rate of secondary building unit formation similar to the rate metal-organic framework nucleation. The authors are thankful to Dr. R. Rousseau for a critical reading of the manuscript. This research would not have been possible without the support of the Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  2. La Cl informatique Formation Outlook 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    La Cl informatique Formation Outlook 2000 Aide-mmoire Novembre 2003 #12;Table des matires crire directement dans votre Outlook. Voici la mthode pour le faire. Dans le menu Outils, choisir Comptes de Hotmail apparatra dans la liste des comptes de Outlook. 11 #12;Mettre un arrire plan dans votre message

  3. Star Formation Histories in the Local Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    2004-07-09

    Deep color magnitude diagrams extending to the main sequence provide the most direct measure of the detailed star formation history in a stellar population. With large investments of observing time, HST can obtain such data for populations out to 1 Mpc, but its field of view is extremely small in comparison to the size of Local Group galaxies. This limitation severely constrains our understanding of galaxy formation. For example, the largest galaxy in the Local Group, Andromeda, offers an ideal laboratory for studying the formation of large spiral galaxies, but the galaxy shows substructure on a variety of scales, presumably due to its violent merger history. Within its remaining lifetime, HST can only sample a few sight-lines through this complex galaxy. In contrast, a wide field imager could provide a map of Andromeda's halo, outer disk, and tidal streams, revealing the spatially-dependent star formation history in each structure. The same data would enable many secondary studies, such as the age variation in Andromeda's globular cluster system, gigantic samples of variable stars, and microlensing tracers of the galaxy's dark matter distribution.

  4. Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Throop, Henry

    Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation? Henry Throop John Bally SWRI Univ.Colorado / CASA DPS 12-Oct-2004 #12;Orion Nebula Photo-evaporation by extr 4 O/B stars, UV-bright, 105 solar luminosities 2000 solar-type stars with disks Photo-evaporation (PE) by external O/B stars removes disks on 105

  5. Formation distance Stphanie Jean-Daubias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Daubias, Stéphanie

    ) dans le temps et dans l'espace de l'apprenant et de l'équipe professorale 3 #12;Deux types de médias en;Formation à distance et espace Plusieurs variantes possibles enseignement entièrement à distance

  6. Facult de Sant Publique Formation continue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    Facult de Sant Publique Formation continue en management des institutions de soins Programme 2011, management stratgique (UCL, ULB) CIPS p.16 > Certificat interuniversitaire en management de la qualit dans) p.19 > Certificat interuniversitaire en management mdical (ULB, UCL) CIMM p.19 > Certificat

  7. Formatting Your Senior Project Get started!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    at the bottom right of the dialog box. #12;Overall Formatting Guidelines Margins Set all margins to 1 inch (top, bottom, left and right) Set Header and Footer to .5 inch Font Set size at 12 points Choose Courier New, Times New Roman, Arial, Garamond, or Century Schoolbook. Alignment Align text LEFT only

  8. ACOUSTIC FORMING FOR ENHANCED DEWATERING AND FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cyrus K Aidun

    2007-11-30

    The next generation of forming elements based on acoustic excitation to increase drainage and enhances formation both with on-line control and profiling capabilities has been investigated in this project. The system can be designed and optimized based on the fundamental experimental and computational analysis and investigation of acoustic waves in a fiber suspension flow and interaction with the forming wire.

  9. Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayr, P.

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal ...

  10. Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

  11. Method for formation of thin film transistors on plastic substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Sigmon, T.W.; Aceves, R.C.

    1998-10-06

    A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The process relies on techniques for depositing semiconductors, dielectrics, and metals at low temperatures; crystallizing and doping semiconductor layers in the TFT with a pulsed energy source; and creating top-gate self-aligned as well as back-gate TFT structures. The process enables the fabrication of amorphous and polycrystalline channel silicon TFTs at temperatures sufficiently low to prevent damage to plastic substrates. The process has use in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics. 5 figs.

  12. Method for formation of thin film transistors on plastic substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Portola Valley, CA); Aceves, Randy C. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-10-06

    A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The process relies on techniques for depositing semiconductors, dielectrics, and metals at low temperatures; crystallizing and doping semiconductor layers in the TFT with a pulsed energy source; and creating top-gate self-aligned as well as back-gate TFT structures. The process enables the fabrication of amorphous and polycrystalline channel silicon TFTs at temperatures sufficiently low to prevent damage to plastic substrates. The process has use in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics.

  13. Panchromatic star formation rate indicators and their uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Cunha, Elisabete

    2015-01-01

    The star formation rate (SFR) is a fundamental property of galaxies and it is crucial to understand the build-up of their stellar content, their chemical evolution, and energetic feedback. The SFR of galaxies is typically obtained by observing the emission by young stellar populations directly in the ultraviolet, the optical nebular line emission from gas ionized by newly-formed massive stars, the reprocessed emission by dust in the infrared range, or by combining observations at different wavelengths and fitting the full spectral energy distributions of galaxies. In this brief review we describe the assumptions, advantages and limitations of different SFR indicators, and we discuss the most promising SFR indicators for high-redshift studies.

  14. Characterising the acceleration phase of blast wave formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, T. E. Pasley, J.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Schmitz, H.

    2014-10-15

    Intensely heated, localised regions in uniform fluids will rapidly expand and generate an outwardly propagating blast wave. The Sedov-Taylor self-similar solution for such blast waves has long been studied and applied to a variety of scenarios. A characteristic time for their formation has also long been identified using dimensional analysis, which by its very nature, can offer several interpretations. We propose that, rather than simply being a characteristic time, it may be interpreted as the definitive time taken for a blast wave resulting from an intense explosion in a uniform media to contain its maximum kinetic energy. A scaling relation for this measure of the acceleration phase, preceding the establishment of the blast wave, is presented and confirmed using a 1D planar hydrodynamic model.

  15. Formation of super-heavy elements in astrophysical nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter

    2012-10-20

    The unexplored area of heavy neutron-rich nuclides is extremely important for the understanding of the r process of astrophysical nucleogenesis. For elements with Z>100 only neutron deficient isotopes (located to the left of the stability line) have been synthesized so far. The 'north-east' area of the nuclear map can be reached neither in fusion reactions nor in fragmentation processes. Low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions are quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei including those located at the superheavy (SH) island of stability [1]. The neutron capture process is considered here as an alternative method for the production of SH nuclei. Requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for the synthesis of long-living neutron rich SH nuclei are formulated. Formation of SH nuclei in supernova explosions is also discussed and the abundance of SH elements in nature is estimated.

  16. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

    2010-10-14

    We have attempted to hydrogenate adsorbed formate species on copper catalysts to probe the importance of this postulated mechanistic step in methanol synthesis. Surface formate coverages up to 0.25 were produced at temperatures between 413K and 453K on supported (Cu/SiO2) copper and unsupported copper catalysts. The adlayers were produced by various methods including (1) steady state catalytic conditions in CO2-H2 (3:1, 6 bar) atmospheres, and (2) by exposure of the catalysts to formic acid. As reported in earlier work, the catalytic surface at steady state contains bidentate formate species with coverages up to saturation levels of ~ 0.25 at the low temperatures of this study. The reactivity of these formate adlayers was investigated at relevant reaction temperatures in atmospheres containing up to 6 bar H2 partial pressure by simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy measurements. The yield of methanol during the attempted hydrogenation (titration) of these adlayers was insignificant (<0.2 mol % of the formate adlayer) even in dry hydrogen partial pressures up to 6 bar. Hydrogen titration of formate species produced from formic acid also failed to produce significant quantities of methanol, and attempted titration in gases consisting of CO-hydrogen mixtures or dry CO2 were also unproductive. The formate decomposition kinetics, measured by IR, were also unaffected by these changes in the gas composition. Similar experiments on unsupported copper also failed to show any methanol. From these results, we conclude that methanol synthesis on copper cannot result from the direct hydrogenation of (bidentate) formate species in simple steps involving adsorbed H species alone. Furthermore, experiments performed on both supported (Cu/SiO2) and unsupported copper catalysts gave similar results implying that the methanol synthesis reaction mechanism only involves metal surface chemistry. Pre-exposure of the bidentate formate adlayer to oxidation by O2 or N2O produces a change to a monodentate configuration. Attempted titration of this monodentate formate/O coadsorbed layer in dry hydrogen produces significant quantities of methanol, although decomposition of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen remains the dominant reaction pathway. Simultaneous production of water is also observed during this titration as the copper surface is re-reduced. These results indicate that co-adsorbates related to surface oxygen or water-derived species may be critical to methanol production on copper, perhaps assisting in the hydrogenation of adsorbed formate to adsorbed methoxyl.

  17. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    o nergy Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Efficiency and Renewable Energy United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 18th W rld Hydrogen E Presidential Priorities Energy efficiency and renewable energy research development andEnergy efficiency

  18. Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2010-01-01

    industry/bestpractices/software.html Pump System Assessmentup to 16% of pumps in use in U.S. industry are more than 20pump user Format: Downloadable software Contact: U.S. Department of Energy URL: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/industry/

  19. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita Energy efficiency and renewable energy research, development, and deployment activities help the Nation Presidential Priorities Economic Create green jobs through Recovery Act energy projects Double renewable

  20. Molecular Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Long; Li, Zhenjun; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2014-04-16

    Understanding hydrogen formation on TiO2 surfaces is of great importance as it could provide fundamental insight into water splitting for hydrogen production using solar energy. In this work, hydrogen formation from glycols having different numbers of methyl end-groups have been studied using temperature pro-grammed desorption on reduced, hydroxylated, and oxidized TiO2(110) surfaces. The results from OD-labeled glycols demon-strate that gas-phase molecular hydrogen originates exclusively from glycol hydroxyl groups. The yield is controlled by a combi-nation of glycol coverage, steric hindrance, TiO2(110) order and the amount of subsurface charge. Combined, these results show that proximal pairs of hydroxyl aligned glycol molecules and subsurface charge are required to maximize the yield of this redox reaction. These findings highlight the importance of geometric and electronic effects in hydrogen formation from adsorbates on TiO2(110).

  1. Thermodynamic study on the formation of acetylene during coal pyrolysis in the arc plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, W.; Li, F.; Cai, G.; Lu, Y.; Chang, L.

    2009-07-01

    Based on the principle of minimizing the Gibbs free energy, the composition of C-H-O-N-S equilibrium system about acetylene formation during the pyrolysis in arc plasma jet for four kinds of different rank-ordered coals such as Datong, Xianfeng, Yangcheng, and Luan was analyzed and calculated. The results indicated that hydrogen, as the reactive atmosphere, was beneficial to the acetylene formation. The coal ranks and the hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur in coal all could obviously affect the acetylene yield. The mole fraction of acetylene is the maximum when the ratio value of atom H/C was 2. The content of oxygen was related to the acetylene yield, but it does not compete with CO formation. These agreed with the experimental results, and they could help to select the coal type for the production of acetylene through plasma pyrolysis process.

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    industry/bestpractices/software.html Pump System AssessmentPumps, and Fans website at: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/industry/pump user Format: Downloadable software Contact: U.S. Department of Energy URL: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/industry/

  3. NOx Formation in a Premixed Syngas Flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, S.L. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Givi, P. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Strakey, P.; Casleton, K.

    2006-11-01

    Reduction of NOx is a subject of significant current interest in stationary gas turbines. The objective of this study is to examine the effects of turbulence on non-thermal NOx formation in a syngas flame. This is archived by a detailed parametric study via PDF simulations of a partially stirred reactor and a dumped axisymmetric premixed flame. Several different detailed and reduced kinetics schemes are considered. The simulated results demonstrate the strong dependence of combustion process on turbulence. It is shown that the amount of NOx formation is significantly influenced by the inlet conditions. That is, the turbulence intensity can be tweaked to attain optimal ultra-low NOx emissions at a given temperature.

  4. Reconstructing the Star Formation Histories of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uta Fritze; Thomas Lilly

    2007-01-15

    We present a methodological study to find out how far back and to what precision star formation histories of galaxies can be reconstructed from CMDs, from integrated spectra and Lick indices, and from integrated multi-band photometry. Our evolutionary synthesis models GALEV allow to describe the evolution of galaxies in terms of all three approaches and we have assumed typical observational uncertainties for each of them and then investigated to what extent and accuracy different star formation histories can be discriminated. For a field in the LMC bar region with both a deep CMD from HST observations and a trailing slit spectrum across exactly the same field of view we could test our modelling results against real data.

  5. Nanodot formation induced by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abere, M. J.; Kang, M.; Goldman, R. S.; Yalisove, S. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, C. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Rittman, D. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Phillips, J. D. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The femtosecond laser generation of ZnSe nanoscale features on ZnSe surfaces was studied. Irradiation with multiple exposures produces 10100?nm agglomerations of nanocrystalline ZnSe while retaining the original single crystal structure of the underlying material. The structure of these nanodots was verified using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The nanodots continue to grow hours after irradiation through a combination of bulk and surface diffusion. We suggest that in nanodot formation the result of ultrafast laser induced point defect formation is more than an order of magnitude below the ZnSe ultrafast melt threshold fluence. This unique mechanism of point defect injection will be discussed.

  6. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancil, J.

    1995-01-01

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  7. Galactosynthesis: Halo Histories, Star Formation, and Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Buchalter; Raul Jimenez; Marc Kamionkowski

    2000-06-01

    We investigate the effects of a variety of ingredients that must enter into a realistic model for disk-galaxy formation, focusing primarily on the Tully-Fisher (TF) relation and its scatter in several wavebands. Our main findings are: (a) the slope, normalization, and scatter of the TF relation across various wavebands is determined {\\em both} by halo properties and star formation in the disk; (b) TF scatter owes primarily to the spread in formation redshifts. The scatter can be measurably reduced by chemical evolution, and also in some cases by the weak anti-correlation between peak height and spin; (c) multi-wavelength constraints can be important in distinguishing between models which appear to fit the TF relation in I or K; (d) successful models seem to require that the bulk of disk formation cannot occur too early (z>2) or too late (z<0.5), and are inconsistent with high values of $\\Omega_0$; (e) a realistic model with the above ingredients can reasonably reproduce the observed z=0 TF relation in {\\em all} bands (B, R, I, and K). It can also account for the z=1 B-band TF relation and yield rough agreement with the local B and K luminosity functions and B-band surface-brightness--magnitude relation. The remarkable agreement with observations suggests that the amount of gas that is expelled or poured into a disk galaxy must be small, and that the specific angular momentum of the baryons must roughly equal that of the halo; there is little room for angular momentum transfer. In an appendix we present analytic fits to stellar-population synthesis models.

  8. Carboxylic acid accelerated formation of diesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Dickson, T.J.

    1998-04-28

    This invention pertains to accelerating the rate of formation of 1,1-dicarboxylic esters from the reaction of an aldehyde with a carboxylic acid anhydride or a ketene in the presence of a non-iodide containing a strong Bronsted acid catalyst by the addition of a carboxylic acid at about one bar pressure and between about 0 and 80 C in the substantial absence of a hydrogenation or carbonylation catalyst.

  9. Galaxy Structure, Dark Matter, and Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Weinberg

    1996-10-01

    The structure of galaxies, the nature of dark matter, and the physics of galaxy formation were the interlocking themes of DM 1996: Dark and Visible Matter in Galaxies and Cosmological Implications. In this conference summary report, I review recent observational and theoretical advances in these areas, then describe highlights of the meeting and discuss their implications. I include as an appendix the lyrics of The Dark Matter Rap: A Cosmological History for the MTV Generation.

  10. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  11. On star formation in primordial protoglobular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; Raul Jimenez; Bernard Jones

    1996-04-11

    Using a new physical model for star formation (Padoan 1995) we have tested the possibility that globular clusters (GCs) are formed from primordial mass fluctuations, whose mass scale ($10^8$ - $10^9$ M$_{\\odot}$) is selected out of a CDM spectrum by the mechanism of non-equilibrium formation of $H_2$. We show that such clouds are able to convert about 0.003 of their total mass into a bound system (GC) and about 0.02 into halo stars. The metal enriched gas is dispersed away from the GC by supernova explosions and forms the galactic disk. These mass ratios between GCs, halo and disk depend on the predicted IMF which is a consequence of the universal statistics of fluid turbulence. They also depend on the ratio of baryonic over non-baryonic mass ,$X_b$, and are comparable with the values observed in typical spiral galaxies for $X_b \\approx 0.1-0.2$. The computed mass and radius for a GC ( $5\\times 10^5$ M$_{\\odot}$ and 30 pc) are in good agreement with the average values in the Galaxy. The model predicts an exponential cut off in the stellar IMF below 0.1 M$_{\\odot}$ in GCs and 0.6 M$_{\\odot}$ in the halo. The quite massive star formation in primordial clouds leads to a large number of supernovae and to a high blue luminosity during the first two Gyr of the life of every galaxy.

  12. Formation of charmonium states in heavy ion collisions and thermalization of charm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Thews

    2006-04-06

    We examine the possibility to utilize in-medium charmonium formation in heavy ion interactions at collider energy as a probe of the properties of the medium. This is possible because the formation process involves recombination of charm quarks which imprints a signal on the resulting normalized transverse momentum distribution containing information about the momentum distribution of the quarks. We have contrasted the transverse momentum spectra of J/Psi, characterized by , which result from the formation process in which the charm quark distributions are taken at opposite limits with regard to thermalization in the medium. The first uses charm quark distributions unchanged from their initial production in a pQCD process, appropriate if their interaction with the medium is negligible. The second uses charm quark distributions which are in complete thermal equilibrium with the transversely expanding medium, appropriate if a very strong interaction between charm quarks and medium exists. We find that the resulting of the formed J/Psi should allow one to differentiate between these extremes, and that this differentiation is not sensitive to variations in the detailed dynamics of in-medium formation. We include a comparison of predictions of this model with preliminary PHENIX measurements, which indicates compatibility with a substantial fraction of in-medium formation.

  13. Stratigraphy of the Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group, Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Audrey Gail

    1994-01-01

    Wilcox Group sediments are classified into three main formations: a lower Hooper Formation, a middle Simsboro Formation, and an upper Calvert Bluff Formation. The Calvert Bluff and Simsboro formations have been interpreted ...

  14. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Energy Overview & A Perspective on Fuel Cell Technologies Dr; Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012 Invest $150 billion over ten years in energy R&D to transition$Thousands Budget History Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Budget History FY2004-FY2011 (requested) U

  15. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Renewable Energy, Office of Fuel Cell Technologies, of theand Operation. UTC Fuel Cells, DOE Freeze Workshop,exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) drastically reducing

  16. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    and G. Li, ?Polymer solar cells with enhanced open-circuittandem and triple-junction solar cells,? Materials, 2012, 5(high performance solar cells, Advanced Energy Materials,

  17. Open Data Catalogue | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The files below contain the Public Data Listing for the Department of Energy in .JSON format. The Public Data Listing is a machine-readable list of all the publically available...

  18. 3rd Miami international conference on alternative energy sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nejat Veziroglu, T.

    1980-01-01

    The conference includes sessions on solar energy, ocean thermal energy, wind energy, hydro power, nuclear breeders and nuclear fusion, synthetic fuels from coal or wastes, hydrogen production and uses, formulation of workable policies on energy use and energy conservation, heat and energy storage, and energy education. The volume of the proceedings presents the papers and lectures in condensed format grouped by subject under forty-two sessions for 319 presentations.

  19. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  20. The Instrument Response Function Format for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John E

    2015-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a future ground-based observatory (with two locations, in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres) that will be used in the study of the very-high-energy gamma-ray sky. CTA observations will be proposed by external users or initiated by the observatory, with the resulting measurements being processed by the CTA observatory and the reduced data made accessible to the corresponding proposer. Instrument Response Functions (IRFs) will also be provided to convert the quantities measured by the array(s) into relevant science products (i.e. spectra, sky maps, light curves). As the response of the telescopes depend on many correlated observational and physical quantities (e.g. gamma-ray arrival direction, energy, telescope orientation, background light, weather conditions etc.) the CTA IRFs could grow into increasingly larger and larger file sizes, which can become unwieldy or impractical for use in specific observation cases. To this end, a customized IRF format (complying with t...

  1. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  2. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Richard Farmer Hydrogen Business Council September 14, 2010 #12; Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012 Invest $150

  3. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy AUGUST 2010 2009 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT EXECUTIVE (Berkeley Lab) Kevin Porter and Sari Fink (Exeter Associates) Suzanne Tegen (National Renewable Energy

  4. Stratmoor, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek Formation Grabens,Stratmoor,

  5. Dynamic and thermal control of an electromagnetic formation flight testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neave, Matthew D. (Matthew David)

    2005-01-01

    Formation flight of multiple spacecraft is an emerging method for completing complex space missions in an efficient manner. A limitation found in maintaining such formations is the need for precise control at all times. ...

  6. A first site of galaxy cluster formation: complete spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A first site of galaxy cluster formation: complete spectroscopy of a protocluster at z 6.01 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A first site of galaxy cluster formation:...

  7. Formation of annealing twins during recrystallization and grain growth in 304L austenitic stainless steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    . 304L austenitic stainless steel has a low stacking fault energy ( -2 Jm02.0 ) and so annealing twinsFormation of annealing twins during recrystallization and grain growth in 304L austenitic stainless steel Y.JIN1, a , M.BERNACKI1 , G.S.ROHRER2 , A.D.ROLLETT2 , B.LIN2 , N.BOZZOLO1 1 CEMEF, Rue Claude

  8. Mechanical and statistical study of the laminar hole formation in transitional plane Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolland, Joran

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the numerical study and modelling of two aspects the formation of laminar holes in transitional turbulence of plane Couette flow (PCF). On the one hand, we consider quenches: sudden decreases of the Reynolds number R which force the formation of holes. The Reynolds number is decreased from featureless turbulence to the range of existence of the oblique laminar-turbulent bands [Rg;Rt]. The successive stages of the quench are studied by means of visualisations and measurements of kinetic energy and turbulent fraction. The behaviour of the kinetic energy is explained using a kinetic energy budget: it shows that viscosity causes quasi modal decay until lift-up equals it and creates a new balance. Moreover, the budget confirms that the physical mechanisms at play are independent of the way the quench is performed. On the other hand we consider the natural formation of laminar holes in the bands, near Rg. The Direct Numerical simulations (DNS) show that holes in the turbulent bands pr...

  9. Pattern formation in drying drops Robert D. Deegan*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deegan, Robert

    , Chicago, Illinois 60637 Received 24 November 1998 Ring formation in an evaporating sessile dropPattern formation in drying drops Robert D. Deegan* James Franck Institute, 5640 South Ellis Avenue. Here I show that the drop itself can generate one of the essential conditions for ring formation

  10. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  11. DEFORMATION OF THE HURRICANE MOUNTAIN FORMATION MELANGE ALONG TOMHEGAN AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beane, Rachel J.

    DEFORMATION OF THE HURRICANE MOUNTAIN FORMATION MELANGE ALONG TOMHEGAN AND COLD STREAMS, WEST through Acadian deformation recorded in foliated pelites of the Hurricane Mountain Formation in west central Maine. The Hurricane Mountain Formation is a melange with a grey sulfidic slate- to gneiss- matrix

  12. Peptide bond formation through gas-phase reactions in the interstellar medium: formamide and acetamide as prototypes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: predondo@qf.uva.es [Computational Chemistry Group, Departamento de Qumica Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-09-20

    A theoretical study of the reactions of NH{sub 4}{sup +} with formaldehyde and CH{sub 5}{sup +} with formamide is carried out. The viability of these gas-phase ion-molecule reactions as possible sources of formamide and acetamide under the conditions of interstellar medium is evaluated. We report a theoretical estimation of the reaction enthalpies and an analysis of their potential energy surfaces. Formation of protonated formamide from the reaction between ammonium cation and formaldehyde is an exothermic process, but all the channels located on the potential energy surface leading to this product present net activation energies. For the reaction between methanium and formamide, different products are possible from a thermodynamic point of view. An analysis of its potential energy surface showed that formation of protonated acetamide and amino acetaldehyde takes place through barrier-free paths. Therefore, this reaction could be a feasible source of acetamide and amino acetaldehyde in space.

  13. Interoperability format translation and transformation between IFC architectural design file and simulation file formats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chao, Tian-Jy; Kim, Younghun

    2015-01-06

    Automatically translating a building architecture file format (Industry Foundation Class) to a simulation file, in one aspect, may extract data and metadata used by a target simulation tool from a building architecture file. Interoperability data objects may be created and the extracted data is stored in the interoperability data objects. A model translation procedure may be prepared to identify a mapping from a Model View Definition to a translation and transformation function. The extracted data may be transformed using the data stored in the interoperability data objects, an input Model View Definition template, and the translation and transformation function to convert the extracted data to correct geometric values needed for a target simulation file format used by the target simulation tool. The simulation file in the target simulation file format may be generated.

  14. Interoperability format translation and transformation between IFC architectural design file and simulation file formats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chao, Tian-Jy; Kim, Younghun

    2015-02-03

    Automatically translating a building architecture file format (Industry Foundation Class) to a simulation file, in one aspect, may extract data and metadata used by a target simulation tool from a building architecture file. Interoperability data objects may be created and the extracted data is stored in the interoperability data objects. A model translation procedure may be prepared to identify a mapping from a Model View Definition to a translation and transformation function. The extracted data may be transformed using the data stored in the interoperability data objects, an input Model View Definition template, and the translation and transformation function to convert the extracted data to correct geometric values needed for a target simulation file format used by the target simulation tool. The simulation file in the target simulation file format may be generated.

  15. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  16. Globular Cluster Formation in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Lipscy; P. Plavchan

    2003-11-12

    We present high resolution mid-infrared (mid-IR; 11.7 and 17.65 micron) maps of the central 400 pc region of the starburst galaxy M82. Seven star forming clusters are identified which together provide ~ 15% of the total mid-IR luminosity of the galaxy. Combining the mid-IR data with thermal radio measurements and near- and mid-IR line emission, we find that these young stellar clusters have inferred masses and sizes comparable to globular clusters. At least 20% of the star formation in M82 is found to occur in super-star clusters.

  17. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  18. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  19. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  20. result formats | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult formats Home Jweers's picture Submitted

  1. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita of Energy Military Energy and Alternative Fuels Conference March 17-18, 2010 San Diego, CA #12;2 1. Overview;3 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges Energy Efficiency and Resource Diversity Fuel cells offer

  2. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Ling-I

    2011-01-01

    candidate for solar energy conversion applications. [13] Thesemiconductors for solar energy conversion applications. Weapplications in solar energy conversion and catalysis.

  3. METR 4553/5553 Climate and Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4553/5553 Climate and Renewable Energy Spring 2013 Instructor Dr. Susan Postawko Dr. Mark to energy generated by fossil fuels. Course web site: Accessed on Desire2Learn @ http://learn.ou.edu (log of energy and climate Work with others to come to a consensus on questions of energy and climate Format

  4. 788 J. Phys. Chem. 1985,89, 788-797 sites of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls.13 Formate formation caused

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    788 J. Phys. Chem. 1985,89, 788-797 sites of hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls.13 Formate formation caused surface carbonates to disappear and did not displace the isolated hydroxyls, suggesting that the formate and methoxy groups caused the isolated hydroxyls to disappear, indicating that these species were adsorbed

  5. Communication n 219 Atelier 21 : Formation au mtier du soin En quoi l'universitarisation de la formation infirmire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    infirmier bas sur le dveloppement des comptences. Nous avons choisi de mettre en exergue une pratique rfrentiels d'activits, de comptences et de formation infirmire. Mots cls : infirmier(re), formation conduisant au diplme d'tat d'infirmier. Le rfrentiel de formation a comme enjeu une autre dfinition du

  6. 2 Star formation and outflows: an overview 2.1 The current picture of lowmass star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanke, Thomas

    #24; star is not yet high enough for hydrogen fusion at the time when accretion dies out temperature is high enough for hydrogen fusion, the star #12; 12 2 STAR FORMATION AND OUTFLOWS: AN OVERVIEW11 2 Star formation and outflows: an overview 2.1 The current picture of low­mass star formation

  7. Formate brines -- New fluids for drilling and completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, M.S.; Shipp, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The term ``formate brines`` refers broadly to three primary compounds dissolved in water -- sodium formate (NaCOOH), potassium formate (KCOOH) and cesium formate (CsCOOH). Each is chemically classified as an alkali-metal salt of formic acid. They offer properties that in many respects are superior to their predecessors, halide brines such as zinc bromide and calcium bromide, without the undesirable side effects of those more common halide brine systems. This article introduces the technology and provides an overview of published work to date regarding formates.

  8. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  9. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  10. REVISITING JOVIAN-RESONANCE INDUCED CHONDRULE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasawa, M. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, K. K.; Tanaka, H. [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-19, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Nakamoto, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Miura, H. [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Yamanohata, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Yamamoto, T., E-mail: nagasawa.m.ad@m.titech.ac.jp [Center for Planetary Science, Kobe University, 7-1-48 Minamimachi, Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    It is proposed that planetesimals perturbed by Jovian mean-motion resonances are the source of shock waves that form chondrules. It is considered that this shock-induced chondrule formation requires the velocity of the planetesimal relative to the gas disk to be on the order of ? 7 km s{sup 1} at 1AU. In previous studies on planetesimal excitation, the effects of Jovian mean-motion resonance together with the gas drag were investigated, but the velocities obtained were at most 8 km s{sup 1} in the asteroid belt, which is insufficient to account for the ubiquitous existence of chondrules. In this paper, we reexamine the effect of Jovian resonances and take into account the secular resonance in the asteroid belt caused by the gravity of the gas disk. We find that the velocities relative to the gas disk of planetesimals a few hundred kilometers in size exceed 12 km s{sup 1}, and that this is achieved around the 3:1 mean-motion resonance. The heating region is restricted to a relatively narrowband between 1.5AU and 3.5AU. Our results suggest that chondrules were produced effectively in the asteroid region after Jovian formation. We also find that many planetesimals are scattered far beyond Neptune. Our findings can explain the presence of crystalline silicate in comets if the scattered planetesimals include silicate dust processed by shock heating.

  11. Formation and polymerization of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Under acidic sol-gel polymerization conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)-propane 1 and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane 2 were shown to preferentially form cyclic disilsesquioxanes 3 and 4 rather than the expected 1,3-propylene- and 1,4-butylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Formation of 3 and 4 is driven by a combination of an intramolecular cyclization to six and seven membered rings, and a pronounced reduction in reactivity under acidic conditions as a function of increasing degree of condensation. The stability of cyclic disilsesquioxanes was confirmed with the synthesis of 3 and 4 in gram quantities; the cyclic disilsesquioxanes react slowly to give tricyclic dimers containing a thermodynamically stable eight membered siloxane ring. Continued reactions were shown to perserve the cyclic structure, opening up the possibility of utilizing cyclic disilsesquioxanes as sol-gel monomers. Preliminary polymerization studies with these new, carbohydrate-like monomers revealed the formation of network poly(cyclic disilsesquioxanes) under acidic conditions and polymerization with ring-opening under basic conditions.

  12. FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    126 III.A.5.2 Development of Large Format Lithium-Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density (Dow Kokam, LLC) ......

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 37, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2009 2303 Nitric Oxide Formation in a Premixed Flame With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 37, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2009 2303 Nitric Oxide Formation in a Premixed Flame With High-Level Plasma Energy Coupling Xing Rao, Igor B. Matveev, and Tonghun Lee Abstract) in a transient-arc direct-current plasmatron igniter using premixed air/fuel mixtures. Quantitative measurements

  14. August 7, 2008 We are pleased to announce the formation of the Southwestern Biofuels Association (SWBA), a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    August 7, 2008 We are pleased to announce the formation of the Southwestern Biofuels Association (SWBA), a progressive trade association promoting the development of renewable biofuels in New, August 15th at noon at the New Mexico Capitol Rotunda in Santa Fe. While energy and biofuels

  15. Physical and geological processes of delta formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Charles Carpenter

    1953-01-01

    This study was initiated to review the literature and technology applicable to coating beverage cans, to confirm previous assumptions made about the low air emissions impact of the UV can printing process, to determine energy estimates for thermal...

  16. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    by device optimization, Advanced Materials, 2010, 22(39),Optimization of ultra-thin light absorbing layer and transparent cathode architecture, Advanced Energy Materials,optimization of diketopyrrolopyrrole?based narrow bandgap polymer solar cells, Advanced Materials,

  17. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Y. Wu, and G. Li, ?Polymer solar cells with enhanced open-tandem and triple-junction solar cells,? Materials, 2012, 5(molecules for high performance solar cells, Advanced Energy

  18. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    status and future potential,? Solar Energy, 2005, 79(1), 78-Organic solar cells: their developments and potentials,?Therefore, organic solar cells, with potential in low-cost

  19. A tale of two feedbacks: Star formation in the host galaxies of radio AGNs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Ji Hoon [CEOU-Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Trichas, Markos [Airbus Defence and Space, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage SG1 2AS (United Kingdom); Goto, Tomo [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Malkan, Matt [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 3-714 UCLA, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Ruiz, Angel [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA), Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, 411 007 Pune (India); Lee, Hyung Mok; Kim, Seong Jin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Murata, K.; Wada, Takehiko; Wada, Kensuke [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Yoshino-dai 3-1-1, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Shim, Hyunjin [Department of Earth Science Education, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hanami, Hitoshi [Physics Section, Faculty of Humanities, Iwate University, Ueda 3 chome, 18-34 Morioka, Morioka, Iwate 020-8550 (Japan); Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J., E-mail: mkarouzos@astro.snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-04-01

    Several lines of argument support the existence of a link between activity at the nuclei of galaxies, in the form of an accreting supermassive black hole, and star formation activity in these galaxies. Radio jets have long been argued to be an ideal mechanism that allows active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to interact with their host galaxies and affect star formation. We use a sample of radio sources in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field to study the nature of this putative link, by means of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We employ the excellent spectral coverage of the AKARI infrared space telescope and the rich ancillary data available in the NEP to build SEDs extending from UV to far-IR wavelengths. We find a significant AGN component in our sample of relatively faint radio sources (formation in the host galaxy, independent of the radio luminosity. In contrast, for narrow redshift and AGN luminosity ranges, we find that increasing radio luminosity leads to a decrease in the specific star formation rate. The most radio-loud AGNs are found to lie on the main sequence of star formation for their respective redshifts. For the first time, we potentially see such a two-sided feedback process in the same sample. We discuss the possible suppression of star formation, but not total quenching, in systems with strong radio jets, that supports the maintenance nature of feedback from radio AGN jets.

  20. Subtask 2.17 - CO{sub 2} Storage Efficiency in Deep Saline Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorecki, Charles; Liu, Guoxiang; Braunberger, Jason; Klenner, Robert; Ayash, Scott; Dotzenrod, Neil; Steadman, Edward; Harju, John

    2014-02-01

    As the field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) continues to advance, and large-scale implementation of geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage progresses, it will be important to understand the potential of geologic formations to store meaningful amounts of CO{sub 2}. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline formations (DSFs) has been suggested as one of the best potential methods for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere, and as such, updated storage resource estimation methods will continue to be an important component for the widespread deployment of CCS around the world. While there have been several methodologies suggested in the literature, most of these methods are based on a volumetric calculation of the pore volume of the DSF multiplied by a storage efficiency term and do not consider the effect of site-specific dynamic factors such as injection rate, injection pattern, timing of injection, pressure interference between injection locations, and overall formation pressure buildup. These volumetric methods may be excellent for comparing the potential between particular formations or basins, but they have not been validated through real-world experience or full-formation injection simulations. Several studies have also suggested that the dynamic components of geologic storage may play the most important role in storing CO{sub 2} in DSFs but until now have not directly compared CO{sub 2} storage resource estimates made with volumetric methodologies to estimates made using dynamic CO{sub 2} storage methodologies. In this study, two DSFs, in geographically separate areas with geologically diverse properties, were evaluated with both volumetric and dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource estimation methodologies to compare the results and determine the applicability of both approaches. In the end, it was determined that the dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource potential is timedependent and it asymptotically approaches the volumetric CO{sub 2} storage resource potential over very long periods of time in the two systems that were evaluated. These results indicate that the volumetric assessments can be used as long as the appropriate storage efficiency terms are used and it is understood that it will take many wells over very long periods of time to fully realize the storage potential of a target formation. This subtask was funded through the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme.

  1. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Energy Efficiency energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles The Energy Efficiency Page reflects EIA's information on energy efficiency and...

  2. Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The motivation behind this study lies in the desire to suppress coherent transition radiation (COTR) observed in experiments at modern free electron lasers. The physical mechanism behind the problem of COTR is that the OTR is predominantly radiated at small angles of order of 1/{gamma} where {gamma} is the relativistic factor of the beam. This means that the transverse formation size of the image is of order of {bar {lambda}}{gamma} where {bar {lambda}} = {lambda}/2{pi} with {lambda} the radiation wavelength. For relativistic beams this can be comparable or even exceed the transverse size of the beam, which would mean that the image of the beam has very little to do with its transverse profile. It is fortuitous, however, that the incoherent image is formed by adding radiation energy of electrons and results in the transverse formation size being of order of {bar {lambda}}/{theta}{sub a}, with {theta}{sub a} is the aperture angle of the optical system. The COTR image, in contrast, is formed by adding electromagnetic field of electrons, and leads to the formation size {bar {lambda}}{gamma}. In situations when the COTR intensity exceeds that of OTR the COTR imaging makes the diagnostic incapable of measuring the beam profile.

  3. Type Ia supernovae in a hierarchical galaxy formation model: the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Nagashima; Takashi Okamoto

    2006-02-03

    We investigate chemical evolution in Milky Way-like galaxies based on the cold dark matter model in which cosmic structures form via hierarchical merging. We introduce chemical enrichment due to type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) into the Mitaka semi-analytic galaxy formation model developed by Nagashima & Yoshii. For the first time we derive distributions of stellar metallicities and their ratios in Milky Way-like galaxies treating chemical enrichment due to SNe Ia in a hierarchical galaxy formation model self-consistently. As a first attempt, we assume all SNe Ia to have the same lifetime, and assume instantaneous recycling for type II supernovae (SNe II). We find that our model reproduces well the metal abundance ratio [O/Fe] against [Fe/H] and the {iron metallicity distribution function} in the solar neighborhood. This means that the so-called G-dwarf problem is resolved by the hierarchical formation of galaxies, and a gas infall term introduced in traditional monolithic collapse models to solve this problem is well explained by the mixture of some physical processes such as hierarchical merging of dark halos, gas cooling, energy feedback and injection of gas and metals into hot gas due to supernovae. Our model predicts more oxygen-enhanced stars in bulges at [Fe/H] $\\simeq 0$ than in disks. This trend seems to be supported by recent observations while they have still uncertainties. More data in number and accuracy will provide independent and important constraints on galaxy formation. (abridged)

  4. Formation of Self-Organized Anode Patterns in Arc Discharge Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Pablo Trelles

    2012-12-31

    Pattern formation and self-organization are phenomena commonly observed experimentally in diverse types of plasma systems, including atmospheric-pressure electric arc discharges. However, numerical simulations reproducing anode pattern formation in arc discharges have proven exceedingly elusive. Time-dependent three-dimensional thermodynamic nonequilibrium simulations reveal the spontaneous formation of self-organized patterns of anode attachment spots in the free-burning arc, a canonical thermal plasma flow established by a constant DC current between an axi-symmetric electrodes configuration in the absence of external forcing. The number of spots, their size, and distribution within the pattern depend on the applied total current and on the resolution of the spatial discretization, whereas the main properties of the plasma flow, such as maximum temperatures, velocity, and voltage drop, depend only on the former. The sensibility of the solution to the spatial discretization stresses the computational requirements for comprehensive arc discharge simulations. The obtained anode patterns qualitatively agree with experimental observations and confirm that the spots originate at the fringes of the arc - anode attachment. The results imply that heavy-species - electron energy equilibration, in addition to thermal instability, has a dominant role in the formation of anode spots in arc discharges.

  5. The impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse: filament formation and magnetic field amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Peters; Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Ralf S. Klessen; Robi Banerjee; Christoph Federrath; Rowan J. Smith; Sharanya Sur

    2012-09-26

    Stars form by the gravitational collapse of interstellar gas. The thermodynamic response of the gas can be characterized by an effective equation of state. It determines how gas heats up or cools as it gets compressed, and hence plays a key role in regulating the process of stellar birth on virtually all scales, ranging from individual star clusters up to the galaxy as a whole. We present a systematic study of the impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse in the context of high-redshift star formation, but argue that our findings are also relevant for present-day star formation in molecular clouds. We consider a polytropic equation of state, P = k rho^Gamma, with both sub-isothermal exponents Gamma 1. We find significant differences between these two cases. For Gamma > 1, pressure gradients slow down the contraction and lead to the formation of a virialized, turbulent core. Weak magnetic fields are strongly tangled and efficiently amplified via the small-scale turbulent dynamo on timescales corresponding to the eddy-turnover time at the viscous scale. For Gamma < 1, on the other hand, pressure support is not sufficient for the formation of such a core. Gravitational contraction proceeds much more rapidly and the flow develops very strong shocks, creating a network of intersecting sheets and extended filaments. The resulting magnetic field lines are very coherent and exhibit a considerable degree of order. Nevertheless, even under these conditions we still find exponential growth of the magnetic energy density in the kinematic regime.

  6. Mental Representations Formed From Educational Website Formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth T. Cady; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Tuan Q. Tran; Bernardo de la Garza; Peter D. Elgin

    2006-10-01

    The increasing popularity of web-based distance education places high demand on distance educators to format web pages to facilitate learning. However, limited guidelines exist regarding appropriate writing styles for web-based distance education. This study investigated the effect of four different writing styles on readers mental representation of hypertext. Participants studied hypertext written in one of four web-writing styles (e.g., concise, scannable, objective, and combined) and were then administered a cued association task intended to measure their mental representations of the hypertext. It is hypothesized that the scannable and combined styles will bias readers to scan rather than elaborately read, which may result in less dense mental representations (as identified through Pathfinder analysis) relative to the objective and concise writing styles. Further, the use of more descriptors in the objective writing style will lead to better integration of ideas and more dense mental representations than the concise writing style.

  7. Abundance ratios in hierarchical galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1999-01-18

    The chemical enrichment and stellar abundance ratios of galaxies which form in a hierarchical clustering scheme are calculated. For this purpose I adopt the star formation histories (SFH) as they are delivered by semi-analytic models in Kauffmann (1996}. It turns out that the average SFH of cluster ellipticals does not yield globally alpha-enhanced stellar populations. The star burst that occurs when the elliptical forms in the major merger plays therefore a crucial role in producing alpha-enhancement. Only under the assumption that the IMF is significantly flattened with respect to the Salpeter value during the burst, a Mg/Fe overabundant population can be obtained. In particular for the interpretation of radial gradients in metallicity and alpha-enhancement, the mixing of global and burst populations are of great importance. The model predicts bright field galaxies to be less alpha-enhanced than their counterparts in clusters.

  8. Formation of nanofilament field emission devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR); Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A process for fabricating a nanofilament field emission device. The process enables the formation of high aspect ratio, electroplated nanofilament structure devices for field emission displays wherein a via is formed in a dielectric layer and is self-aligned to a via in the gate metal structure on top of the dielectric layer. The desired diameter of the via in the dielectric layer is on the order of 50-200 nm, with an aspect ratio of 5-10. In one embodiment, after forming the via in the dielectric layer, the gate metal is passivated, after which a plating enhancement layer is deposited in the bottom of the via, where necessary. The nanofilament is then electroplated in the via, followed by removal of the gate passification layer, etch back of the dielectric, and sharpening of the nanofilament. A hard mask layer may be deposited on top of the gate metal and removed following electroplating of the nanofilament.

  9. Star-Formation Knots in IRAS Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Hutchings

    1995-11-08

    Images of IRAS galaxies with a range of IR properties are examined for bright knots, both within and outside the galaxy. These are found almost exclusively in galaxies with steep IR spectra, but over a wide range of IR luminosity, and usually without strong nuclear activity. In most cases, the knots are likely to be star-formation induced by tidal interactions, and are seen in the early stages of such interactions. Detailed photometry is presented of knots in six representative galaxies. The knots appear to have a wide range of colour and luminosity, but it is argued that many are heavily reddened. Knots formed outside the parent galaxy may be a new generation of what later become globular clusters, but they appear to have a wide range of luminosities.

  10. JET FORMATION IN COUNTERSTREAMING COLLISIONLESS PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Takabe, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. [Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gregory, C. D.; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, UMR 7605, CNRS, CEA, Universite Paris VI, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Morita, T.; Aoki, H. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Dono, S.; Tanji, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Loupias, B., E-mail: kuramitsu-y@ile.osaka-u.ac.j [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-12-20

    Plasma jet formation was observed in counterstreaming plasmas in a laboratory experiment. In order to model an ambient plasma of astrophysical jets, the counterstreaming plasmas were created by irradiating a double CH-plane target with a high-power laser system. Since the mean free paths of the ions in terms of the counterstreaming motion were larger than the scale length of the experiment, the two-stream interaction of the plasmas was essentially collisionless. The time evolution of the jet collimation was obtained over several shots with different timing by shadowgraphy. When a single CH-plane target was irradiated, no jet collimation was observed. The counterstreaming plasma as an ambient plasma is essential for the jet plasma to collimate.

  11. Understanding galaxy formation with ISO deep surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    2005-03-17

    We present the results obtained through the various ISO extragalactic deep surveys. While IRAS revealed the existence of galaxies forming stars at a rate of a few tens (LIRGs) or even hundreds (ULIRGs) solar masses in the local universe, ISO not only discovered that these galaxies were already in place at redshift one, but also that they are not the extreme objects that we once believed them to be. Instead they appear to play a dominant role in shaping present-day galaxies as reflected by their role in the cosmic history of star formation and in producing the cosmic infrared background detected by the COBE satellite in the far infrared to sub-millimeter range.

  12. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Overview of DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE-DOD MOU Workshop September 30, 2010 #12;2 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges Energy Efficiency and Resource Diversity

  13. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Audience/Event Date EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Sunita Satyapal Acting Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Fuel Cell Project Kickoff September 30, 2009 #12;2 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges Energy Efficiency and Resource

  14. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Sunita SatyapalSunita SatyapalSeptember 24, 2009 *On detail #12;2 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges Energy Efficiency and Resource DiversityEnergy Efficiency and Resource Diversity Fuel cells offer a highly efficient way to use diverse

  15. Matter & Energy Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    See Also: Matter & Energy Solar Energy Electronics Materials Science Earth & Climate Energy at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got brighter. Although silicon is the industry Electronics Over 1.2 Million Electronics Parts, Components and Equipment. www.AlliedElec.com solar energy

  16. Observations of solute effects on bubble formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmeier, U.; Yaminsky, V.V.; Christenson, H.K.

    1995-09-01

    The authors have studied the effects of solute, in particular aqueous electrolyte, on bubble formation at capillary orifices and frits at varying gas flow rates. Using a stroboscope, video microscope, and rotating mirror, they have obtained pictures which show how bubble formation involves the interaction of bubbles at the orifice. These interactions depend on the value of the surface elasticity E due to positively (ethanol) or negatively (NaCl) adsorbed solute. At low flow rates consecutive bubbles do not interact. Each bubble detaches and leaves the orifice region before the next one starts forming. A intermediate flow rates the more closely spaced, consecutive bubbles begin to interact. In pure liquids there is no barrier to bubble coalescence and the detached bubble is fed by the subsequent bubble as this starts to grow. The process may be repeated several times before the original bubble has risen out of range. In solutions where E is large enough bubble coalescence is inhibited. Instead of feeding into the detached bubble the following bubble pushes it aside, and the bubbles appear to bounce off each other. Bouncing may give rise to a characteristic sequence of larger and smaller bubbles if the emerging bubbles break off prematurely from the orifice due to the inertia of the original bubble. The transition from feeding to bouncing depends critically on E of the solution and leads to a smaller average bubble size for large E values. At high flow rates detached bubbles are invariably fed by several subsequent ones. At very high flow rates the bubbling becomes chaotic, but the interaction of bubbles after leaving the orifice area produces smaller bubbles in solutions. Bouncing is more likely to occur with narrow and irregular capillaries. The dramatically different appearance of gas-sparged columns in salt water and freshwater has its origin in the difference between assemblies of pores showing mainly feeding (freshwater) or bouncing (salt water).

  17. Gas flows, star formation and galaxy evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John E. Beckman; Emilio Casuso; Almudena Zurita; Monica Relao

    2004-05-31

    In the first part of this article we show how observations of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy: G- and K-dwarf numbers as functions of metallicity, and abundances of the light elements, D, Li, Be and B, in both stars and the interstellar medium (ISM), lead to the conclusion that metal poor HI gas has been accreting to the Galactic disc during the whole of its lifetime, and is accreting today at a measurable rate, ~2 Msun per year across the full disc. Estimates of the local star formation rate (SFR) using methods based on stellar activity, support this picture. The best fits to all these data are for models where the accretion rate is constant, or slowly rising with epoch. We explain here how this conclusion, for a galaxy in a small bound group, is not in conflict with graphs such as the Madau plot, which show that the universal SFR has declined steadily from z=1 to the present day. We also show that a model in which disc galaxies in general evolve by accreting major clouds of low metallicity gas from their surroundings can explain many observations, notably that the SFR for whole galaxies tends to show obvious variability, and fractionally more for early than for late types, and yields lower dark to baryonic matter ratios for large disc galaxies than for dwarfs. In the second part of the article we use NGC 1530 as a template object, showing from Fabry-Perot observations of its Halpha emission how strong shear in this strongly barred galaxy acts to inhibit star formation, while compression acts to stimulate it.

  18. BOSTONIA WinterSpring 2014 Teflon has nothing on the lotus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    or improving the performance of steam turbines by keeping them dry. "There are a lot of applications where.edu/bostonia. surfaces have two things going for them: a liquid-repellent surface chemistry--like a Tef- lon pan, and pores. The microscopic texture traps air, so the drop is touching only a fraction of the solid surface

  19. V-147: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute Java Applets |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs SearchWater-SavingofCode | Department

  20. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950 TimelineUtility-Scale Solar through the

  1. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  2. Remarks on energetic conditions for positronium formation in non-polar solids. Coupled Dipole Method application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrow, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A numerical program calculating an energy of a positron or (and) an electron near the free volume in solid n-alkanes has been build. The theory of interaction of e+ or (and) e- with this non-polar media based on polarizability has been introduced. The energy of the e+ -- e- pair in the bulk was compared to that calculated when the pair forms a positronium (Ps) inside the free volume. The calculations are based on the Coupled Dipole Method and the dipole-dipole interaction energy for induced dipoles is taken into account. Furthermore, a correction of a local permittivity for the e+ -- e- interaction is calculated taking into account the non-isotropic medium between them. The method is a step toward more accurate calculations of energetic conditions during the Ps formation in matter. The possibility of emission of the excess energy of the Ps formation as electromagnetic radiation is discussed. It is argued that if this radiation is observed, it can be used as a new spectroscopic tool providing information about...

  3. CO and byproduct formation during CO? reduction in dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehmer, F. [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); AFS GmbH, Von-Holzapfel-Strae 10, 86497 Horgau (Germany); Welzel, S.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Engeln, R. [Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-09-28

    The dissociation of CO? and the formation of CO, O?, and O were studied in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure by means of ex-situ infrared absorption spectroscopy. CO mixing ratios of 0.1%4.4% were determined for specific injected energies between 0.1 and 20 eV per molecule (0.370 kJ/l). A lower limit of the gas temperature of 320480 K was estimated from the wall temperature of the quartz reactor as measured with an infrared camera. The formation of CO in the DBD could be described as function of the total number of transferred charges during the residence time of the gas in the active plasma zone. An almost stoichiometric CO:O? ratio of 2:1 was observed along with a strongly temperature dependent O? production up to 0.075%. Although the ideal range for an efficient CO? dissociation in plasmas of 1 eV per molecule for the specific injected energy was covered, the energy efficiency remained below 5% for all conditions. The present results indicate a reaction mechanism which is initiated by electron impact processes followed by charge transfer reactions and non-negligible surface enhanced O and CO recombination. While electron-driven CO? dissociation is relatively energy inefficient by itself, fast O recombination and the low gas temperatures inhibit the synergistic reuse of atomic oxygen in a secondary CO? + O dissociation step.

  4. Bubble formation in water with addition of a hydrophobic solute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryuichi Okamoto; Akira Onuki

    2015-05-29

    We show that phase separation can occur in a one-component liquid outside its coexistence curve (CX) with addition of a small amount of a solute. The solute concentration at the transition decreases with increasing the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas. As a typical bubble-forming solute, we consider ${\\rm O}_2$ in ambient liquid water, which exhibits mild hydrophobicity and its critical temperature is lower than that of water. Such a solute can be expelled from the liquid to form gaseous domains while the surrounding liquid pressure is higher than the saturated vapor pressure $p_{cx}$. This solute-induced bubble formation is a first-order transition in bulk and on a partially dried wall, while a gas film grows continuously on a completely dried wall. We set up a bubble free energy $\\Delta G$ for bulk and surface bubbles with a small volume fraction $\\phi$. It becomes a function of the bubble radius $R$ under the Laplace pressure balance. Then, for sufficiently large solute densities above a threshold, $\\Delta G$ exhibits a local maximum at a critical radius and a minimum at an equilibrium radius. We also examine solute-induced nucleation taking place outside CX, where bubbles larger than the critical radius grow until attainment of equilibrium.

  5. Gap formation and stability in non-isothermal protoplanetary discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Les, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Several observations of transition discs show lopsided dust-distributions. A potential explanation is the formation of a large-scale vortex acting as a dust-trap at the edge of a gap opened by a giant planet. Numerical models of gap-edge vortices have thus far employed locally isothermal discs, but the theory of this vortex-forming or `Rossby wave' instability was originally developed for adiabatic discs. We generalise the study of planetary gap stability to non-isothermal discs using customised numerical simulations of disc-planet systems where the planet opens an unstable gap. We include in the energy equation a simple cooling function with cooling timescale $t_c=\\beta\\Omega_k^{-1}$, where $\\Omega_k$ is the Keplerian frequency, and examine the effect of $\\beta$ on the stability of gap edges and vortex lifetimes. We find increasing $\\beta$ lowers the growth rate of non-axisymmetric perturbations, and the dominant azimuthal wavenumber $m$ decreases. We find a quasi-steady state consisting of one large-scale, ...

  6. Star formation and cosmic massive black hole formation, a universal process organized by angular momenta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    It is suggested that star formation is organized following the same principles as we have applied in a recent explanation of galaxy and massive black hole formation. In this scenario angular momentum is randomly distributed by tidal torquing among condensations, Lyman-{alpha} clouds or cores for star formation during the initial non-linear phase of collapse. This angular momentum is characterized by the parameter, {lambda}, the ratio of the angular momentum of the cloud to that of a Keplerian orbit with the same central mass and radius. This parameter is calculated in very many simulations of structure formation of the universe as well as core formation and appears to be universal and independent of any scale. The specific angular momentum during the collapse of every cloud is locally conserved and universally produces a near flat rotation curve M{sub formation of a flat rotation curve (protostellar) disk of mass M{sub dsk} {sup -}30 M{sub o} of radius R{sub dsk} {approx_equal} 1100 AU or 5.4 x 10{sup -3} pc. In such a disk {Sigma} {proportional_to} 1/R and reaches the RVI condition at R{sub crit} {approx_equal} 40 AU where M{sub

  7. Stratosolar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek Formation

  8. Stratovolcano | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek FormationStratovolcano Jump to:

  9. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Source: US DOE 10/2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Upcoming Workshops & Solicitations Source: US DOE 10/2010 2 #12; Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012

  10. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy 2009 FUEL CELL MARKET REPORT NOVEMBER 2010 #12;Authors-Jerram of Fuel Cell Today Consulting, Rachel Gelman of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Jennifer Gangi

  11. STAR FORMATION AROUND SUPERGIANT SHELLS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Book, Laura G.; Chu Youhua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Fukui, Yasuo

    2009-03-15

    We examine the recent star formation associated with four supergiant shells in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC): LMC 1, 4, 5, and 6, which have been shown to have simple expanding-shell structures. H II regions and OB associations are used to infer star formation in the last few Myr, while massive young stellar objects reveal the current ongoing star formation. Distributions of ionized H I and molecular components of the interstellar gas are compared with the sites of recent and current star formation to determine whether triggering has taken place. We find that a great majority of the current star formation has occurred in gravitationally unstable regions, and that evidence of triggered star formation is prevalent at both large and local scales.

  12. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-29

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  13. Formation of Political Networks: Bifurcations, Patterns, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Naim, Eli

    number of political parties 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 frequency Israel Ukraine Data: CIA world factbook 2002 -30 -20 -10 0 10 20 30 x Dissipative system: volume contracts Lyapunov (energy) function exists x2 Outlook Role of initial conditions? Classification? Role of spatial dimension? Correlations? Add

  14. Method and apparatus for vibrating a substrate during material formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeffrey A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Roger, Johnson N. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; John, Munley T. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Walter, Park R. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA

    2008-10-21

    A method and apparatus for affecting the properties of a material include vibrating the material during its formation (i.e., "surface sifting"). The method includes the steps of providing a material formation device and applying a plurality of vibrations to the material during formation, which vibrations are oscillations having dissimilar, non-harmonic frequencies and at least two different directions. The apparatus includes a plurality of vibration sources that impart vibrations to the material.

  15. Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David Scott; Uwechue, Uzo Philip

    2012-06-12

    A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

  16. Hydrolysis, formation and ionization constants at 25/sup 0/C, and at high temperature-high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.L.; Phillips, C.A.; Skeen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Thermochemical data for nuclear waste disposal are compiled. The resulting computerized database consists of critically evaluated data on Gibbs energy of formation, enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of selected substances for about 16 elements at 25/sup 0/C and zero ionic strength. Elements covered are Am, As, Br, C, Cl, F, I, Mo, Np, N, O, P, Pu, Si, Sr, S, and U. Values of these thermodynamic properties were used to calculate equilibrium quotients for hydrolysis, complexation and ionization reactions up to 300/sup 0/C and 3 ionic strength, for selected chemical reactions.

  17. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on fused silica upon two-color double-pulse irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hhm, S.; Herzlieb, M.; Rosenfeld, A. [Max-Born-Institut fr Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strae 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Max-Born-Institut fr Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie (MBI), Max-Born-Strae 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Krger, J.; Bonse, J. [BAM Bundesanstalt fr Materialforschung und prfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Bundesanstalt fr Materialforschung und prfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-16

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of fused silica with multiple irradiation sequences consisting of laser pulse pairs (50 fs single-pulse duration) of two different wavelengths (400 and 800 nm) is studied experimentally. Parallel polarized double-pulse sequences with a variable delay ?t between ?10 and +10 ps and between the individual fs-laser pulses were used to investigate the LIPSS periods versus ?t. These two-color experiments reveal the importance of the ultrafast energy deposition to the silica surface by the first laser pulse for LIPSS formation. The second laser pulse subsequently reinforces the previously seeded spatial LIPSS frequencies.

  18. The Formation and Destruction of Molecular Clouds and Galactic Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Iwasaki, Kazunari; Hosokawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We describe an overall picture of galactic-scale star formation. Recent high-resolution magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of two-fluid dynamics with cooling/heating and thermal conduction have shown that the formation of molecular clouds requires multiple episodes of supersonic compression. This finding enables us to create a scenario in which molecular clouds form in interacting shells or bubbles on a galactic scale. First we estimate the ensemble-averaged growth rate of molecular clouds over a timescale larger than a million years. Next we perform radiation hydrodynamics simulations to evaluate the destruction rate of magnetized molecular clouds by the stellar FUV radiation. We also investigate the resultant star formation efficiency within a cloud which amounts to a low value (a few percent) if we adopt the power-law exponent -2.5 for the mass distribution of stars in the cloud. We finally describe the time evolution of the mass function of molecular clouds over a long timescale (>1Myr) and discuss the st...

  19. Unbinding Transition Induced by Osmotic Pressure in Relation to Unilamellar Vesicle Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. L. Yamada; M. Hishida; H. Seto; K. Tsumoto; T. Yoshimura

    2006-07-26

    Small-angle X-ray scattering and phase-contrast microscopy experiments were performed to investigate the effect of the osmotic pressure on vesicle formation in a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/water/NaI system. Multi-lamellar vesicles were formed when a pure lipid film was hydrated with an aqueous solution of NaI. On the other hand, uni-lamellar vesicles (ULVs) were formed when a lipid film mixed with an enough amount of NaI was hydrated. To confirm the effect of the osmotic pressure due to NaI, a free-energy calculation was performed. This result showed that the osmotic pressure induced an unbinding transition on the hydration process, which resulted in ULV formation.

  20. Relationship between pyrite formation and organic sulfur content of coal as revealed by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Hagan, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    There are a large number of questions concerning the mode of occurrence of organic sulfur in peat, and what, if anything, alters its occurrence during and after coalification. The formation of pyrite during periods of peatification and coalification has been hypothesized to have a great effect on the organic sulfur content of organic material surrounding the pyrite. Measurement of organic sulfur contents at different distances from pyrite particles would serve as direct experimental proof for or against this pypothesis. A combination of in situ energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) line profiles, EDS x-ray maps, and WDS analyses across pyrite/coal interfaces in a variety of coals shows unequivocally that formation of pyrite does not alter the organic sulfur contents of the surrounding coal macerals.

  1. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H-beam formation and transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Roderich [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as d. c. discharge- and rf-driven multicusp sources. Penning-type and ECR-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber-. and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed. ionization mechanism, beam formation and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  2. Formation mechanism and properties of CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Demchenko, Denis O.; Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Erdonmez, Can K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-08-11

    The mechanism of formation of recently fabricated CdS-Ag{sub 2}S nanorod superlattices is considered and their elastic properties are predicted theoretically based on experimental structural data. We consider different possible mechanisms for the spontaneous ordering observed in these 1D nanostructures, such as diffusion-limited growth and ordering due to epitaxial strain. A simplified model suggests that diffusion-limited growth partially contributes to the observed ordering, but cannot account for the full extent of the ordering alone. The elastic properties of bulk Ag{sub 2}S are predicted using a first principles method and are fed into a classical valence force field (VFF) model of the nanostructure. The VFF results show significant repulsion between Ag{sub 2}S segments, strongly suggesting that the interplay between the chemical interface energy and strain due to the lattice mismatch between the two materials drives the spontaneous pattern formation.

  3. The Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies with Star Formation in Outward Propagating Super Shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Mori; Yuzuru Yoshii; Takuji Tsujimoto; Ken'ichi Nomoto

    1997-01-13

    We simulate the dynamical and chemical evolution of a dwarf galaxy embedded in a dark matter halo, using a three-dimensional N-body/SPH simulation code combined with stellar population synthesis. The initial condition is adopted in accord with a $10^{10}M_\\odot$ virialized sphere in a 1-sigma CDM perturbation which contains 10% baryonic mass. A supersonic spherical outflow is driven by the first star burst near the center of the galaxy and produces an expanding super shell in which stars are subsequently formed. Consecutive formation of stars in the expanding shell makes the stellar system settled with the exponential brightness profile, the positive metallicity gradient, and the inverse color gradient in agreement with observed features of dwarf galaxies. We therefore propose that the energy feedback via stellar winds and supernovae is a decisive mechanism for formation of less compact, small systems like dwarf galaxies.

  4. (U) modulator to provide a continuous stepped frequency signal format

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walters, Glenn A. (Escondido, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A modulator provides a continuous signal format composed of discrete freqcy steps and is designed to eliminate frequency overlap or smearing normally associated with filter ringing.

  5. The modelling of feedback in star formation simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, James E

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of numerical simulations of stellar feedback in the context of star formation at scales ranging from the formation of individual stars to models of galaxy formation including cosmic reionisation. I survey the wealth of algorithms developed recently to solve the radiative transfer problem and to simulate stellar winds, supernovae and protostellar jets. I discuss the results of these simulations with regard to star formation in molecular clouds, the interaction of different feedback mechanisms with each other and with magnetic fields, and in the wider context of galactic-- and cosmological--scale simulations.

  6. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Title: Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method...

  7. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Ling-I

    2011-01-01

    is prohibited by the surface oxide layer, the thickness ofthe formation of an oxide layer prevents further exposure ofpenetrating into the oxide layer rapidly by tunneling to

  8. Accounting for Variation of Diminutive Formation in Porteo Spanish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norrmann-Vigil, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Accounting for Variation of Diminutive Formation in Porteobase, the inclusion Accounting for Variation of Diminutiveas additive, thus accounting for cumulativity effects (2).

  9. COLD BUBBLE FORMATION DURING TOKAMAK DENSITY LIMIT DISRUPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John

    COLD BUBBLE FORMATION DURING TOKAMAK DENSITY LIMIT DISRUPTIONS J. HOWARD, M. PERSSON* Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra

  10. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for...

  11. "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road Princeton, NJ 08540-6649 "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones", Chun-Chieh Wu (National Taiwan University) Contact Information Website: Website...

  12. Chemistry & Biology Aryl-aldehyde Formation in Fungal Polyketides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Chemistry & Biology Article Aryl-aldehyde Formation in Fungal Polyketides: Discovery at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA 2Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana

  13. Histamine Formation and Honeycombing During Decomposition of Skipjack Tuna,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Histamine Formation and Honeycombing During Decomposition of Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis pelamis, caught in Hawaiian waters. Fresh skipjack tuna tis- sue was practically devoid of histamine

  14. Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  15. Ab initio study of formation, migration and binding properties of helium-vacancy clusters in aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei

    2008-08-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to study the dissolution and migration of helium, and the stability of small helium-vacancy clusters HenVm (n, m=0 to 4) in aluminum. The results indicate that the octahedral configuration is more stable than the tetrahedral. Interstitial helium atoms are predicted to have attractive interactions and jump between two octahedral sites via an intermediate tetrahedral site with low migration energy of 0.10 eV. The binding energies of an interstitial He atom and an isolated vacancy to a HenVm cluster are also obtained from the calculated formation energies of the clusters. We find that the divacancy and tri--vacancy clusters are not stable, but He atoms can increase the stability of vacancy clusters. The interactions of He atoms with a vacancy are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Energy transport systems for semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome, Joseph W.

    the ET model does not possess such modes. In both cases, however, we employ a conservation law format Subject Classification: 35J65, 82A70, 65C20, 76N10, 35L65 1. Introduction In this paper, an energy in the hydrodynamic model. The absence of hyperbolic modes makes for essential mathematical simplification. The plan

  17. The Quantum Energy Density: Improved E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krogel, Jaron; Yu, Min; Kim, Jeongnim; Ceperley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We establish a physically meaningful representation of a quantum energy density for use in Quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The energy density operator, dened in terms of Hamiltonian components and density operators, returns the correct Hamiltonian when integrated over a volume containing a cluster of particles. This property is demonstrated for a helium-neon \\gas," showing that atomic energies obtained from the energy density correspond to eigenvalues of isolated systems. The formation energies of defects or interfaces are typically calculated as total energy dierences. Using a model of delta-doped silicon (where dopant atoms form a thin plane) we show how interfacial energies can be calculated more eciently with the energy density, since the region of interest is small. We also demonstrate how the energy density correctly transitions to the bulk limit away from the interface where the correct energy is obtainable from a separate total energy calculation.

  18. Generalized Entropy Theory of Glass Formation in Polymer Melts with Specific Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Sheng Xu; Karl F. Freed

    2015-03-21

    Chemical structure has been long recognized to greatly influence polymer glass formation, but a general molecular theory that predicts how chemical structure determines the properties of glass-forming polymers has been slow to develop. While the generalized entropy theory (GET) explains the influence of various molecular details on polymer glass formation, the application of the GET has heretofore been limited to the use of the simplest polymer model in which all united atom groups within the monomers of a species interact with a common monomer averaged van der Waals energy. However, energetic heterogeneities are ubiquitous within the monomers of real polymers, and their implications for polymer glass formation remain to be investigated theoretically. This paper uses an extension of the GET to explore the influence of energetic heterogeneities within monomers upon the nature of polymer glass formation. The present paper focuses on establishing general trends for the variation of characteristic properties of glass formation, such as the isobaric fragility parameter $m_P$ and the glass transition temperature $T_g$, with molecular details, such as the specific interactions and chain stiffness. Our computations confirm that the previously used model with monomer averaged interactions correctly captures general trends in the variation of $m_P$ and $T_g$ with various molecular parameters. More importantly, adjustment of the energetic heterogeneities within monomers alone are shown to provide an efficient mechanism for tailoring the properties of glass-forming polymers. The variations of polymer properties along iso-fragility and iso-$T_g$ lines are illustrated as important design tools for exhibiting the combined influence of specific interactions and chain stiffness.

  19. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  20. Halo Formation in Warm Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Bode; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Neil Turok

    2001-05-29

    Discrepancies have emerged between the predictions of standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory and observations of clustering on sub-galactic scales. Warm dark matter (WDM) is a simple modification of CDM in which the dark matter particles have initial velocities due either to their having decoupled as thermal relics, or having been formed via non-equilibrium decay. We investigate the nonlinear gravitational clustering of WDM with a high resolution N-body code, and identify a number of distinctive observational signatures. Relative to CDM, halo concentrations and core densities are lowered, core radii are increased, and large halos emerge with far fewer low mass satellites. The number of small halos is suppressed, and those present are formed by `top down' fragmentation of caustics, as part of a `cosmic web' connecting massive halos. Few small halos form outside this web. If we identify small halos with dwarf galaxies, their number, spatial distribution, and formation epoch appear in better agreement with the observations for WDM than they are for CDM.

  1. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}

  2. Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

  3. Transient Pulse Formation in Jasmonate Signaling Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhasis Banerjee; Indrani Bose

    2010-03-03

    The jasmonate (JA) signaling pathway in plants is activated as defense response to a number of stresses like attacks by pests or pathogens and wounding by animals. Some recent experiments provide significant new knowledge on the molecular detail and connectivity of the pathway. The pathway has two major components in the form of feedback loops, one negative and the other positive. We construct a minimal mathematical model, incorporating the feedback loops, to study the dynamics of the JA signaling pathway. The model exhibits transient gene expression activity in the form of JA pulses in agreement with experimental observations. The dependence of the pulse amplitude, duration and peak time on the key parameters of the model is determined computationally. The deterministic and stochastic aspects of the pathway dynamics are investigated using both the full mathematical model as well as a reduced version of it. We also compare the mechanism of pulse formation with the known mechanisms of pulse generation in some bacterial and viral systems.

  4. Modeling the formation of in vitro filopodia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -C. Lee; A. Gopinathan; J. M. Schwarz

    2010-05-13

    Filopodia are bundles of actin filaments that extend out ahead of the leading edge of a crawling cell to probe its upcoming environment. {\\it In vitro} experiments [D. Vignjevic {\\it et al.}, J. Cell Biol. {\\bf 160}, 951 (2003)] have determined the minimal ingredients required for the formation of filopodia from the dendritic-like morphology of the leading edge. We model these experiments using kinetic aggregation equations for the density of growing bundle tips. In mean field, we determine the bundle size distribution to be broad for bundle sizes smaller than a characteristic bundle size above which the distribution decays exponentially. Two-dimensional simulations incorporating both bundling and cross-linking measure a bundle size distribution that agrees qualitatively with mean field. The simulations also demonstrate a nonmonotonicity in the radial extent of the dendritic region as a function of capping protein concentration, as was observed in experiments, due to the interplay between percolation and the ratcheting of growing filaments off a spherical obstacle.

  5. Surface coating for prevention of crust formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

  6. Explaining the formation of bulges with MOND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, F

    2015-01-01

    In the cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm, bulges easily form through galaxy mergers, either major or minor, or through clumpy disks in the early universe, where clumps are driven to the center by dynamical friction. Also pseudo-bulges, with a more disky morphology and kinematics, can form more slowly through secular evolution of a bar, where resonant stars are elevated out of the plane, in a peanut/box shape. As a result, in CDM cosmological simulations, it is very difficult to find a bulgeless galaxy, while they are observed very frequently in the local universe. A different picture emerges in alternative models of the missing mass problem. In MOND (MOdified Newtonian Dynamics), galaxy mergers are much less frequent, since the absence of dark matter halos reduces the dynamical friction between two galaxies. Also, while clumpy galaxies lead to rapid classical bulge formation in CDM, the inefficient dynamical friction with MOND in the early-universe galaxies prevents the clumps to coalesce together in the center...

  7. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  8. Essays on Dynamic Value Change Perspective in Resource Based View, Determinants of Alliance Formation and Risk Preference in Alliance Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Ik Su

    2011-02-22

    ON DYNAMIC VALUE CHANGE PERSPECTIVE IN RESOURCE BASED VIEW, DETERMINANTS OF ALLIANCE FORMATION AND RISK PREFERENCE IN ALLIANCE FORMATION A Dissertation by IK SU JUN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ESSAYS ON DYNAMIC VALUE CHANGE PERSPECTIVE IN RESOURCE BASED VIEW, DETERMINANTS OF ALLIANCE FORMATION...

  9. Star formation with adaptive mesh refinement and magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Terms . . . . 29 2.1.10 Dual Energy Formalism . . . . . . .we will discuss the dual energy formulation in Enzo forenergy shows up. With dual energy formalism on (see section

  10. Sustainable Energy Energies renouvelables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    1 Cours de Sustainable Energy Energies renouvelables en Belgique Avril 2015 Dr. Ir. Raoul NIHART'nergie de stock Notion d'nergie de flux #12;4 Pourquoi les SER ? (SER = Sources d'Energie,1 % Structure de la production partir d'Energies Renouvelables dans le monde en 2012 Source : EDF Gothermie 1

  11. Energy Conservation Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    Energy Conservation Renewable Energy The Future at Rutgers University Facilities & Capital Planning Operations & Services Utilities Operations 6 Berrue Circle Piscataway, NJ 08854 #12;Energy Conservation Wh C ti ? R bl EWhy Conservation? Renewable Energy Climate control reduces green house gases Reduces

  12. A possible evidence of the hadron-quark-gluon mixed phase formation in nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Kizka; V. S. Trubnikov; K. A. Bugaev; D. R. Oliinychenko

    2015-04-24

    The performed systematic meta-analysis of the quality of data description (QDD) of existing event generators of nucleus-nucleus collisions allows us to extract a very important physical information. Our meta-analysis is dealing with the results of 10 event generators which describe data measured in the range of center of mass collision energies from 3.1 GeV to 17.3 GeV. It considers the mean deviation squared per number of experimental points obtained by these event generators, i.e. the QDD, as the results of independent meta-measurements. These generators and their QDDs are divided in two groups. The first group includes the generators which account for the quark-gluon plasma formation during nuclear collisions (QGP models), while the second group includes the generators which do not assume the QGP formation in such collisions (hadron gas models). Comparing the QDD of more than a hundred of different data sets of strange hadrons by two groups of models, we found two regions of the equal quality description of data which are located at the center of mass collision energies 4.4-4.87 GeV and 10.8-12 GeV. At the collision energies below 4.4 GeV the hadron gas models describe data much better than the QGP one and, hence, we associate this region with hadron phase. At the collision energies between 5 GeV and 10.8 GeV and above 12 GeV we found that QGP models describe data essentially better than the hadron gas ones and, hence, these regions we associate with the quark-gluon phase. As a result, the collision energy regions 4.4-4.87 GeV and 10.8-12 GeV we interpret as the energies of the hadron-quark-gluon mixed phase formation. Based on these findings we argue that the most probable energy range of the QCD phase diagram (tri)critical endpoint is 12-14 GeV.

  13. Academic Registry Guidelines on Submission and Format of Thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Academic Registry Guidelines on Submission and Format of Thesis Please check with Academic Registry before submitting a thesis as the following Regulations may be subject to change from time to time. The following is a statement of the provisions governing the submission and format of a thesis. These provisions

  14. Video Digests: A Browsable, Skimmable Format for Informational Lecture Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    Video Digests: A Browsable, Skimmable Format for Informational Lecture Videos Amy Pavel, Colorado- ing current timeline-based video players. Video digests are a new format for informational videos authors create such digests using transcript-based interactions. With our tools, authors can manually

  15. Self-Stabilizing Robot Formations over Unreliable Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    -stabilization ensures that the robots can adapt to changes in the desired target formation. Categories and Subject17 Self-Stabilizing Robot Formations over Unreliable Networks SETH GILBERT Ecole Polytechnique F Descriptors: F.1.2 [Computation by Abstract Devices]: Modes of Compu- tation--Interactive and reactive

  16. Time Series Photometry Data: Standard Access, Standard Formats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Andrs

    Time Series Photometry Data: Standard Access, Standard Formats Andr#19; as Holl Konkoly Observatory a discussion on data access and #12;le format aspects of photometry. Introduction Presently there is time series photometry data available in public databases, but the access to these varies from one collection

  17. Ring current formation influenced by solar wind substorm conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winglee, Robert M.

    Click Here for Full Article Ring current formation influenced by solar wind substorm conditions M outflows during an internally driven substorm. We show that the energization of the ions is not correlated with the time that the ions leave the ionosphere; instead energization is correlated with the formation

  18. Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudich, James A.

    Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge and Specific Domains and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America, 3 UNC of America Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating

  19. Amyloid Oligomer Formation Probed by Water Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Amyloid Oligomer Formation Probed by Water Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy J. H. Walton, R, Chicago, Illinois; and Department of Pharmacology, University of California, Davis, California ABSTRACT Formation of amyloid oligomers, the most toxic species of amyloids in degenerative diseases, is critically

  20. Laboratory Simulations of Molecular Hydrogen Formation in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savin, Daniel Wolf

    Laboratory Simulations of Molecular Hydrogen Formation in the Early Universe: A Progress Report D Heidelberg, Germany Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Il-la-Neuve B-1348, Belgium Abstract. During the epoch of protogalaxy and first star formation, H2 is the main

  1. CONSTRAINING THE ENVIRONMENT OF CH FORMATION WITH CH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oka, Takeshi

    CONSTRAINING THE ENVIRONMENT OF CH + FORMATION WITH CH + 3 OBSERVATIONS This article has been reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. CONSTRAINING THE ENVIRONMENT OF CH+ FORMATION WITH CH+ 3 OBSERVATIONS Nick of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA 2 Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics

  2. Universality in dynamical formation of entanglement for quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubotani, Hiroto; Toda, Mikito; Adachi, Satoshi [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama 221-8686 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Nara Women's University, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro 152-8550 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Dynamical formation of entanglement is studied for quantum chaotic biparticle systems. We find that statistical properties of the Schmidt eigenvalues for strong chaos are well described by the random matrix theory of the Laguerre unitary ensemble. This implies that entanglement formation for quantum chaos has universal properties, and does not depend on specific aspects of the systems.

  3. Formation and distribution of benzene on Titan V. Vuitton,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelle, Roger V.

    Formation and distribution of benzene on Titan V. Vuitton,1 R. V. Yelle,1 and J. Cui1 Received 29 a study of the formation and distribution of benzene (C6H6) on Titan. Analysis of the Cassini Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements of benzene densities on 12 Titan passes shows that the benzene signal exhibits

  4. UFO (UnFold Operator) default data format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissel, L.; Biggs, F. ); Marking, T.R. )

    1991-05-01

    The default format for the storage of x,y data for use with the UFO code is described. The format assumes that the data stored in a file is a matrix of values; two columns of this matrix are selected to define a function of the form y = f(x). This format is specifically designed to allow for easy importation of data obtained from other sources, or easy entry of data using a text editor, with a minimum of reformatting. This format is flexible and extensible through the use of inline directives stored in the optional header of the file. A special extension of the format implements encoded data which significantly reduces the storage required as compared wth the unencoded form. UFO supports several extensions to the file specification that implement execute-time operations, such as, transformation of the x and/or y values, selection of specific columns of the matrix for association with the x and y values, input of data directly from other formats (e.g., DAMP and PFF), and a simple type of library-structured file format. Several examples of the use of the format are given.

  5. Dissolved organic carbon export with North Pacific Intermediate Water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    Dissolved organic carbon export with North Pacific Intermediate Water formation Dennis A. Hansell 2002. [1] An evaluation of DOC export with the formation of North Pacific Intermediate Water east of Japan. The new intermediate water, formed at a rate of 25 Sv, exports DOC at 13 6 Tg DOC yr

  6. METHOD Open Access A standard variation file format for human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yandell, Mark

    was originally developed during the human genome project to compare human genome annotations [17]. ImportantlyMETHOD Open Access A standard variation file format for human genome sequences Martin G Reese1 data. The 10Gen dataset, ten human genomes in GVF format, is freely available for com- munity analysis

  7. Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, George

    Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft Oliver Junge Center-Bl¨obaum partially supported by the CRC 376 Oliver Junge Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft p.1 #12;Outline mechanical optimal control problem direct discretization of the variational

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Formation Rates in a PEMFC Anode and Cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    Hydrogen Peroxide Formation Rates in a PEMFC Anode and Cathode Effect of Humidity and Temperature Hydrogen peroxide H2O2 formation rates in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell PEMFC anode and cathode were, has the capability to be the structural and fundamental unit of an impending hydrogen economy. Two

  9. Astronomy 241: Foundations of Astrophysics I 21. Solar System Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Joshua Edward

    to flow in. #12;Three-Trillion-Mile-Long Jet From a Wobbly Star #12;Planet Formation: The Frost Line The disk was hot at the center, and cool further out. Inside the frost line, only rocks & metals can of Mars and Jupiter -- roughly 4 AU from the Sun. #12;Planet Formation: Terrestrial Planets 1. Within

  10. Paleoecology and paleontology of the Lower Cretaceous Kiowa Formation, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, R. W.

    1970-01-15

    OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 52 (CRETACEOUS 1) PALEOECOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF THE LOWER CRETACEOUS KIOWA FORMATION, KANSAS ROBERT W. SCOTT Department of Geology, University of Kansas, Lawrence Present address: Waynesburg College... PALEOECOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF THE LOWER CRETACEOUS KIOWA FORMATION, KANSAS ROBERT W. SCOTT Department of Geology, University of Kansas, Lawrence Present address: Waynesburg College, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania CONTENTS PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Interspecific...

  11. MODELING OF POROSITY FORMATION AND FEEDING FLOW IN STEEL CASTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    , or even larger shrinkage cavities found in inadequately fed cast sections. Microporosity can cause leaksMODELING OF POROSITY FORMATION AND FEEDING FLOW IN STEEL CASTING Kent D. Carlson, Zhiping Lin pressure, feeding flow, and porosity formation and growth in steel castings during solidification

  12. Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Microfluidics Formation of Bubbles in a Multisection Flow-Focusing Junction Michinao Hashimoto the stable formation of trains of mono-, bi-, and tri-disperse bubbles in microfluidic flow- focusing (FF-assembly through the patterns of flow created by the bubbles. 1.1 Bubbles and Droplets in Microfluidics

  13. Pattern formation in nonequilibrium physics J. P. Gollub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollub, Jerry P.

    concepts to emerge in this century. At the center of our modern understanding of pattern formationPattern formation in nonequilibrium physics J. P. Gollub Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania 19041 and Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 J. S

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS FROM HANFORD FORMATION SEDIMENTS REACTED WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS FROM HANFORD FORMATION SEDIMENTS REACTED WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE with the Hanford sediments. I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to Professor Jim Henson, Dan Hardesty for me to have all of my work done. iv #12;CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS FROM HANFORD FORMATION SEDIMENTS

  15. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Glenshaw Formation (MiddleLate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martino, Ronald L.

    Sequence Stratigraphy of the Glenshaw Formation (MiddleLate Pennsylvanian) in the Central. L., 2004, Sequence stratigraphy of the Glenshaw Formation (middlelate Pennsylvanian) in the central Appalachian basin, in J. C. Pashin and R. A. Gastaldo, eds., Sequence stratigraphy, paleoclimate

  16. Finite Element Model of Fracture Formation on Growing Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    Finite Element Model of Fracture Formation on Growing Surfaces Pavol Federl and Przemyslaw-mail: federl|pwp@cpsc.ucalgary.ca Abstract We present a model of fracture formation on surfaces of bilayered materials. The model makes it possible to synthesize patterns of fractures induced by growth or shrinkage

  17. Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    OFFPRINT Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers T. Vogel, T.epljournal.org doi: 10.1209/0295-5075/85/10003 Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers the conformational phase diagram of a simple model for flexible polymers with explicit thickness. The thickness

  18. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmez, Gilberto C.; Vzquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ?15 pc and masses ?600 M {sub ?} above density n ? 10{sup 3} cm{sup 3} (?2 10{sup 3} M {sub ?} at n > 50 cm{sup 3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ?0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup 2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ?30 M {sub ?} Myr{sup 1} pc{sup 1}.

  19. Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre (Rijswijk, NL); Schoeling, Lanny Gene (Katy, TX)

    2009-07-14

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

  20. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE FORMATION AND MODES OF STAR FORMATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUP 31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Chandar, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); English, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MN R3T 2N2 (Canada); Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.; Young, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Mendes de Oliveira, C. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica, e Ciencias Atmosfericas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Whitmore, B.; Maybhate, Aparna [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218-2463 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)], E-mail: sgalla4@uwo.ca

    2010-02-15

    The handful of low-mass, late-type galaxies that comprise Hickson Compact Group 31 (HCG 31) is in the midst of complex, ongoing gravitational interactions, evocative of the process of hierarchical structure formation at higher redshifts. With sensitive, multicolor Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we characterize the large population of < 10 Myr old star clusters (SCs) that suffuse the system. From the colors and luminosities of the young SCs, we find that the galaxies in HCG 31 follow the same universal scaling relations as actively star-forming galaxies in the local universe despite the unusual compact group environment. Furthermore, the specific frequency of the globular cluster system is consistent with the low end of galaxies of comparable masses locally. This, combined with the large mass of neutral hydrogen and tight constraints on the amount of intragroup light, indicate that the group is undergoing its first epoch of interaction-induced star formation. In both the main galaxies and the tidal-dwarf candidate, F, stellar complexes, which are sensitive to the magnitude of disk turbulence, have both sizes and masses more characteristic of z = 1-2 galaxies. After subtracting the light from compact sources, we find no evidence for an underlying old stellar population in F-it appears to be a truly new structure. The low-velocity dispersion of the system components, available reservoir of H I, and current star formation rate of {approx}10 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} indicate that HCG 31 is likely to both exhaust its cold gas supply and merge within {approx}1 Gyr. We conclude that the end product will be an isolated, X-ray-faint, low-mass elliptical.

  1. DESIGN GUIDELINE 3.2 ENERGY AND WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    DESIGN GUIDELINE 3.2 ENERGY AND WATER CONSERVATION Summary This Design Guideline applies to new properties. Consider energy and water conservation in all aspects of project design. Incorporate conservation Design Related Documents: Energy and Water Conservation Report Format-Projects $2M to $10M Construction

  2. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  3. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Karl D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 379962300 (United States); Wirth, Brian D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 379962300 (United States); P.O. Box 2008, MS-6003, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 378316003 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten fuzz in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  4. Photon exchange and entanglement formation during the transmission through a rectangular quantum barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Sulyok; Katharina Durstberger-Rennhofer; Johann Summhammer

    2014-10-17

    When a quantum particle traverses a rectangular potential created by a quantum field both photon exchange and entanglement between particle and field take place. We present analytic results for the transition amplitudes of any possible photon exchange processes for an incoming plane wave and initial Fock, thermal and coherent field states. We show that for coherent field states the entanglement correlates the particle's position to the photon number in the field instead of the particle's energy as usual. Besides entanglement formation, remarkable differences to the classical field treatment also appear with respect to the symmetry between photon emission and absorption, resonance effects and if the field initially occupies the vacuum state.

  5. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moslem, W. M.; El-Said, A. S.

    2012-12-15

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  6. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S. Peter

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ? ? 0.5?e, where ?e is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3?e and 0.6?e. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  7. Maskelynite formation via solid-state transformation: Evidence of infrared and x-ray anisotropy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Ehm, Lars; Woerner, William R.; Phillips, Brian L.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Wright, Shawn P.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2015-03-24

    We present optical microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-energy X-ray total scattering experiments, and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy on shocked labradorite from the Lonar Crater, India. We show that maskelynite of shock class 2 is structurally more similar to fused glass than to crystalline plagioclase. However, there are slight but significant differences preservation of original pre-impact igneous zoning, anisotropy at Infrared wavelengths, X-ray anisotropy, and preservation of some intermediate range order which are all consistent with a solid-state transformation formation of maskelynite.

  8. Energy Saver | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Save Energy, Save Money Energy 101: Home Cooling Infographic Energy 101: Home Cooling Infographic Just in time for summer Check out our Energy 101: Home Cooling Infographic. With...

  9. Nature Energie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nature Energie Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nature Energie Place: France Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: French developer of wind and solar energy projects. References:...

  10. Bump formation in the runaway electron tail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decker, J; Flp, T

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electrons are generated in a magnetized plasma when the parallel electric field exceeds a critical value. For such electrons with energies typically reaching tens of MeV, the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac (ALD) radiation force, in reaction to the synchrotron emission, is significant and can be the dominant process limiting the electron acceleration. The effect of the ALD-force on runaway electron dynamics in a homogeneous plasma is investigated using the relativistic finite-difference Fokker-Planck codes LUKE [Decker & Peysson, Report EUR-CEA-FC-1736, Euratom-CEA, (2004)] and CODE [Landreman et al, Comp. Phys. Comm. 185, 847 (2014)]. Under the action of the ALD force, we find that a bump is formed in the tail of the electron distribution function if the electric field is sufficiently large. We also observe that the energy of runaway electrons in the bump increases with the electric field amplitude, while the population increases with the bulk electron temperature. The presence of the bump divides the elec...

  11. Demonstrating Innovative Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Energy and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstrating Innovative Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Energy and National Security Applications Front-end creel for processing precursor in tow format In-line melt spinning for...

  12. Industrial Energy Auditing - A Short Course for Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an intensive five day short course, directed toward engineers currently working in industry, which provides the participants with the rudiments of industrial energy auditing. Experience has shown that this format of training can...

  13. EA-1482: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of...

  14. Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2009-07-07

    A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

  15. Enhancing Magnesite Formation at Low Temperature and High CO2 Pressure: The Impact of Seed Crystals and Minor Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Qafoku, Odeta; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Liu, Jia; Perea, Daniel E.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2015-02-24

    The formation of magnesite was followed in aqueous solution containing initially added Mg(OH)2 equilibrated with supercritical carbon dioxide (90 atm pressure, 50C) in the presence of introduced magnesite particles and minor components, Co(II). As expected, the introduction of magnesite particles accelerated the formation of magnesite from solution. However, the formation rate of magnesite was even greater when small concentrations of Co(II) were introduced, indicating that the increased rate of magnesite formation in the presence of Co(II) was not solely due to the addition of a growth promoting surface. Detailed analysis of the magnesite particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and atom probe tomography (APT) revealed that the originally added Co(II) was concentrated in the center but also present throughout the growing magnesite particles. Addition of the Co(II) in different chemical forms (i.e. as solid phase CoCO3 or Co(OH)2) could alter the growth rate of magnesite depending upon the addition of bicarbonate to the starting solution. Geochemical modeling calculations indicate that this difference is related to the thermodynamic stability of these different phases in the initial solutions. More broadly, these results indicate that the presence of even small concentrations of foreign ions that form carbonate compounds with a similar structure as magnesite can be incorporated into the magnesite lattice, accelerating the formation of anhydrous carbonates in natural environments.

  16. COMMISSARIAT A L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES DRHRS / SCP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    COMMISSARIAT A L'ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES DRHRS / SCP BUREAU DES STAGES DE LONGUE DUREE EN ENTREPRISE LAURENCE LOURS / CEA Saclay 01.69.08.20.90 stages@cea.fr http://www.cea.fr/ressources_humaines/stages_et_formation_en_alternance

  17. Formation and evolution of coronal rain observed by SDO/AIA on February 22, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vashalomidze, Z; Zaqarashvili, T V; Oliver, R; Shergelashvili, B; Ramishvili, G; Poedts, S; De Causmaecker, P

    2015-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of coronal rain are currently not fully understood. Coronal rain is the fall of cool and dense blobs formed by thermal instability in the solar corona towards the solar surface with acceleration smaller than gravitational free fall. We aim to study the observational evidence of the formation of coronal rain and to trace the detailed dynamics of individual blobs. We used time series of the 171 \\AA\\, and 304 \\AA\\, spectral lines obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) above active region AR 11420 on February 22, 2012. Observations show that a coronal loop disappeared in the 171 \\AA\\ channel and appeared in the 304 \\AA\\ line$\\text{}\\text{}$ more than one hour later, which indicates a rapid cooling of the coronal loop from 1 MK to 0.05 MK. An energy estimation shows that the radiation is higher than the heat input, which indicates so-called catastrophic cooling. The cooling was accompanied by the formation of coronal rain in the fo...

  18. Lead monoxide $\\alpha$-PbO: electronic properties and point defect formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berashevich, J; Rubel, O; Rowlands, J A; Reznik, A

    2012-01-01

    The electronic properties of polycrystalline lead oxide consisting of a network of single-crystalline $\\alpha$-PbO platelets and the formation of the native point defects in $\\alpha$-PbO crystal lattice are studied using first principles calculations. The $\\alpha$-PbO lattice consists of weakly coupled layers with inter-layer interactions of 0.013 eV/atom that is too low to produce high efficiency charge transfer between the adjacent layers. In practice, the polycrystalline nature of $\\alpha$-PbO causes the formation of lattice defects in such a high concentration that defect-related conductivity becomes the dominant factor in the interlayer charge transition. We found that the formation energy for the O vacancies is low, such vacancies are occupied by two electrons in the zero charge state and tend to donate their electrons to the Pb vacancies that leads to ionization of both vacancies.The vacancies introduce localized states in the band gap which can affect charge transport. The O vacancy forms a defect sta...

  19. ALMA resolves extended star formation in high-z AGN host galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, C M; Stanley, F; Alexander, D M; Daddi, E; Mullaney, J R; Pannella, M; Rosario, D J; Smail, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) 870um imaging of five z~1.5-4.5 X-ray detected AGN (with luminosities of L(X)>10^42 erg/s). The sub-millimetre emission is extended on scales of FWHM~0.2"-0.5", corresponding to physical sizes of 1-3 kpc (median value of 1.8 kpc). These sizes are comparable to the majority of z=1-5 sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) with equivalent ALMA measurements. In combination with spectral energy distribution analyses, we attribute this rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) emission to dust heated by star formation. The implied star-formation rate surface densities are 20-200 Msol/yr/kpc^2, which are consistent with SMGs of comparable FIR luminosities (i.e., L(IR)~ [1-5]x10^12 Lsol). Although limited by a small sample of AGN, which all have high FIR luminosities, our study suggests that the kpc-scale spatial distribution and surface density of star formation in high-redshift star-forming galaxies is the same irrespective of the presence of X-ray detected AGN.

  20. The Relation between Luminous AGNs and Star Formation in Their Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Lei; Egami, E; Haines, C P; Pereira, M J; Smith, G P

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to star formation in their host galaxies. Our sample includes 205 Type-1 and 85 Type-2 AGNs, 162 detected with Herschel, from fields surrounding 30 galaxy clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). The sample is identified by optical line widths and ratios after selection to be brighter than 1 mJy at 24 microns. We show that Type-2 AGN [OIII]5007 line fluxes at high z can be contaminated by their host galaxies with typical spectrograph entrance apertures (but our sample is not compromised in this way). We use spectral energy distribution (SED) templates to decompose the galaxy SEDs and estimate star formation rates, AGN luminosities, and host galaxy stellar masses (described in an accompanying paper). The AGNs arise from massive black holes (~ 3 X 10^8 Msun) accreting at ~ 10% of the Eddington rate and residing in galaxies with stellar mass > 3 X 10^{10} Msun; those detected with Herschel have IR luminosity from star formation in the rang...