National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for lost venezuelan output

  1. Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This assessment of the Venezuelan petroleum loss examines two areas. The first part of the analysis focuses on the impact of the loss of Venezuelan crude production on crude oil supply for U.S. refiners who normally run a significant fraction of Venezuelan crude oil. The second part of the analysis looks at the impact of the Venezuelan production loss on crude markets in general, with particular emphasis on crude oil imports, refinery crude oil throughput levels, stock levels, and the changes in price differences between light and heavy crude oils.

  2. Focus on Venezuelan heavy crude: refining margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-25

    Of six crudes refined in the US Gulf Coast, heavy Venezuelan crude Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) provides the best margin per barrel. Data for end of December 1983 and the first three weeks of January show that margins on all crudes are on the rise in this market, due to a turnaround in product prices. The lighter crudes are showing the greatest increase in Gross Product Worth. This is having a modest shrinking effect on the margin differential between light and heavy crudes in this market. The domestic crude West Texas Intermediate, at 40/sup 0/ API, provides the highest GPW in this crude slate sample, over US $31 per barrel, compared to GPW of under US $28 per barrel for Lagunillas. Still, as Lagunillas cost about US $8 less than does WTI, refiners with sufficient residue conversion capacity can be earning about US $3.50 more in margin per barrel than they can with WTI. Although few refiners would be using a 15/sup 0/ API crude exclusively for any length of time, heavier oil's inclusion in modern refiners' diets is enhancing their competitive position more than any other single factor. This issue of Energy Detente presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for January 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  3. Characterization of Venezuelan heavy oil vacuum residua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izquierdo, A.; Carbognani, L.; Leon, V.; Parisi, A. )

    1988-06-01

    Characterization of abundant ''heavy'' feedstocks such as tar sands, heavy oils and vacuum residua will play a fundamental role in the use of these energy sources. Their physical and chemical properties vary from one feed to another, and this can have some consequences in their necessary upgrading processes. In this paper results on the characterization of 510/sup 0/C-vacuum residua (VR) obtained from Venezuelan Heavy and Medium Oils are presented. These are Morichal (Mo), Merey (Me), Guafita (Gu) and Barinas (Ba). The VR have all an API gravity between 3 and 6, more than 15% asphaltenes, metals above 200 ppm, as well as high contents of nitrogen, more than 6000 ppm, and sulphur, over 1%. It has been found that when these feeds are hydrotreated under similar conditions the processability improves in the order Ba

  4. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Industrial Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas ...

  5. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  6. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  7. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all ...

  8. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  9. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  10. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    F. Wood Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all ...

  11. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all ...

  12. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  13. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  14. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  15. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  16. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  17. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  18. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities ...

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities ...

  20. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2013 414 0 132 206 76 2014 852 88 266 326 173

  1. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816

  2. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commercial Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155

  4. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584

  5. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2013 1,486 0 96 11 1,379 2014 1,283 3 90 16

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001

  12. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357

  13. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2013 831 0 261 423 147

  14. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0

  15. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0

  16. Lost Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lost Creek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lost Creek Wind Farm Facility Lost Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  17. Seismic properties of a Venezuelan heavy oil in water emulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, F.; Liu, Y.; Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.

    1996-08-01

    Several procedures for the production of low-viscosity, surfactant-stabilized, easy-transportable dispersions of heavy crude oil in water-briefly, oil in water (or o/w) emulsions - have been recently patented. Some of them propose to form the o/w emulsion in the reservoir, after the injection of a mixture of water and surfactants, increasing significantly the per well daily production. Progression of the o/w emulsion front, through the reservoir to the production wells, can be monitored in seismic planar slices with successive 3D seismic surveys (413 seismic), if enough contrast exists between the seismic velocity value of the o/w emulsion and the one of the oil in place. To facilitate the analysis of the contrast, this study presents high frequency acoustic velocity measurements performed in the laboratory. The experimental setup includes two reflectors and an ultrasonic transducer with double burst train emission. The estimated velocity precision is 0.02%. The measured samples are: a Venezuelan heavy o/w emulsion, a mixture of the same heavy oil and gasoil and a saturated sandstone core containing the o/w emulsion. Additionally, seismic velocities of the actual pore fluids - live oil and five o/w emulsion - and saturated sandstone are calculated using the above laboratory measurements, Wood`s equation, and Gassman`s and Biot`s models.

  18. Characterization of genetic variability of Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin; Be, Nicholas A.; Allen, Jonathan; Weaver, Scott C.; Forrester, Naomi; Guerbois, Mathilde; Jaing, Crystal

    2016-04-07

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused large outbreaks of severe illness in both horses and humans. New approaches are needed to rapidly infer the origin of a newly discovered VEEV strain, estimate its equine amplification and resultant epidemic potential, and predict human virulence phenotype. We performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of all available VEE antigenic complex genomes, verified that a SNP-based phylogeny accurately captured the features of a phylogenetic tree based on multiple sequence alignment, and developed a high resolution genome-wide SNP microarray. We used the microarray to analyze a broadmore » panel of VEEV isolates, found excellent concordance between array- and sequence-based SNP calls, genotyped unsequenced isolates, and placed them on a phylogeny with sequenced genomes. The microarray successfully genotyped VEEV directly from tissue samples of an infected mouse, bypassing the need for viral isolation, culture and genomic sequencing. Lastly, we identified genomic variants associated with serotypes and host species, revealing a complex relationship between genotype and phenotype.« less

  19. CFD Modeling for Lost Foam White Side

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The lost foam casting process produces clean, high-quality castings with close tolerances. The most important advantage is that no cores (with binders) are required. One challenge in lost foam...

  20. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  1. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  2. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, D.A.

    1994-09-06

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

  3. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  4. Venezuelan oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.R. )

    1989-01-01

    Oil reserves have been known to exist in Venezuela since early historical records, however, it was not until the 20th century that the extensive search for new reserves began. The 1950's marked the height of oil exploration when 200 new oil fields were discovered, as well as over 60{percent} of proven reserves. Venezuela now produces one tone in seven of crude oil consumption and the country's abundant reserves such as the Bolivar Coastal field in the West of the country and the Orinoco Belt field in the East, will ensure it's continuing importance as an oil producer well into the 21st century. This book charts the historical development of Venezuela oil and provides a chronology of all the significant events which have shaped the oil industry of today. It covers all the technical, legal, economic and political factors which have contributed to the evolution of the industry and also gives information on current oil resources and production. Those events significant to the development of the industry, those which were influential in shaping future policy and those which precipitated further action are included. The book provides a source of reference to oil companies, oil economists and petroleum geologists.

  5. Plugging mechanisms in a lost circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Givler, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of lost circulation during the drilling of geothermal wells is recognized to be a serious impediment to well completion. A viable solution, in terms of an ''engineered'' plugging material, will be enhanced via analytical cognizance of possible down-hole plugging mechanisms. This paper investigates several plugging strategies that result from rudimentary, mathematical models of the mud rheology (with and without dispersed particulate). 10 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community’s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as anmore » all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.« less

  7. Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Variable valve actuation with onoff IEGR pre-bump is ...

  8. Complete inactivation of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus by 1,5-iodonaphthylazide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Anuj; Raviv, Yossef; Puri, Anu; Viard, Mathias; Blumenthal, Robert; Maheshwari, Radha K. . E-mail: rmaheshwari@usuhs.mil

    2007-06-29

    Hydrophobic alkylating compounds like 1,5-iodonaphthylazide (INA) partitions into biological membranes and accumulates selectively into the hydrophobic domain of the lipid bilayer. Upon irradiation with far UV light, INA binds selectively to transmembrane proteins in the viral envelope and renders them inactive. Such inactivation does not alter the ectodomains of the membrane proteins thus preserving the structural and conformational integrity of immunogens on the surface of the virus. In this study, we have used INA to inactivate Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Treatment of VEEV with INA followed by irradiation with UV light resulted in complete inactivation of the virus. Immuno-fluorescence for VEEV and virus titration showed no virus replication in-vitro. Complete loss of infectivity was also achieved in mice infected with INA treated plus irradiated preparations of VEEV. No change in the structural integrity of VEEV particles were observed after treatment with INA plus irradiation as assessed by electron microscopy. This data suggest that such inactivation strategies can be used for developing vaccine candidates for VEEV and other enveloped viruses.

  9. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus entry mechanism requires late endosome formation and resists cell membrane cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A.; Fleming, Elisa H.; Davey, Robert A. . E-mail: radavey@utmb.edu

    2006-04-10

    Virus envelope proteins determine receptor utilization and host range. The choice of receptor not only permits specific targeting of cells that express it, but also directs the virus into specific endosomal trafficking pathways. Disrupting trafficking can result in loss of virus infectivity due to redirection of virions to non-productive pathways. Identification of the pathway or pathways used by a virus is, thus, important in understanding virus pathogenesis mechanisms and for developing new treatment strategies. Most of our understanding of alphavirus entry has focused on the Old World alphaviruses, such as Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus. In comparison, very little is known about the entry route taken by more pathogenic New World alphaviruses. Here, we use a novel contents mixing assay to identify the cellular requirements for entry of a New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). Expression of dominant negative forms of key endosomal trafficking genes shows that VEEV must access clathrin-dependent endocytic vesicles for membrane fusion to occur. Unexpectedly, the exit point is different from Old World alphaviruses that leave from early endosomes. Instead, VEEV also requires functional late endosomes. Furthermore, unlike the Old World viruses, VEEV entry is insensitive to cholesterol sequestration from cell membranes and may reflect a need to access an endocytic compartment that lacks cholesterol. This indicates fundamental differences in the entry route taken by VEEV compared to Old World alphaviruses.

  10. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  11. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  12. Anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from a Venezuelan oil field and its potential use in microbial improved oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trebbau, G.; Fernandez, B.; Marin, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this work is to determine the ability of indigenous bacteria from a Venezuelan oil field to grow under reservoir conditions inside a porous media, and to produce metabolites capable of recovering residual crude oil. For this purpose, samples of formation waters from a central-eastern Venezuelan oil reservoir were enriched with different carbon sources and a mineral basal media. Formation water was used as a source of trace metals. The enrichments obtained were incubated at reservoir temperature (71{degrees}C), reservoir pressure (1,200 psi), and under anaerobic conditions for both outside and inside porous media (Berea core). Growth and metabolic activity was followed outside porous media by measuring absorbance at 660 nm, increases in pressure, and decreases in pH. Inside porous media bacterial activity was determined by visual examination of the produced waters (gas bubbles and bacterial cells). All the carbohydrates tested outside porous media showed good growth at reservoir conditions. The pH was lowered, gases such as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were identified by GC. Surface tension was lowered in some enrichments by 30% when compared to controls. Growth was decreased inside porous media, but gases were produced and helped displace oil. In addition, 10% residual oil was recovered from the Berea core. Mathematical modeling was applied to the laboratory coreflood experiment to evaluate the reproducibility of the results obtained.

  13. Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The project will further reduce porosity and fold defects in lost foam casting to improve production efficiency, mechanical properties, and marketability of castings.

  14. REQUEST FOR LOST/STOLEN BADGE REPLACEMENT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REQUEST FOR LOST/STOLEN BADGE REPLACEMENT REQUEST FOR LOST/STOLEN BADGE REPLACEMENT Form documents the circumstances surrounding the loss of the security badge, i.e., the date the badge was Iost/stolen, location where the badge may have been Iost/stolen, attempts to find the lost badge, etc. REQUEST FOR LOST/STOLEN BADGE REPLACEMENT (10.68 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE HQ F 473.1 (fillable pdf) DOE F 5634.1 DOE F 5639.2

  15. Progress in The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Wright, E.K.

    1991-01-01

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50{percent} through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1990--March, 1991. 4 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  17. Igniter and actuator output testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    Closed system mechanical work output measurements were made for five types of thermal battery igniters and one type of valve actuator. Each unit was fired into a high-precision fit piston/cylinder arrangement, and the work output was determined from measuring the rise of a known weight. The results showed that work output for an individual igniter type varied over a considerable range while the mean work output values of the various igniter types appeared to depend principally on the type of closure disc and the details of the charge mix. The large variability in igniter output was the principal inducement to build a second apparatus, with approximately 10 times the capacity of the first, to investigate the output actuators. Compared with igniters, the actuator work output was appropriately in scale, but the variability was considerably reduced (R=1.5), and was attributed to increase in scale. Motion picture photography at 8000 to 9000 frames per second was used to determine the motion of the rising weight and the associated output pressure, which exhibited three distinct phases. Initially, the average acceleration of the weight was of the order of 100 g during the first half-millisecond of weight rise and corresponded to average pressures of 15,000 to 37,000 psi, depending principally on the mass of the weight. This was followed by a significant weight rise at a constant pressure of approximately 150 to 450 psi. Finally, the weight decelerated to rest under gravity to reach the maximum recorded height. 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Center for Inverse Design: Lost SharePoint Password?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lost SharePoint Password? Enter your name and e-mail address in the boxes provided. When you are finished, click "Request Password." If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, ...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lost Creek - WY 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lost Creek - WY 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Lost Creek (WY.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC

  20. Net lost revenue from DSM: State policies that work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-07-01

    A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenue incurred through successful operation of demand-side management (DSM) programs. Net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This paper examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The paper has three objectives: (1) determine whether NLRA is a feasible and effective approach to the lost-revenue disincentive for utility DSM programs, (2) identify the conditions linked to effective implementation of NLRA mechanisms and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior, and (3) suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach. Seven of the ten states we studied report no substantial problems with their approach. We observe several conditions linked to effective NLRA implementation. Observed changes in utility investment behavior occur after implementation of DSM rate reforms, which include deployment of NLRA mechanisms. Utilities in states with lost revenue recovery invest more than twice as much in DSM as do utilities in other states.

  1. Geology reinterpretation of an inactive old field-Mata 3, Venezuelan East Basin-using computer methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, O.; Rivero, C.; Abud, J.

    1996-08-01

    Nowadays to find a new oil field is a very dificult task that the petroleum people know very well; therefore the reactivation of an old oil field that had important production is the best way to increase the economic benefits for the Corporation and for the country in general. In this paper, the most important point was the Geology Study regarding the reopening of the Mata-3 oil field, which ceased to be active 15 years ago, after producing 30 mmbls of light oil. There are 30 prospective sands but only 3 of them have produced 70% of the primary production. Thus, the principal objectives were the S2, S3, 4 sands of Oficina Formation (Venezuelan East Basin) in 476 wells located in this area. The following computer systems that were available to us: GIPSIE System, Vax (Intergraph Co.); PMSE System, Vax (Intergraph Co.); CPS-3 System, Unix (Radian Co.); and SIGEMAP System PC (Corpoven, S.A.). All of them assist in the different tasks that must be done by the geologists working in the interpretation area. In the end, we recommended 40 wells to workover (2 wells/year for 20 years) and thereby to increase the POI (petroleum in situ) and increase the reserves by 13.4 mmbls of fight oil, important commercial production. The estimate of the total investment is about $2 million (340 mmBs.).

  2. AmeriFlux US-Los Lost Creek

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Desai, Ankur [University of Wisconsin

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Los Lost Creek. Site Description - Shrub wetland site, chosen to be representative of the wetlands within the WLEF tall tower flux footprint. This is a deciduous shrub wetland. Coniferous and grassy stands also exist within the WLEF flux footprint. Solar power. The site has excellent micrometeorological characteristics.

  3. Overload protection circuit for output driver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, Roger G.

    1982-05-11

    A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

  4. WIPP Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident CARLSBAD, N.M., February ... a safety milestone Feb. 19 by working two million man-hours without a lost-time accident. ...

  5. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval; Nedkova, Teodora [Kaiser Aluminum

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  6. Advanced lost foam casting technology. 1995 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B.A.; Sheldon, D.S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production; Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency; Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects; Task 4: Pattern Gating; and Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers. This report summarizes the work done in the past two years and the conclusions drawn from the work.

  7. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  8. High Energy Output Marx Generator Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monty Lehmann

    2011-07-01

    High Energy Output Marx Generator Design a design of a six stage Marx generator that has a unipolar pulse waveform of 200 kA in a 50500 microsecond waveform is presented. The difficulties encountered in designing the components to withstand the temperatures and pressures generated during the output pulse are discussed. The unique methods and materials used to successfully overcome these problems are given. The steps necessary to increase the current output of this Marx generator design to the meg-ampere region or higher are specified.

  9. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

  10. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 National Security Complex Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has worked one million hours, covering a 633-day period, without a lost-time injury. Some 285 people including building trade crafts, non-manual staff and escorts worked without a lost-time accident during this period. The Construction team's last lost workday was in September 2010. A

  11. Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment,

  12. PV output smoothing with energy storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2012-03-01

    This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

  13. Assessment of net lost revenue adjustment mechanisms for utility DSM programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-01-01

    Utility shareholders can lose money on demand-side management (DSM) investments between rate cases. Several industry analysts argue that the revenues lost from utility DSM programs are an important financial disincentive to utility DSM investment. A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenues incurred through successful operation of DSM programs. Explicitly defined net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states` preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This report examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The report has three objectives. First, we determine whether NLRA is a feasible and successful approach to removing the lost-revenue disincentive to utility operation of DSM programs. Second, we identify the conditions linked to successful implementation of NLRA mechanisms in different states and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior. Third, we suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. We first identify states with NLRA mechanisms where utilities are recovering lost revenues from DSM programs. We interview staff at regulatory agencies in all these states and utility staff in four states. These interviews focus on the status of NLRA, implementation issues, DSM measurement issues, and NLRA results. We also analyze regulatory agency orders on NLRA, as well as associated testimony, reports, and utility lost revenue recovery filings. Finally, we use qualitative and quantitative indicators to assess NLRA`s effectiveness. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach to the lost-revenue disincentive.

  14. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, Timothy W.; Sathe, Sanjeev B.; Peck, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  15. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheat, Robert M.; Dale, Gregory E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  16. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi; Griffin, John A.

    2014-03-31

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (≤ 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  17. Neutron light output and detector efficiency (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron light output and detector efficiency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron light output and detector efficiency You are accessing a document from the ...

  18. Neutron light output and detector efficiency (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron light output and detector efficiency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron light output and detector efficiency Authors: Taddeucci, Terry N 1 + Show Author ...

  19. Error estimates for fission neutron outputs (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Error estimates for fission neutron outputs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Error estimates for fission neutron outputs You are accessing a document from the...

  20. Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System This presentation summarizes the information given ...

  1. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  2. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness November 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Debris from the former mill buildings at the Moab site is excavated ...

  3. Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. – Workers with Paducah site infrastructure contractor Swift & Staley, Inc. recently exceeded 1.5 million hours without lost time away from work due to injury or illness, representing nine years of safe performance.

  4. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has ...

  5. Paducah Site Exceeds 2.5 Million Hours Without Lost Workdays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This month, EM’s cleanup contractor at the Paducah site celebrated surpassing 2.5 million work hours without lost workdays resulting from job-related injury or illness.

  6. Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Variable valve actuation with on/off IEGR pre-bump is an enabling technology for HCCI, PCCI, LTC and other advanced combustion techniques, and designs for production-intent equipment have been developed deer09_ernest.pdf (149.78 KB) More Documents & Publications Expanding Robust HCCI Operation (Delphi CRADA) Rapid Compression Machine … A Key

  7. Fact #901: November 30, 2015 States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue

  8. Off-set stabilizer for comparator output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lunsford, James S.

    1991-01-01

    A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

  9. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  10. Room-return scattering in fission neutron outputs (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Room-return scattering in fission neutron outputs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Room-return scattering in fission neutron outputs You are accessing a document from...

  11. B.U. Students Talk Energy Research at Lost Dog Cafe > Archived News Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Archived News Stories Latest News The perfect atom sandwich requires an extra layer › Cornell boasts 22 'highly cited' researchers › Postdoc brings open access issue to the table › In This Section EMC2 News Archived News Stories B.U. Students Talk Energy Research at Lost Dog Cafe April 10th, 2014 › There was a science café at the Lost Dog Cafe in Binghamton last night. A group of Binghamton University students and professors talked about

  12. Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-09-12

    This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

  13. Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – The number 1,584 may not mean much to most people, but for the workers on EM’s Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, it represents the number of days without a work-related, lost-time injury or illness, as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

  14. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – It has been more than five years since workers on the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah had a lost-time injury or illness. This represents roughly 2.2 million hours of safe work.

  15. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  16. Halbach array generator/motor having mechanically regulated output voltage and mechanical power output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-06-14

    A motor/generator has its stationary portion, i.e., the stator, positioned concentrically within its rotatable element, i.e., the rotor, along the axis of rotation of the rotor. The rotor includes a Halbach array of magnets. The voltage and power outputs are regulated by varying the radial gap in between the stator windings and the rotating Halbach array. The gap is varied by extensible and retractable supports attached to the stator windings that can move the windings in a radial direction.

  17. Output-Based Error Estimation and Adaptation for Uncertainty...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Output-Based Error Estimation and Adaptation for Uncertainty Quantification Isaac M. Asher and Krzysztof J. Fidkowski University of Michigan US National Congress on Computational...

  18. Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Lesson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Grade Level(s): IB 2 (Senior - 3 ... C.8 Photovoltaic cells and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) Understandings: * Solar ...

  19. Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moeller, Charles P. (Del Mar, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A waveguide power divider (10) for splitting electromagnetic microwave power and directionally coupling the divided power includes an input waveguide (21) and reduced height output waveguides (23) interconnected by axial slots (22) and matched loads (25) and (26) positioned at the unused ends of input and output guides (21) and (23) respectively. The axial slots are of a length such that the wave in the input waveguide (21) is directionally coupled to the output waveguides (23). The widths of input guide (21) and output guides (23) are equal and the width of axial slots (22) is one half of the width of the input guide (21).

  20. Venezuelan plant completes instrument upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, H.; Garcia, C.O.

    1996-07-22

    The Lamarliquido LPG plant, offshore Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela, has received a major upgrade to its control system after 25 years of pneumatic instrumentation. The plant is now operating fully remote from a new central control room with a maximum production of 5,500 b/d, expected to go to 6,600 b/d. The phases of the project included installation and integration of four control systems: distributed control system; fire prevention, detection, and control system; refrigeration process turbocompressor control system; and emergency shutdown system. The paper describes the 1960s vintage instrumentation, the modernization objectives and phases, the distributed control system, the fire control system, gas and fire detection, the turbocompressor system, emergency shutdown system, and plant shutdown logic.

  1. Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C.; Martin, Stephen J.

    1991-01-01

    A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

  2. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beene, James R.; Bemis, Jr., Curtis E.

    1986-01-01

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  3. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

    1984-07-17

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  4. Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

  5. Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output and physical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    observations (Conference) | SciTech Connect Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output and physical observations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output and physical observations Authors: Higdon, David M [1] ; Lawrence, Earl [1] ; Heitmann, Katrin [2] ; Habib, Salman [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory ANL Publication Date: 2011-07-25 OSTI Identifier: 1084581 Report Number(s):

  6. Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System This presentation summarizes the information given during the DOE SunShot Grand Challenge: Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012. ssgrandchallenge_finance_schrag.pdf (63.07 KB) More Documents & Publications The SunShot Vision Study SunShot Vision Study: February 2012 (Book), SunShot, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Advanced Thermal Management for Higher Module Power Output

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Higher temperatures of photovoltaic (PV) modules are causing lower than projected module performance. For example, a free-standing Si PV module has 0.4% decrease in efficiency per degree Celsius. Reducing the module temperature to near ambient levels will increase yearly energy output by 8%. This project will enable lower operating temperatures for modules, resulting in higher module power output and lower levelized cost of electricity (LCOE).

  8. Method for separating FEL output beams from long wavelength radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George; Shinn, Michelle D.; Gubeli, Joseph

    2016-04-26

    A method for improving the output beam quality of a free electron laser (FEL) by reducing the amount of emission at wavelengths longer than the electron pulse length and reducing the amount of edge radiation. A mirror constructed of thermally conductive material and having an aperture therein is placed at an oblique angle with respect to the beam downstream of the bending magnet but before any sensitive use of the FEL beam. The aperture in the mirror is sized to deflect emission longer than the wavelength of the FEL output while having a minor impact on the FEL output beam. A properly sized aperture will enable the FEL radiation, which is coherent and generally at a much shorter wavelength than the bending radiations, to pass through the aperture mirror. The much higher divergence bending radiations will subsequently strike the aperture mirror and be reflected safely out of the way.

  9. Crosshole EM for oil field characterization and EOR monitoring: Field examples from Lost Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C.; Wratcher, M.; Lambert, I.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Tseng H.W.

    1996-07-16

    A steamflood recently initiated by Mobil Development and Production U.S. at the Lost Hills No 3 oil field in California is notable for its shallow depth and the application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques to monitor the subsurface steam flow. Steam was injected into three stacked eastward-dipping unconsolidated oil sands at depths from 60 to 120 m; the plume is expected to develop as an ellipsoid aligned with the regional northwest-southeast strike. Because of the shallow depth of the sands and the high viscosity of the heavy oil, it is important to track the steam in the unconsolidated sediments for both economic and safety reasons. Crosshole and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic imaging were applied for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. The crosshole EM data were collected to map the interwell distribution of the high-resistivity oil sands and to track the injected steam and hot water. Measurements were made in two fiberglass-cased observation wells straddling the steam injector on a northeast-southwest profile. Field data were collected before the steam drive, to map the distribution of the oil sands, and then 6 and 10 months after steam was injected, to monitor the expansion of the steam chest. Resistivity images derived from the collected data clearly delineated the distribution and dipping structure of the target oil sands. Difference images from data collected before and during steamflooding indicate that the steam chest has developed only in the middle and lower oil sands, and it has preferentially migrated westward in the middle oil sand and eastward in the deeper sand. Surface-to-borehole field data sets at Lost Hills were responsive to the large-scale subsurface structure but insufficiently sensitive to model steam chest development in the middle and lower oil sands. As the steam chest develops further, these data will be of more use for process monitoring.

  10. Motor vehicle output and GDP, 1968-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Poyer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we assess the performance of the BEA series 'value of motor vehicle output' as an indicator of the business cycle over the period 1968-2007. We statistically assess the causal relationship between real motor vehicle output (RMVO) and real gross domestic product (RGDP). This is accomplished by standard estimation and statistical methods used to assess vector autoregressive models. This assessment represents the initial results of a more encompassing research project, the intent of which is to determine the dynamic interaction of the transport sector with the overall economy. It's a start to a more comprehensive assessment of how transport and economic activity interrelate.

  11. Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Handbook providing practical information to help regulators decide if they want to use output-based regulations and explains how to develop an output-based emission standard

  12. Drilling fluids and lost circulation in hot dry rock geothermal wells at Fenton Hill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckols, E.B.; Miles, D.; Laney, R.; Polk, G.; Friddle, H.; Simpson, G.; Baroid, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal hot dry rock drilling activities at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico encountered problems in designing drilling fluids that will reduce catastrophic lost circulation. Four wells (GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3) penetrated 733 m (2405 ft) of Cenozoic and Paleozoic sediments and Precambrian crystalline rock units to +4572 m (+15,000 ft). The Cenozoic rocks consist of volcanics (rhyolite, tuff, and pumice) and volcaniclastic sediments. Paleozoic strata include Permian red beds (Abo Formation) and the Pennsylvanian Madera and Sandia Formations, which consist of massive limestones and shales. Beneath the Sandia Formation are igneous and metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age. The drilling fluid used for the upper sedimentary formations was a polymeric flocculated bentonite drilling fluid. Severe loss of circulation occurred in the cavernous portions of the Sandia limestones. The resultant loss of hydrostatic head caused sloughing of the Abo and of some beds within the Madera Formation. Stuck pipe, repetitive reaming, poor casing cement jobs and costly damage to the intermediate casing resulted. The Precambrian crystalline portion of the EE-2 and EE-3 wells were directionally drilled at a high angle, and drilled with water as the primary circulating fluid. Due to high temperatures (approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F) BHT) and extreme abrasiveness of the deeper part of the Precambrian crystalline rocks, special problems of corrosion inhibition and of torque friction were incurred.

  13. Silica phase changes: Diagenetic agent for oil entrapment, Lost Hills field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julander, D.R.; Szymanski, D.L. )

    1991-02-01

    The siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target at Lost Hills. Silica phase changes have influenced the distribution and entrapment of hydrocarbons. With increasing temperature, opal A phase diatomite is converted to opal CT and finally quartz phase rock. All phases are low in permeability. The opal A diatomite is characteristically high in oil saturation and productive saturation. Productivity from this phase is dependent on structural position and fieldwide variations in oil viscosity and biodegradation. The deeper chert reservoir coincides with the opal CT to quartz phase transition. Porosity is again reduced in this transition, but saturations in the quartz phase rocks increase. Tests in the chert reservoir indicate a single, low-permeability system, suggesting the importance of matric contribution. resistivity and porosity in the diatomite, and resistivity and velocity in the chert, are the physical properties which best reflect saturation. Methods exploiting these properties (FMS, BHTV, borehole, and surface shear wave studies) should be helpful in further characterizing the reservoirs and identifying future pay.

  14. Mortality in Appalachian coal mining regions: the value of statistical life lost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendryx, M.; Ahern, M.M.

    2009-07-15

    We examined elevated mortality rates in Appalachian coal mining areas for 1979-2005, and estimated the corresponding value of statistical life (VSL) lost relative to the economic benefits of the coal mining industry. We compared age-adjusted mortality rates and socioeconomic conditions across four county groups: Appalachia with high levels of coal mining, Appalachia with lower mining levels, Appalachia without coal mining, and other counties in the nation. We converted mortality estimates to VSL estimates and compared the results with the economic contribution of coal mining. We also conducted a discount analysis to estimate current benefits relative to future mortality costs. The heaviest coal mining areas of Appalachia had the poorest socioeconomic conditions. Before adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas ranged from 3,975 to 10,923, depending on years studied and comparison group. Corresponding VSL estimates ranged from $18.563 billion to $84.544 billion, with a point estimate of $50.010 billion, greater than the $8.088 billion economic contribution of coal mining. After adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual deaths in mining areas ranged from 1,736 to 2,889, and VSL costs continued to exceed the benefits of mining. Discounting VSL costs into the future resulted in excess costs relative to benefits in seven of eight conditions, with a point estimate of $41.846 billion.

  15. Optical device with conical input and output prism faces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brunsden, Barry S.

    1981-01-01

    A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

  16. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  17. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, M.L.; McNeilly, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phtotransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  18. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Marc L.; McNeilly, David R.

    1985-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phototransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  19. Development of a high-output dual-fuel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danyluk, P.R. . Fairbanks Morse Engineering Division)

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a new dual-fuel engine development program. The engine is the largest commercially available in terms of power output (650 hp/cyl) and features very low emissions (1 g/hp-hr NO[sub x]) and excellent fuel consumption (43 percent thermal efficiency). A two-cylinder turbocharged prototype was designed and built for the initial development. Results from testing on 18-cylinder production versions are also reported.

  20. High natural gas output and inventories contribute to lower prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    High natural gas output and inventories contribute to lower prices High natural gas production and ample gas inventories are expected to keep natural gas prices relatively low for the rest of 2015. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says that while expected production growth is slowing from last year's torrid pace, domestic natural gas production in 2015 is still expected to be almost 6 percent above the 2014 level. Higher production has pushed U.S. natural

  1. Development of output user interface software to support analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahanani, Nursinta Adi Natsir, Khairina Hartini, Entin

    2014-09-30

    Data processing software packages such as VSOP and MCNPX are softwares that has been scientifically proven and complete. The result of VSOP and MCNPX are huge and complex text files. In the analyze process, user need additional processing like Microsoft Excel to show informative result. This research develop an user interface software for output of VSOP and MCNPX. VSOP program output is used to support neutronic analysis and MCNPX program output is used to support burn-up analysis. Software development using iterative development methods which allow for revision and addition of features according to user needs. Processing time with this software 500 times faster than with conventional methods using Microsoft Excel. PYTHON is used as a programming language, because Python is available for all major operating systems: Windows, Linux/Unix, OS/2, Mac, Amiga, among others. Values that support neutronic analysis are k-eff, burn-up and mass Pu{sup 239} and Pu{sup 241}. Burn-up analysis used the mass inventory values of actinide (Thorium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Uranium). Values are visualized in graphical shape to support analysis.

  2. Ring laser having an output at a single frequency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackell, Lloyd A.

    1991-01-01

    A ring laser is disclosed that produces a single frequency of laser radiation in either the pulsed mode of operation or the continuous waveform (cw) mode of operation. The laser comprises a ring laser in a bowtie configuration, a birefringent gain material such as Nd:YLF, an improved optical diode that supports laser oscillation having a desired direction of travel and linear polarization, and a Q-switch. An output coupler (mirror) having a high reflectivity, such as 94%, is disclosed. Also disclosed is a self-seeded method of operation in which the laser can provide a pulse or a series of pulses of high power laser radiation at a consistent single frequency with a high degree of amplitude stability and temporal stability. In operation, the laser is operated in continuous waveform (cw) at a low power output with the Q-switch introducing a loss into the resonating cavity. Pumping is continued at a high level, causing the gain material to store energy. When a pulse is desired, the Q-switch is actuated to substantially reduce the losses so that a pulse can build up based on the low level cw oscillation. The pulse quickly builds, using the stored energy in the gain medium to provide a high power output pulse. The process may be repeated to provide a series of high power pulses of a consistent single frequency.

  3. Application and Continued Development of Thin Faraday Collectors as a Lost Ion Diagnostic for Tokamak Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Ed Cecil

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishment of sixteen years of work toward the development of thin foil Faraday collectors as a lost energetic ion diagnostic for high temperature magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Following initial, proof of principle accelerator based studies, devices have been tested on TFTR, NSTX, ALCATOR, DIII-D, and JET (KA-1 and KA-2). The reference numbers refer to the attached list of publications. The JET diagnostic KA-2 continues in operation and hopefully will provide valuable diagnostic information during a possible d-t campaign on JET in the coming years. A thin Faraday foil spectrometer, by virtue of its radiation hardness, may likewise provide a solution to the very challenging problem of lost alpha particle measurements on ITER and other future burning plasma machines.

  4. Implications from a study of the timing of oil entrapment in Monterey siliceous shales, Lost Hills, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julander, D.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The oil and gas-rich upper Miocene siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target in the Lost Hills Oil Field, San Joaquin Valley, California. As a result of diagenesis, the siliceous shales can be subdivided by opal phase into three sections (from shallow to deep): the Opal-A diatomites which are rich in oil saturation; the Opal-CT porcellanites which are predominantly wet but include pockets of moderate oil saturation; and the Quartz cherts and porcellanites which in some places are highly oil saturated immediately below the Opal CT section. Productivity trends in each of the three sections have been established through drilling and production testing, but a predictive model was not available until a study of the timing of oil entrapment at Lost Hills was recently completed. The study included an analysis of the depositional history of the siliceous shales and timing of: (1) structural growth of the Lost Hills fold, (2) source-rock maturation, and (3) development of the opal-phase segregation of the Monterey shales. The study led to enhanced understanding of the known oil saturation and production trends in the three opal-phase sections and yielded a predictive model that is being used to identify areas in the field with remedial or delineation potential. The study also produced evidence of fold axis rotation during the Pliocene and Pleistocene that helps explain differences in fracture orientations within the Monterey shales.

  5. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2010-08-24

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  6. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2009-06-02

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  7. High lumen compact fluorescents boost light output in new fixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    Some compact fluorescent lamps aren`t so compact. General Electric (GE), OSRAM, and Philips have been expanding offerings in longer, more powerful, hard wired CFLs that generate enough light to serve applications once limited to conventional fluorescents and metal halide systems. All three of these manufacturers have for some time offered 18- to 40-watt high-output CFLs, which use a fluorescent tube doubled back on itself to produce a lot of light in a compact source. Now GE has introduced an even larger, more powerful 50-watt unit, and OSRAM is soon to follow suit with a 55-watt lamp. These new entries to the field of turbocharged CFLs can provide general lighting at ceiling heights of 12 feet or more as well as indirect lighting, floodlighting, and wall washing. They are such a concentrated source of light that they can provide the desired illumination using fewer lamps and fixtures than would be needed with competing sources.

  8. Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004 Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004 The U.S. ...

  9. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the Electromechanical battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition.

  10. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the electromechanical battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1999-01-19

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition. 4 figs.

  11. Method for optimizing the mechanical output of a fluid pressure free piston engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibrell, E.W.; Schaich, W.A.

    1988-07-05

    The method is described for minimizing rotational speed variations of a centrifugal piston expander engine comprising the steps of: (1) supplying a pressured gas to a centrifugal piston expander engine having a rotatable output element and a discharge conduit for cooled exhaust gas; (2) expanding and cooling the pressured gas in the centrifugal piston expander engine to produce cyclically varying oppositely directed, positive and negative torques on the rotatable output shaft; (3) driving a rotary load in the positive torque direction by the rotatable output element through one rotatable element of a unidirectional clutch having two rotating elements relatively movable in only the negative torque direction; and (4) connecting a battery operated motor-generator unit to the rotatable output shaft to supplement the rotary speed of the output shaft during periods of negative torque output by the centrifugal piston expander engine and to recharge the battery during periods of maximum positive torque output of the centrifugal expander engine.

  12. Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

    2000-04-01

    This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Littleton; John Griffin

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (“Energy SMARRT”) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU’s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU’s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  14. New runners to boost peak output at Niagara Falls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reason, J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrofitted Francis turbines will improve the value of power generated from Niagara Falls by increasing the peak output of the hydroturbine units at the Robert Moses hydroelectric plant. The computer-designed runners are expected to add 330 MW to the peak capacity of the 28-yr-old plant and significantly increase the efficiency at high flow rates. Next year, the first new runner will be retrofit to the highly instrumented Unit 4. If the retrofit unit meets it increased-performance expectations, the other 12 units will be upgraded between 1993 and 1998. The work is part of an overall expansion of the Niagara Power Project designed to made better use of the power value of Niagara river water, within the constraints of a treaty with Canada and the scenic value of the falls. These constraints, together with varying flows and heads, introduced enormous complexities into the selection and design of the new runners. The alterations being made to Unit 4, in addition to replacing the turbine runner, include modifying the draft tube-liners, increasing the wicket-gate stroke, replacing the turbine discharge ring (to accommodate longer blades), making various electrical modifications to the generator, and replacing the transformer. But the key to the retrofit is the computer-designed runner. Charles Grose, senior project manager, New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY, emphasizes that such computer design techniques were not available a few years ago; neither were the computer-controlled machining techniques necessary to manufacture the new runners. Other aspects of the upgrading that were analyzed include runner stability, resonance, shaft torsional stress, and runaway speed.

  15. Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    -limited" experiment, in which emissions are assumed to be constrained, so that the concentration of carbon dioxide levels off at 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) shortly after 2100. The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

  16. Pdvsa maps ambitious Venezuelan oil plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-14

    Venezuela's national oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela SA (Pdvsa), is moving ahead with an ambitious investment program designed to substantially expand its activities in oil and gas exploration and production, refining, petrochemicals, and coal in the 1990s. The company, which has stakes in refining and marketing companies in the U.S., Europe, and the Caribbean, also is seeking new investment opportunities in U.S. and European markets as well as in the Far East. Pdvsa officials expect the company by 2000 to have developed a much stronger presence in the global energy market.

  17. Venezuelan oil field revival bids won

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-29

    This paper reports that four private sector companies or combines will operate inactive oil fields in Venezuela under state owned Petroleos de Venezuela's marginal field reactivation program. The award of operating contract to winning bidders marks the first time private companies will be allowed to produce crude oil in Venezuela since nationalization of the industry in 1976. Winning bidders have committed a total of $720 million in investments to the program during the 1990s. Current plans call for drilling 670 appraisals and development wells, conducting 250 workovers and well repairs, and conducting about 2,9000 line km of seismic surveys. Venezuela's energy ministry is targeting a production level of 90,000 b/d by the end of the decade from the reactivated fields.

  18. Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and ...

  19. Double Power Output for GaAs Solar Cells Embedded in Luminescent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Double power output of bifacial thin-film GaAs microscale solar cells is achieved by embedding in luminescent waveguides (LSCs) with light- trapping backside reflectors (BSRs). ...

  20. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    1996-11-08

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  1. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  2. Estimating Solar PV Output Using Modern Space/Time Geostatistics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. J.; George, R.; Bush, B.

    2009-04-29

    This presentation describes a project that uses mapping techniques to predict solar output at subhourly resolution at any spatial point, develop a methodology that is applicable to natural resources in general, and demonstrate capability of geostatistical techniques to predict the output of a potential solar plant.

  3. System for adjusting frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartholomew, David B.

    2006-11-14

    A system for setting and adjusting a frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator in a network is disclosed. The system comprises an accumulator module configured to receive pulses from an oscillator and to output an accumulated value. An adjustor module is configured to store an adjustor value used to correct local oscillator drift. A digital adder adds values from the accumulator module to values stored in the adjustor module and outputs their sums to the accumulator module, where they are stored. The digital adder also outputs an electrical pulse to a logic module. The logic module is in electrical communication with the adjustor module and the network. The logic module may change the value stored in the adjustor module to compensate for local oscillator drift or change the frequency of output pulses. The logic module may also keep time and calculate drift.

  4. Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1999-03-16

    The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range. 3 figs.

  5. Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range.

  6. Technique for enhancing the power output of an electrostatic generator employing parametric resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2016-02-23

    A circuit-based technique enhances the power output of electrostatic generators employing an array of axially oriented rods or tubes or azimuthal corrugated metal surfaces for their electrodes. During generator operation, the peak voltage across the electrodes occurs at an azimuthal position that is intermediate between the position of minimum gap and maximum gap. If this position is also close to the azimuthal angle where the rate of change of capacity is a maximum, then the highest rf power output possible for a given maximum allowable voltage at the minimum gap can be attained. This rf power output is then coupled to the generator load through a coupling condenser that prevents suppression of the dc charging potential by conduction through the load. Optimized circuit values produce phase shifts in the rf output voltage that allow higher power output to occur at the same voltage limit at the minimum gap position.

  7. Final Technical Report Quantification and Standardization of Pattern Properties for the Control of the Lost Foam Casting Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Michaels

    2005-09-30

    This project takes a fresh look at the ''white side'' of the lost foam casting process. We have developed the gel front hypothesis for foam pyrolysis behavior and the magnetic metal pump method for controlling lost foam casting metal fill event. The subject of this report is work done in the improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process. The original objective of this project was to improve the control of metal fill by understanding the influence of foam pattern and coating properties on the metal fill event. Relevant pattern properties could then be controlled, providing control of the metal fill event. One of the original premises of this project was that the process of metal fill was relatively well understood. Considerable previous work had been done to develop fluid mechanical and heat transfer models of the process. If we could just incorporate measured pattern properties into these models we would be able predict accurately the metal fill event. As we began to study the pyrolysis behavior of EPS during the metal fill event, we discovered that the chemical nature of this event had been completely overlooked in previous research. Styrene is the most prevalent breakdown product of EPS pyrolysis and it is a solvent for polystyrene. Much of the styrene generated by foam pyrolysis diffuses into intact foam, producing a molten gel of mechanically entangled polystyrene molecules. Much of the work of our project has centered on validation of this concept and producing a qualitative model of the behavior of EPS foam undergoing pyrolysis in a confined environment. A conclusion of this report is that styrene dissolution in EPS is a key phenomenon in the pyrolysis process and deserves considerable further study. While it is possible to continue to model the metal fill event parametrically using empirical data, we recommend that work be undertaken by qualified researchers to directly characterize and quantify this phenomenon for the benefit of modelers, researchers, and

  8. Seismic Reflection Project Near the Southern Terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi Faults, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. M. Jackson; G. S. Carpenter; R. P. Smith; J. L. Casper

    2006-10-01

    Thirteen seismic reflection lines were processed and interpreted to determine the southern terminations of the Lost River and Lemhi faults along the northwest boundary of the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). The southernmost terminations of the Arco and Howe segments were determined to support characterization of the Lost River and Lemhi fault sources, respectively, for the INL probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Keywords:Keywords are required forExternal Release Review*Keywords  Keywords *Contacts (Type and Name are required for each row) Type ofContactContact Name  POC Editor RecordFour commercial seismic reflection lines (Arco lines 81-1 and 81-2; Howe lines 81-3 and 82-2) were obtained from the Montana Power Company. The seismic data were collected in the early 1980’s using a Vibroseis source with station and shot point locations that resulted in 12-fold data. Arco lines 81?1 and 81?2 and Howe lines 81?3 and 82?2 are located within the basins adjacent to the Arco and Howe segments, respectively. Seven seismic lines (Arco lines A1, A2, A3, and A4 and Howe lines H1, H2, and H3) were acquired by EG&G Idaho, Inc. Geosciences for this study using multiple impacts with an accelerated weight drop source. Station and shot point locations yielded 12-fold data. The seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. Two seismic lines (Arco line S2 and Howe line S4) were obtained from Sierra Geophysics. In 1984, they acquired seismic reflection data using an accelerated weight drop source with station and shot point locations that yielded 6-fold data. The two seismic reflection lines are oriented perpendicular to and at locations along the projected extensions of the Arco and Howe fault segments within the ESRP. In 1992 for this study, Geotrace Technologies Inc. processed all of the seismic reflection data using industry standard processing techniques. The

  9. REPORTING LOST, STOLEN, FORGOTTEN ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Protect Badges for LSF policy. Badge Holder NAME (Last, First, MI) SSN: SNLID: PHONE: Sandia Corp. Employee Contractor Consultant Visitor Colleague Badge Type HSPD-12...

  10. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  11. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  12. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4e. Gross Output1by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002...

  13. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3e. Gross Output1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998...

  14. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research ... at a fraction of the cost of building new reactors, while providing continued ...

  15. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  16. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratorys Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  17. Phasing surface emitting diode laser outputs into a coherent laser beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F.

    2006-10-10

    A system for generating a powerful laser beam includes a first laser element and at least one additional laser element having a rear laser mirror, an output mirror that is 100% reflective at normal incidence and <5% reflective at an input beam angle, and laser material between the rear laser mirror and the output mirror. The system includes an injector, a reference laser beam source, an amplifier and phase conjugater, and a combiner.

  18. Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting vtpn04_lm_schutte_2012_o.pdf (461.49 KB) More Documents & Publications Materials Lightweight Materials Overview Overview of Lightweight Materials

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...1,2730243,2501775,10875372,11870666,-8.4 " Charleston, SC",124,148,1030,563,2223,-74.7 " El Paso, TX",25988,44883,167,122862,7508,"NM" " Houston-Galveston, TX",113426,232428,225146...

  20. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 1,518 1,406 Massachusetts 3,491 3,282 3,827 2,521 1,014 2,169 32 47 8,364 8,020 New Hampshire 791 744 640 611 235 225 0 0 1,666 1,579 Rhode Island 527 481 533 474 114 109 4 3 ...

  1. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 2 2 -10.6% 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 ...

  2. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 526 2.29 7.8 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- ...

  3. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8,726 2 3 8 9 Maine 3,403 3,675 10 12 8 9 Massachusetts 12,917 14,735 6 11 13 14 New Hampshire 3,458 3,447 3 3 4 5 Rhode Island 2,566 2,838 0.09 1 1 1 Vermont 14 15 0.06 0.07 1 ...

  4. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- ...

  5. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 18.09 18.16 -0.4% 19.94 21.91 17.75 17.68 New Hampshire W W W 15.16 16.84 W W Rhode Island W W W -- -- W W Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- ...

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 -- Maine 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Massachusetts W 582 W 1,965 1,496 31.3% 0 0 -- New Hampshire W W W W W W 0 0 -- Rhode Island W 0 W W W W 0 0 -- Vermont 0 0 -- 57 NM NM 0 0 -- ...

  7. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 ...

  8. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    829 3.8% 0 0 860 829 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 4,233 4,087 3.6% 0 0 4,233 4,087 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,871 1,839 1.7% 0 0 1,195 1,128 676 711 0 0 Rhode Island 3,980 956 316% 0 0 3,980 ...

  9. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -- Maine 85 0.85 8.2 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 1,225 0.72 11.3 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 526 2.29 7.8 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 254 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Vermont 0 ...

  10. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    14% 1 1 476 424 6 6 43 30 Massachusetts 1,646 713 131% 240 126 1,324 546 80 39 1 2 New Hampshire 454 187 143% 216 135 222 41 16 11 0.05 0.19 Rhode Island 113 75 50% 21 22 83 38 NM ...

  11. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 15 27% 0 0 10 7 0 0 9 8 Massachusetts 1,248 1,723 -28% 0 0 1,244 1,718 0 0 5 5 New Hampshire 544 616 -12% 544 616 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 ...

  12. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.94 8.4 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- ...

  13. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11.86 Massachusetts 17.39 15.83 14.68 14.23 12.74 13.18 8.76 13.06 15.35 14.51 New Hampshire 17.53 16.33 14.34 13.52 11.93 11.40 -- -- 15.22 14.30 Rhode Island 17.17 15.20 ...

  14. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Maine -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Massachusetts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New Hampshire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- ...

  15. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W W Connecticut W W W -- -- W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts W W W -- -- W W New Hampshire 4.27 4.21 1.4% 4.27 4.21 -- -- Rhode Island W -- W -- -- W -- Vermont -- -- -- -- ...

  16. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    66 30% 0 0 53 38 0 0 32 28 Massachusetts 1,225 1,805 -32% 0 0 1,225 1,805 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 526 726 -28% 526 726 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 254 0 -- 0 0 254 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 ...

  17. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -458 -368 24.5% 0 0 -458 -368 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 ...

  18. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -- 6.65 6.06 Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 6.46 5.75 12% 5.54 6.84 6.47 5.74 New Hampshire W W W 6.05 8.85 W W Rhode Island W 5.67 W -- -- W 5.67 Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- ...

  19. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 305 105 191.3% 11 4 289 100 5 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 10 2 388.5% 0 0 10 2 0 0 0 0 Vermont 24 17 ...

  20. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " Massachusetts","w","w","-","-","w","w","-","-",-7.4,"s","-","-" " New Hampshire",108.29,"-","-","-",108.33,"-","-","-","s","-","-","-" " Rhode ...

  1. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27.6% 1 1 261 204 2 2 41 32 Massachusetts 1,005 390 157.4% 131 71 793 287 80 31 1 1 New Hampshire 287 105 175.0% 108 62 163 28 16 14 0.07 0.26 Rhode Island 88 51 74.9% 11 11 60 26 ...

  2. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5,409 14,249 Massachusetts 126,810 148,736 -15% 1,544 1,245 125,265 147,491 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 31,309 29,644 5.6% 424 355 30,885 29,289 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 44,839 46,035 -2.6% ...

  3. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -- Maine 53 0.80 8.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 1,225 0.72 11.3 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 254 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- ...

  4. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11,855 Massachusetts 20,071 20,728 26,076 17,713 7,961 16,463 361 361 54,469 55,265 New Hampshire 4,510 4,554 4,465 4,517 1,969 1,973 0 0 10,944 11,043 Rhode Island 3,070 3,165 ...

  5. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 587 873 0 0 50 25 Massachusetts 1,867 1,300 44% 301 154 1,566 1,146 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 741 354 110% 455 268 287 86 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 217 31 594% 0 0 217 31 0 0 0 0 ...

  6. SAS Output

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.1% 0 0 112 115 200 196 0 0 Massachusetts 2,071 2,029 2.1% 0 0 2,071 2,029 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 125 156 -20% 0 0 125 156 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 ...

  7. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2013 Outage Type FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages...

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. U.S. Transformer Outages by Type and NERC region, 2013 Outage Type Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 59.00 --...

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2013 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern...

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2013 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts Voltage Region Type Operating...

  11. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... equal to Internal Demand less Direct Control Load Management and Interruptible Demand. ... Capacity Margin is the amount of unused available capability of an electric power system at ...

  12. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",435,"-",12081,12516 "Arkansas",87,"-","-",87 "Colorado",971,10,17142,18123 "Illinois",16944,1634,34136,52713

  13. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2014" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",32,17359,87.17 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Franklin",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",9,5764,103.31 " Shelby",2,"w","w"

  14. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2014" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market1","Captive2","Total3" "Alabama",84.48,"-",87.17 "Alaska","w","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","w" "Arkansas","w","w","w" "Colorado",35.68,44.28,38.64

  15. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal Thickness (inches)","Underground","Surface","Total" "Under 7","-",922,922 "7 - Under 13","-",2518,2518 "13 - Under 19",343,6236,6579 "19 - Under 25",197,11075,11273 "25 - Under 31",2693,10632,13324 "31 - Under 37",15604,14557,30161 "37 - Under 43",20075,13504,33580

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Coal Rank, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of

  17. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "State and Region1" "Alabama",12081,327,435,3486,12516,3813 "Alaska","-",1502,"-","-","-",1502

  18. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Disposition by State, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market Sales1","Captive Sales / Transactions2","Exports3","Total" "Alabama",5310,"-",12049,17359 "Alaska",954,"-",554,1508 "Arizona",8182,"-","-",8182 "Arkansas",1,104,9,114 "Colorado",10602,11844,2089,24536 "Illinois",39533,6139,10170,55842

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2014" "Rank","Mine Name / Operating Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining LLC","Surface","Wyoming",117965515 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company LLC","Surface","Wyoming",101016860 3,"Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining

  20. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities, 2003 through 2013 (Million Dollars) Description 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Operating...

  1. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State","Continuous1","Conventional and","Longwall3","Total" ,,"Other2" "Alabama","w","-","w",89.68 "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","-","w",37.28 "Illinois",44.23,"w",4...

  2. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mile. Some structures were designed and then built to carry future transmission circuits in order to handle expected growth in new capability requirements. Lines are taken...

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2014" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" ...

  4. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2004 - ... Notes: NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on EIA's Electricity ...

  5. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2004 - 2014, Actual ... Notes: NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on EIA's Electricity ...

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9.B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2013 Actual, 2014-2018 Projected Net...

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8.B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2013 Actual, 2014-2018 Projected Net...

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",40.85,44.62,71.22,40.85,71.22,-42.6 " Canada*",85.43,69.79,74.16,85.43,74.16,15.2 " Dominican

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",586002,1478020,446185,586002,446185,31.3 " Canada*",440922,1341068,339057,440922,339057,30 "

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",91.86,102.82,92.36,91.86,92.36,-0.5 " Canada*",88.1,104.16,87.3,88.1,87.3,0.9 "

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" ,2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",9472145,9165858,13595691,9472145,13595691,-30.3 " Baltimore, MD",3850539,2991709,4886468,3850539,4886468,-21.2 " Buffalo, NY",3381,570146,96786,3381,96786,-96.5 " New

  12. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" ,2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",7922195,7044057,10183046,7922195,10183046,-22.2 " Baltimore, MD",2990819,1811937,3344676,2990819,3344676,-10.6 " Buffalo, NY",196,566999,95591,196,95591,-99.8

  13. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Coal Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",240168,341205,171698,240168,171698,39.9 " Canada",239440,341189,171631,239440,171631,39.5 " Mexico",728,16,67,728,67,"NM" "South America

  14. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price of U.S. Coal Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",71.92,104.33,107.02,71.92,107.02,-32.8 " Canada",71.93,104.32,107.01,71.93,107.01,-32.8 " Mexico",66.79,360.25,113.43,66.79,113.43,-41.1

  15. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production, 2010 - 2016" "(thousand short tons)" "Year","January - March","April - June","July - September","October - December","Total" 2010,265702,264982,277505,276180,1084368 2011,273478,264291,275006,282853,1095628 2012,266865,241047,258956,249591,1016458 2013,244867,243211,257595,239169,984842 2014,245271,245844,255377,253557,1000049 2015,240189,211130,237263,207355,895936

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Imports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" ,2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",312200,225584,520059,312200,520059,-40 " Baltimore, MD","-",10410,"-","-","-","-" " Boston,

  17. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. U.S. Coke Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",2763,52115,2035,2763,2035,35.8 " Canada",2763,52115,2035,2763,2035,35.8 "Europe Total",1056,1156,14,1056,14,"NM" "

  18. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",181.85,113.11,213.82,181.85,213.82,-15 " Canada",181.85,113.11,213.82,181.85,213.82,-15 "Europe

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Coal-Producing Region","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "and State",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "Alabama",2446,2298,4022,2446,4022,-39.2 "Alaska",310,328,265,310,265,16.7 "Arizona",1335,1376,1755,1335,1755,-23.9 "Arkansas",11,18,21,11,21,-48

  20. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016" "(thousand short tons)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2010,17807,4803,21965,5058,21074,4680,20870,4811,81716,19353

  1. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016" "(dollars per short ton)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports"

  2. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2010 - 2016" "(short tons and dollars per short ton)" "Year and Quarter","Australia","Canada","Colombia","Indonesia","China","Venezuela","Other","Total" ,,,,,,,"Countries" 2010,380404,1766896,14583950,1904040,52869,581700,82828,19352687 2011,61745,1680490,9500387,856038,22128,778887,187931,13087606

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",1373100,2359203,1865247,1373100,1865247,-26.4 " Canada*",608869,1671121,715703,608869,715703,-14.9 " Dominican Republic",19,"-",1745,19,1745,-98.9

  4. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",62.62,81.09,76.28,62.62,76.28,-17.9 " Canada*",87.37,97.37,80.39,87.37,80.39,8.7 " Dominican

  5. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","January - March","October - December","January - March",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",787098,881183,1419062,787098,1419062,-44.5 " Canada*",167947,330053,376646,167947,376646,-55.4 " Dominican

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 2004 through 2014 (From Chapter 2.) Supply (Million Megawatthours) Generation Year Electric Utilities IPP (Non-CHP) IPP (CHP) Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Total Imports Total Supply 2004 2,505 1,119 184 8 154 34 4,005 2005 2,475 1,247 180 8 145 44 4,099 2006 2,484 1,259 165 8 148 43 4,107 2007 2,504 1,324 177 8 143 51 4,208 2008 2,475 1,332 167 8 137 57 4,176 2009 2,373 1,278 159 8 132 52 4,003 2010 2,472 1,339 162 9 144 45 4,170 2011 2,461 1,331

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2004 through 2014 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Total Electric Industry 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 142,121,652 2008 125,037,837 17,582,382 774,808 726 143,395,753 2009 125,208,829 17,562,235 757,537 704 143,529,305 2010 125,717,935

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2004 through 2014 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 3,669,918,840

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Revenue from Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2004 through 2014 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Total Electric Industry 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 343,703 2008 155,496 137,036 70,231 820 363,583 2009 157,044 132,747 62,670 828 353,289 2010 166,778 135,554 65,772 814 368,918 2011 166,714

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Average Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sectors 2004 through 2014 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Total Electric Industry 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.26 6.96 10.71 9.74 2009 11.51 10.16 6.83 10.66 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.56 9.83 2011 11.72 10.24 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2013 12.13

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2004 - December 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,380,662 1,336,133 1,009,516 7,653 3,733,965 2009 1,364,758 1,306,853 917,416 7,768

  12. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Revenue from Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2004 - December 2014 (Million Dollars) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 343,703 2008 155,496 137,036 70,231 820 363,583 2009 157,044 132,747 62,670 828 353,289 2010 166,778 135,554 65,772 814 368,918 2011 166,714

  13. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Average Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2004 - December 2014 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.26 6.96 10.71 9.74 2009 11.51 10.16 6.83 10.66 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.56 9.83 2011 11.72 10.24 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2013

  14. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Purchases, 2004 through 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2005 2,760,043 3,250,298 12,201 69,744 6,092,285 2006 2,605,315 2,793,288 26,628 77,353 5,502,584 2007 2,504,002 2,805,833 24,942 76,646 5,411,422 2008 2,483,927 3,024,730 25,431 78,693 5,612,781 2009 2,364,648 2,564,407 27,922 71,669 5,028,647 2010 2,353,086 3,319,211 23,976 73,861 5,770,134

  15. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2004 through 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2004 1,923,440 3,756,175 1,053,364 25,996 6,758,975 2005 1,925,710 2,867,048 1,252,796 26,105 6,071,659 2006 1,698,389 2,446,104 1,321,342 27,638 5,493,473 2007 1,603,179 2,476,740 1,368,310 31,165 5,479,394 2008 1,576,976 2,718,661 1,355,017 30,079 5,680,733 2009 1,495,636 2,240,399

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electric Power Industry - U.S. Electricity Imports from and Electricity Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2004-2014 (Megawatthours) Canada Mexico U.S. Total Year Imports from Exports to Imports from Exports to Imports Exports 2004 33,007,487 22,482,109 1,202,576 415,754 34,210,063 22,897,863 2005 42,332,039 18,680,237 1,597,275 470,731 43,929,314 19,150,968 2006 41,544,052 23,405,387 1,147,258 865,948 42,691,310 24,271,335 2007 50,118,056 19,559,417 1,277,646 584,175 51,395,702 20,143,592 2008

  17. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric and Solar Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  18. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric and Solar Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2004 1,513,641 62,196 11,498 199,662 374 475,682 245,546 6 3,686 -7,526 467 2,505,231 2005 1,484,855 58,572 11,150 238,204 10 436,296 245,553 16 4,930

  20. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  1. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commercial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric and Solar Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  2. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commercial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric and Solar Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  4. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  5. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Net Generation by Energy Source: Residential Sector, 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Distributed Generation Period Estimated Distributed Solar Photovoltaic Generation Annual Totals 2014 4,243 Year 2014 January 226 February 238 March 328 April 361 May 402 June 410 July 431 August 431 September 404 October 382 November 319 December 311 See Glossary for definitions. Values are final. See Technical Notes for a discussion of the sample design for the Form EIA-923 and predecessor forms. Totals may

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014 Year 2013

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Other Gases by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year