Sample records for lost time incident

  1. Analysis of Search Incidents and Lost Person Behavior in Yosemite National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doke, Jared

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Every year thousands of people are reported lost or missing in wilderness areas and in response, a search and rescue (SAR) operation is launched to locate, stabilize, and extract those missing. Actually locating the subject is often the most...

  2. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has...

  3. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    JUNCTION, Colo. - It has been more than five years since workers on the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah had a lost-time injury or illness. This...

  4. Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO: 519-661-2079 (82079)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Accident/Incident Reporting Form & Investigation Report FAX COMPLETED FORM (Within 24 hours) TO ­ Accident/Incident Reporting Form PART A Name of Employee: ______________________________________ Employee: Report Only Accident Incident No Injury/Hazard First Aid Lost Time Non-Lost Time (If Report Only

  5. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  6. Dynamically Predicting Corridor Travel Time Under Incident Conditions Using a Neural Network Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Xiaosi

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    into the ANN model development, despite that incident might be a major source of prediction degradations. Additionally, directly deriving corridor travel times in a one-step manner raises some intractable problems, such as pairing input-target data, which have...

  7. Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness October 30, 2014 -...

  8. Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name _________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    Employee Accident / Incident Investigation Report Employee Name's Title _________________________________________________________________ Date and Time of Accident accident occurred

  9. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth requirements for the DOE Incidents of Security Concern Program, including timely identification and notification of, response to, inquiry into, reporting of, and closure actions for incidents of security concern. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 470.1; DOE N 471.3; and Chapter IV of DOE M 471.2-1B (Note: Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Chapter III remain in effect.) Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  10. Einstein's lost frame Rodrigo de Abreu and Vasco Guerra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Vasco

    Einstein's lost frame Rodrigo de Abreu and Vasco Guerra November 24, 2005 #12;2 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 7 2 Einstein's frame 15 2.1 Space and time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 and Einstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 4.2 A formal Galileo transformation

  11. INCIDENT # CHARGE SECTION OF NYS PENAL LAW DISPOSITION TYPE REPORTED TO PLACE OF OCCURRENCE DATE & TIME OF OCCURRENCE DATE & TIME REPORTED 1304224 None

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    INCIDENT # CHARGE SECTION OF NYS PENAL LAW DISPOSITION TYPE REPORTED TO PLACE OF OCCURRENCE DATE Public Safety Department Music Building 6442 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 April 29, 2013 2:15PM Building 6660 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 May 1, 2013 12:15PM May 1, 2013 2:50PM 1305279 None Petit

  12. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, D.A.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

  13. Sudan and the Lost Girls: Another Step

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    Sudan and the Lost Girls: Another Step in the Journey-- Sudan to America Presented by Brandeis Journalism-- Panel discussion on "Sudan and the Lost Girls: Another Step in the Journey," present- ed Educational Fund. The participants will discuss life in South Sudan during the mass exodus of youth from

  14. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, D.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  15. A Statistical Model for Lost Language Decipherment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Benjamin

    In this paper we propose a method for the automatic decipherment of lost langauges. Given a non-parallel corpus in a known related language, our model produces both alphabetic mappings and translations of words into their ...

  16. to the PORTAL servers, including count, occupancy, and time mean speeds in each lane. PORTAL also includes incident and variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    , transportation is a heavy user of society's time and energy resources. Sustainability measures, also described. SUSTAINABILITY MEASURES The concept of sustainability is becoming more important in trans- portation systems Sustainability Transportation is a major contributor to urban air pollution through vehicle emissions (1). Road

  17. Arterial-street signal timing strategies to provide additional through-traffic capacity during freeway incident conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, James Joseph

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relationships identified are likely to be common to other arterial-street sections with similar configurations and traffic patterns. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research was funded by Project No. 30, "Fuel Savings from Surveillance, Signing, and Signal Control... timing plan to accommodate diverted traffic from a freeway plays a significant role in the development of integrated freeway and arterial street control systems like the Automated Traffic Surveillance gnd control (ATSAC) system in Los Angeles (Rowe...

  18. Two Lost Sonnets by Sterling A. Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidwell, John E.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TWO LOST SONNETS BY STERLING A. BROWN edited and introduced by John Edgar Tidwell and Ted Genoways The emergence of Sterling A. Brown into poetic maturity resulted from a well- known dialectical engagement with the aesthetics of African...-American folk tradition. As Brown recounted so often, these experiential and imaginative encounters derived from a benevolent conspiracy between his theologian father, the Rev. Sterling Nelson Brown, and the eminent historian Carter G. Woodson to send...

  19. Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Variable valve actuation with onoff IEGR pre-bump is...

  20. UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT The UMBC community will have access to a University Policy on Lost and Found Property. II. PURPOSE OF THE POLICY The purpose of the Lost and Found Property Policy is to provide procedures for the accountability and safekeeping of currency and tangible

  1. Unaccounted-for gas; Lost or just misplaced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstead, J.R.; Cowgill, R.M. (Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (US))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lost and unaccounted for gas is the term used by the gas industry to define the difference between the quantity of gas received into and delivered out of a system over a specific period of time. For Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG and E) the gas is not really lost, just misplaced. The proper term is unaccounted for gas (UAF). PG and E has conducted a comprehensive research project to evaluate UAF on its gas transmission and distribution systems. This project was cofunded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI). GRI's involvement was directed, by Kirin Kothari, Manager of Metering and Operations Research. While PG and E's work began as a reaction to state regulatory agency concerns, this work will be invaluable to the rest of the gas industry in that it provides results and, more importantly, methodologies for the gas utility industry to use in taking the lead with regulatory agencies and with the energy industry regarding: Prudence of the UAF aspects of operations, Equity of allocation of UAF costs to various customer classes, Support for the position that the gas industry's contribution to the country's unburned methane emissions is small.

  2. Primary cementing across massive lost circulation zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turki, W.H.; Mackay, A.S.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of severe lost circulation problems in some wells in the Ghawar and Abqaiq Fields, Aramco has been unable to cover the Umm Er-Radhuma (Paleocene) and Wasia (Cretaceous) aquifers with cement. This has necessitated setting an extended liner opposite the Wasia aquifer, to ensure that there are two casing strings and a cement sheath across the aquifer, resulting in increased casing cost and reduced well productivity. This paper describes the results of field trial tests performed, along with conclusions and recommendations aimed at solving this problem. Field methods employed include light weight extended cements, ultra-light cement slurries weighing as little as 55 lbm/ft/sup 3/ (pcf), using ceramic hollow spheres, glass bubbles and foam, plus hydrostatic cementing, and mechanical devices. Finally, methods of job evaluation are discussed. These include temperature surveys, bond logs, radioactive tracers, and a new cement volume log.

  3. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  4. No time lost in UBC Board of Governors member Stanley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    expects to call tenders before the end of the year for the new Home Economics Building to be built onthe

  5. Lost films chronicle dawn of hydroelectric power in the Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lost-films-chronicle-dawn-of-hydroelectric-power-in-the-Northwest Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects &...

  6. Progress in The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Wright, E.K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50{percent} through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1990--March, 1991. 4 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

  8. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

  9. Enterprise Incidents Issue 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isn't possibl ... " Two .. nxious hours later thelo' moved into sensor range of the derellct, and discovered that he was wrong. "Can lo'ou r .. ise them yet, Lieutenant?" Kirk asked. Art .. r "Nor sir. There's just the automatic s.o.s. still beine...ScoTpress q ENTERPR.,ISE C I D E N T Stories by 8 Sheila Clark A STAR TREK FANZINE ENTERPRISE INCIDENTS 8 stories by Sheila Clark Abduction The Falcon Incident Tor'uaa Strancer. at the Gate Philanthrop), It l Foraet You Journe...

  10. Fusion Power: I Think We're Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fusion Power: I Think We're Lost Robert L. Hirsch Consultant November 18, 2002 Presented to the Burning Plasma Assessment Committee of the National Research Council #12;2 How to Tell People Things and Technology. Summer 1997 & fall 1999. 2. Kaslow, J., et al. CRITERIA FOR PRACTICAL FUSION POWER SYSTEMS. EPRI

  11. KOSHLIAKOV'S FORMULA AND GUINAND'S FORMULA IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    KOSHLIAKOV'S FORMULA AND GUINAND'S FORMULA IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK BRUCE C. BERNDT1 , YOONBOK involving the modified Bessel function K(z). These include Koshliakov's formula and Guinand's formula, both by these authors several years after Ramanujan's death. Other formulas, including one by K. Soni and two

  12. Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

  13. Calibration of the TFTR lost alpha diagnostic R. L. Boivin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Calibration of the TFTR lost alpha diagnostic R. L. Boivin Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts 1992; accepted for publication 7 June 1992) We present various aspects of the calibration of the TFTR-energy ions (MeV range). The first goal of this study was to establish the absolute calibration

  14. Yes, you can control lost and unaccounted-for gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, D.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1982, lost and unaccounted-for gas cost the US gas industry $1.983 billion, based on a gas worth of $5.00/1000 CF. A survey of key gas operators across the country produced a list of 23 suggestions for reducing gas losses in the areas of leakage control, measurement practices, accounting accuracy, and theft prevention.

  15. Is security a lost cause? Chris J Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    Is security a lost cause? Chris J Mitchell c.mitchell@rhul.ac.uk Information Security Group Royal security, namely: (a) what do current technological trends mean for future information security, and (b) what effect do conflicts between security/privacy requirements and economic and technological pressures

  16. amusic brain lost: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amusic brain lost First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 doi:10.1093brainawl204 Brain...

  17. PiPe dreams? Jobs Gained, Jobs Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    PiPe dreams? Jobs Gained, Jobs Lost by the ConstruCtion of Keystone XL a rePort by Corne, and Induced) Jobs from Keystone XL 26 KXL Will Have Minor Impact on Unemployment Levels 27 Four Ways Keystone to the Keystone XL budget and expenditures, steel sourcing, and the costs of environmental damage. #12;Corne

  18. Incident at the Rock Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgfeld, Doug

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the off limit rock pile At a Portland school Where theDoug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/Doug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/

  19. Lost circulation in geothermal wells: survey and evaluation of industry experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, M.A.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lost circulation during drilling and completion of geothermal wells can be a severe problem, particularly in naturally fractured and/or vugular formations. Geothermal and petroleum operators, drilling service companies, and independent consultants were interviewed to assess the lost circulation problem in geothermal wells and to determine general practices for preventing lost circulation. This report documents the results and conclusions from the interviews and presents recommendations for needed research. In addition, a survey was also made of the lost circulation literature, of currently available lost circulation materials, and of existing lost circulation test equipment.

  20. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  1. Recovery of the lost individual: a Deweyan examination of individuality and community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pope, Nakia S

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1929 - 1930, John Dewey wrote a series of essays which became the work "Individualism Old and New.'' In this work, he describes a type of individual which he terms "lost.'' The lost individual is disconnected, disoriented, and disassociated...

  2. On the cost of lost production from Russian oil fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Russia is now paying heavily for past mismanagement of its major oil fields. Unconventional attempts to maximize short-run extraction, neglect of routine maintenance, and shortages of critical equipment have combined to cause a steep decline in production. This study examines the scope and size of resulting economic losses using an extension of the traditional exponential decline model. Estimates derived from the model indicate that as much as 40% of the potential value of Russian oil reserves has been lost through poor management. 20 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet),EnergyImprovement of the Lost Foam Casting Process Improvement of

  4. TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting Why?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    TIPS ON ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING Accident Reporting ­ Why? Obligation to report Health Care of the accident ­ if not, the organization (i.e. the department) can be fined Obligation under Section 51, 52 happened? When did it happen? (Date, Time and Place) When was the accident/incident reported? Any

  5. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations.

  6. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09.

  7. Reporting Incidents Of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To enhance the Department of Energy (DOE) Incidents of Security Concern Reporting Program through more consistent reporting, better information tracking, and interactive coordination. DOE N 251.54, dated 07/08/03, extends this directive until 07/08/04. Cancels Deputy Secretary Glauthier memorandum, subject: Reporting Security Incidents, dated 9-7-99.

  8. Traffic Incident Analysis on Urban Arterials Using Extended Spectral Envelope Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhen-zhen; Gao, Zi-you; Sun, Ya-fu; Guo, Sheng-min

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A traffic incident analysis method based on extended spectral envelope (ESE) method is presented to detect the key incident time. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (the length of time window, the length of sliding window and the study period) are discussed on four real traffic incidents in Beijing. The results show that: (1) Moderate length of time window got the best accurate in detection. (2) The shorter the sliding window is, the more accurate the key incident time are detected. (3) If the study period is too short, the end time of an incident cannot be detected. Empirical studies show that the proposed method can effectively discover the key incident time, which can provide a theoretic basis for traffic incident management.

  9. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09; Admin Chg 2 dated 12-22-09. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

  10. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

  11. MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

  12. Wanderl[o]st: Lost Identities and Losing Place in the New World (Dis)Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, Kendall Abbott

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    in the margins as lost subjects. The battle that they wage is with their ideals that, in turn, are the cause of their struggles with society. In this sense, I use the term ?loser? endearingly, because failure is infinitely more provocative than success while.... The consequences of being lost are dire but it does not appear that the lost subjects and losers make great efforts to ?find? themselves or ?win.? I hypothesize that one big reason for the desire?or the lust?for wandering, getting lost, is the desire to lose one...

  13. Assessment of net lost revenue adjustment mechanisms for utility DSM programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility shareholders can lose money on demand-side management (DSM) investments between rate cases. Several industry analysts argue that the revenues lost from utility DSM programs are an important financial disincentive to utility DSM investment. A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenues incurred through successful operation of DSM programs. Explicitly defined net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states` preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This report examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The report has three objectives. First, we determine whether NLRA is a feasible and successful approach to removing the lost-revenue disincentive to utility operation of DSM programs. Second, we identify the conditions linked to successful implementation of NLRA mechanisms in different states and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior. Third, we suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. We first identify states with NLRA mechanisms where utilities are recovering lost revenues from DSM programs. We interview staff at regulatory agencies in all these states and utility staff in four states. These interviews focus on the status of NLRA, implementation issues, DSM measurement issues, and NLRA results. We also analyze regulatory agency orders on NLRA, as well as associated testimony, reports, and utility lost revenue recovery filings. Finally, we use qualitative and quantitative indicators to assess NLRA`s effectiveness. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach to the lost-revenue disincentive.

  14. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS] [CanmetMATERIALS; Griffin, John A. [University of Alabama - Birmingham] [University of Alabama - Birmingham

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (? 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  15. Mixing energy analysis of Bingham plastic fluids for severe lost circulation prevention using similitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massingill, Robert Derryl, Jr.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As the demand for oil and gas resources increases, the need to venture into more hostile environments becomes a dynamic focus in the petroleum industry. One problem associated with certain high risk formations is lost circulation. As a result...

  16. Mixing energy analysis of Bingham plastic fluids for severe lost circulation prevention using similitude 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massingill, Robert Derryl, Jr.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As the demand for oil and gas resources increases, the need to venture into more hostile environments becomes a dynamic focus in the petroleum industry. One problem associated with certain high risk formations is lost ...

  17. Asymptotic Optimality of Constant-Order Policies for Lost Sales Inventory Models with Large Lead Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A.

    Sciences, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, e-mail: yingdong@us.ibm.com § Business Analytics and Mathematical Sciences, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, e-mail: mxsharma@us.ibm.com ¶ Business Analytics and Mathematical Sciences, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, e-mail: mss@us.ibm.com 1 #12;([35, 34, 12

  18. Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    number 1,584 may not mean much to most people, but for the workers on EM's Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, it represents the number of days without a...

  19. Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmount forDecontamination andBoard -

  20. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time Injury,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4EnergyMissionIllness | Department of

  1. Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4EnergyMissionIllness | Department of|

  2. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute moredetection scoreAlex VolosinNuclearY-12

  3. Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of EnergyThePatricia Hoffman isThe Metals Plant is

  4. WIPP Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for19, 20142,pril 2Workers

  5. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  6. Evaluation of equipment and methods to map lost circulation zones in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, W.J.; Leon, P.A.; Pittard, G.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study and evaluation of methods to locate, characterize, and quantify lost circulation zones are described. Twenty-five methods of mapping and quantifying lost circulation zones were evaluated, including electrical, acoustical, mechanical, radioactive, and optical systems. Each tool studied is described. The structured, numerical evaluation plan, used as the basis for comparing the 25 tools, and the resulting ranking among the tools is presented.

  7. Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud D´epartement de Math´ematiques, Universit´e de an incidence algebra of a poset associated to a presentation by a quiver and relations of a finite dimensional algebra. We provide an exact sequence relying the fundamental groups of the incidence algebra

  8. Lost in the Bermuda Triangle: Energy, Complexity, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albonesi, David H.

    · Exotic cooling techniques · e.g. spray-evaporative cooling · Packaging cost and cooling requirements · Verification · Risk · Static vs. Dynamic logic · Verification time · Cooling requirements · Competitiveness... to reduce complexity? #12;Design Complexity Aggressive implementation techniques (speculation, O-o-O, etc

  9. Violation of Laws, Losses, and Incidents of Security Concerns

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To set forth Department of Energy (DOE) procedures to assure timely and effective action relating to violations of criminal, laws, loses, and incidents of security concern to DOE. Cancels DOE O 5631.5. Canceled by DOE O 470.1 of 9-28-1995.

  10. Shallow faults mapped with seismic reflections: Lost River Fault, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mubarik, Ali; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stations 132 and 160. Total bedrock dis?lace- ment interpreted along this seismic survey line is approxa- mately 6 m, representing 4 to 6 times more displacement than is observed on either the common offset refraction section or at the surface..., vol. A, U.S. Geological Survey Open-file Report 85-290, 182-194, 1985. Crone, A. J., and M. N. Macbette, Surface faulting accompa- nying the Borah Peak earthquake, central Idaho, Geology, 12, 664-667, 1984. Crone, A. J., M. N. Macbette, M. G...

  11. Novel applications of data mining methodologies to incident databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Sumit

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    10. Management of Change 11. Incident Investigation 12. Emergency Planning and Response 13. Audits 14. Trade Secrets 5 1.4. Incident Investigation Incident investigation is one of the elements in PSM. Incident investigation follows...

  12. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  13. Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

  14. Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan, using parametric Lindenmayer systems, a first formal model of rangeomorph morphologies reveals a fractal-filling strategies. The fractal body plan of rangeomorphs is shown to maximize surface area, consistent

  15. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was exam- ined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic. The speciation of carbon de- pends on the chemical and physical conditions prevailing in the reservoir, and itsCarbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade

  16. In Proceedings of Supercomputing '94, pp. 600-610. Parallel Performance Prediction Using Lost Cycles Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crovella, Mark

    performance debugging and tuning of paral- lel programs is based on the \\measure-modify" ap- proach, which modeling and scalability anal- ysis provide predictive power, but are not widely used in practice, due programs that bridges this gap between measurement and modeling. Our approach is based on lost cycles

  17. Theodor Meyer--Lost pioneer of gas dynamics Gary S. Settles a,, Egon Krause b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settles, Gary S.

    Theodor Meyer--Lost pioneer of gas dynamics Gary S. Settles a,Ã, Egon Krause b , Heinz F ¨utterer c August 2009 a b s t r a c t Theodor Meyer's 1908 doctoral dissertation, with Ludwig Prandtl (1875­1953) as his advisor, introduced much of what has now become basic gas dynamics: not only the Prandtl­Meyer

  18. Something Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the int(~ll? :i.gence to :cuDJ.iso that little problem. About the tails - He'll just h?;v(~ to hope that tnoy l; . r:i.ll c'Lccep-trank insigni.:1 in lieu of tails carried. high. It thcy':ce already in contr'..ct wit}} the IJ1ederation they must know...:'C"lnov(:cJ. from the l".mlx~,f;;Fj2.clo:cial party 0 And tha.t would nover do. T:'G Jx:.cl his own pJ.;::tDS for tho future -- and they (:id not (::ntircly coincL:lo I,vi th f)':::,T:'C':.1.1' n ??? ""Jelcome 2:,bor:?1Td th(~ Jl~ntGTpJ:'ise 9 Ambassador. 1f...

  19. Incident Prevention, Warning, and Response (IPWAR) Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual defines a structured, cohesive, and consistent process for performing incident prevention, warning, and response for DOE's Federal information systems and is consistent with the requirements of Federal laws, Executive orders, national security directives, and other regulations. The Manual also provides requirements and implementation instructions for the Department's Incident Prevention, Warning and Response process, and supplements DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03. DOE N 205.17 cancels this manual. This manual cancels DOE N 205.4, Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents, dated 3/18/2002.

  20. Laboratory and field evaluation of polyurethane foam for lost circulation control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.; Loeppke, G.E.; Rand, P.B.; Wright, E.K. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-part polyurethane foam has been tested in the laboratory and in the field to assess its utility in controlling lost circulation encountered when drilling geothermal wells. A field test was conducted in The Geysers in January, 1988, to evaluate the chemical formulation and downhole tool used to deploy the chemicals. Although the tool apparently functioned properly in the field test, the chemicals failed to expand sufficiently downhole, instead forming a dense polymer that may be ineffective in sealing loss zones. Subsequent laboratory tests conducted under simulated downhole conditions indicate that the foam chemical undergo sever mixing with water in the wellbore, which disturbs the kinetics of the chemical reaction more than was previously contemplated. The results indicate that without significant changes in the foam chemical formulation or delivery technique, the foam system will be ineffective in lost circulation control except under very favorable conditions. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    companies regularly increase production by adding additional manufacturing equipment, or increasing operating hours. This approach can add large new energy loads to the electrical grid and gas distribution networks. Alternately, increasing production...Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production, Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy John Seryak Gary Epstein Mark D’Antonio Engineer jseryak@ers-inc.com President gepstein@ers-inc.com Vice President mdantonio...

  2. Long road to recovery: Bastrop team develops plan to restore Lost Pines region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Laura

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the September #28;re. ?In terms of the recovery, the Lost Pines Recovery Team put together a #28;ve-year plan that includes erosion control, reseeding, replanting and hazardous fuels management,? said Roxanne Hernandez, habitat conservation... challenges Erosion has proven to be one of the most di#27;cult challenges to recovery. Initially, the #28;re caused much fertile soil to erode. Hernandez said until vegetation grows to provide ground cover, erosion will continue. Newly planted pine tree...

  3. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Techniques (Presentation) Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray...

  4. Changing Obsidian Sources at the Lost Dune and McCoy Creek Sites, Blitzen Valley, Southeast Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, William H; Thomas, Scott P; Skinner, Craig E

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dune (35HA792); MC = McCoy Creek (35HA1263) Component ffl;sample. Provenience of McCoy Creek artifacts from Musil (AT THE LOST DUNE AND MCCOY CREEK SITES OREGON NEVADA Burns

  5. A QUASITHETA PRODUCT IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK BRUCE C. BERNDT 1 , HENG HUAT CHAN, AND ALEXANDRU ZAHARESCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    A QUASI­THETA PRODUCT IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK BRUCE C. BERNDT 1 , HENG HUAT CHANF27; Secondary, 33D10, 33C05. 1 #12; 2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND ALEXANDRU ZAHARESCU

  6. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

    2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  7. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  8. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  9. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  10. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  11. Injury / Incident Report INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    OF INJURY NONE EMPLOYER PHYSICIAN EMERGENCY FAMILY PHYSICIAN OTHER PHYSICIAN / SPECIALIST TO YOUR. _________________________________________ Room #___________________ STATE EXACTLY - THE SEQUENCE OF EVENTS LEADING UP TO THE INCIDENT, WHERE TO USE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE DEVICES 8 NOT GUARDED OR IMPROPERLY GUARDED 9 INADEQUATE ILLUMINATION 10

  12. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  13. Incident Data Analysis Using Data Mining Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veltman, Lisa M.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and findings that are currently available will greatly aid in this effort. 7 3. HSEES DATA The Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) data includes information on events where: ? There was an uncontrolled/illegal release... = Equipment failure, 3 = Operator Error, 8 = Other, G = Intentional, H = Bad weather condition, S = Illegal act SEC_FACT Secondary factor contributing to incident 1=Improper mixing, 2=Equipment failure, 3=Human error, 4=Improper filling, loading, or packing...

  14. Environment Induced Time Arrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janos Polonyi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

  15. A common language for computer security incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Howard; Thomas A Longstaff

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the computer security information regularly gathered and disseminated by individuals and organizations cannot currently be combined or compared because a common language has yet to emerge in the field of computer security. A common language consists of terms and taxonomies (principles of classification) which enable the gathering, exchange and comparison of information. This paper presents the results of a project to develop such a common language for computer security incidents. This project results from cooperation between the Security and Networking Research Group at the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, and the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. This Common Language Project was not an effort to develop a comprehensive dictionary of terms used in the field of computer security. Instead, the authors developed a minimum set of high-level terms, along with a structure indicating their relationship (a taxonomy), which can be used to classify and understand computer security incident information. They hope these high-level terms and their structure will gain wide acceptance, be useful, and most importantly, enable the exchange and comparison of computer security incident information. They anticipate, however, that individuals and organizations will continue to use their own terms, which may be more specific both in meaning and use. They designed the common language to enable these lower-level terms to be classified within the common language structure.

  16. The lost and unaccounted-for gas: Chasing the ``Silver Bullet``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, R. [Arthur Andersen, Houston, TX (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the competitive and financial stakes increase in today`s natural gas market, pipeline companies are focusing increased attention on lost and unaccounted for gas (L and U) both as a significant element in bottom-line financial gains and losses, and as a major factor in interstate pipeline companies` rates to customers. However, many companies are finding that the Silver Bullet approach to L and U of the pre-deregulation past--locating a single, large problem or station error and correcting it--is at worst a misfire and at best only a short-term, partial solution. The paper discusses the scope of L and U losses, measurement errors, how companies are addressing losses, what a Silver Bullet is, alternative approaches, and costs.

  17. A review of "Satan's Poetry: Fallenness and the Poetic Tradition in Paradise Lost" by Danielle A. St. Hilaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swann, Adam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that prompted them. Danielle A. St. Hilaire. Satan?s Poetry: Fallenness and the Poetic Tradition in Paradise Lost. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2012. x + 246 pp. $58.00. #25;#31;#27;#22;#31;#18; #26; #28;#8;#28;#7; #21;#18;#28;#29;#29;, #23...;#29;#22;#27;#31;#25;#21;#22;#20;#26; #24;#19; #6;#30;#28;#21;#6;#24;#18;. It is becoming increasingly challenging to #15;nd things unattempted yet in Paradise Lost criticism, and nowhere is this truer than in studies of Satan and the fallen state. St. Hilaire is under no illusions...

  18. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  19. How is open solar magnetic flux lost over the solar cycle? M. J. Owens,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    How is open solar magnetic flux lost over the solar cycle? M. J. Owens,1,2 N. U. Crooker,3 and M 2011. [1] The Sun's open magnetic field, magnetic flux dragged out into the heliosphere by the solar wind, varies by approximately a factor of 2 over the solar cycle. We consider the evolution of open

  20. Fairness lost in immigration reform; Never before have sweeping changes to policies been undertaken with so little public debate or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Fairness lost in immigration reform; Never before have sweeping changes to policies been undertaken reform is unique neither in terms of its controversial substance nor in its lack of meaningful democratic processes. In the past, major immigration reform has typically been the result of parliamentary deliberation

  1. Mission-Enhance emergency operation mission success by reducing risk of incident or fatality resulting in serious loss across a wide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FACT SHEET 6 November 2014 #12; 1992 Hurricane Andrew- 27 Lost Time Accident. 1995 Hurricane Marilyn to include Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Katrina, Alabama Tornado Recovery Event 2011, and the World Trade FUNCTIONAL PRT ESTABLISHMENT: 1989 Hurricane Hugo- NO USACE Safety and Occupational Health (SOH) systemic

  2. From the Lost Radium Files: Misadventures in the Absence of Training, Regulation, and Accountability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Lubenau, Joel O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Radium was the foundation of brachytherapy in the early decades of the 20th century. Despite being a most precious and perilous substance, it was mislaid with surprising frequency. This essay explores how it was lost, the efforts taken to recover it, and measures instituted to prevent mishandling. Methods and Materials: Review of contemporary literature, government publications, archives, and lay press. Results: Radium is a particularly dangerous substance because of its long half-life, its gaseous daughter (radon), and the high-energy emissions of its decay products. Despite the hazard, it was unregulated for most of the century. Any physician could obtain and administer it, and protocols for safe handling were generally lacking. Change came with appreciation of the danger, regulation, mandated training, and the institution of a culture of accountability. Unfortunately, careless management of medical radionuclides remains a global hazard. Conclusion: Responsible stewardship of radioactive material was not a high priority, for practitioners or the federal government, for much of the 20{sup th} century. As a result, large quantities of radium had gone astray, possibly subjecting the general public to continued radiation exposure. Lessons from the radium era remain relevant, as medical radionuclides are still mishandled.

  3. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  4. Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Security incidents on the Internet, 1989--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an analysis of trends in Internet security based on an investigation of 4,299 Internet security-related incidents reported to the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center (CERT{reg_sign}/CC) from 1989 through 1995. Prior to this research, knowledge of actual Internet security incidents was limited and primarily anecdotal. This research: (1) developed a taxonomy to classify Internet attacks and incidents, (2) organized, classified, and analyzed CERT{reg_sign}/CC incident records, (3) summarized the relative frequency of the use of tools and vulnerabilities, success in achieving access, and results of attacks, (4) estimated total Internet incident activity, (5) developed recommendations for Internet users and suppliers, and (6) developed recommendations for future research. With the exception of denial-of-service attacks, security incidents were found to be increasing at a rate less than Internet growth. Estimates showed that most, if not all, severe incidents were reported to the CERT{reg_sign}/CC, and that more than one out of three above average incidents (in terms of duration and number of sites) were reported. Estimates also indicated that a typical Internet site was involved in, at most, around one incident (of any kind) per year, and a typical Internet host in, at most, around one incident in 45 years. The probability of unauthorized privileged access was around an order of magnitude less likely. As a result, simple and reasonable security precautions should be sufficient for most Internet users.

  6. Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdiyati, -

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining...

  7. Countries with Estimated or Reported Tuberculosis Incidence, 2009 "High Incidence" areas are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000 population Afghanistan Cook China India Namibia Sri Lanka Colombia Indonesia Nepal Sudan Comoros Iraq Nicaragua Suriname Congo Japan

  8. Version0109 THIS INJURY AND ILLNESS INCIDENT REPORT IS ONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Version0109 THIS INJURY AND ILLNESS INCIDENT REPORT IS ONE OF THE FIRST FORMS THAT MUST BE FILLED's Form 301 ­ Injury and Illness Incident Report, should be completed as soon as possible after? ______________________ 10. Date of Accident __________________________ DESCRIPTIONOFTHEINJURY: 1. State name of machine

  9. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006 chest pain headaches elevated bp rapid heart rate muscle tremors shock symptoms grinding of teeth visual Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress

  10. Investigation of lane occupancy as a freeway control parameter for use during incident conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friebele, John Duncan

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    freeway safety warning device, using critical occupancy parameters, was developed and simulated in real-time. Evaluation of the simulated operation of the device revealed. that relia'cle detection of shock waves generated by freeway incidents... Detection of Shock Waves Page 38 Sensitivity of Occupancy Measurements 38 Occupancy Differential Concept Determination of' Occupancy D"' fzerence Parameters Det, ection of Shock Waves 41 RESULTS Critical Occupancy Concept Determination of Critical...

  11. Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , plant wide energy use is mainly a function of three variables: weather conditions, production quantity and operating hours. For example, as outdoor temperatures increase in the summer time, plant electricity use may also increase due to air... of production factors. Next, imagine dedicated production presses that shut off during idle cycle times. This equipment uses energy directly proportional to production quantity, regardless of the operating hours. Lighting equipment for this same operation...

  12. A review of 'Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books': An Authoritative Text of the 1667 First Edition" edited by John T. Shawcross and Michael Lieb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Reuben

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: An Authoritative Text of the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xvi + 456 pp. bibl. $68. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. Michael Lieb and John T. Shawcross..., eds. ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: Essays on the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xii + 288 pp. index. append. $60. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. 40 seventeenth-century news...

  13. A review of 'Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books': Essays on the 1667 First Edition" edited by John T. Shawcross and Michael Lieb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Reuben

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: An Authoritative Text of the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xvi + 456 pp. bibl. $68. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. Michael Lieb and John T. Shawcross..., eds. ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: Essays on the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xii + 288 pp. index. append. $60. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. 40 seventeenth-century news...

  14. Bloggers as Citizen Journalists: The 2012 Pink Slime Incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannone, Anthony

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and added to ground beef to make lean affordable beef blends. News reports questioning the safety and quality of LFTB began in March 2012. A qualitative content analysis was performed on 44 blogs that mentioned the pink slime incident between...

  15. Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Sara Shammni

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness ...

  16. ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

  17. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Littleton; John Griffin

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (�¢����Energy SMARRT�¢���) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU�¢����s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU�¢����s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  18. A combination air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, S.L.; Beavers, W.M.; Niederhofer, J.D.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the drilling of coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior Basin, the possibility of penetrating a highly permeable fault or fracture zone is likely. These fracture zones, and occasionally the faults, are the source of large quantities of water. When air is being used as the drilling medium, problems may arise with producing and disposing of the formation water. When rotary drilling with fluid, loss of returns may also become a problem. The use of conventional lost circulation materials have been demonstrated-in this situation--to be both ineffective and expensive. Also, lost circulation materials substantially reduce the effective secondary permeability of the coal seams, severely limiting the ultimate methane production potential of the well. If the wellbore is generally competent, one inexpensive solution to the problem is to drill with air to a point where surface recovery tanks are full of produced formation water. Drilling can continue by switching to conventional fluid drilling until the surface storage tanks are pumped dry. This process of alternating fluid and air drilling can be continued until reaching total depth. Structural geologic information, available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior Basin, documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air and fluid drilling technique may prove to be advantageous to coalbed methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. Recently, this technique was successfully utilized on TRW, Inc., coalbed methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.

  19. Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

  20. JULY 2005 1 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    of 2) spring-neap variation in dissipation was observed. The observations also suggest a kinematic-integrated dissipation (D), such that D E1±0.5 at sites along the ridge. This kinematic relationship is supported by combining a simple knife-edge model to estimate internal tide generation with wave-wave interaction time

  1. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasao, Mamiko [Organization for Research Initiative and Development, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Wada, Motoi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsutaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  2. Changes in vigorous physical activity and incident diabetes inmale runners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined the dose-response relationship between changes in reported vigorous exercise (running distance, {Delta}km/wk) and self-reported physician diagnosed diabetes in 25,988 men followed prospectively for (mean {+-} SD) 7.8 {+-} 1.8 years. Logistic regression analyses showed that the log odds for diabetes declined significantly in relation to men's {Delta}km/wk (coefficient {+-} SE: -0.012 {+-} 0.004, P < 0.01), which remained significant when adjusted for BMI (-0.018 {+-} 0.003, P < 0.0001). The decline in the log odds for diabetes was related to the distance run at the end of follow-up when adjusted for baseline distance, with (-0.024 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) or without (-0.027 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) adjustment for BMI. Baseline distance was unrelated to diabetes incidence when adjusted for the distance at the end of follow-up. Compared to men who ran <8 km/wk at the end of follow-up, incidence rates in those who ran {ge} 8 km/wk were 95% lower between 35-44 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 92% lower between 45-54 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 87% lower between 55 and 64 years old (P < 0.0001), and 46% lower between 65-75 yrs old (P = 0.30). For the subset of 6,208 men who maintained the same running distance during follow-up ({+-}5 km/wk), the log odds for diabetes declined with weekly distance run (-0.024 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.02) but not when adjusted for BMI (-0.005 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.65). Conclusion: Vigorous exercise significantly reduces diabetes incidence, due in part to the prevention of age-related weight gain and in part to other exercise effects. Physical activity decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes [1-10]. Moderate and vigorous exercise are purported to produce comparable reductions in diabetes risk if the energy expenditure is the same [3,10]. The optimal physical activity dose remains unclear, however, with some [4-7] but not all studies [1,8,9] showing continued reduction in diabetes for high versus intermediate energy expenditures. The National Runners Health Study [11-19] is unique among population cohorts in its focus on the health impact of higher doses of vigorously intense physical activity (i.e., {ge} 6-fold metabolic rate). The study was specifically designed to evaluate the dose-response relationship between vigorous physical activity and health for intensities and durations that exceed current physical activity recommendations [20-22]. One specific hypothesis is whether changes in vigorous physical activity affect the risk for becoming diabetic. Although women were surveyed and followed-up, only 23 developed diabetes so there is limited statistical power to establish their significance. Our analyses of diabetes and vigorous exercise are therefore restricted to men. This paper relates running distance at baseline and at the end of follow-up to self-reported, physician diagnosed diabetes in vigorously active men who were generally lean and ostensibly at low diabetic risk The benefits of greater doses of more vigorous exercise are relevant to the 27% of U.S. women and 34% of U.S. men meet or exceed the more general exercise recommendations for health benefits [23]. Specific issues to be addressed are: (1) whether maintenance of the same level of vigorous exercise over time reduces the risk of incident diabetes in relation to the exercise dose; (2) whether men who decrease their activity increase their risk for becoming diabetic; and (3) whether end of follow-up running distances are more predictive of diabetes than baseline distances, suggesting a causal, acute effect. Elsewhere we have shown that greater body weight is related to a lack of vigorous exercise [12-14] and increases the risk for diabetes even among generally lean vigorously active men [11]. In runners, leanness may be due to the exercise or due to initially lean men choosing to run further [17]. Therefore we also test whether body weight mediates the effects of vigorous exercise on diabetes, and whether this may be due to self-selection.

  3. Lost in secular evolution: the case of a low mass classical bulge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Kanak

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a classical bulge in disk galaxies holds important clue to the assembly history of galaxies. Finding observational evidence of very low mass classical bulges particularly in barred galaxies including our Milky Way, is a challenging task as the bar driven secular evolution might bring significant dynamical change to these bulges alongside the stellar disk. Using high-resolution N-body simulation, we show that if a cool stellar disk is assembled around a non-rotating low-mass classical bulge, the disk rapidly grows a strong bar within a few rotation time scales. Later, the bar driven secular process transform the initial classical bulge into a flattened rotating stellar system whose central part also have grown a bar-like component rotating in sync with the disk bar. During this time, a boxy/peanut (hereafter, B/P) bulge is formed via the buckling instability of the disk bar and the vertical extent of this B/P bulge being slightly higher than that of the classical bulge, it encompasses the whol...

  4. Correlation between Incident and Emission Polarization in Nanowire Surface Plasmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Correlation between Incident and Emission Polarization in Nanowire Surface Plasmon Waveguides Nanowire plasmons can be launched by illumination at one terminus of the nanowire and emission can waveguide, or as a polarization-rotating, nanoscale half-wave plate. The understanding of how plasmonic

  5. Mapping incident photosynthetically active radiation from MODIS data over China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    of incident photosynthetically active radiation from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data. Journal, nitrogen and energy in different natural systems. Since photosynthesis is the core process for energy as an input for modeling photosynthesis from single plant leaves to complex plant communities. For example

  6. Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

  7. A categorical model for traffic incident likelihood estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchangi, Shamanth

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis an incident prediction model is formulated and calibrated. The primary idea of the model developed is to correlate the expected number of crashes on any section of a freeway to a set of traffic stream characteristics, so that a...

  8. AT&TConsulting Incident Management Program Security Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    and best practices. The AT&T Incident Management Program service provides expert resources to assess overhaul. AT&T Consulting will create custom solutions that are practical, efficient and help address response to a proactive, preventative approach. Although new technology solutions, such as Intrusion

  9. Formal Analysis of Aviation Incidents Tibor Bosse1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, Tibor

    of the plane back despite stall warnings [10]. For the analysis of accidents and incidents in aviation, roughly two streams can be distinguished in the literature, namely accident analysis and risk analysis. Whilst purposes, a main difference is that accident analysis attempts to identify one specific combination

  10. UBC Student & Visitor Incident/Accident Report This report is to be completed by, or on behalf of, Visitors to UBC Campus and UBC Students who have been injured on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karczmarek, Joanna

    UBC Student & Visitor Incident/Accident Report This report is to be completed by, or on behalf of of Transportation to Medical Facility: Department Visited Date and Time of Incident/Accident (m/d/y) ____/____/____ ____:____ am / pm Describe the exact location of accident. (Include building name and room number

  11. Measurement of incident position of hypervelocity particles on piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takechi, Seiji; Onishi, Toshiyuki; Minami, Shigeyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nogami, Ken-ichi [Department of Physics, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Ohashi, Hideo [Faculty of Marine Science, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 108-8477 (Japan); Sasaki, Sho [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Iwate 023-0861 (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Okada, Nagaya [Honda Electronics Co., Ltd., Aichi 441-3193 (Japan)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cosmic dust detector for use onboard a satellite is currently being developed by using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). The characteristics of the PZT detector have been studied by bombarding it with hypervelocity iron (Fe) particles supplied by a Van de Graaff accelerator. One central electrode and four peripheral electrodes were placed on the front surface of the PZT detector to measure the impact positions of the incident Fe particles. It was demonstrated that the point of impact on the PZT detector could be identified by using information on the time at which the first peak of the output signal obtained from each electrode appeared.

  12. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating the shortest wavelength laboratory x-ray laser, below 4.5 nm and operating in the water window, by using the high-energy capability of the Titan laser.

  13. Final Technical Report Quantification and Standardization of Pattern Properties for the Control of the Lost Foam Casting Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Michaels

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project takes a fresh look at the ''white side'' of the lost foam casting process. We have developed the gel front hypothesis for foam pyrolysis behavior and the magnetic metal pump method for controlling lost foam casting metal fill event. The subject of this report is work done in the improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process. The original objective of this project was to improve the control of metal fill by understanding the influence of foam pattern and coating properties on the metal fill event. Relevant pattern properties could then be controlled, providing control of the metal fill event. One of the original premises of this project was that the process of metal fill was relatively well understood. Considerable previous work had been done to develop fluid mechanical and heat transfer models of the process. If we could just incorporate measured pattern properties into these models we would be able predict accurately the metal fill event. As we began to study the pyrolysis behavior of EPS during the metal fill event, we discovered that the chemical nature of this event had been completely overlooked in previous research. Styrene is the most prevalent breakdown product of EPS pyrolysis and it is a solvent for polystyrene. Much of the styrene generated by foam pyrolysis diffuses into intact foam, producing a molten gel of mechanically entangled polystyrene molecules. Much of the work of our project has centered on validation of this concept and producing a qualitative model of the behavior of EPS foam undergoing pyrolysis in a confined environment. A conclusion of this report is that styrene dissolution in EPS is a key phenomenon in the pyrolysis process and deserves considerable further study. While it is possible to continue to model the metal fill event parametrically using empirical data, we recommend that work be undertaken by qualified researchers to directly characterize and quantify this phenomenon for the benefit of modelers, researchers, and workers in the field. Another original premise of this project was that foam pattern and coating properties could be used to efficiently control metal fill. After studying the structure of EPS foam in detail for the period of this contract, we have come to the conclusion that EPS foam has an inherent variability at a scale that influences metal fill behavior. This does not allow for the detailed fine control of the process that we originally envisioned. We therefore have sought other methods for the control of the metal fill event. Of those, we now believe that the magnetic metal pump shows the most promise. We have conducted two casting trials using this method and preliminary results are very encouraging. A conclusion of our report is that, while every effort should continue to be made to produce uniform foam and coatings, the use of the magnetic metal pump should be encouraged and closed loop control mechanisms should be developed for this pouring method.

  14. University of Bristol Incident & Crisis Management Framework Appendix L.2012 Appendix L Estates Incident Management Team: Roles & Responsibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    ) Or the out of hours on call Maintenance Manager Manage shift resources and act as the first line technical the incident is over and water and power are restored ­ limiting the extent of re-commissioning so far Responsibilities / Actions Security Services Security Services staff as on duty Manage shift resources and act

  15. Studying Aviation Incidents by Agent-Based Simulation and Analysis A Case Study on a Runway Incursion Incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, Tibor

    in the analysis of accidents and incidents in aviation: even if detailed flight data from the `black box this approach mainly focuses on the analysis of existing accidents (also called accident analysis), the current paper also addresses analysis of potential future accidents (called risk analysis). This is done

  16. Diploma Replacement Request Form Students who have misplaced or lost their original diplomas may order a replacement diploma. The cost for each

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    Diploma Replacement Request Form Students who have misplaced or lost their original diplomas may order a replacement diploma. The cost for each replacement diploma is $25.00 ($35.00 for D.M.D, J.D., LL.M., and M.D). Please fill out the applicable information and mail it to the address below. Replacement

  17. FUEL DEVICE REPLACEMENT Use this application to request a replacement fuel access device for a device that has been lost or stolen. Use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    FUEL DEVICE REPLACEMENT Use this application to request a replacement fuel access device as those explained in the original Fuel Device Application and for your convenience provided on this form Information Lost Stolen Unknown Date of last known use Certification of Use I certify that fuel access device

  18. Collaborative Research: Barotropic Radiation Experiment (BARX) The question of how energy flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dushaw, Brian

    flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents comprising the general and vorticity. Intellectual Merit. A fundamental process by which ocean currents lose the energy acquired from Variability in the Central North Atlantic Ocean 1. Motivations and Objectives The paths along which energy

  19. Conferences Lost Password

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Session topic:large-scale land cover initiatives The effective reduction of global carbon emissions from biofuel production is highly dependent on the direct and indirect land use & land cover (LULC) change

  20. Incident Energy Dependence of pt Correlations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi,R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak,Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti,M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez,J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes,E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov,E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, ({Delta}p{sub t,i}{Delta}p{sub t,j}), as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, jet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  1. FLT3 mutation incidence and timing of origin in a population case series of pediatric leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discovered among 517 acute leukemia cases for an overall1 FLT3 mutations among 517 acute leukemia subjects from theseries of 177 childhood acute leukemias and their impact on

  2. FLT3 mutation incidence and timing of origin in a population case series of pediatric leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AML1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children bornin childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Proc Natl Acadin childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blood 2004, 103(

  3. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamada, Tomomi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine (Japan); Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  4. Mapping Greenland's mass loss in space and time Christopher Harig1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Frederik J.

    Mapping Greenland's mass loss in space and time Christopher Harig1 and Frederik J. Simons lost from the Greenland ice cap, based on satellite gravity data collected by the Gravity Recovery distribution of Greenland's mass loss and how the geographical pattern has varied on relatively shorter time

  5. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebi, Junko, E-mail: junkoe@fmu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan); Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima (Japan)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ?6, ?12, ?24, and ?36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (?65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ?6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  6. Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools for the analysis of incident and accident reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools for the analysis of incident and accident reports, Analysis of accidents/incidents, Categorization, Textual similarity INTRODUCTION Learning valuable lessons, (ii) the analysis of reports regardless of the categorization in order to expand the analysis

  7. Socioeconomic status and prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates among the diverse population of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MN, Smith E, Siadaty M, Hauck FR, Pickle LW (2006) Spatial analysis of prostate cancer incidence and race in Virginia,

  8. Do You Plan to Have Children? The Incidence of Potentially Illegal Questions during Resident Interviews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hern, Jr., H. Gene; Alter, Harrison J.; Wills, Charlotte P.; Snoey, Eric R.; Simon, Barry C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incidence of Potentially Illegal Questions During Residentor sexual preferences are potentially illegal. Littlethe prevalence of potentially illegal questions based on

  9. ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 FederalTransformers1Thomas LiuYashema MackIncident

  10. Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Lucy L.

    Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the relation of health behaviors and psy- chosocial factors to the incidence of type 2 diabetes are not well established. Methods: Prospective occupational cohort study

  11. SCENARIOS OF FUTURE LUNG CANCER INCIDENCE BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL: MODELLING STUDY IN DENMARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 SCENARIOS OF FUTURE LUNG CANCER INCIDENCE BY EDUCATIONAL LEVEL: MODELLING STUDY IN DENMARK Gwenn : 10.1016/j.ejca.2010.07.027 #12;2 Abstract Objective: To model future trends in lung cancer incidence in Denmark by education under different scenarios for cigarette smoking. Methods: Lung cancer incidence until

  12. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  13. accident survival time: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    person(s) involved in IncidentAccident: 1) Name New Hampshire, University of 2 Does Daylight Savings Time Affect Traffic Accidents? Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: This...

  14. HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    HOW TO REPORT AN ACCIDENT, INCIDENT OR NEAR MISS 1. Notify your supervisor or lab manager as soon as possible of your accident, incident, or near miss. 2. Fill out the online accident report (OARS) form://www.ehs.washington.edu/ohsoars/index.shtm. The supervisor, lab manager, or person who had the accident can fill out the form. 3. For any serious accidents

  15. Asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R. K.; Fernandez, P. B.; Mills, D. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Graber, T. J. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator was constructed and tested in 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The monochromator was originally designed as a high heat load monochromator capable of handling 5-10 kW beams from a wiggler source. This was accomplished by spreading the x-ray beam out on the surface an asymmetric-cut crystal and by using liquid metal cooling of the first crystal. The monochromator turned out to be a highly versatile monochromator that could perform many different types of experiments. The monochromator consisted of two 18 deg. asymmetrically cut Si crystals that could be rotated about 3 independent axes. The first stage ({Phi}) rotates the crystal around an axis perpendicular to the diffraction plane. This rotation changes the angle of the incident beam with the surface of the crystal without changing the Bragg angle. The second rotation ({Psi}) is perpendicular to the first and is used to control the shape of the beam footprint on the crystal. The third rotation ({Theta}) controls the Bragg angle. Besides the high heat load application, the use of asymmetrically cut crystals allows one to increase or decrease the acceptance angle for crystal diffraction of a monochromatic x-ray beam and allows one to increase or decrease the wavelength bandwidth of the diffraction of a continuum source like a bending-magnet beam or a normal x-ray-tube source. When the monochromator is used in the doubly expanding mode, it is possible to expand the vertical size of the double-diffracted beam by a factor of 10-15. When this was combined with a bending magnet source, it was possible to generate an 8 keV area beam, 16 mm wide by 26 mm high with a uniform intensity and parallel to 1.2 arc sec that could be applied in imaging experiments.

  16. Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan,T.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

  17. Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

  18. Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obidullah, A.S.M.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    -Startup Safety Review ? Mechanical Integrity ? Hot Work Permit ? Management of Change ? Incident Investigations ? Emergency Response & Planning ? Compliance Audits ? Trade Secrets 5 Detailed description of the PSM regulation...

  19. Synchrotron radiation damage observations in normal incidence copper mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z.; Melendez, J.; Colbert, J.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-cooled copper mirrors used at near-normal incidence on two beam lines at the NSLS are observed to undergo severe degradation upon exposure to the direct SR beam. These mirrors are used on beam lines designed to utilize radiation in the wavelength regions longer than 100 nm and are coated with a uv reflection-enhancing coating, consisting of one or more bilayers of aluminum with a MgF/sub 2/ overcoat. Beamline performance degrades very rapidly following installation of a new set of mirrors. Analysis of the mirror surfaces by various non-destructive techniques indicates severe degradation of the coating and surface along the central strip where most of the x-ray power is absorbed from the beam. In one case where the mirror had three bilayer coatings, the outer coating layer has disappeared along the central strip. Rutherford backscatter measurements indicate compositional changes between layers and confirm the existence of a carbon deposit on the surface. Thermal modeling suggests that most of the damage is caused by direct photon interaction, since the temperature rise in the energy deposition region is small.

  20. Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  2. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  3. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mak, Kimberley S. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Leslie K. [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Mak, Raymond H. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Pile-Spellman, John [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Abrahm, Janet L. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Prigerson, Holly G. [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A., E-mail: tbalboni@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Center for Palliative Care, Boston, MA (United States); Center for Psycho-oncology and Palliative Care Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC outcomes and strategies for reducing MSCC-related costs.

  4. Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan with historically high air pollution levels. This work tests whether persistent spatial patterns of metrics of chronic exposure to air pollutants are associated with the observed patterns of cancer incidence rates

  5. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 -Aug 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-001248 THOMPSON ROAD Gas leak Security , Toronto Fire, Toronto Police, and Occupational Health and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas leak in the area of the Life Science BuildingWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 - Aug 18, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  6. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 -Feb 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas leak Security and Toronto Fire responded to a report of a natural gas odour in B-wing. TorontoWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 - Feb 12, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building\\Const. Security, York Fire Prevention and Toronto Fire responded to a fire alarm. The cause of the alarm

  7. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 -Jul 15, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The building was checked and no natural gas was found. Toronto Fire determined that all was in order. 7/12/2012 07:31 AM HazardousWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 - Jul 15, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  8. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 -May 5, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-000845 YORK LANES RETAIL Gas leak Security, Toronto Fire and Enbridge Gas responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The source of the odour was located in a restaurant kitchen. EnbridgeWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 - May 5, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  9. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of May 14 -May 20, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekly Security Incident Log Period of May 14 - May 20, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building-000955 PARKING GARAGE - ARBORETUM LANE (PS2) Mech\\Electrical Security responded to a report that an automotive York Security responded to a report of an unknown male causing a disturbance in the food court

  10. Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants D Laurier 1 living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present herein results about the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results

  11. Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and geographic We have previously shown that geographic differences in cancer mortalities in Europe are related of 45 male and 47 female cancers. Differences in cancer incidences are correlated moder- ately, first

  12. Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer survival: Lessons from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Cancer. Author manuscript Page /1 5 Social inequalities in cancer incidence and cancer ( ). With regards to cancer risk, a first comprehensive review of socioeconomic inequalities was1 published by IARC in 1997 ( ). This review covered inequalities in cancer mortality, incidence and survival and discussed

  13. Biohazardous Laboratory Incidence/Accident Response and Reporting Protocol UGA Office of Biosafety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Biohazardous Laboratory Incidence/Accident Response and Reporting Protocol UGA Office of Biosafety Biohazardous laboratory incident or accident involves the following: 1. Any potential or known exposure-related accidents or illnesses involving work described under the NIH Guidelines for Recombinant DNA Research (NIH

  14. Monthly Theme OARS January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Monthly Theme ­ OARS ­ January 2009 Report an Accident / Incident / Near Miss Online Accident Reporting System (OARS) debuts January 2009 EH&S has a NEW online system to report any accident or incident that happens at the University. The web- based reporting system is called OARS -- Online Accident Reporting

  15. Oak Ridge: Approaching 4 Million Safe Work Hours

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Workers at URS | CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR), the prime contractor for EM’s Oak Ridge cleanup, are approaching a milestone of 4 million safe work hours without a lost time away incident.

  16. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

  17. Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, W.S.; Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Stoddard, D.H.

    1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety Technology Group is developing methodology that can be used to assess the risk of operating a plant to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. As an early step in the methodology, a preliminary hazards analysis identifies safety-related incidents. In the absence of appropriate safety features, these incidents could lead to significant consequences and risk to onsite personnel or to the public. This report is a compilation of potential safety-related incidents that have been identified in studies at SRL and in safety analyses of various commercially designed reprocessing plants. It is an expanded revision of the version originally published as DP-1558, Published December 1980.

  18. A preliminary evaluation of the economic risk for cleanup of nuclear material licensee contamination incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostmeyer, R.M.; Skinner, D.J.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an analysis of the economic risks from nuclear material licensee contamination incidents. The results of the analyses are intended to provide a technical basis for an NRC rulemaking which would require nuclear material licensees to demonstrate adequate financial means to cover the cleanup costs for accidental or inadvertant release of radioactive materials. The important products of this effort include (1) a method for categorizing licensees according to the potential cost and frequency of contamination incidents, (2) a model for ranking the categories of licensees according to potential incident costs, and (3) estimates of contamination risk for the licensee categories.

  19. Entropic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

  20. An account of scientific transfer to the industry: the co-development of an incident analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    about their need of an incident analysis method. The company wanted a tool that would help them better

  1. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  2. Climate and Landscape Factors Associated with Buruli Ulcer Incidence in Victoria, Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Ravensway, Jenni; Benbow, Mark Eric; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Pierce, Steven J.; Campbell, Lindsay P.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.; Hayman, John A.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Wallace, John R.; Qi, Jiaguo

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans), is a necrotizing skin disease found in more than 30 countries worldwide. BU incidence is highest in West Africa; however, cases have substantially increased in coastal...

  3. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication and testing of an oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry (OIDRS) system for in-vivo and noninvasive detection of epithelial cancer. Two probes were fabricated using micromachining...

  4. Root cause analysis of solder flux residue incidence in the manufacture of electronic power modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Pranav

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the root causes of the incidence of solder flux residue underneath electronic components in the manufacture of power modules. The existing deionized water-based centrifugal cleaning process was ...

  5. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO ACCIDENT/INCIDENT/OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE REPORT FOR EMPLOYEES RELEVANT SECTIONS: _______________________________________ NAME OF SUPERVISOR TO WHOM ACCIDENT WAS REPORTED: _________________________________ TELEPHONE: _____________________ IF THERE WAS A DELAY IN REPORTING THIS ACCIDENT, LIST REASON

  6. A study of the relationship between emotional history and the incidence of cancer in human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian, Henry Andrew

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    report a more severe emotional history than the non-cancer group. Eighty-eight male subjects were selected from the Veterans Administration Hospital in Temple, Texas to be interviewed according to a patterned interview guide. Results... SUBJECTS' CRITICAL INCIDENTS 55 APPENDIX D - SUMMARIES OF NON-CANCER 72 SUBJECTS' CRITICAL INCIDENTS APPENDIX E - RELEASE FORM 87 VITA 89 LIST OF TABLES Table Page B iographical Data of Sub j ects in Sample 10 Statistical Analysis of Data 22...

  7. A study of the incidence and histology of accessory corpora lutea in swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Lewis Russell

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE AND HISTOLOGY OF ACCESSORY CORPORA LUTEA IN SWINE A Thesis by LEWIS R. SCHULTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1969 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction A STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE AND HISTOLOGY OF ACCESSORY CORPORA LUTEA IN SWINE A Thesis by LEWIS R. SCHULTZ Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (M...

  8. The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Dean Roger

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF.... December I 987 Major Subject: Veterinary Medical Sciences THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Approved as to style and content by: Ronnie G. Elmore (Chairman of Committee...

  9. A climate-soil-crop model to evaluate drought incidence and severity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puvirajasinghe, Patrick

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CLINATE-SOIL-CROP MODEL TO EVALUATE DROUGHT INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY A Thesis by PATRICK PUVIRAJASINGHE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1982 Major Subject: Agronomy A CLIMATE-SOIL-CROP MODEL TO EVALUATE DROUGHT INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY A Thesis by PATRICK PUVIRAJASINGHE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) 5' 9 (Member) (Me r) (Member ead of e...

  10. Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driggers, S.A.

    1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

  11. Validating Dynamic Message Sign Freeway Travel Time Messages Using Ground Truth Geospatial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Validating Dynamic Message Sign Freeway Travel Time Messages Using Ground Truth Geospatial Data agencies have invested more than $300 million in dynamic message sign (DMS) systems for communicating important messages to travelers, including weather conditions, incidents, construction, homeland security

  12. Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, B.A.

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

  13. Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

  14. Meteorological Integration for the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System: General Guidance for BWIC Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, William J.; Wang, Weiguo; Rutz, Frederick C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Xie, YuLong; Seiple, Timothy E.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for developing systems to detect the release of aerosolized bioagents in urban environments. The system that accomplishes this, known as BioWatch, is a robust first-generation monitoring system. In conjunction with the BioWatch detection network, DHS has also developed a software tool for cities to use to assist in their response when a bioagent is detected. This tool, the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System, will eventually be deployed to all BioWatch cities to aid in the interpretation of the public health significance of indicators from the BioWatch networks. BWIC consists of a set of integrated modules, including meteorological models, that estimate the effect of a biological agent on a city’s population once it has been detected. For the meteorological models in BWIC to successfully calculate the distribution of biological material, they must have as input accurate meteorological data, and wind fields in particular. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for cities to use in identifying sources of good-quality local meteorological data that BWIC needs to function properly. This process of finding sources of local meteorological data, evaluating the data quality and gaps in coverage, and getting the data into BWIC, referred to as meteorological integration, is described. The good news for many cities is that meteorological measurement networks are becoming increasingly common. Most of these networks allow their data to be distributed in real time via the internet. Thus, cities will often only need to evaluate the quality of available measurements and perhaps add a modest number of stations where coverage is poor.

  15. Fabled Lost Cities The Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    antiquity in the Mediterranean. #12;Cover: The Theater at Ephesus Dear PrinCetonian, The "fabled cities

  16. Description of Coverage LOST LUGGAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    vehicles or conveyances. · Contact lenses, eyeglasses, sunglasses, hearing aids; artificial teeth, dental

  17. 17/03/2006 Accepted in European Journal of Cancer Prevention Time Trends and Geographic Variations for Thyroid Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    17/03/2006 Accepted in European Journal of Cancer Prevention 1 Time Trends and Geographic Variations for Thyroid Cancer in New Caledonia, a Very High Incidence Area (1985-1999) Thérèse Truong1 mail: guenel@vjf.inserm.fr Running head: Incidence of thyroid cancer in New Caledonia #12

  18. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, J Diaz; Knecht, A; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on March 11, 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima nuclear reactor complex. On March 17-18, 2011 we detected the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. The highest detected activity to date is <~32 mBq/m^3 of 131-I.

  19. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

    2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

  20. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel. Large increases in Reynolds stress occur due to onset of the small-scale concentrations of vorticity immediately downstream of separation; substantial increases at locations further downstream arise from development of the large-scale vorticity concentrations.

  1. A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Jun; Engelhorn, K.; Cho, B.I.; Lee, H.J.; Greaves, M.; Weber, C.P.; Falcone, R.W.; Padmore, H. A.; Heimann, P.A.

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast x-ray streak camera has been realized using a grazing incidence reflection photocathode. X-rays are incident on a gold photocathode at a grazing angle of 20 degree and photoemitted electrons are focused by a large aperture magnetic solenoid lens. The streak camera has high quantum efficiency, 600fs temporal resolution, and 6mm imaging length in the spectral direction. Its single shot capability eliminates temporal smearing due to sweep jitter, and allows recording of the ultrafast dynamics of samples that undergo non-reversible changes.

  2. Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

  3. EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

  4. Household catastrophic payments for tuberculosis care in Nigeria: incidence, determinants, and policy implications for universal health coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ukwaja, Kingsley; Alobu, Isaac; Abimbola, Seye; Hopewell, Philip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for tuberculosis care in Nigeria: incidence, determinants,Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. 2 National TuberculosisAbakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. 3 National Primary Health

  5. forthcoming in Economic Letters Incidence of Federal and State Gasoline Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    concerns over high gasoline prices. As recently as April 2003, Congress argued over the merits of includingforthcoming in Economic Letters Incidence of Federal and State Gasoline Taxes Hayley Chouinarda, Berkeley, and member of the Giannini Foundation. Abstract The federal specific gasoline tax falls equally

  6. Using Violation and Vulnerability Analysis to Understand the Root-Causes of Complex Security Incidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    Incidents C.W. Johnson Dept. of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. http Department of Energy has also established the Information Security Resource Center to coordinate the `root is appropriate because it included failures in the underlying audit and control mechanisms. It also stemmed from

  7. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  8. Systme de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    Système de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le réseau A.S.T.R.I.D Mémoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Aper¸cu d'ITIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Objectifs de ce m´emoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 ITIL 4 2.1 Introduction

  9. SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paper

  10. A. Name: Information Systems Security Incident Response Policy B. Number: 20070103-secincidentresp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    Page 1 I. Title A. Name: Information Systems Security Incident Response Policy B. Number: 20070103-secincidentresp C. Author(s): David Millar (ISC Information Security) and Lauren Steinfeld (Chief Privacy OfficerNet) as well as the establishment of information security policies, guidelines, and standards. The Office

  11. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  12. DNA Identification of Mountain Lions Involved in Livestock Predation and Public Safety Incidents and Investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernest, Holly

    1 DNA Identification of Mountain Lions Involved in Livestock Predation and Public Safety Incidents concolor, bobcat, forensic, genetics, DNA techniques, noninvasive sampling, fecal DNA, prey swab DNA ABSTRACT Using three case studies, we demonstrated the utility of techniques to analyze DNA from trace

  13. Forecasting Spatiotemporal Impact of Traffic Incidents on Road Networks Bei Pan, Ugur Demiryurek, Cyrus Shahabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    -fidelity spatiotemporal data on trans- portation networks of major cities. In this paper, using two real- world incidents, for example it can be used by city transportation agencies for providing evacuation plan to eliminate potential congested grid locks, for effective dispatching of emergency vehicles, or even for long

  14. Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    Incident and in situ irradiance in Lakes Cadagno and Lucerne: A comparison of methods and models Key words: Lake Lucerne, Lake Cadagno, PAR, UV-A, UV-B, irradiance regime, radiative transfer models) at the field stations Kastanienbaum at Lake Lucerne (434 m a.s.l.) and Piora at Lake Cadagno (1923 m a

  15. Revised rail-stop exposure model for incident-free transport of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostmeyer, R.M.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a model for estimating railstop doses that occur during incident-free transport of nuclear waste by rail. The model, which has been incorporated into the RADTRAN III risk assessment code, can be applied to general freight and dedicated train shipments of waste.

  16. Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    -492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

  17. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection of biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection (OI-RD) microscope, a form of polarization-modulated imaging ellipsometer, for label on the polarizer­ compensator­sample­analyzer scheme and under the off-null condition, a polarization-modulated OI

  18. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that contralateral breast doses and LAR were comparable to WBRT, despite their added complexity. The smaller irradiated volume of the ABPI plan contributed to a halving of LAR for contralateral breast compared with the other plan types. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for a left breast protocol using kilovoltage CBCT contributed <10% to LAR for the majority of organs, and did not exceed 22% of total organ dose. Conclusions: Phantom measurements and calculations of LAR from the BEIR VII models predict that complex breast radiotherapy techniques do not increase the theoretical risk of second cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

  19. Time Off

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis ofwas publishedThree scientistsDepartmentTime Off

  20. (BBA) is competent for investigations on incidents of poisoning honey bees due to the use of pesti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (BBA) is competent for investigations on incidents of poisoning honey bees due to the use of pesti in the case of honey-bee poisoning by pesticides' [Amtl Pfl Best (Berlin-Dahlem), NF 36/5, 179-182]. An overview of the poisoning incidents shows a clear decline in the last years. The most impor- tant

  1. 29.01.03.M1.09 Information Resources Incident Management Page 1 of 3 STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    likelihood that security incidents could be propagated to other systems beyond departmental control, system, process, store, retrieve, display, and transmit information or data. SIRS ­ Security Incident Reporting follow System Regulation 10.02.01, Control of Fraud, Waste and Abuse. 2.6 If there is a substantial

  2. Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M. Berrill,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M 2007 The output energy dependence of high repetition rate grazing incidence pumped Ni-like Mo, Ni-like Ag, and Ne-like Ti transient collisional soft x-ray lasers on the duration of the pump pulse

  3. Residential Life Judicial Review Board Process An incident report is submitted and directed to the Coordinator of the specific residence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Residential Life Judicial Review Board Process · An incident report is submitted and directed of Residential Life. · Upon review, the Coordinator determines whether or not the incident requires a one. For additional information, you may contact the Residential Life office at 257-4917. #12;

  4. -Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load -751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 751-754, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCune, Bruce

    as predictors. Heat load was calculated as a 45 degree rotation of the PDIR response surface. Results- Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load - 751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18 regression (NPMR) improve estimates of potential direct incident radia- tion (PDIR) and heat load based

  5. The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    which facilitates analysis of the incidence of an economywide capandtrade system for carbon dioxide (CO2) at the state level. An understanding of the geographic incidence of climate change mitigation are geographically localized. The upshot is a classic collective action problem. The issue of distribution has long

  6. EOC Title: Documentation Unit General Description The Documentation Unit maintains accurate, up-to-date incident files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew P.

    PLANNING EOC Title: Documentation Unit General Description The Documentation Unit maintains, EOC Action Plan, and other documents, as required · Ensure an EOC sign-in sheet is available for each and Initial Action Incidents (3 hours) · IS-700 National Incident Management System (3 hours) · IS-800

  7. HASCAL: A system for estimating contamination and doses from incidents at worldwide radiological facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoreen, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sykes, R.I. [Titan/ARAP, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    HASCAL (Hazard Assessment System for Consequence Analysis), Version 0.1, is being developed to support analysis of radiological incidents anywhere in the world for Defense Nuclear Agency. HASCAL is a component of HPAC (Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability), a comprehensive nuclear, biological, and chemical hazard effects planning and forecasting modeling system. HASCAL estimates the amount of radioactivity released, its atmospheric transport, and the resulting radiological doses for a variety of radiological incident scenarios. HASCAL is based on RASCAL (Radiological assessment System Consquence Analysis), which was developed for US NRC for analysis of US power reactor accidents. HASCAL contains addtions of an atmospheric transport model (SCIPUFF) and of a database of all power reactors in the world. Enhancements to HASCAL are planned.

  8. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, A. F. H. [Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Lulea University of Technology, S-971 87 Lulea (Sweden)

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  9. Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities for reporting cyber security incidents involving classified and unclassified systems and responding to cyber security alerts and advisories; and to implement requirements of DOE N 205.1, Unclassified Cyber Security Program, and DOE M 471.2-2, Classified Information Systems Security Manual. DOE N 205.13, dated 7-6-04, extends this notice until 7-6-05. Cancels DOE M 471.2-2, Chapter III, section 8.

  10. Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar, J.C.; Sun, Y.; Haberl, J.

    ESL-PA-13-11-02 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Improved Methodology to Measure Normal... Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array Juan-Carlos Baltazar*, Yifu Sun, Jeff Haberl Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, The Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77845, U.S.A. Abstract...

  11. Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

  12. Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar, J.C.; Sun, Y.; Haberl, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at different tilt and azimuth angles, and that can be used to estimate the normal incident component without the tracking devices that require more detailed installation and maintenance.. The array’s sensors are of the photovoltaic type, which require both... for photovoltaic-type solar sensor, and using similar approach, a number of solutions for switching schemes was presented by Miloslaw [7]. However, those methods still cannot provide high accuracy for the whole estimation period and the methods still present...

  13. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)] [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  14. FLUORESCENCE AND FIBER-OPTICS BASED REAL-TIME THICKNESS SENSOR FOR DYNAMIC LIQUID FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narain, Amitabh

    /analyzed the incident reflected waves to identify and measure the total transit time of the sound wave (of known wave-speed1 FLUORESCENCE AND FIBER-OPTICS BASED REAL-TIME THICKNESS SENSOR FOR DYNAMIC LIQUID FILMS T. W. Ng/disadvantages of many known liquid film thickness sensing devices (viz. conductivity probes, reflectance based fiber

  15. Time-track complementarity'' in the study of EAS longitudinal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilova, T.V. (P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr., 53, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Dumora, D. (Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite Bordeaux I rue du Solarium, 33175 Gradignan-Cedex (France)); Erlykin, A.D. (P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr., 53, 117924 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Procureur, J. (Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite Bordeaux I rue du Solarium, 33175 Gradignan-Cedex (France))

    1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    EAS muon production and propagation through the atmosphere were simulated. For each muon at the observation level its incidence angles and the arrival time were determined. It is shown that for large distances from EAS cores and for GeV-muons, time and track measurements could be complementary to improve the accuracy of the muon production height determination.

  16. Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting a new, real-time method for rendering diffuse and glossy objects in low-frequency lighting environments-frequency incident lighting into transferred radiance which includes global effects like shadows and interreflections

  17. How to Enhance Dephasing Time in Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cywinski; R. M. Lutchyn; C. P. Nave; S. Das Sarma

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate the influence of designed pulse sequences in restoring quantum coherence lost due to background noise in superconducting qubits. We consider both 1/f noise and Random Telegraph Noise, and show that the qubit coherence time can be substantially enhanced by carefully engineered pulse sequences. Conversely, the time dependence of qubit coherence under external pulse sequences could be used as a spectroscopic tool for extracting the noise mechanisms in superconducting qubits, i.e. by using Uhrig's pulse sequence one can obtain information about moments of the spectral density of noise. We also study the effect of pulse sequences on the evolution of the qubit affected by a strongly coupled fluctuator, and show that the non-Gaussian features in decoherence are suppressed by the application of pulses.

  18. How to Enhance Dephasing Time in Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cywinski, L; Nave, C P; Sarma, S D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate the influence of designed pulse sequences in restoring quantum coherence lost due to background noise in superconducting qubits. We consider both 1/f noise and Random Telegraph Noise, and show that the qubit coherence time can be substantially enhanced by carefully engineered pulse sequences. Conversely, the time dependence of qubit coherence under external pulse sequences could be used as a spectroscopic tool for extracting the noise mechanisms in superconducting qubits, i.e. by using Uhrig's pulse sequence one can obtain information about moments of the spectral density of noise. We also study the effect of pulse sequences on the evolution of the qubit affected by a strongly coupled fluctuator, and show that the non-Gaussian features in decoherence are suppressed by the application of pulses.

  19. Second harmonic generation by propagation of a p-polarized obliquely incident laser beam in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Pallavi; Agrawal, Ekta [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical study of second harmonic generation due to interaction an intense, p-polarized laser beam propagating obliquely in homogeneous underdense plasma, in the mildly relativistic regime, has been presented. The efficiency of the second harmonic radiation as well as its detuning length has been obtained and their variation with the angle of incidence is analyzed. It is shown that, for a given plasma electron density, the second harmonic efficiency increases with the angle of incidence while the detuning length decreases. The second harmonic amplitude vanishes at normal incidence of the laser beam.

  20. Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women in the women’s interagency HIV study (WIHS) and men in the multicenter AIDS cohort study (MACS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incidence and risk factors for lung cancer among women inan increased incidence of lung can- cer among people withis due to HIV or to other lung cancer risk factors such as

  1. A new coral disease from the southern Arabian Gulf During an ecological survey of coral communities at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence of coral diseases was observed. Although

  2. Systematics of threshold incident energy for deep sub-barrier fusion hindrance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takatoshi Ichikawa; Kouichi Hagino; Akira Iwamoto

    2007-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically evaluate the potential energy at the touching configuration for heavy-ion reactions using various potential models. We point out that the energy at the touching point, especially that estimated with the Krappe-Nix-Sierk (KNS) potential, strongly correlates with the threshold incident energy for steep fall-off of fusion cross sections observed recently for several systems at extremely low energies. This clearly indicates that the steep fall-off phenomenon can be attributed to the dynamics after the target and projectile touch with each other, e.g., the tunneling process and the nuclear saturation property in the overlap region.

  3. Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604° ShowCounty,Energy Information Incidence in

  4. METEOROLOGICAL INFLUENCES ON VAPOR INCIDENTS IN THE 200 EAST & 200 WEST TANK FARMS FROM CY1995 TO CY2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOCKING, M.J.

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Revised for a more comprehensive overview of vapor incidents reported at the Hanford Tank Farms. Investigation into the meteorological influences on vapor incidents in the tank farm to determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases. Weather phenomena, specifically barometric pressure, and wind velocity and direction can potentially cause or exacerbate a vapor release within the farm systems. The purpose of this document is to gather and evaluate the meteorological and weather information for the Tank Farms Shift Log Vapor Incident entries and determine what, if any, meteorological influences contribute to the reporting of odors, smells, vapors, and other gases such as propane. A part of the evaluation will be determining which of the incidents are related to actual ''intrusive'' work, and which are ''transient.'' Transient vapor incidents are herein defined as those vapors encountered during walkdowns, surveys, or other activities that did not require working directly with the tanks, pits, transfer lines, etc. Another part of the investigation will involve determining if there are barometric pressures or other weather related phenomena that might cause or contribute vapors being released when there are no ''intrusive'' activities. A final purpose is to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the 242-A Evaporator operations and Vapor Incidents entered on the Shift Log.

  5. Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a “governing” entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term “Peace Officer” is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: • TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products • OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies • NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel • NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: • NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs • NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems • NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) • NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

  6. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4?M{sub 0}{sup 2}, or about 7.509M{sub 0}{sup 2} ? 6.268 × 10{sup 76}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M{sub 0}{sup 2} ? 1.254 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, and then decreases back down to 4?M{sub 0}{sup 2} = 1.049 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}.

  7. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

  8. Activation Products from Copper and Steel Samples Exposed to Showers Produced by 8 GeV Protons Lost in the Fermilab Main Injector Collimation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Bruce C; Pronskikh, Vitaly S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In conjunction with efforts to predict residual radiation levels in the Fermilab Main Injector, measurements of residual radiation were correlated with the time history of losses. Detailed examination suggested that the list of radioactive isotopes used for fitting was incomplete. We will report on activation studies of magnet steel and copper samples which we irradiated adjacent to the Fermilab Main Injector collimation system. Our results identified several additional radioactive isotopes of interest. The MARS15 studies using a simplified model are compared with measurements. The long half-life isotopes will grow in importance as operation stretches to a second decade and as loss rates rise. These studies allow us to predict limits on these concerns.

  9. The effective beta sensitivity to the incident neutron energy dependence of the absolute delayed neutron yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Angelo, A. (ENEA, Casaccia (Italy)); Filip, A. (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of the [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, and [sup 238]U absolute delayed neutron yields v[sub d] is one of the principal sources of uncertainty in predicting the fission reactor reactivity scale [beta][sub eff]. The current uncertainties in the dependence of v[sub d] on incident neutron energy is investigated for significance in the evaluation of [beta][sub eff]. The uncertainty effects on the GODIVA, JEZEBEL, Zero Power Reactor, SNEAK, and Masurca benchmark facility calculations are analyzed using ENDF/B and JEF basic data. Different assumptions about the energy dependence result in variations of up to 5% in the reactor spectrum averaged values of v[sub d], and these would result in variations of up to [approximately] 2% in the value of [beta][sub eff] for a typical liquid-metal fast breeder reactor.

  10. In situ growth rate measurements by normal-incidence reflectance during MOVPE growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, H.Q.; Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Chui, H.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an in situ technique for monitoring metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth by normal-incidence reflectance. This technique is used to calibrate the growth rate periodically and to monitor the growth process routinely. It is not only a precise tool to measure the growth rate, but also very useful in identifying unusal problems during a growth run, such as depletion of source material, deterioration of surface morphology, and problems associated with an improper growht procedure. We will also present an excellent reproducibility ({+-}0.3% over a course of more than 100 runs) of the cavity wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structures with periodic calibration by this in situ technique.

  11. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064?nm illumination of 10 mW/cm{sup 2?}??1?kW/cm{sup 2}, compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  12. Risk Insights Associated with Incident-Free Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel To Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supko, E.M. [Energy Resources International, Inc., 101518 St., NW, Suite 650, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Kessler, J.H. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Blvd., Charlotte NC 28262 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Final Environmental Impact Statement (YM EIS)[1] included an analysis of the environmental impacts associated with the transport of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from multiple locations across the US to Yucca Mountain for incident-free and accident conditions. While the radiological risks contained in the YM EIS were calculated to be small, it is important to recognize the many conservatisms that were utilized to calculate these risks. This paper identifies conservative assumptions associated with the YM EIS calculation of incident free transportation risk, and provides an estimate of incident free transportation risk using more realistic assumptions. While it is important to use conservative assumptions in the evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with the proposed repository, it is equally important that the public and decision makers understand the conservative nature of the results presented. This paper will provide that perspective regarding the incident free transportation impacts and summarizes the results of a more detailed EPRI report on this subject, 'Assessment of Incident Free Transport Risk for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5'. [2] (authors)

  13. Effects of grazing incidence conditions on the x-ray diffuse scattering from self-assembled nanoscale islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidbauer, M.; Grigoriev, D.; Hanke, M.; Schaefer, P.; Wiebach, T.; Koehler, R. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction from SiGe nanoscale islands grown on Si(001) substrate were investigated. Experiments and corresponding theoretical simulations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation were carried out. The strain field inside and in the vicinity of the SiGe islands was calculated in the framework of linear elasticity theory using the numerical finite element method. The diffuse intensity pattern in reciprocal space reveals a well-resolved fine structure with prominent maxima and a complicated fringe pattern. The distribution of diffuse intensity in reciprocal space strongly depends on the angle of incidence with respect to the sample surface. The results obtained substantiate the important role of basically five (grazing incidence small-angle x-ray) and nine (grazing incidence diffraction) scattering channels that have to be considered for a complete understanding of the scattering scenario. A refined island model concerning shape, size, and Ge composition was elaborated.

  14. Incidence of primary liver cancer and aetiological aspects: a study of a defined population from a low-endemicity area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J Kaczynski; G Hansson; S Wallerstedt

    Summary The prevalence of primary liver cancer (PLC) varies throughout the world. It has been attributed to variations in incidence of the predominant histological type, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The incidence of PLC types other than HCC such as cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) is far less known, especially in low-incidence areas. The aetiology of HCC and other PLC types is obscure, with the exception of the association between HCC and cirrhosis as well as chronic viral hepatitis. The present retrospective incidence and aetiology study concerns a well-defined population from a period with a high autopsy frequency. Preserved biopsy specimens were re-evaluated histopathologically and patient records were studied. Among 590 histologically verified cases of PLC, HCC constituted 90%, CCC 8 % and a mixed form of these types 1%. At the end of the study period the annual age-standardised incidence rate of HCC was 3.6 cases per 100 000 inhabitants. Other PLC types were hepatoblastoma (n = 3), fibrolamellar carcinoma (n = 2), angiosarcoma (n = 1) and infantile haemangioendothelioma (n = 1), each constituting less than I % of the PLC cases. Comparing HCC with CCC we found that cirrhosis (70%) and alcoholism (21%) was significantly more frequent in HCC, and cholelithiasis was significantly more common (60%) in patients with CCC. In the majority of the PLC cases with liver cirrhosis this disorder was unknown before diagnosis of the tumour.

  15. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  16. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study, these results should be viewed as hypothesis generating.

  17. A Computational Model Incorporating Neural Stem Cell Dynamics Reproduces Glioma Incidence across the Lifespan in the Human Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Roman; Stoll, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert...

  18. The influence of iodinated casein and high fat diets on the performance and incidence of fatty livers in laying hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Louis Lee

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INl'LUENCE OF IODINATED CASEIN AND HIGH FAT DIETS ON THE PEBFORMANC' AND INCIDENCE OF FATTY LIVERS IN LAYING H"NS A Thesis Loui" Lee Young Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&II Univer -ity in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject oultry Science THE INPLUENCE OP IODINA'I "D CAS IN AND HIGH FAT DIETS ON THE P, HFOHMAI'JCE AND INCIDENCE OP PATTY LIVENS IN LAYING HENS A Thesis Louis Lee Young Approved...

  19. UCONN Health Center Violent Incident Report *The UConn Health Center defines a violent incident that requires reporting as "Any threatening remark or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    /city: Were you: Victim? ___Yes ___ No If yes, (circle all that applies): physical abuse, verbal abuse, other described as (circle all that applies): verbal abuse, pushing/shoving, fighting, physical abuse, threats factors (check all that applies): Intoxication ___ Dissatisfied with care/waiting time Grief reaction

  20. National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance and need for full compliant implementation of NIMS nationwide was clearly demonstrated during the Hurricane Katrina event, which was clearly expressed in Secretary Chertoff's October 4, 2005 letter addressed to the State's governors. It states, ''Hurricane Katrina was a stark reminder of how critical it is for our nation to approach incident management in a coordinated, consistent, and efficient manner. We must be able to come together, at all levels of government, to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from any emergency or disaster. Our operations must be seamless and based on common incident management doctrine, because the challenges we face as a nation are far greater than capabilities of any one jurisdiction.'' The NIMS is a system/architecture for organizing response on a ''national'' level. It incorporations ICS as a main component of that structure (i.e., it institutionalizes ICS in NIMS). In a paper published on the NIMS Website, the following statements were made: ''NIMS represents a core set of doctrine, principles, terminology, and organizational processes to enable effective, efficient and collaborative incident management at all levels. To provide the framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on a balance between flexibility and standardization.'' Thus the NIC is challenged with the need to adopt quality SDO generated standards to support NIMS compliance, but in doing so maintain the flexibility necessary so that response operations can be tailored for the specific jurisdictional and geographical needs across the nation. In support of this large and complex challenge facing the NIC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked to provide technical support to the NIC, through their DHS Science and Technology ? Standards Portfolio Contract, to help identify, review, and develop key standards for NIMS compliance. Upon examining the challenge, the following general process appears to be a reasonable approach for identifying and establishing existing standards that would be applicable to NIMS compliance. The suggested generalized steps to establishing existing SDO generated standards for NIMS compliance are: (1) establish search criteria from the NIMS and its support documents, (2) search SDO databases to identify key existing nationally and/or internationally recognized standards that have potential application to NIMS compliance needs, (3) review the identified standards against the specific component needs of the NIMS, (4) identify the pertinent aspects/components of those identified standards that clearly address specific NIMS compliance needs, (5) establish a process to adopt the pertinent standards, which includes the generation of formalized FEMA Guidance that identifies the specific NIMS component compliance needs addressed in the respective standard, (6) develop performance criteria for which to measure compliance with the identified NIMS components addressed by the respective adopted standard, and (7) adopt the standard, publish the guidance and performance criteria, and incorporate it into routine FEMA/NIC NIMS management operations. This review process will also help identify real gaps in standards for which new NIMS specific standards should be developed. To jump start this process and hopefully identify some key ''low hanging fruit'' standards the NIC could use to begin such a process, a panel of first-responder experts (familiar with the current standards of common use in the first-responder community) from various response disciplines was formed and a workshop held. The workshop included a pre-workshop information gathering process. This report discusses the workshop and its findings in detail.

  1. Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that has rapidly increased in global incidence in recent dec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    in recent dec- ades1,2 . In the United States, the average annual increase in thyroid cancer incidence of 6.6% between 2000 and 2009 is the highest among all cancers2 . Although the death rate of thyroid cancer is relatively low, the rate of disease recurrence or persistence is high, which is asso- ciated with increased

  2. Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some 100 significant cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some.riviere(cb.ineris.fr guy.marlair@iineris.fr alexis. vignestcbjneris.fr Abstract A biofuel is most often defined as a liquid. There are numerous potential supply chains for the production of biofuels, depending on feedstock, conventional

  3. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    1 Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser final optics in a laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the GILMM substrate, adaptive (deformable) optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film

  4. A new parameterization of canopy spectral response to incident solar radiation: case study with hyperspectral data from pine dominant forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    A new parameterization of canopy spectral response to incident solar radiation: case study, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland c Finnish Forest Research Institute, Suonenjoki Research Station, FIN-77600 Suonenjoki, Finland d VTT Automation, Remote Sensing Group, FIN-02044 VTT, Finland Received 27

  5. A Spatio-Temporal exploratory analysis of pipe-failure incidents in the Water Distribution Network of Limassol, Cyprus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagatsis, Anastasios

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    in the degradation of the WDN of Limassol. The distribution of pipe-failure incidents was studied at the level of District Metered Areas (DMA) boundary classifications and at the location level using point-pattern analysis methodologies. A modified version...

  6. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 014607 (2010) Fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    , and Nuclear Engineering, NES 1-25, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA 2 Los Alamos National Lab, Los; published 19 January 2010) A new method of measuring fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy are necessary for accurate, detailed neutronics calculations for new

  7. Geophys. J. Int. (2002) 151, 501510 On the duration of seismic motion incident onto the Valley of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Kim Bak

    of Mexico for subduction zone earthquakes Nikolai M. Shapiro,1, Kim B. Olsen2 and Shri K. Singh1 1Deportamento de Sismolog´ia y Vulcanolog´ia, Instituto de Geof´isica, UNAM, CP 04510, M´exico, DF, M´exico 2 motion incident onto the Valley of Mexico for subduc- tion zone earthquakes. Our simulations suggest

  8. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C N

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory's environmental surveillance and radiological emergency vehicle and the Co-60 incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Etten, D.M.; Ahlquist, A.J.; Hansen, W.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4-wheel drive van has been outfitted at Los Alamos for environmental surveillance and radiological emergencies. The van's capabilities were described at this conference in 1982. The rapid gamma search and spectral analysis capabilities were utilized in conjunction with the cobalt-60 (/sup 60/Co) teletherapy source incident in Juarez, Mexico. Assistance was requested by the State of New Mexico (through DOE/Albuquerque Area Office) in January 1984 to perform initial in-situ isotopic identification of the contaminated steel that was first discovered in the United States by Los Alamos. The van's capabilities were again called upon in March 1984 to survey the New Mexico highways using the highly sensitive delta count rate monitoring system for /sup 60/Co pellets that may have been tracked into the state. This paper provides (1) setup and results of the surveys conducted with the van, (2) interactions with the press, and (3) an evaluation of the van's usefulness in such an emergency response. 2 references, 5 figures.

  10. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streelight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streelight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltage were beyond the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some do the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

  12. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

    1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

  13. Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare Guse, MS; Amy Schlo2hauer, MPH; Peter Layde, MD, MSc IntroducEon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare groups for both intenEonal opioid and non-opioid poisonings Opioid range: 6 and ICD -10 codes were used to divide poisoning incidents by agent (opioid vs

  14. CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes and probe, to produce a fourth, the anti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes diagram for the production of a CARS signal. The three incident waves pump, probe (both of frequency p) and Stokes (S) combine to produce an anti-Stokes signal, frequency as. Figure 2. Schematic of the CARS system

  15. DTERMINATION GRAPHIQUE DES COEFFICIENTS DE FRESNEL EN INCIDENCE OBLIQUE A LA SURFACE DE SPARATION D'UN MILIEU TRANSPARENT ET D'UN MILIEU ABSORBANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    294. DÉTERMINATION GRAPHIQUE DES COEFFICIENTS DE FRESNEL EN INCIDENCE OBLIQUE A LA SURFACE DE coefficients de Fresnel ainsi obtenus, on a également déterminé pour diverses incidences le facteur de. Cette précision atteint I/I000 en valeur relative pour les coefficients de Fresnel et quelques millièmes

  16. In the Beginning of Penderecki's Paradise Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Scott

    2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ;±#21; #19;#25; #25; #21; < #22;±#20; #19;#20;#21; #20;#20; #21; #22;±#21; #19;#20;#26; #20;#25; #21; #22;±#22; #19;#25;#26; #25;#20; #21; #23;±#20; #19;#20;#21;#22; #20;#20;#20; #21; #23;±#21; #19;#20;#21;#27; #20;#20;#25; #21; #23;±#22; #19;#20;#26;#27; #20;#25;#20...; #21; #23;±#23; #19;#20;#26;#25; #20;#25;H #20; < #23;±#24; #19;#25;#26;#27; #25;#20;#20; #21; #23;±#25; #19;#25;#26;#20; #25;#20;#25; #20; < #24;±#20; #19;#20;#21;#22;#23; #20;#20;#20;#20; #21; #24;±#21; #19;#20;#21;#22;#28; #20;#20;#20;#25; #21; #24;±#22...

  17. Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Railroads already own millions of environmental, analytical, and other records across a portfolio of sites to efficiently mine data for actionable information And, you can't manage what you can't measure 2014© Locus-based environmental data management software used by many organizations in Energy, Chemical, Mining, Agriculture

  18. Though Lost to Sight to Memory Dear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack [writer of accompanying material

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    you have started to receive them. Love [and] kisses. Jack; SENT TO: Mrs. J. P. Harrison; Cor. Ring [and] Wellington; Dundas; Ontario; Canada...

  19. ~ AND CORNELL 5 lost in Albertan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montello, Daniel R.

    told me how to avoid hitting the lung. ("Go in at a steep angle" she'd said. Stay right under the clavicle"), and how to find the subclavian vein, a branch of the vena cava lying atop the lung near its of anatomical 285 #12;286 HEGARTY ET AL. structures (e.g., the lungs), where they are located relative to each

  20. The Economics of a Lost Deal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , such as concrete ceilings or levies on carbon imports; "environmental restoration payments" to be made on excess emissions; and credits for sequestration activities in Annex B countries. It demonstrates, there would have been substantial room for compromise on payments of $35 to $100 per ton of carbon. Examining

  1. commentary / book review: Island Biogeography: Paradigm Lost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaney, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of colonization and extinction on species richness,  and zation  and  extinction  patterns,  based  on  species’ 

  2. Lost! The Social Psychology of Missing Possessions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Brandon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    necklaces 7. sunglasses/eyeglasses 8. bags/backpacks/week old prescription eyeglasses. “What kills me most is I

  3. The natural history of a lost sense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Siri Lefren

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an investigation of the vomeronasal organ, which senses pheromones. It traces the use of the organ in land-dwelling vertebrates, and suggests evidence that the organ is vestigial in humans and Old World ...

  4. The Lost Soul of the Body Politic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chupp, Jesse

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the conclusion, I suggest that the loss of a strongly organic conception of the state has denied modern society and political theory a well established means for incorporating corporate entities and for explaining the existence of the modern nation-state in any...

  5. Lost Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) Wind Farm Jump1 JumpBeachVientos

  6. Lost Lakes Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) Wind Farm Jump1

  7. REPORTING LOST, STOLEN, FORGOTTEN or UNRECOVERED BADGE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmart SensorsData - 2730-LSB

  8. THE FLAMMABILITY ANALYSIS AND TIME TO REACH LOWER FLAMMABILITY LIMIT CALCULATIONS ON THE WASTE EVAPORATION AT 242-A EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HU TA

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the analysis of the waste evaporation process on the flammability behavior. The evaluation calculates the gas generation rate, time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), and minimum ventilation rates for the 242-A Evaporator facility during the normal evaporation process and when vacuum is lost. This analysis performs flammability calculations on the waste currently within all 28 double-shell tanks (DST) under various evaporation process conditions to provide a wide spectrum of possible flammable gas behavior. The results of this analysis are used to support flammable gas control decisions and support and upgrade to Documented Safety Analysis for the 242-A Evaporator.

  9. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a Cu(100) projected band-gap surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbard, J A; Kohlhoff, M; Rennick, C J; So, E; Ford, M; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge transfer (ionization) of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number $n=25-34$) incident at a Cu(100) surface is investigated. Unlike fully metallic surfaces, where the Rydberg electron energy is degenerate with the conduction band of the metal, the Cu(100) surface has a projected bandgap at these energies, and only discrete image states are available through which charge transfer can take place. Resonant enhancement of charge transfer is observed at hydrogen principal quantum numbers for which the Rydberg energy matches the energy of one of the image states. The integrated surface ionization signals show clear periodicity as the energies of states with increasing $n$ come in and out of resonance with the image states. The velocity dependence of the surface ionization dynamics is also investigated. Decreased velocity of the incident H atom leads to a greater mean distance of ionization and a lower field required to extract the ion. The surface-ionization profiles (signal versus applied field) ...

  10. The incidence of burnout or compassion fatigue in medical dosimetrists as a function of various stress and psychologic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Michelle, E-mail: Mhoward24601@yahoo.com [University of Wisconsin—La Crosse, WI 54601 (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Burnout and compassion fatigue (CF) adversely affect medical professionals, including those employed in radiation oncology. Previously conducted research acknowledged the presence of burnout in populations of radiation therapists, radiation oncologists, and oncology nursing staff. The aim of the following research was to measure the incidence of burnout or CF in the specific population of medical dosimetrists surveyed. As professional members of the radiation oncology team, this group had not been included in published research data to date. The hypothesis of the subsequent study stated that a comparable incidence of burnout would be observed among medical dosimetrists as had been reported by earlier researchers for a population of radiation therapists. A survey tool based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and distributed to full members of the American Association of Medical Dosimetrists (AAMD) was utilized as the research measurement method. Results obtained indicated an incidence rates of burnout or CF for medical dosimetrists were less than the rates previously measured for radiation therapists (53% vs 11% for emotional exhaustion [EE] and 45% vs 27% for depersonalization [DP]). The incidence of burnout was based on the Burnout Inventory (BI) developed for the research project. Each of the subscales, EE, DP, and decreased personal accomplishment (PA), was considered and analyzed independently. Although not as prevalent among medical dosimetrists as a variety of additional radiation oncology professionals, a significant portion of the population demonstrated signs of burnout or CF. Future concerns abound for the population of medical dosimetrists as a large number of members scored positive for intermediate risk of burnout and CF. Additionally, a large portion of the population was found to be rapidly approaching retirement.

  11. Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND Abstract: The RESRAD-RDD code was developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT) to assist decision makers, emergency responders, and emergency preparedness planners for response to radiological dispersal device incidents (RDD). The RESRAD-RDD code was released as a companion software tool in 2009 to support the OGT Manual—Preliminary Report on Operational Guidelines Developed for Use in Emergency Preparedness and Response to a Radiological Dispersal Device Incident (DOE/HS-0001). The original RESRAD-RDD code was Microsoft Excel based software with the user interface written in Visual Basic. This version of RESRAD-RDD is being converted to a database driven software that runs on Windows 7 operating system in the .NET environment. The new RESRAD-RDD code is being tested to make sure it reproduces old code results. The new code runs faster than the old spreadsheets code by a factor of 10 or so, fewer clicks are required for the same calculations, operational guidelines can be easily located, and the reports can be written to PDFs instead of HTML. Additional radionuclides are also being added to the new RESRAD-RDD code. An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) scenario is also being added to the code and about 44 - 60 radionuclides will be added to handle IND incident. A new OGT Task Group is in the process of updating the OGT Manual and providing guidance on the development of the IND scenario and methodology. The new code, RESRAD-RDD&IND is expected to be released in early 2015. Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; Jing-Jy Cheng, Argonne National Laboratory; Sunita Kamboj, Argonne National Laboratory; David LePoire, Argonne National Laboratory; Paul Flood, Argonne National Laboratory

  12. Survey of historical incidences with Controls-Structures Interaction and recommended technology improvements needed to put hardware in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey for the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center. The purpose of the survey was to collect information documenting past incidences of problems with CSI during design, analysis, ground development, test and/or flight operation of space systems in industry. The survey was conducted to also compile recommended improvements in technology to support future needs for putting hardware into space. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Lightweight Time Modeling in Timed Creol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørk, Joakim; Owe, Olaf; Schlatte, Rudolf; 10.4204/EPTCS.36.4

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creol is an object-oriented modeling language in which inherently concurrent objects exchange asynchronous method calls. The operational semantics of Creol is written in an actor-based style, formulated in rewriting logic. The operational semantics yields a language interpreter in the Maude system, which can be used to analyze models. Recently, Creol has been applied to the modeling of systems with radio communication, such as sensor systems. With radio communication, messages expire and, if sent simultaneously, they may collide in the air. In order to capture these and other properties of distributed systems, we extended Creol's operational semantics with a notion of time. We exploit the framework of a language interpreter to use a lightweight notion of time, in contrast to that needed for a general purpose specification language. This paper presents a timed extension of Creol, including the semantics and the implementation strategy, and discusses its properties using an extended example. The approach can be...

  14. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  15. Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media Brian E. Anderson,1,2,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    16 July 2009 An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging

  16. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  17. The incidence of tropheryma whipplei in the population of the Brazos Valley region of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Anna Lavonne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    endocarditis can occur (6,8). In the original report, Whipple noted a chronic cough associated with a yellowish expectoration (22). The cough severity varied with climate and weather and the 5 expectoration was most abundant in the morning. Since that time... 30- 40% of patients experience this chronic cough sometimes characterized by chest pain and dyspnea (3). Central nervous system symptoms rarely occur, but lesions in the brain and spinal cord are found in the majority of patients during postmortem...

  18. AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORBERS ALONG GAMMA-RAY BURST SIGHT LINES: THE END OF THE MYSTERY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucchiara, A.

    In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along ...

  19. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  20. Manage Your Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lynn

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    , you expect unused time to come around again, so that when the same opportunities appear you will be wiser about how to use it. Consider how your cultural background af_fects the w ay you plan and manage time. W *Both cited in Bauer, J. It?s Time.... Effective time management means decid- ing which activity should be done from all the possibilities available, and then doing it. It is a matter of setting priorities. Deciding which jobs are most important and working on those may be better than doing less...

  1. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyo Eyo Ita III; Chopin Soo; Hoi-Lai Yu

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  2. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ita, Eyo Eyo; Yu, Hoi-Lai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental canonical commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  3. Developing Improved Travel Time Reliability Measures For Real-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    reliability Use for prioritizing improvements Outline #12; 95th Percentile Travel Time Travel Time Index: mean travel time divided by free flow travel time Buffer Index: difference between 95th percentile travel time and mean travel time, divided by mean travel time Planning Time Index: 95th percentile

  4. The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Dean Roger

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the genital tract was correct for prediction of infection, based on histological presence or absence of inflammatory changes in the endometrium in 68/a of these 153 cases. Wingfield-Digby and Ricketts (1982) showed that bacteriological findings were...-Digby 1978). Wingfield- Digby and Ricketts (1982) showed that uterine bacteriological culture growth correlated with cytological findings 55% of the time. Using the bacteriological criteria of Rickeus (1981)th t lyp lt f~St ~id, E. h ' h' EKE Kl hill p 1...

  5. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  6. Investigation of Incident at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant by Technical Assessment Team

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturing |Time-Based International08Investigation

  7. Incident Case Study Friday, December Incident description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Gregory

    nitric acid into the waste container, capped the container, closed the fume hood glass, and walked away of the fume hood glass were severely damaged, glass shards were scattered throughout the hood the waste bottle container while it was reacting. The volumes of both liquids were relatively small compared

  8. Probabilistic time-series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roweis, Sam

    SCIA 2003 Tutorial: Hidden Markov Models Sam Roweis, University of Toronto June 29, 2003 Probabilistic Generative Models for Time Series #15; Stochastic models for time-series: y 1 ; y 2 ; : : : ; y #15; Add noise to make the system stochastic: p(y t jy t 1 ;y t 2 ; : : : ;y t k ) #15; Markov models

  9. Is Time Inhomogeneous ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Davood Sadatian

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss probability of inhomogeneous time in high or low energy scale of physics. Consequently, the possibility was investigated of using theories such as varying speed of light (VSL) and fractal mathematics to build a framework within which answers can be found to some of standard cosmological problems and physics theories on the basis of time non-homogeneity.

  10. The Measurement of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Boyarsky; P Gora

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a definition of time measurement based on high energy photons and the fundamental length scale, and show that, for macroscopic time, it is in accord with the Lorentz transformation of special relativity. To do this we define observer in a different way than in special relativity.

  11. Emergence of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Heller; W. Sasin

    1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the groupoid approach to noncommutative quantization of gravity, gravitational field is quantized in terms of a C*-algebra A of complex valued funcions on a groupoid G (with convolution as multiplication). In the noncommutative quantum gravitational regime the concepts of space and time are meaningless. We study the "emergence of time" in the transition process from the noncommutative regime to the standard space-time geometry. Precise conditions are specified under which modular groups of the von Neumann algebra generated by A can be defined. These groups are interpreted as a state depending time flow. If the above conditions are further refined one obtains a state independent time flow. We show that quantum gravitational dynamics can be expressed in terms of modular groups.

  12. Incident IR Bandwidth Effects on Efficiency and Shaping for Third Harmonic Generation of Quasi-Rectangular UV Longitudinal Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The photocathode of the proposed LCLS RF Photoinjector will be irradiated by uv laser light which is generated as the third harmonic of incident fundamental ir laser light. We have investigated quantitatively the effect of input ir spectral bandwidth on the exiting longitudinal intensity profiles, energy conversion efficiencies and spectral bandwidths that characterize the third harmonic generation (THG) process with a pair of crystals. These profiles, efficiencies and bandwidths include the residual fundamental and residual second harmonic light exiting the second crystal. The intrinsic acceptance bandwidth for THG is determined by crystal material and thickness as well as the type of phase matching that is used. For our case of BBO material with type I phase matching these bandwidths are approximately 0.9 nm*cm and 0.1 nm*cm for second and third harmonic generation respectively. Consequently for fixed crystal thicknesses and a fixed input ir longitudinal profile, the specified input ir bandwidth will determine the profiles, efficiencies and bandwidths exiting the second crystal. The results reported here are predictions of the SNLO code that is available as 'freeware' from the Sandia National Laboratories. It has been modified for this work. It is critical to note that this modification has enabled us to generate SNLO predictions of the 'coupled' case in which the output of the first crystal is used as input to the second crystal. Our focus is the dependence of uv longitudinal intensity profile and THG efficiency on the input ir bandwidth and crystal thicknesses. We include here cases that best illustrate input bandwidth effects. The criteria for selection of reported cases are highest efficiency generation of quasi-rectangular uv profiles with proportional intensity ripple less than 5% rms on the plateau of the pulse. Maximizing THG efficiency typically amounts to maximizing the crystal thicknesses with the longitudinal profile constraint. The specified incident ir longitudinal profile is quasi-rectangular (i.e. nonzero risetime and falltime with small intensity variation on the plateau) with a 10 psec pulse duration (FWHM). By assumption, this profile has been established upstream of the crystals at the fundamental ir wavelength. The simplest possible optical configuration is used in this work as shown in figure 1. The first crystal is the site of second harmonic generation (SHG) driven by the incident ir irradiation of central wavelength, 800nm. Downstream of the first crystal, the second crystal is the site of third harmonic generation (THG) which occurs by sum frequency mixing. Inter-crystal optics (such as a half waveplate) are assumed to be lossless at the fundamental and second harmonic wavelengths. As shown in figure 1, a portion of the incident ir irradiation is not sequestered from the first crystal for subsequent THG in the second crystal. Also, quasi-phase matching configurations and other complex compensation schemes have not been investigated at this point. The simplistic geometry better elucidates the intrinsic acceptance bandwidth limitations imposed by the crystals. Our goal in this endeavor has been to conduct a quantitative assessment of incident ir bandwidth effects on the THG process for BBO material of varied thicknesses and not, at this stage, to comply with all uv pulse specifications for the LCLS RF Photoinjector. Nonetheless, our results can be compared with LCLS photoinjector uv pulse requirements which call for a nominal 10 psec FWHM with 1 psec risetime and falltime and a nominally flat plateau (allowing for slope adjustments) with no more than a 5% rms proportional intensity variation. Furthermore, the results of this work can be used to suggest crystal thicknesses that would likely comply with all uv pulse requirements given the appropriate longitudinal profile and bandwidth for an input ir pulse.

  13. Time exposure performance of Mo-Au Gibbsian segregating alloys for extreme ultraviolet collector optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu Huatan; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Thompson, Keith C.; Neumann, Martin J.; Ruzic, David N

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful implementation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography depends on research and progress toward minimizing collector optics degradation from intense plasma erosion and debris deposition. Thus studying the surface degradation process and implementing innovative methods, which could enhance the surface chemistry causing the mirrors to suffer less damage, is crucial for this technology development. A Mo-Au Gibbsian segregation (GS) alloy is deposited on Si using a dc dual-magnetron cosputtering system and the damage is investigated as a result of time dependent exposure in an EUV source. A thin Au segregating layer is maintained through segregation during exposure, even though overall erosion in the Mo-Au sample is taking place in the bulk. The reflective material, Mo, underneath the segregating layer is protected by this sacrificial layer, which is lost due to preferential sputtering. In addition to theoretical work, experimental results are presented on the effectiveness of the GS alloys to be used as potential EUV collector optics material.

  14. Lost Old Members 1950-present day We have lost touch with these Old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    George Gerald Newton 1948 Revd Ian Morton Lowery 1948 Mr David Katin 1948 Mr James Michael Mills Hughes Dr Edward Marcus Swannie 1949 Mr William Hughes Tewell 1949 Revd Edward Stevens 1949 Mr Michael 1949 Mr Hakon Nord 1949 Mr Ronald Frank Moody 1949 Mr Thomas Henry Brian Baker 1949 Mr Eric Joseph

  15. Time, energy & form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnis, Martha Jane

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

  16. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  17. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  18. Edge effects, not connectivity, determine the incidence and development of a foliar fungal plant disease.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brenda, L.; Haddad, Nick, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a model plant-pathogen system in a large-scale habitat corridor experiment, we found that corridors do not facilitate the movement of wind-dispersed plant pathogens, that connectivity of patches does not enhance levels of foliar fungal plant disease, and that edge effects are the key drivers of plant disease dynamics. Increased spread of infectious disease is often cited as a potential negative effect of habitat corridors used in conservation, but the impacts of corridors on pathogen movement have never been tested empirically. Using sweet corn (Zea mays) and southern corn leaf blight (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) as a model plant-pathogen system, we tested the impacts of connectivity and habitat fragmentation on pathogen movement and disease development at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA. Over time, less edgy patches had higher proportions of diseased plants, and distance of host plants to habitat edges was the greatest determinant of disease development. Variation in average daytime temperatures provided a possible mechanism for these disease patterns. Our results show that worries over the potentially harmful effects of conservation corridors on disease dynamics are misplaced, and that, in a conservation context, many diseases can be better managed by mitigating edge effects.

  19. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Bock, Robert Eldon [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  20. Investigation of the spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, Simon C. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Holy, Vaclav (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic); Reno, John Louis; Krause, B. (ESRF, Grenoble, France); Norman, Andrew G. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Mikulik, P. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Caha, O. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Mascarenhas, Angelo (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

  1. Finding clusters of similar events within clinical incident reports: a novel methodology combining case based reasoning and information retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsatsoulis, Costas; Amthauer, Heather A.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ....................... Correspondence to: Dr C Tsatsoulis, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA; tsatsoul@ittc.ku.edu ....................... O ne of the goals of incident reporting systems is to allow their users to discover trends, identify patterns of organizational... be retrieved even if it shares only a few terms. ii26 Tsatsoulis, Amthauer www.qshc.com on 14 February 2007 qshc.bmj.comDownloaded from K53K65K63K74K69K6FK6E K41K96K44K69K73K63K6FK76K65K72K79 K49K6EK66K6FK72K6DK61K74K69K6FK6E K31K2E K52K65K70K6FK72K74 K64K61K...

  2. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Å to above 300 Å. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 ?m wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Å above 100 Å, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  3. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  4. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xian-Rong, E-mail: xiahuang@aps.anl.gov; Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Siddons, D. P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  5. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persinger, M.A.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

  6. Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

  7. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  8. Bootstrapping Time Dilation Decoherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisco Gooding; William G. Unruh

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general relativistic model of a spherical shell of matter with a perfect fluid on its surface coupled to an internal oscillator, which generalizes a model recently introduced by the authors to construct a self-gravitating interferometer [1]. The internal oscillator evolution is defined with respect to the local proper time of the shell, allowing the oscillator to serve as a local clock that ticks differently depending on the shell's position and momentum. A Hamiltonian reduction is performed on the system, and an approximate quantum description is given to the reduced phase space. If we focus only on the external dynamics, we must trace out the clock degree of freedom, and this results in a form of intrinsic decoherence that shares some features with a proposed "universal" decoherence mechanism attributed to gravitational time dilation [2]. We show that the proposed decoherence remains present in the (gravity-free) limit of flat spacetime, indicating that the effect can be attributed entirely to proper time differences, and thus is not necessarily related to gravity. Finally, we point out a way to bootstrap the gravitational contribution to the time dilation decoherence by including self-interaction, and comment on how this can be considered a fundamentally gravitational intrinsic decoherence effect.

  9. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  10. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  11. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  12. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent for a random Ehrenfest gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjay Moudgalya; Sarthak Chandra; Sudhir R. Jain

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the motion of a system of free particles moving in a plane with hard scatterers of regular polygonal shape arranged in a random manner. Calling this the Ehrenfest gas which is known to be pseudo-integrable, we propose a finite-time Lyapunov exponent characterizing the dynamics. In the limit of large number of vertices, where polygon tends to a circle, we recover the Lyapunov exponent for the Lorentz gas. To obtain this result, we generalized the reflection law of a pencil of rays incident on a polygonal scatterer in a way that the formula for the circular scatterer is recovered in the limit of infinite vertices. Thus, seemingly paradoxically, chaos seems to emerge from pseudo-chaos.

  13. I became interested in the issue of landscape response to fire in a very direct and personal way. My wife, Blythe Mickelson, and I were victims of the Oakland Firestorm. We lost our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, William

    (synthetics melt and can easily be ignited), and we left our home carrying nothing but the clothes on our, while others predicted "massive mud and landslides" due to fire developed hydrophobicity (San Francisco and mud could easily be loosened by heavy rain and pour onto homes at lower elevations (Los Angeles Times

  14. Genepool Time Heatmaps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene Controls FloweringJavaGenepool Time

  15. Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant of threats that result in damages leading to increased laser absorption, beam quality degradation and reduced

  16. Auklet (Charadriiformes: Alcidae, Aethia spp.) chick meals from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, have a very low incidence of plastic marine debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    , have a very low incidence of plastic marine debris Alexander L. Bond a,*, Ian L. Jones a , Jeffrey C t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Plastic Marine debris North Pacific Ocean Auklet Aethia Aleutian Islands a b s t r a c t The ingestion of plastic marine debris is a chronic problem for some of the world

  17. U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant Incident; U.S. Monitoring Control Strategy Explained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant about radiation contamination from the Japanese nuclear power plant incident and on the control potential routes by which seafood contaminated with radionuclides from the Japanese nuclear power plant

  18. Degraded Modes and the `Culture of Coping' in Military Operations: An Analysis of a Fatal Incident On-Board HMS Tireless on 20/21 March 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    was following Standard operating Procedures (SOPs) using Self Contained Oxygen Generators (SCOGs) to maintain and operators must work together to ensure that maintenance intervals are scheduled so that critical componentsDegraded Modes and the `Culture of Coping' in Military Operations: An Analysis of a Fatal Incident

  19. The Cost of Policing Security Incidents on the Central VAX Clusters Breaches of security on the central VAX clusters (VXCERN and VXENG) come to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    The Cost of Policing Security Incidents on the Central VAX Clusters Breaches of security on the central VAX clusters (VXCERN and VXENG) come to the attention of the support staff at approximately a rate unpleasant attack that was made on VAXes not just in the CERN Computer Centre, but across the CERN site

  20. {sup 6}Li({pi}{sup +}, {ital pp}){sup 4}He{sub g.s.} reaction at 100 and 165 MeV incident pion energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papandreou, Z.; Huber, G.; Lolos, G.; Cormier, J.; Mathie, E.; Naqvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Ottewell, D.; Tacik, R.; Walden, P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Jones, G.; Trelle, R. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada); Aslanoglou, X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Humphrey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential and total cross sections for {pi}{sup +} absorption on {sup 6}Li leading to the {ital pp}+{sup 4}He{sub g.s} final state are presented at incident pion energies of 100 and 165 MeV. The narrow width of the {ital pp} angular correlation is observed and reported.

  1. Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

  2. A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

  3. Enterprise Incidents Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be trusted; Vulcans were known for their loyalty - they held disloyalty in total abhorrance, he knew; and was convinced that with his luck, he'd strike the one Vulcan Hho .!:@& capable of disloyalty ... anyway, Spock was half Human, and NcCoy certainly...

  4. Enterprise Incidents Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Captain? I am a Commander nov.!,,11 Kirk bO'ded his head in apology. "Hy mistake, Commander Koloth." I'iThank you" shields up, and, I NoVl, before Vie go any further, may I enquire Vlhy you have your presume, your men at battle stations? I merely...." lIe coulel hear the worry in his captain's voice as Kirk replied to his report. "Okay 0 Carry on as :you are, Scott Yo Turn ber inside out if you have too" "I'm practically doin' He looked back to his men, hurry up? man! I'! that noVl, ""li...

  5. Enterprise Incidents Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I'G"i.od, that would have boen just r. littlo too muoh for him. He snt nt thu Vulcan I s side ag8.in just e.s Nanr.the 00.00 entrance. Her robo soomed to glow in tho filtered light of Kirk frowned 38 he saw her eyos. Woron't thoy groy bofore? bluCl, ovon bluor than... anything to gi vo us a cluo!" "Ayo, sir - I'll tak' it tao bits if I hav0 tao!" IIThank8, Scotty, II grinned Kirk. Ho walked over to the entrance. "lKeanvihilo, Illl havo another word with our onigmatic quoen." HOWOV0r~ }7anatho was noy/hore to bo so"en...

  6. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:DepartmentDepartment of EnergyEnergy JohnExcel12/17/1998NOT

  7. Bootstrapping Time Dilation Decoherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gooding, Cisco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general relativistic model of a spherical shell of matter with a perfect fluid on its surface coupled to an internal oscillator, which generalizes a model recently introduced by the authors to construct a self-gravitating interferometer [1]. The internal oscillator evolution is defined with respect to the local proper time of the shell, allowing the oscillator to serve as a local clock that ticks differently depending on the shell's position and momentum. A Hamiltonian reduction is performed on the system, and an approximate quantum description is given to the reduced phase space. If we focus only on the external dynamics, we must trace out the clock degree of freedom, and this results in a form of intrinsic decoherence that shares some features with a proposed "universal" decoherence mechanism attributed to gravitational time dilation [2]. We show that the proposed decoherence remains present in the (gravity-free) limit of flat spacetime, indicating that the effect can be attributed entirely to ...

  8. HAWC Timing Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huentemeyer, Petra; Dingus, Brenda

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Experiment is a second-generation highsensitivity gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector that builds on the experience and technology of the Milagro observatory. Like Milagro, HAWC utilizes the water Cherenkov technique to measure extensive air showers. Instead of a pond filled with water (as in Milagro) an array of closely packed water tanks is used. The event direction will be reconstructed using the times when the PMTs in each tank are triggered. Therefore, the timing calibration will be crucial for reaching an angular resolution as low as 0.25 degrees.We propose to use a laser calibration system, patterned after the calibration system in Milagro. Like Milagro, the HAWC optical calibration system will use ~1 ns laser light pulses. Unlike Milagro, the PMTs are optically isolated and require their own optical fiber calibration. For HAWC the laser light pulses will be directed through a series of optical fan-outs and fibers to illuminate the PMTs in approximately one half o...

  9. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 162 Fall 2001. Date: Wednesday December 12, 2001. Time: 7:00 pm -9:00 pm. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  10. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 161 Fall 2001. Date: Friday December 14, 2001. Time: 8:00 am -10:00 am. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  11. Deciding Timed Bisimulation for Timed Automata Using Zone Valuation Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Sanjiva

    Deciding Timed Bisimulation for Timed Automata Using Zone Valuation Graph Shibashis Guha, Chinmay was first proved to be decidable for timed automata by Cerans using a product construction method on region graph. Several other methods have been proposed in the literature since then for decid- ing timed

  12. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  13. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, Karl M. (Minneapolis, MN); Fundakowski, Richard A. (Saint Paul, MN); Levitt, Tod S. (Minneapolis, MN); Overland, John E. (Plymouth, MN); Suresh, Bindinganavle R. (New Brighton, MN); Ulrich, Franz W. (Minneapolis, MN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges are segmented out by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections.

  14. Grazing incidence angle based sensing approach integrated with fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for remote and label-free detection of medical device contaminations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Moinuddin, E-mail: moinuddin.hassan@fda.hhs.gov; Ilev, Ilko [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Division of Biomedical Physics, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of medical devices has become a critical and prevalent public health safety concern since medical devices are being increasingly used in clinical practices for diagnostics, therapeutics and medical implants. The development of effective sensing methods for real-time detection of pathogenic contamination is needed to prevent and reduce the spread of infections to patients and the healthcare community. In this study, a hollow-core fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methodology employing a grazing incidence angle based sensing approach (FO-FTIR-GIA) was developed for detection of various biochemical contaminants on medical device surfaces. We demonstrated the sensitivity of FO-FTIR-GIA sensing approach for non-contact and label-free detection of contaminants such as lipopolysaccharide from various surface materials relevant to medical device. The proposed sensing system can detect at a minimum loading concentration of approximately 0.7 ?g/cm{sup 2}. The FO-FTIR-GIA has the potential for the detection of unwanted pathogen in real time.

  15. Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved

  16. Borehole stability analysis at the Coporo-1 well, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Henry

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technically and economically challenging. Shear failures in shales caused frequent pack-off, stuck pipe, reaming, and back reaming. Tensile failures in sands generated lost-circulation incidents. Log-derived mechanical properties, leak-off test and lost...

  17. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine?, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon-#12;fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning a timing-belt based hydroEngine ?powertrain: 1. Can a belt handle the high torques and power loads demanded by the SLH? (Yes.) 2. Can the SLH blades be mounted to belt with a connection that can withstand the loads encountered in operation? (Yes.) 3. Can the belt, with blade attachments, live through the required cyclic loading? (Yes.) The research adds to the general understanding of sustainable small hydropower systems by using innovative system testing to develop and demonstrate performance of a novel powertrain solution, enabling a new type of hydroelectric turbine to be commercially developed. The technical effectiveness of the methods investigated has been shown to be positive through an extensive design and testing process accommodating many constraints and goals, with a major emphasis on high cycle fatigue life. Economic feasibility of the innovations has been demonstrated through many iterations of design for manufacturability and cost reduction. The project is of benefit to the public because it has helped to develop a solution to a major problem -- despite the large available potential for new low-head hydropower, high capital costs and high levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) continue to be major barriers to project development. The hydroEngine? represents a significant innovation, leveraging novel fluid mechanics and mechanical configuration to allow lower-cost turbine manufacture and development of low head hydropower resources.

  18. Turbo Space-Time Codes with Time Varying Linear Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    1 Turbo Space-Time Codes with Time Varying Linear Transformations Hangjun Chen and Alexander 07102 Email: {hangjun.chen; alexander.m.haimovich}@njit.edu Abstract Turbo space-time codes with symbols in this paper. It is shown that turbo codes with TVLT achieve full diversity gain and do not require exhaustive

  19. Scalable boson-sampling with time-bin encoding using a loop-based architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith R. Motes; Alexei Gilchrist; Jonathan P. Dowling; Peter P. Rohde

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an architecture for arbitrarily scalable boson-sampling using two nested fiber loops. The architecture has fixed experimental complexity, irrespective of the size of the desired interferometer, whose scale is limited only by fiber and switch loss rates. The architecture employs time-bin encoding, whereby the incident photons form a pulse train, which enters the loops. Dynamically controlled loop coupling ratios allow the construction of the arbitrary linear optics interferometers required for boson-sampling. The architecture employs only a single point of interference and may thus be easier to stabilize than other approaches. The scheme has polynomial complexity and could be realized using demonstrated present-day technologies.

  20. Hopf bifurcations in time-delay systems with band-limited feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Illing; Daniel J. Gauthier

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the steady-state solution and its bifurcations in time-delay systems with band-limited feedback. This is a first step in a rigorous study concerning the effects of AC-coupled components in nonlinear devices with time-delayed feedback. We show that the steady state is globally stable for small feedback gain and that local stability is lost, generically, through a Hopf bifurcation for larger feedback gain. We provide simple criteria that determine whether the Hopf bifurcation is supercritical or subcritical based on the knowledge of the first three terms in the Taylor-expansion of the nonlinearity. Furthermore, the presence of double-Hopf bifurcations of the steady state is shown, which indicates possible quasiperiodic and chaotic dynamics in these systems. As a result of this investigation, we find that AC-coupling introduces fundamental differences to systems of Ikeda-type [Ikeda et al., Physica D 29 (1987) 223-235] already at the level of steady-state bifurcations, e.g. bifurcations exist in which limit cycles are created with periods other than the fundamental ``period-2'' mode found in Ikeda-type systems.

  1. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: Zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased, number of skin cancers in the EBRT patients compared with that of the general population.

  2. The LCLS Timing Event System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

  3. Timing Calibration in PET Using a Time Alignment Probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, William W.; Thompson, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    when the two sets of calibration factors are loaded into theare equivalent. Inde, .er/#—calibration, positron emissionB. Conventional Time-Delay Calibration Method 4> >,? '- -'#$

  4. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  5. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  6. ExperTime: Tracking Expertise over Time Norwegian University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    ExperTime: Tracking Expertise over Time Jan Rybak Norwegian University of Science and Technology Norwegian University of Science and Technology kjetil.norvag@idi.ntnu.no ABSTRACT This paper presents Exper 6­11, 2014, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. ACM 978-1-4503-2257-7/14/07. http://dx.doi.org/10

  7. IT'S ABOUT TIME Characteristic times in biogeochemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    , and then It falls to earth: Can you tell me when? Decision making on energy and climate change #12;Impulse responseIT'S ABOUT TIME Characteristic times in biogeochemistry and climate Stephen E. Schwartz Symposium on biogeochemical cycling and climate In honor of Henning Rodhe on the occasion of his retirement from the chair

  8. Real-Time Control with Parametric Timed Reachability Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    for which the existence of a parameter valuation, such that there is a strategy for the controller to reach set of parameter valuations. Keywords: Timed automata, game theory, parameters, control, verification, model-checking 1. INTRODUCTION Formal methods are widely used in the analysis of time critical systems

  9. Copyright 2005 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London, England)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 2005 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London, England) July 11, 2005 Monday London Edition 1 SECTION: COMMENT; Pg. 19 LENGTH: 922 words HEADLINE: Hope and generosity can triumph, nudged the world closer to this prospect. With the backdrop of the bombs in London, the Gleneagles

  10. Time Structure of Muonic Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cazon; R. A. Vazquez; A. A. Watson; E. Zas

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical description of the time structure of the pulses induced by muons in air showers at ground level is deduced assuming the production distance distribution for the muons can be obtained elsewhere. The results of this description are compared against those obtained from simulated showers using AIRES. Major contributions to muon time delays are identified and a relation between the time structure and the depth distribution is unveiled.

  11. Quantum Gravity, the Origin of Time and Time's Arrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1992-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The local Lorentz and diffeomorphism symmetries of Einstein's gravitational theory are spontaneously broken by a Higgs mechanism by invoking a phase transition in the early Universe, at a critical temperature $T_c$ below which the symmetry is restored. The spontaneous breakdown of the vacuum state generates an external time and the wave function of the Universe satisfies a time dependent Schrodinger equation, which reduces to the Wheeler-deWitt equation in the classical regime for $T T_c$ and matter is created fractions of seconds after the big bang, generating the matter in the Universe. The time direction of the vacuum expectation value of the scalar Higgs field generates a time asymmetry, which defines the cosmological arrow of time and the direction of increasing entropy as the Lorentz symmetry is restored at low temperatures.

  12. Subsystem real-time Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the extension of Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) theory to real-time Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (rt-TDDFT). FDE a is DFT-in-DFT embedding method that allows to partition a larger Kohn-Sham system into a set of smaller, coupled Kohn-Sham systems. Additional to the computational advantage, FDE provides physical insight into the properties of embedded systems and the coupling interactions between them. The extension to rt-TDDFT is done straightforwardly by evolving the Kohn-Sham subsystems in time simultaneously, while updating the embedding potential between the systems at every time step. Two main applications are presented: the explicit excitation energy transfer in real time between subsystems is demonstrated for the case of the Na$_4$ cluster and the effect of the embedding on optical spectra of coupled chromophores. In particular, the importance of including the full dynamic response in the embedding potential is demonstrated.

  13. Resource Allocation with Time Intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: resource allocation, proper intervals, unsplittable flow ... be positioned within a larger time interval) and call admission control, see [4] and [8] for ...

  14. Effort, memory, attention and time : paths to more effective personal information management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Kleek, Max, 1980-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the widespread availability of digital tools for storing, accessing, and sharing information, why is so much information still lost, forgotten, or kept on paper? The work in this thesis finds that such disorganization ...

  15. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

  16. eFRMAC Overview: Data Management and Enabling Technologies for Characterization of a Radiological Release A Case Study: The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J. [NNSA; Clark, Harvey W. [NSTec; Essex, James J. [NSTec; Wagner, Eric C. [NSTec

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eFRMAC enterprise is a suite of technologies and software developed by the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Emergency Response to coordinate the rapid data collection, management, and analysis required during a radiological emergency. This enables the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center assets to evaluate a radiological or nuclear incident efficiently to facilitate protective actions to protect public health and the environment. This document identifies and describes eFRMAC methods including (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data analysis, (4) product creation, (5) quality control, and (6) dissemination.

  17. Electric Time in Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephon Alexander; Martin Bojowald; Antonino Marciano; David Simpson

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum cosmology is formulated with a realistic global internal time given by the electric vector potential. New possibilities for the quantum behavior of space-time are found, and the high-density regime is shown to be very sensitive to the specific form of state realized.

  18. Time Management Top 50 Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , weekly and term goals in order of priority and work on top priorities. 2. Prioritize each task based-schedule yourself. 14. Get sleep, exercise and relaxation to keep your energy up. 15. Figure out your peak times of day for energy and do difficult tasks (e.g., studying) during that time. 16. Do the most difficult

  19. STARBASE: MANAGING CONTENTION AND TIMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    systems (RT­DBMS) has primarily based on simulation. This chapter discusses how current real­time technology has been applied to architect an actual RT­DBMS on a real­time microkernel operating system. A real RT­DBMS must confront many practical issues which simulations typically ignore: race conditions

  20. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  1. Time Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    malicious attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel signature model ­ Time Valid One-Time Signature (TV perfect tolerance to packet loss and strong robustness against malicious attacks. The communication is found in current substation communication systems where critical messages related to transient faults (e

  2. Distinct changes of genomic biases in nucleotide substitution at the time of mammalian radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter F. Arndt; Dmitri A. Petrov; Terence Hwa

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in the regional substitution patterns in the human genome created patterns of large-scale variation of base composition known as genomic isochores. To gain insight into the origin of the genomic isochores we develop a maximum likelihood approach to determine the history of substitution patterns in the human genome. This approach utilizes the vast amount of repetitive sequence deposited in the human genome over the past ~250 MYR. Using this approach we estimate the frequencies of seven types of substitutions: the four transversions, two transitions, and the methyl-assisted transition of cytosine in CpG. Comparing substitutional patterns in repetitive elements of various ages, we reconstruct the history of the base-substitutional process in the different isochores for the past 250 Myr. At around 90 Myr ago (around the time of the mammalian radiation), we find an abrupt 4- to 8-fold increase of the cytosine transition rate in CpG pairs compared to that of the reptilian ancestor. Further analysis of nucleotide substitutions in regions with different GC-content reveals concurrent changes in the substitutional patterns. While the substitutional pattern was dependent on the regional GC-content in such ways that it preserved the regional GC-content before the mammalian radiation, it lost this dependence afterwards. The substitutional pattern changed from an isochore-preserving to an isochore-degrading one. We conclude that isochores have been established before the radiation of the eutherian mammals and have been subject to the process of homogenization since then.

  3. Contacts of space--times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maia, M.D.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of contact between manifolds is applied to space--times of general relativity. For a given background space--time a contact approximation of second order is defined and interpreted both from the point of view of a metric pertubation and of a higher order tangent manifold. In the first case, an application to the high frequency gravitational wave hypothesis is suggested. In the second case, a constant curvature tangent bundle is constructed and suggested as a means to define a ten parameter local space--time symmetry.

  4. Evolution Of Surface Topography On GaAs(100) And GaAs(111) At Normal And Oblique Incidence Of Ar{sup +}-Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venugopal, V.; Basu, T.; Garg, S.; Majumder, S.; Sarangi, S. N.; Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Das, P.; Bhattacharyya, S. R.; Chini, T. K. [Surface Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale surface structures emerging from medium energy (50-60 keV)Ar{sup +}-ion sputtering of p-type GaAs(100) and semi-insulating GaAs(111) substrates have been investigated. For normally incident 50 keV Ar{sup +}-ions of fluence 1x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} on GaAs(100) and GaAs(111) features in the form of nanoscale pits/holes without short range ordering are observed with densities 5.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2} and 5.9x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}, respectively along with irregularly shaped patches of islands. For GaAs(111) on increasing the influence to 5x10{sup 17} /cm{sup 2} the pit density increases marginally to 6.2x10{sup 9} /cm{sup 2}. For 60 deg. off-normal incidence of 60 keV Ar.{sup +}-ions of fluence 2x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} on GaAs(100) microscale wavelike surface topography is observed. In all cases well-defined nanodots are absent on the surface.

  5. Time Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Unruh

    1993-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Time plays different roles in quantum mechanics and gravity. These roles are examined and the problems that the conflict in the roles presents for quantum gravity are briefly summarised.

  6. TIME-DEPENDENT MAXWELL'S EQUATIONS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716. (monklath.udel. ... The plan of the paperis as follows. In 2 we .... which states that the energy in the discrete system is independent of time. This energy ...

  7. Jaguar/Kraken time lapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Time lapse video of the upgrade to ORNL's Jaguar and the University of Tennessee's Kraken, the world's fastest and third-fastest supercomputers. For more information, please visit www.nccs.gov.

  8. TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    MASTER CON TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970 ADVANCE REGISTRATION NOVEMBER 3-21 IN, please leave it or pass it along so that other students may use it. #12;Winter Quarter 1970. Examination

  9. Lost in a Transmedia Storytelling Franchise: Rethinking Transmedia Engagement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Michael

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Press, 2007), 4-5. 19 Michael Jordan Clarke, “Tentpole TV: The Business and Culture of Transmedia in Network Television” (PhD diss., University of California, 2010), 11-12. 20 Eli M. Noam defines synergies as “the ability to create cross...

  10. advanced lost foam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been obtained using hydroxyl fatty acids tubes. The stabilization results from the adsorption of monomers at the air-water interface preventing coalescence and coarsening...

  11. Vale: Roger Charles LETHBRIDGE WE have lost Roger Charles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , during his halcyon days as PVC (Development) and PVC (Academic) are really about bricks and mortar, about

  12. arm protein lost: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    correction through different approaches. We evaluate these techniques underlining pros and cons of their usage in different control conditions by analyzing the results of...

  13. Geophysical Mapping of Lost Historical Sites: Brenham, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Charles

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    summer. And to my bros who were always ready to slash it; Tate Meehan, Tim de Smet, and Leo Keeler. 3 NOMENCLATURE MAG Magnetics EMI Electromagnetic Induction GPR Ground Penetrating Radar s Seconds m Meters – measurement... the south-west corner of the grid Figure 8 - Charles Stanford measuring the south-east grid corner 12 Figure 9 - Tim De Smet and Leo Keeler measuring the north-east grid corner Data acquisition All three geophysical techniques were...

  14. Phaeacian Dido: Lost Pleasures of an Epicurean Intertext

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Pamela

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Eratosthenes (ca. 285-194), who succeeded Apollonius Rhodius as head of the library at Alexandria, quoted by Athenaeus Deipnosophistae 1.16e. 2. For Virgilian citations and bibliography see Pease 1935 and Dyson 1996. © 1 9 9 8 BY THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY....5-11) as an Epicurean manifesto. Odysseus delivers his famous declaration, of course, at the Phaeacian banquet soon after his rescue by the princess Nausikaa. After years of war, and years of wandering through inhuman realms Odysseus declares: ou yap Y £ cPr)(jlL...

  15. No American Miltons: Melville, Zukofsky, and America's Lost Epic Tradition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Timothy Clayton

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Penn. ? Melville the Poet. ? Selected Essays of Robert PennMelville The Making of the Poet. Evanston, Illinois:thanks. But then, as the poets remind us, it is due to these

  16. How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brion, Sebastien

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    while most accounts of power loss focus on ethical breachesPower Loss .1. Proposed Model of Power Loss Figure 2. Social Monitoring

  17. Reconstructing top quark-antiquark events with one lost jet

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demina, Regina [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Harel, Amnon [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Orbaker, Douglas [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a technique for reconstructing the kinematics of pair-produced top quarks that decay to a charged lepton, a neutrino and four final state quarks in the subset of events where only three jets are reconstructed. We present a figure of merit that allows for a fair comparison of reconstruction algorithms without requiring their calibration. The new reconstruction of events with only three jets is fully competitive with the full reconstruction typically used for four-jet events.

  18. Lost in Translation? Transformation Nets to the Rescue!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochreiter, Sepp

    -Driven Engineering places models as first-class artifacts throughout the software lifecycle. An essential pre as first-class artifacts through- out the software lifecycle [3]. The main promise of MDE is to raise these problems, we propose a novel formalism for the development of model transformations which is based

  19. The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Randall James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1281 C.E., under the rule of Kublai Khan, the Mongols sent a fleet of more than 4000 vessels to subjugate the island nation of Japan. A powerful typhoon, called kamikaze, dashed the invading fleet into pieces on the shores of Japan and thus saved...

  20. Lost treasures at UEA A mysterious collection of Kalahari Bushmen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    of which may still have poison on their tips, toys, weapons, jewellery, and carved wooden figures of this most generous award will be used to buy cutting- edge equipment." The UEA team showed its gratitude

  1. Lost : 2,938 miles and 42 years away

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oring, Sheryl

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 42 years April 7, 1968 to Junes devastating earthquake in Haiti. While San Diego is 2,938that would deliver it to Haiti. At first, this was not meant

  2. Lost Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole, Nebraska:LongboardLoretto,Los(RedirectedCreek, Texas:

  3. Lost River Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners andLodgepole, Nebraska:LongboardLoretto,Los(RedirectedCreek,

  4. Security on Campus The Security Office and lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Campus-and-Facilities-Management-Office/Our-services/Security-services/ Travel Smart Maps www.transport.wa.gov.au/activetransport/26081.ASP Public Transport Journey Planner http://www.transperth.wa.gov.au/Home are located in the Gym. Contact the Student Centre for access. Travel Smart Maps · Travel Smart maps or top up Smart Riders from the Rockingham train station or most newsagents. Maps and timetables

  5. Lost Trail Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    syntax: * Display map Temperature No Data Listed Flow No Data Listed Capacity 1.00x106 Btuhr 0.300 MWt Annual Generation 7.00x109 Btuyr 2.10 GWhyr Load Factor 0.80 Contact...

  6. Center for Inverse Design: Lost SharePoint Password?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruaryMetalControl SystemLightWhiteEFRC

  7. REQUEST FOR LOST/STOLEN BADGE REPLACEMENT | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo. 195Department ofELECTRIC ENERGY

  8. Lost Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) Wind Farm Jump1 JumpBeachVientosHills,

  9. Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.Energy UniversityOversight

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lost Creek - WY 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffaloJohns HopkinsLaDivision -

  11. CFD Modeling for Lost Foam White Side | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartmentCAIRSPlanning TimelineChemistry | Department

  12. REQUEST FOR LOST/STOLEN BADGE REPLACEMENT | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy Small Team OversightDepartment ofBroadband PlanREGULATORY11note:REQUEST

  13. UNDERGRAD FULL-TIME PART-TIME UNDERGRAD FULL-TIME PART-TIME Arts & Social Sciences 4706 1118 15 -19 3910 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -TIME UNDERGRAD FULL-TIME PART-TIME Year 1 3431 432 Tri-County area 7533 1474 Year 2 3012 406 Rest of Ontario 2929 GRADUATE FULL-TIME PART-TIME GRADUATE FULL-TIME PART-TIME Tri-County area 586 80 Spec & Cert 3 2 Rest

  14. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E. (West Chicago, IL); Dawson, John W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  15. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  16. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  17. PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4314 8/2/2011 13:40 Agriculture Parking Lot Criminal Damage Spark plug cables cut on pick-up truck Report on file

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    :48 Boone Tavern Parking Lot Property Damage Mitsubishi Gallant Report on file 4318 8/10/2011 19:10 Anna Smith Parking Lot Theft by Unlawful Taking Car battery and Jumper Cables Report on file 4319 8 responded 4321 8/14/2011 17:14 Evans Sports Complex Theft by Unlawful Taking Solar Panel and Mounting

  18. PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 5340 8/1/2013 21:03 Deep Green Dorm Theft By Unlawful Taking Scrap metal stolen from dumpster behind new dorm construction BPD Notified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    By Unlawful Taking Scrap metal stolen from dumpster behind new dorm construction BPD Notified 5341 8/2/2013 17 Taking Coins found missing from jar in apartment Report Filed 5346 8/9/2013 5:30 Industrial Arts Fire

  19. Time evolution of cascade decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; Louis Lello

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) "flows" as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a "bottleneck" in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay can be interpreted as evolving sequentially $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2; ~ \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$. In the opposite limit the population of resonances ($\\phi_1$) does not build up substantially and the cascade decay proceeds almost directly from the initial parent to the final state without resulting in a large amplitude of the resonant state. An alternative but equivalent non-perturbative method useful in cosmology is presented. Possible phenomenological implications for heavy sterile neutrinos as resonant states and consequences of quantum entanglement and correlations in the final state are discussed.

  20. Time Consistent Risk Measure Under Stopping Time Framework ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    or down-side risk measures have been proposed, from the Roy's safety-first criterion .... the probability P(xt ? Ct) to be no less than ? at time t, i.e.,. P(xt ? Ct) ...... 1, into the objective function E[xt], we have. E[xt] = t?1. ? k=0 ekx0 + t?1. ? s

  1. Snyder noncommutative space-time from two-time physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Juan M.; Zamora, Adolfo [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the two-time physics model leads to a mechanical system with Dirac brackets consistent with the Snyder noncommutative space. A Euclidean version of this space is also obtained and it is shown that both spaces have a dual system describing a particle in a curved space.

  2. Lost Ladies, New Women: Narrative Voice and Female Identity in Willa Cather's A Lost Lady and Kate Chopin's The Awakening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Von Cannon, Jordan Lindsey

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of assigning gender to narrators, either by the author or reader, has recently become a point of interest in narratology. The increasing interest in gender, sexuality, and queer studies highlights gendered voices ...

  3. Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Han; Fu, Kan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 °C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

  4. Ideally embedded space-times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haesen, S; Haesen, Stefan; Verstraelen, Leopold

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the growing interest in embeddings of space-time in higher-dimensional spaces we consider a specific type of embedding. After proving an inequality between intrinsically defined curvature invariants and the squared mean curvature, we extend the notion of ideal embeddings from Riemannian geometry to the indefinite case. Ideal embeddings are such that the embedded manifold receives the least amount of tension from the surrounding space. Then it is shown that the de Sitter spaces, a Robertson-Walker space-time and some anisotropic perfect fluid metrics can be ideally embedded in a five-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space.

  5. Ideally embedded space-times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Haesen; Leopold Verstraelen

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the growing interest in embeddings of space-time in higher-dimensional spaces we consider a specific type of embedding. After proving an inequality between intrinsically defined curvature invariants and the squared mean curvature, we extend the notion of ideal embeddings from Riemannian geometry to the indefinite case. Ideal embeddings are such that the embedded manifold receives the least amount of tension from the surrounding space. Then it is shown that the de Sitter spaces, a Robertson-Walker space-time and some anisotropic perfect fluid metrics can be ideally embedded in a five-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space.

  6. Noncommutative space-time models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Gromov; V. V. Kuratov

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FRT quantum Euclidean spaces $O_q^N$ are formulated in terms of Cartesian generators. The quantum analogs of N-dimensional Cayley-Klein spaces are obtained by contractions and analytical continuations. Noncommutative constant curvature spaces are introduced as a spheres in the quantum Cayley-Klein spaces. For N=5 part of them are interpreted as the noncommutative analogs of (1+3) space-time models. As a result the quantum (anti) de Sitter, Newton, Galilei kinematics with the fundamental length and the fundamental time are suggested.

  7. High-power oblique incidence h-f ionospheric modification. Report for 25 February 1987-25 February 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sales, G.S.; Platt, I.G.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To successfully perform the proposed ionospheric modification experiment (IONMOD) it is necessary to establish the range of the expected changes in the ionosphere, the parameters that offer the greatest likelihood of detection of these changes and the systems that can best carry out the appropriate measurements to detect them. The distributed region of the ionosphere is modeled as a spherical depletion region of varying depth and size. Three dimensional numerical ray tracing is then used to determine the expected magnitude and location of the amplitude and arrival angle deviations. These calculations indicate rather small changes, of the order of 3 dB in amplitude and about 0.5 deg in the elevation angle, with even smaller changes in the azimuth arrival angle. This leads to strong requirements for the measuring system in terms of antenna design and the signal to noise that must be achieved. Consider the basic concept of a probe system to make the required amplitude and arrival angle measurements. Such a system will be based upon the real time calculation of the Doppler spectrum of the signal on each antenna of the system and use the measured phase difference on each line in the spectrum, as an interferometer, to determine the arrival angle and amplitude. The requirements are determined for the signal to noise ration that will permit the measurements with sufficient accuracy. The results indicate that sufficient measurement sensitivity of the probe system can be achieved with a transmitter power of 100 W continuous and an antenna pre-amplifier (with a low noise front end) properly designed to be atmospherically noise limited.

  8. Differential cross section of gamma n to K+ Sigma- on bound neutrons with incident photons from 1.1 to 3.6 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Anefalos Pereira; M. Mirazita; P. Rossi; E. De Sanctis; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; S. Stepanyan; for the CLAS Collaboration

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential cross sections of the reaction gamma d to K+ Sigma- (p) have been measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab using incident photons with energies between 1.1 and 3.6 GeV. This is the first complete set of strangeness photoproduction data on the neutron covering a broad angular range. At energies close to threshold and up to E_gamma ~ 1.8 GeV, the shape of the angular distribution is suggestive of the presence of s-channel production mechanisms. For E_gamma > 1.8 GeV, a clear forward peak appears and becomes more prominent as the photon energy increases, suggesting contributions from t-channel production mechanisms. These data can be used to constrain future analysis of this reaction.

  9. Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, A R; Norman, E B; Hurley, D L; Lo, B T; Chan, Y D; Guillaumon, P V; Harvey, B G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found...

  10. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabil Ghodbane

    2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  11. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  12. Curricular internship Timing and Duration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    1 Art.1 Curricular internship Art.2 Objectives Art.3 Timing and Duration Art.4 Choice of Employer Art.5 Pertinence of the internship Art.6 Internship Search GRADUATE INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES Faculties training or work experience, herein referred to as `internship', is one of the graduation requirements. 2

  13. Waste to Energy Time Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

  14. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair) [Conference Chair; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE�s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE�s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  15. Time Management Top 50 Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    daily, weekly and term goals in order of priority and work on top priorities. 2. Prioritize each task limitations and do not overschedule yourself. 14. Get sleep, exercise and relaxation to keep your energy up. 15. Figure out your peak times of day for energy and do difficult tasks (e.g.: studying) during

  16. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  17. DEVELOPING IMPROVED TRAVEL TIME RELIABILITY MEASURES FOR REAL-TIME AND ARCHIVED ITS DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    including travel time, 95th percentile travel time, travel time index, buffer index planning time index-based detector data, collected in periodic special studies, or estimated using simulation [1,3]: 95th Percentile between 95th percentile travel time and mean travel time, divided by mean travel time. Planning Time Index

  18. Introduction Space Time Codes Space Time Coding with Feedback New Thoughts Summary Space-Time Coding for Multi-Antenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veeravalli, Venugopal

    Introduction Space Time Codes Space Time Coding with Feedback New Thoughts Summary Space 2007 #12;Introduction Space Time Codes Space Time Coding with Feedback New Thoughts Summary MIMO: Diversity vs Multiplexing Multiplexing Diversity Pictures taken from lectures notes on Space Time Coding

  19. Treating Time Travel Quantum Mechanically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John-Mark A. Allen

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fact that closed timelike curves (CTCs) are permitted by general relativity raises the question as to how quantum systems behave when time travel to the past occurs. Research into answering this question by utilising the quantum circuit formalism has given rise to two theories: Deutschian-CTCs (D-CTCs) and "postselected" CTCs (P-CTCs). In this paper the quantum circuit approach is thoroughly reviewed, and the strengths and shortcomings of D-CTCs and P-CTCs are presented in view of their non-linearity and time travel paradoxes. In particular, the "equivalent circuit model"---which aims to make equivalent predictions to D-CTCs, while avoiding some of the difficulties of the original theory---is shown to contain errors. The discussion of D-CTCs and P-CTCs is used to motivate an analysis of the features one might require of a theory of quantum time travel, following which two overlapping classes of new theories are identified. One such theory, the theory of "transition probability" CTCs (T-CTCs), is fully developed. The theory of T-CTCs is shown not to have certain undesirable features---such as time travel paradoxes, the ability to distinguish non-orthogonal states with certainty, and the ability to clone or delete arbitrary pure states---that are present with D-CTCs and P-CTCs. The problems with non-linear extensions to quantum mechanics are discussed in relation to the interpretation of these theories, and the physical motivations of all three theories are discussed and compared.

  20. Light incoherence theory revisited by Heisenberg time-energy uncertainty challenges solar cell optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Aline; Deparis, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of the efficiency of solar cells is a major challenge for renewable energies. Using a rigorous theoretical approach, we show that the photocurrent generated in a solar cell depends strongly on the degree of coherence of the incident light. In accordance with Heisenberg uncertainty time-energy, incoherent light at photons of carrier energy lower than the active material bandgap can be absorbed whereas coherent light at the same carrier energy cannot. We identify cases where incoherence does enhance efficiency. This result has a dramatical impact on the way solar cells must be optimized regarding sunlight. As an illustration, surface-corrugated GaAs and c-Si thin-film solar cells are considered.

  1. Payroll & Human Resources (PHR) System Time Entry Tip Sheet PHR EXEMPT TIME ENTRY PHR EXEMPT TIME ENTRY PHR EXEMPT TIME ENTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    , select Quit to exit. Completing Your Timesheet 1. From the Time Entry page, select the appropriate pay - Menu screen, select Quit to exit. Completing Your Timesheet 1. From the Time Entry page, selectPayroll & Human Resources (PHR) System Time Entry Tip Sheet PHR EXEMPT TIME ENTRY PHR EXEMPT TIME

  2. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  3. Regression quantiles for time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Zongwu

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~see, e+g+, Ibragimov and Linnik, 1971, p+ 316!+ Namely, partition REGRESSION QUANTILES FOR TIME SERIES 187 $1, + + + , n% into 2qn 1 1 subsets with large block of size r 5 rn and small block of size s 5 sn+ Set q 5 qn 5 ? n rn 1 sn? , (A.7) where {x...! are the standard Lindeberg–Feller conditions for asymptotic normality of Qn,1 for the independent setup+ Let us first establish ~A+8!+ To this effect, we define the large-block size rn by rn 5 {~nhn!102} and the small-block size sn 5 {~nhn!1020log n}+ Then, as n r...

  4. Time Contortions in Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Kracklauer

    2002-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As a basis for epistemological study of ``time,'' we analyze three suspect phenomena introduced by modern physics: non-locality, asymmetric aging and advanced interaction. It is shown that all three arise in connection with what has to be taken as arbitrary ideosyncrasies in formulation. It is shown that minor changes result in internally consistent variations of both Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity devoid of these phenomena. The reinterpretation of some experiments though to confirm the existence of non-locality and asymmetric aging is briefly considered and a possible test is proposed.

  5. Tests of time-invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busetti, Fabio; Harvey, Andrew C

    as an alternative - or complement - to quan- tiles; see, for example, Newey and Powell (1987), Efron (1991) and, in a time series context, De Rossi and Harvey (2006b). We then de?ne residuals based on expectiles and show that they can be used to construct... based on absolute values, (5), are very close to those of the #17;#28; (DQ) tests in (3). The earlier theoretical analysis indicated that the statistics are identical for known quan- tiles and it appears that enforcing the symmetry restriction when...

  6. Development of a hybrid intelligent system for on-line real-time monitoring of nuclear power plant operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) has an intricate operational domain involving systems, structures and components (SSCs) that vary in scale and complexity. Many of the large scale SSCs contribute to the lost availability in the ...

  7. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D'Auria, G.

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  8. A subquantum arrow of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theo M. Nieuwenhuizen

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The outcome of a single quantum experiment is unpredictable, except in a pure-state limit. The definite process that takes place in the apparatus may either be intrinsically random or be explainable from a deeper theory. While the first scenario is the standard lore, the latter implies that quantum mechanics is emergent. In that case, it is likely that one has to reconsider radiation by accelerated charges as a physical effect, which thus must be compensated by an energy input. Stochastic electrodynamics, for example, asserts that the vacuum energy arises from classical fluctuations with energy $\\frac{1}{2}\\hbar\\omega$ per mode. In such theories the stability of the hydrogen ground state will arise from energy input from fluctuations and output by radiation, hence due to an energy throughput. That flux of energy constitutes an arrow of time, which we call the "subquantum arrow of time". It is related to the stability of matter and it is more fundamental than, e.g., the thermodynamic and cosmological arrows.

  9. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  10. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  11. Stationary distributions of continuous time Markov chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 13, 2012 ... stationary distribution as the limiting fraction of time spent in states. 1 Stationary measures in continuous time. The following theorem is an ...

  12. The Delivery Man Problem with Time Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    depot, while open time windows are considered at all other locations. ... nodes of G: earliest and latest times are described by parameters ei and li for nodes i ...

  13. Production of K+ and of K- Mesons in Heavy-Ion Collisions from 0.6 to 2.0 AGeV Incident Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Foerster; F. Uhlig; I. Boettcher; D. Brill; M. Debowski; F. Dohrmann; E. Grosse; P. Koczon; B. Kohlmeyer; S. Lang; F. Laue; M. Mang; M. Menzel; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; H. Oeschler; M. Ploskon; W. Scheinast; A. Schmah; T. J. Schuck; E. Schwab; P. Senger; Y. Shin; J. Speer; H. Stroebele; C. Sturm; G. Surowka; A. Wagner; W. Walus

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the yields and the emission patterns of K+ and of K- mesons measured in inclusive C+C, Ni+Ni and Au+Au collisions at incident energies from 0.6 AGeV to 2.0 AGeV using the Kaon Spectrometer KaoS at GSI. For Ni+Ni collisions at 1.5 and at 1.93 AGeV as well as for Au+Au at 1.5 AGeV detailed results of the multiplicities, of the inverse slope parameters of the energy distributions and of the anisotropies in the angular emission patterns as a function of the collision centrality are presented. When comparing transport-model calculations to the measured K+ production yields an agreement is only obtained for a soft nuclear equation of state (compression modulus KN ~ 200 MeV). The production of K- mesons at energies around 1 to 2 AGeV is dominated by the strangeness-exchange reaction K- N pi Y (Y = Lambda, Sigma) which leads to a coupling between the K- and the K+ yields. However, both particle species show distinct differences in their emission patterns suggesting different freeze-out conditions for K+ and for K- mesons.

  14. Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

    2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

  15. Orbital effects of a monochromatic plane gravitational wave with ultra-low frequency incident on a gravitationally bound two-body system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We analytically compute the long-term orbital variations of a test particle orbiting a central body acted upon by an incident monochromatic plane gravitational wave. We assume that the characteristic size of the perturbed two-body system is much smaller than the wavelength of the wave. Moreover, we also suppose that the wave's frequency is much smaller than the particle's orbital one. We make neither a priori assumptions about the direction of the wavevector nor on the orbital geometry of the planet. We find that, while the semi-major axis is left unaffected, the eccentricity, the inclination, the longitude of the ascending node, the longitude of pericenter and the mean anomaly undergo non-vanishing long-term changes. They are not secular trends because of the slow modulation introduced by the tidal matrix coefficients and by the orbital elements themselves. They could be useful to indepenedently constrain the ultra-low frequency waves which may have been indirectly detected in the BICEP2 experiment. Our calculation holds, in general, for any gravitationally bound two-body system whose characteristic frequency is much larger than the frequency of the external wave. It is also valid for a generic perturbation of tidal type with constant coefficients over timescales of the order of the orbital period of the perturbed particle.

  16. Study of multilayered SiGe semiconductor structures by X-ray diffractometry, grazing-incidence X-ray reflectometry, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunin, P. A., E-mail: yunin@ipmras.ru; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Drozdov, M. N.; Korolev, S. A.; Lobanov, D. N. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this publication, we report the results of studying a multilayerd nonperiodic SiGe/Si structure by the methods of X-ray diffractometry, grazing-angle X-ray reflectometry, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Special attention is paid to the processing of the component distribution profile using the SIMS method and to consideration of the most significant experimental distortions introduced by this method. A method for processing the measured composition distribution profile with subsequent consideration of the influence of matrix effects, variation in the etching rate, and remnants of ion sputtering is suggested. The results of such processing are compared with a structure model obtained upon combined analysis of X-ray diffractometry and grazing-angle reflectometry data. Good agreement between the results is established. It is shown that the combined use of independent techniques makes it possible to improve the methods of secondary-ion mass spectrometry and grazing-incidence reflectometry as applied to an analysis of multilayered heteroepitaxial structures (to increase the accuracy and informativity of these methods)

  17. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Å spectral band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K., E-mail: widmann1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 Å and 135 Å, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mÅ at the 200 Å setting and better than 40 mÅ for the 135-Å range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Å Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Å Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  18. Toward a self-consistent model of the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse with an overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debayle, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France) [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sanz, J. [ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)] [ETSI Aeronáuticos. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mima, K. [School for the Creation of Photonic Industries, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)] [School for the Creation of Photonic Industries, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a recent work by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 85, 046411 (2012)], we elaborate upon a one-dimensional model describing the interaction between an ultra-intense, normally incident laser pulse and an overdense plasma. The analytical solutions of the reflected laser field, the electrostatic field, and the plasma surface oscillation are obtained within the cold-fluid approximation. The high-order harmonic spectrum is calculated from the exact solution of the plasma surface oscillations. In agreement with particle-in-cell simulations, two regimes of harmonic generation are predicted: for moderately relativistic laser intensities, or high plasma densities, the harmonic spectrum is determined by the discontinuity in the derivative of the reflected field when the electron plasma boundary oscillates across the fixed ion boundary. For higher intensities, the electron plasma boundary is confined inside the ion region and oscillates at relativistic velocities, giving rise to a train of reflected attosecond pulses. In both cases, the harmonic spectrum obeys an asymptotic ?{sup ?4} scaling. The acceleration of electrons and the related laser absorption efficiency are computed by a test particle method. The model self-consistently reproduces the transition between the “anomalous skin effect” and the “J × B” heating predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. Analytical estimates of the different scalings are presented.

  19. Step-by-step capping and strain state of GaN/AlN quantum dots studied by grazing-incidence diffraction anomalous fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coraux, J.; Favre-Nicolin, V.; Renevier, H. [Commissariat l'Energie Atomique, Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, SP2M/NRS, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 53, 38041, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Proietti, M. G. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, c. Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Daudin, B. [Commissariat l'Energie Atomique, Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, SP2M/NRS, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of small-size embedded nanostructures, by a combination of complementary anomalous diffraction techniques, is reported. GaN quantum dots (QD's), grown by molecular beam epitaxy in a modified Stranski-Krastanow mode, are studied in terms of strain and local environment, as a function of the AlN cap layer thickness, by means of grazing-incidence anomalous diffraction. That is, the x-ray photon energy is tuned across the Ga absorption K edge which makes diffraction chemically selective. Measurement of hkl scans, close to the AlN (3030) Bragg reflection, at several energies across the Ga K edge, allows the extraction of the Ga partial structure factor, from which the in-plane strain of GaN QD's is deduced. From the fixed-Q energy-dependent diffracted intensity spectra, measured for diffraction-selected isostrain regions corresponding to the average in-plane strain state of the QD's, quantitative information regarding the composition and out-of-plane strain has been obtained. We recover the in-plane and out-of-plane strains in the dots. The comparison to the biaxial elastic strain in a pseudomorphic layer indicates a tendency to an overstrained regime.

  20. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melconian, Jerry O. (76 Beaver Rd., Reading, MA 01867)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  1. Reporting of Nuclear Incidents (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each operator of a nuclear power generating facility shall notify the Commissioner of Environmental Protection or his designee, which may be another State Agency, as soon as possible but in all...

  2. LANL responds to radiological incident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent...

  3. Computer Security Incident Handling Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaithersburg, MD Tom Millar United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team National Cyber Security Division National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD Karen Scarfone Scarfone Cybersecurity C O M

  4. Computer Security Incident Handling Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States Computer Emergency Readiness Team National Cyber Security Division Department of Homeland Security of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD Karen Scarfone Scarfone Cybersecurity C O M P U T E R S E C U R I

  5. Incident Management | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome| DepartmentPumpHomeofImprovingof the

  6. LANL responds to radiological incident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointedKyungmin2010 topLANL responds to

  7. Development of earthquake early warning system using real time signal of broadband seismogram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Hendar; Puspito, Nanang T.; Ibrahim, Gunawan; Harjadi, Prih [Badan Meteorologi Klimatologi dan Geofisika, Jl. Angkasa I No 2 Jakarta 10720 Indonesia Institut Technologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Earthquake pose serious threat of live and properties for urban area near subduction zone offshore and active fault on land. Jakarta and Bandung is an example of big city that no system of Earthquake early warning (EEW) event very high urbanization, and has many important infra structure in the area. The capital city is potentially high risk ground shaking. EEW can be usefull tool for reducing earthquake hazard, if spatial relation between cities and earthquake source is favorable for such warning and their citizens are properly trained to response early warning message. An EEW and rapid response system can provide the critical information needed to minimized lost of live and property and direct rescue. Earthquake ground shaking with magnitude M>6.0 from zone of Megathrust, southern of West Java should potentially damage in the area of west java especially Bandung and Jakarta City. This research development of EEW parameter such as amplitude displacement (Pd), rapid magnitude determination (M) and Peak ground Velocity (PGV). We explore the practical approach to EEW with the use of Broadband seismogram signal. Time effective EEW which epicenter from megathrust zone has potential to provide EEW in the area of west java such as Jakarta first ground shaking more or less 60 second later and strong shaking 118 second after EEW Alarm on CISI Station. EEW notification at potentially damage in the area of west java can be predicted from the characteristic of Pd > 0.5 cm, M> 6 and PGV > 10 cm/sec. GIS as a tool for presentation of hazard mapping in the affected area.

  8. Real-time, digital pulse-shape discrimination in non-hazardous fast liquid scintillation detectors: Prospects for safety and security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, M. J. [Engineering Dept., Lancaster Univ., Lancaster, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Aspinall, M. D.; Cave, F. D. [Hybrid Instruments Ltd., Lancaster LA1 1XB (United Kingdom); Lavietes, A. D. [Dept. of Safeguards, International Atomic Energy Agency, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) in fast, organic scintillation detectors is a long-established technique used to separate neutrons and {gamma} rays in mixed radiation fields. In the analogue domain the method can achieve separation in real time, but all knowledge of the pulses themselves is lost thereby preventing the possibility of any post- or repeated analysis. Also, it is typically reliant on electronic systems that are largely obsolete and which require significant experience to set up. In the digital domain, PSD is often more flexible but significant post-processing has usually been necessary to obtain neutron/{gamma}-ray separation. Moreover, the scintillation media on which the technique relies usually have a low flash point and are thus deemed hazardous. This complicates the ease with which they are used in industrial applications. In this paper, results obtained with a new portable digital pulse-shape discrimination instrument are described. This instrument provides real-time, digital neutron/{gamma} separation whilst preserving the synchronization with the time-of-arrival for each event, and realizing throughputs of 3 x 10{sup 6} events per second. Furthermore, this system has been tested with a scintillation medium that is non-flammable and not hazardous. (authors)

  9. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, K., E-mail: k.hirata@aist.go.jp [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)] [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gumma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  10. Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time Electricity Pricing Beneficial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Resources Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time Electricity Pricing Beneficial to Solar PV in New York City? Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time Electricity...

  11. Payroll & Human Resources (PHR) System Time Entry Tip Sheet PHR NON-EXEMPT TIME ENTRY PHR NON-EXEMPT TIME ENTRY PHR NON-EXEMPT TIME ENTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    , select Quit to exit. Completing Your Timesheet 1. From the Time Entry page, select the appropriate pay the Time Entry - Menu screen, select Quit to exit. Completing Your Timesheet 1. From the Time Entry page. 5. From the Time Entry - Menu screen, select Quit to exit. HELP/SUPPORT HELP/SUPPORT HELP

  12. Concurrency Theory Lecture 22: Timed Modelling & Conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Systems Example 22.1 (Real-time reactive systems) brake systems and airbags in cars plant controls mobile.1 (Real-time reactive systems) brake systems and airbags in cars plant controls mobile phones ... Real-Time Reactive Systems Example 22.1 (Real-time reactive systems) brake systems and airbags in cars plant controls

  13. Time Zone Information Compiled by John Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, John

    Deviations From Standard Time 1 The U.S. is on daylight saving time from the first Sunday in April @ 2am til the last Sunday in October @ 2am. Western Europe is on daylight saving time generally from the last Sunday designation. Additionally, it proclaims daylight saving time as does Europe. India's standard is at +05

  14. Introduction Discrete-time autoregressive process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Girolami, Cristina

    Introduction Discrete-time autoregressive process Continuous-time Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process Sharp large deviations for the non-stationary Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process Bernard Bercu Bordeaux University-Uhlenbeck process 1 / 46 #12;Introduction Discrete-time autoregressive process Continuous-time Ornstein

  15. Using Run-Time Predictions to Estimate Queue Wait Times and Improve Scheduler Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    that using our run-time predictor results in lower mean wait times for the workloads with higher o ered loads of the systems we are simulating.We also nd that using our run-time predictors result in mean wait timesUsing Run-Time Predictions to Estimate Queue Wait Times and Improve Scheduler Performance Warren

  16. Real-Time Transport in Open Quantum Systems From $\\mathcal{PT}$-Symmetric Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin E. Elenewski; Hanning Chen

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoscale electronic transport is of intense technological interest, with applications ranging from semiconducting devices and molecular junctions to charge migration in biological systems. Most explicit theoretical approaches treat transport using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green's functions. This is a static formalism, with dynamic response properties accommodated only through complicated extensions. To circumvent this limitation, the carrier density may be propagated using real-time time-dependent DFT (RT-TDDFT), with boundary conditions corresponding to an open quantum system. Complex absorbing potentials can emulate outgoing particles at the simulation boundary, although these do not account for introduction of charge density. It is demonstrated that the desired positive particle flux is afforded by a class of $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric generating potentials that are characterized by anisotropic transmission resonances. These potentials add density every time a particle traverses the cell boundary, and may be used to engineer a continuous pulse train for incident packets. This is a first step toward developing a complete transport formalism unique to RT-TDDFT.

  17. Analysis and synthesis of the variability of irradiance and PV power time series with the wavelet transform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perpinan, O. [Electrical Engineering Department, EUITI-UPM, Ronda de Valencia 3, 28012 Madrid (Spain); Lorenzo, E. [Instituto de Energia Solar, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The irradiance fluctuations and the subsequent variability of the power output of a PV system are analysed with some mathematical tools based on the wavelet transform. It can be shown that the irradiance and power time series are nonstationary process whose behaviour resembles that of a long memory process. Besides, the long memory spectral exponent {alpha} is a useful indicator of the fluctuation level of a irradiance time series. On the other side, a time series of global irradiance on the horizontal plane can be simulated by means of the wavestrapping technique on the clearness index and the fluctuation behaviour of this simulated time series correctly resembles the original series. Moreover, a time series of global irradiance on the inclined plane can be simulated with the wavestrapping procedure applied over a signal previously detrended by a partial reconstruction with a wavelet multiresolution analysis, and, once again, the fluctuation behaviour of this simulated time series is correct. This procedure is a suitable tool for the simulation of irradiance incident over a group of distant PV plants. Finally, a wavelet variance analysis and the long memory spectral exponent show that a PV plant behaves as a low-pass filter. (author)

  18. Influence of a Weak Field of Pulsed DC Electricity on the Behavior and Incidence of Injury in Adult Steelhead and Pacific Lamprey, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesa, Matthew

    2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Predation by pinnipeds, such as California sea lions Zalophus californianus, Pacific harbor seals Phoca vitulina, and Stellar sea lions Eumetopias jubatus on adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp in the lower Columbia River has become a serious concern for fishery managers trying to conserve and restore runs of threatened and endangered fish. As a result, Smith-Root, Incorporated (SRI; Vancouver, Washington), manufacturers of electrofishing and closely-related equipment, proposed a project to evaluate the potential of an electrical barrier to deter marine mammals and reduce the amount of predation on adult salmonids (SRI 2007). The objectives of their work were to develop, deploy, and evaluate a passive, integrated sonar and electric barrier that would selectively inhibit the upstream movements of marine mammals and reduce predation, but would not injure pinnipeds or impact anadromous fish migrations. However, before such a device could be deployed in the field, concerns by regional fishery managers about the potential effects of such a device on the migratory behavior of Pacific salmon, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lampreys Entoshpenus tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, needed to be addressed. In this report, we describe the results of laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of prototype electric barriers on adult steelhead and Pacific lampreys. The effects of electricity on fish have been widely studied and include injury or death (e.g., Sharber and Carothers 1988; Dwyer et al. 2001; Snyder 2003), physiological dysfunction (e.g., Schreck et al. 1976; Mesa and Schreck 1989), and altered behavior (Mesa and Schreck 1989). Much of this work was done to investigate the effects of electrofishing on fish in the wild. Because electrofishing operations would always use more severe electrical settings than those proposed for the pinniped barrier, results from these studies are probably not relevant to the work proposed by SRI. Field electrofishing operations typically use high voltage and amperage settings and a variety of waveforms, pulse widths (PW), and pulse frequencies (PF), depending on conditions and target species. For example, when backpack electrofishing for trout in a small stream, one might use settings such as 500 V pulsed DC, a PW of 1 ms, and a PF of 60 Hz. In contrast, the electrical barrier proposed by SRI will produce electrical conditions significantly lower than those used in electrofishing, particularly for PW and PF (e.g., PW ranging from 300-1,000 {micro}s and PF from 2-3 Hz). Further, voltage gradients (in V/cm) are predicted to be lower in the electric barrier than those produced during typical electrofishing. Although the relatively weak, pulsed DC electric fields to be produced by the barrier may be effective at deterring pinnipeds, little, if anything, is known about the effects of such low intensity electrical fields on fish behavior. For this research, we evaluated the effects of weak, pulsed DC electric currents on the behavior of adult steelhead and Pacific lamprey and the incidence of injury in steelhead only. In a series of laboratory experiments, we: (1) documented the rate of passage of fish over miniature, prototype electric barriers when they were on and off; (2) determined some electric thresholds beyond which fish would not pass over the barrier; and (3) assessed the incidence and severity of injury in steelhead exposed to relatively severe electrical conditions. The results of this study should be useful for making decisions about whether to install electrical barriers in the lower Columbia River, or elsewhere, to reduce predation on upstream migrating salmonids and other fishes by marine pinnipeds.

  19. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. 7 figs.

  20. Time-of-flight radio location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence.

  1. Real-time x-ray studies of gallium nitride nanodot formation by droplet heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yiyi; Oezcan, Ahmet S.; Sanborn, Christopher; Ludwig, Karl F.; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Chandrasekaran, Ramya; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Zhou Lin; Smith, David J. [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA and School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-organized gallium nitride nanodots have been fabricated using droplet heteroepitaxy on c-plane sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy at different substrate temperatures and Ga fluxes. Nanoscale Ga droplets were initially formed on the sapphire substrate at high temperatures by Ga deposition from an effusion cell in an ultrahigh vacuum growth chamber. Subsequently, the droplets were converted into GaN nanodots using a nitrogen plasma source. The process was monitored and controlled using real-time grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The samples were examined postgrowth by in situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction, which confirmed the epitaxial relationship between the GaN nanodots and the sapphire surface. X-ray diffraction indicated that the wurtzite phase was dominant at higher substrate temperature (710 deg. C), but a mixture of wurtzite and zinc blende phases was present at a substrate temperature of 620 deg. C. Ex situ atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that the dot size distribution was bimodal. A thin GaN continuous layer of {approx} three monolayers thick was observed by transmission electron microscopy on the sample grown at a substrate temperature of 620 deg. C, but no such layer was observed for the substrate temperature of 710 deg. C. This suggests that there is little mobility of Ga atoms in contact with the sapphire substrate at the lower temperature so that they cannot easily diffuse to nearby droplets and instead form a thin layer covering the surface.

  2. Real-Time X-ray Studies of Gallium Nitride Nanodot Formation by Droplet Heteroepitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang,Y.; Ozcan, A.; Sanborn, C.; Ludwig, K.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Moustakas, T.; Zhou, L.; Smith, D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-organized gallium nitride nanodots have been fabricated using droplet heteroepitaxy on c-plane sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy at different substrate temperatures and Ga fluxes. Nanoscale Ga droplets were initially formed on the sapphire substrate at high temperatures by Ga deposition from an effusion cell in an ultrahigh vacuum growth chamber. Subsequently, the droplets were converted into GaN nanodots using a nitrogen plasma source. The process was monitored and controlled using real-time grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering. The samples were examined postgrowth by in situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction, which confirmed the epitaxial relationship between the GaN nanodots and the sapphire surface. X-ray diffraction indicated that the wurtzite phase was dominant at higher substrate temperature (710? C), but a mixture of wurtzite and zinc blende phases was present at a substrate temperature of 620? C. Ex situ atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses showed that the dot size distribution was bimodal. A thin GaN continuous layer of ? three monolayers thick was observed by transmission electron microscopy on the sample grown at a substrate temperature of 620? C, but no such layer was observed for the substrate temperature of 710? C. This suggests that there is little mobility of Ga atoms in contact with the sapphire substrate at the lower temperature so that they cannot easily diffuse to nearby droplets and instead form a thin layer covering the surface.

  3. [PROCESSING WEB TIME ENTRY FOR EMPLOYEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 [PROCESSING WEB TIME ENTRY FOR EMPLOYEES] #12;Page 1 of 35 Contents Beginning the Process ....................................................................................... 33 #12;Page 2 of 35 Beginning the Process... Web Time Entry is processed through Banweb, using your

  4. Timing Verification of Adaptive Integrated Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Rohit

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.3 Hierarchical Timing Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.4 Timing Yield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3. PROPOSED TECHNIQUES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.2 Grid model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.3 Quadtree model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.4 Probabilisic event approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3...

  5. Can hedge funds time market liquidity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Charles

    We explore a new dimension of fund managers' timing ability by examining whether they can time market liquidity through adjusting their portfolios' market exposure as aggregate liquidity conditions change. Using a large ...

  6. Robert Heinecken's TV/Time Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfahler, Zachary Austin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environment, for example, exploits the televisual medium inMedium is the Message:” The Aesthetics of TV/Time Environmentwith TV/Time Environment. 11 “The Medium is the Message:”

  7. Fall Back Daylight Savings time is November

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsley, Braddock K.

    Fall Back ­ Daylight Savings time is November 2nd.The Energy Policy Act of 2005 changed both the starting and ending dates. Beginning in 2007, daylight time starts on the second Sunday in March and ends

  8. Constant time algorithms in sparse graph model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Huy Ngoc, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We focus on constant-time algorithms for graph problems in bounded degree model. We introduce several techniques to design constant-time approximation algorithms for problems such as Vertex Cover, Maximum Matching, Maximum ...

  9. Modeling Timed Concurrent Systems using Generalized Ultrametrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Timed Concurrent Systems using Generalized Ultrametrics Xiaojun Liu Eleftherios Matsikoudis Edward A. Lee Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley to lists, requires prior specific permission. #12;Modeling Timed Concurrent Systems using Generalized

  10. Arnold Schwarzenegger REAL-TIME GRID RELIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research (PIER) California Energy Commission Beth Chambers Contract Manager Jamie Patterson (VSA) prototype to monitor system voltage conditions and provide real time dispatchers with reliabilityArnold Schwarzenegger Governor REAL-TIME GRID RELIABILITY MANAGEMENT California ISO Real

  11. http://tas.sagepub.com Time & Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela Baker, Gregory Roach, Sally Ferguson and Drew Dawson Time Preferences The Impact of Different and Non-work Time Preferences Angela Baker, Gregory Roach, Sally Ferguson and Drew Dawson ABSTRACT

  12. Real-Time PCR Dean Fraga,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    , Wooster, Ohio 2 Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, Ohio 3 Ashland University, Ashland, Ohio OVERVIEW AND PRINCIPLES The real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) is a recent

  13. Parental Time, Behaviors and Childhood Obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuteesa, Annette

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    is to test and correct for the problem of endogeneity stemming from unobserved health factors that can distort any meaningful causal impact of maternal time on child weight status. Using the household production theory, parental time allocation decisions...

  14. Dynamic Vehicle Routing with Stochastic Time Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, Marco

    In this paper we study a dynamic vehicle routing problem where demands have stochastic deadlines on their waiting times. Specifically, a network of robotic vehicles must service demands whose time of arrival, location and ...

  15. A Latent Time-Budget Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan de Leeuw; Peter G.M. van der Heijden; Peter Verboon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DE L E E U W (1989), Latent budget analysis, in: A. DECARLI,DER H E U D E N (1988), The analysis of time- budgets with alatent-time-budget model, in E. Diday et al. (eds. ), Data

  16. Quantum mechanical time contradicts the uncertainty principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitoshi Kitada

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The a priori time in conventional quantum mechanics is shown to contradict the uncertainty principle. A possible solution is given.

  17. Time symmetry in wave function collapse models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Bedingham

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework for wave function collapse models that is symmetric under time reversal is presented. Within this framework there are equivalent pictures of collapsing wave functions evolving in both time directions. The backwards-in-time Born rule can be broken by an initial condition on the Universe resulting in asymmetric behaviour. Similarly the forwards-in-time Born rule can in principle be broken by a final condition on the Universe.

  18. Grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence analysis for non-destructive determination of In and Ga depth profiles in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streeck, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Brunken, S.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Weber, A.; Schock, H.-W.; Mainz, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Gerlach, M.; Hönicke, P.; Lubeck, J.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Herzog, C.; Kanngießer, B. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of highly efficient thin film solar cells involves band gap engineering by tuning their elemental composition with depth. Here we show that grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and well-characterized instrumentation is suitable for a non-destructive and reference-free analysis of compositional depth profiles in thin films. Variation of the incidence angle provides quantitative access to the in-depth distribution of the elements, which are retrieved from measured fluorescence intensities by modeling parameterized gradients and fitting calculated to measured fluorescence intensities. Our results show that double Ga gradients in Cu(In{sub 1?x},Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} can be resolved by GIXRF.

  19. Absence of Structural Impact of Noble Nanoparticles on P3HT: PCBM Blends for Plasmon Enhanced Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells Probed by Synchrotron Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuele Lilliu; Mejd Alsari; Oier Bikondoa; J. Emyr Macdonald; Marcus S. Dahlem

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of noble metal nanoparticles, displaying localized surface plasmon resonance, in the active area of donor-acceptor bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices is an industrially compatible light trapping strategy, able to guarantee better absorption of the incident photons and give an efficiency improvement between 12% and 38%. In the present work, we investigate the effect of Au and Ag nanoparticles blended with P3HT: PCBM on the P3HT crystallization dynamics by synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. We conclude that the presence of (1) 80nm Au, (2) mix of 5nm, 50nm, 80nm Au, (3) 40nm Ag, and (4) 10nm, 40nm, 60nm Ag colloidal nanoparticles, at different concentrations below 0.3 wt% in P3HT: PCBM blends, does not affect the behaviour of the blends themselves.

  20. A Linear-Time Approach for Static Timing Analysis Covering All Process Corners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    A Linear-Time Approach for Static Timing Analysis Covering All Process Corners Sari Onaissi into the timing analysis of a circuit. With the increase in the number of interesting process vari- ables process variations lead to circuit timing variability and a corresponding timing yield loss. Traditional