National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for lost time incident

  1. 22 March 2012 Employee Information Lost Time No Lost Time Modified Duties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    22 March 2012 Employee Information Lost Time No Lost Time Modified Duties Last Name First Name the injured worker have personal coverage? Yes No Is the injured worker a partner or director in this business OR Did this condition develop over a period of time? Yes No Hours of employment on the day of accident

  2. Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness March 31, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Empty...

  3. Analysis of Search Incidents and Lost Person Behavior in Yosemite National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doke, Jared

    2012-12-31

    -2010) of Search and Rescue case incident reports from Yosemite National Park (2,308 in total) were examined and 213 searches were retained for analysis. It was determined that approximately 62% of incidents involve missing hikers. Nearly two thirds of the searches...

  4. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has...

  5. Workers at EM’s West Valley Site Surpass 1 Million Hours without Lost-Time Accident

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM’s cleanup contractor at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) recently marked 1 million work hours without a lost-time accident or illness.

  6. Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountain, Christopher Eugene

    1993-01-01

    One application of travel time information explored in this thesis is freeway incident detection. It is vital to develop reliable methods for automatically detecting incidents to facilitate the quick response and removal of incidents before...

  7. Implications from a study of the timing of oil entrapment in Monterey siliceous shales, Lost Hills, San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julander, D.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The oil and gas-rich upper Miocene siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target in the Lost Hills Oil Field, San Joaquin Valley, California. As a result of diagenesis, the siliceous shales can be subdivided by opal phase into three sections (from shallow to deep): the Opal-A diatomites which are rich in oil saturation; the Opal-CT porcellanites which are predominantly wet but include pockets of moderate oil saturation; and the Quartz cherts and porcellanites which in some places are highly oil saturated immediately below the Opal CT section. Productivity trends in each of the three sections have been established through drilling and production testing, but a predictive model was not available until a study of the timing of oil entrapment at Lost Hills was recently completed. The study included an analysis of the depositional history of the siliceous shales and timing of: (1) structural growth of the Lost Hills fold, (2) source-rock maturation, and (3) development of the opal-phase segregation of the Monterey shales. The study led to enhanced understanding of the known oil saturation and production trends in the three opal-phase sections and yielded a predictive model that is being used to identify areas in the field with remedial or delineation potential. The study also produced evidence of fold axis rotation during the Pliocene and Pleistocene that helps explain differences in fracture orientations within the Monterey shales.

  8. Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karimian, Majid [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Idris, M. H. [Dept. of Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Johor Bauru (Malaysia); Ourdjini, A.; Muthu, Kali [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage of coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.

  9. Integrating time-series visualizations within parallel coordinates for exploratory analysis of incident databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    a University of Pittsburgh b University of North Carolina at Charlotte ABSTRACT Aviation disaster prevention and their corresponding effects on the craft's safety, better maintenance and response plans can be devised to prevent Aviation Agency's Accident/Incident Database, which contains more than 90,000 incidents across 53

  10. Dynamically Predicting Corridor Travel Time Under Incident Conditions Using a Neural Network Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Xiaosi

    2011-02-22

    system. The model development process can be used as a demonstration of how, in detail, to predict travel time under various freeway conditions by using the neural network approach. The modeling results may be integrated directly into major TMCs... outputs. Since freeway segments are typically much shorter, the pairing of input and outputs become less erroneous and the sample size is usually no longer an issue. Furthermore, the first step of the two-stage method can be used as a building block so...

  11. Incidence Calculus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Alan

    1992-01-01

    We describe incidence calculus, a logic for probabilistic reasoning. In incidence calculus, probabilities are not directly associated with formulae. Rather sets of possible worlds are directly associated with formulae ...

  12. Enterprise Incidents Issue 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1975-01-01

    . He applied it very carefully. Spock mc.de no sound, but tho others could seo the sweat running down his 13 body. j,gain Modolln kept the iron in plnce until it lost its oolour; this time Spook oollapsed bofore it was removed. Kirk fought...

  13. CFD Modeling for Lost Foam White Side

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The lost foam casting process produces clean, high-quality castings with close tolerances. The most important advantage is that no cores (with binders) are required. One challenge in lost foam...

  14. Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-03-17

    Sets forth requirements for the DOE Incidents of Security Concern Program, including timely identification and notification of, response to, inquiry into, reporting of, and closure actions for incidents of security concern. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 470.1; DOE N 471.3; and Chapter IV of DOE M 471.2-1B (Note: Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Chapter III remain in effect.) Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  15. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  16. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

  17. Downhole material injector for lost circulation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glowka, D.A.

    1994-09-06

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

  18. Mission-Enhance emergency operation mission success by reducing risk of incident or fatality resulting in serious loss across a wide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FACT SHEET 6 November 2014 #12; 1992 Hurricane Andrew- 27 Lost Time Accident. 1995 Hurricane Marilyn in the USACE Safety and Health requirements manual, EM 385-1-1 APP B. 1998 Hurricane Georges- Lost time exposure hours with a lost time accident- 2012 Hurricane Sandy- 2 USACE government lost time accidents

  19. Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems Variable valve actuation with onoff IEGR pre-bump is...

  20. UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Manil

    UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT The UMBC community will have access to a University Policy on Lost and Found Property. II. PURPOSE OF THE POLICY The purpose of the Lost and Found Property Policy is to provide procedures for the accountability and safekeeping of currency and tangible

  1. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  2. Primary cementing across massive lost circulation zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turki, W.H.; Mackay, A.S.

    1983-03-01

    As a result of severe lost circulation problems in some wells in the Ghawar and Abqaiq Fields, Aramco has been unable to cover the Umm Er-Radhuma (Paleocene) and Wasia (Cretaceous) aquifers with cement. This has necessitated setting an extended liner opposite the Wasia aquifer, to ensure that there are two casing strings and a cement sheath across the aquifer, resulting in increased casing cost and reduced well productivity. This paper describes the results of field trial tests performed, along with conclusions and recommendations aimed at solving this problem. Field methods employed include light weight extended cements, ultra-light cement slurries weighing as little as 55 lbm/ft/sup 3/ (pcf), using ceramic hollow spheres, glass bubbles and foam, plus hydrostatic cementing, and mechanical devices. Finally, methods of job evaluation are discussed. These include temperature surveys, bond logs, radioactive tracers, and a new cement volume log.

  3. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  4. WORKERS' COMPENSATION GUIDE INJURY / INCIDENT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    employees with appropriate medical care and a portion of lost wages following a work-related injury, illness with the CSU Office of Risk Management phone number (970) 491-6745. The employee is required to supply that these be provided to us within 24 hours of a visit or prior to next work shift, whichever is first. TIME RECORD

  5. 2 Incidence 2.1 Incidence Axioms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    .3 A Tetrahedron Model The Incidence Axioms do not force the existence of an infinite number of points. We can in the commands yourself. Once you have a picture, use the mouse to drag the picture to different orientations, ping­pong balls, oranges or L'en'art spheres. Also, consider the question of whether

  6. Progress in The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Wright, E.K.

    1991-01-01

    Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50{percent} through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1990--March, 1991. 4 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The project will further reduce porosity and fold defects in lost foam casting to improve production efficiency, mechanical properties, and marketability of castings.

  8. Enterprise Incidents Issue 12 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaton, Rosemarie

    1995-01-01

    stream_source_info Star Trek Enterprise_Incidents_12_-_The_Legacy.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 89 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Star Trek Enterprise_Incidents_12_-_The_Legacy.pdf.txt Content...

  9. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  10. 2 Incidence 2.1 Incidence Axioms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    of Theorem 2.4.2 can be found in the book. 9 #12;2.3 A Tetrahedron Model The Incidence Axioms do not force to drag the picture to di erent orientations. 10 #12;2.4 Geometrical Worlds Here are some geometrical to draw on, such as very smooth tennis balls, ping-pong balls, oranges or L en art spheres. Also, consider

  11. July 2013 Cyber Incident

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information ...

  12. January 2013 Cyber Incident

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of...

  13. Lost conservation opportunities in the Pacific Northwest irrigation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrer, B.J.; Hattrup, M.P.

    1987-06-01

    Initial efforts in the study were focused on identifying potential lost opportunities. Results of these efforts resulted in the following measures being identified as potential lost opportunities in the irrigation sector: pumping plant efficiency improvements on both existing and new sprinkler irrigated acres, low-pressure irrigation on new sprinkler acres, and mainline modification and fittings redesign on new sprinkler acres. All of these potential lost opportunities except fittings design were subject to more detailed analyses through a survey of irrigation equipment dealers, pump repairers and country extension agents. Fittings design was omitted from the survey. Results of the survey indicated that only high-efficiency electric motors and correct pump selection methods on existing and new sprinkler systems and low-pressure irrigation on new handmove/sideroll systems should be considered lost opportunities.

  14. Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

  15. KOSHLIAKOV'S FORMULA AND GUINAND'S FORMULA IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    KOSHLIAKOV'S FORMULA AND GUINAND'S FORMULA IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK BRUCE C. BERNDT1 , YOONBOK involving the modified Bessel function K(z). These include Koshliakov's formula and Guinand's formula, both by these authors several years after Ramanujan's death. Other formulas, including one by K. Soni and two

  16. Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

  17. Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Incident Reporting System Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized AccidentIncident Reporting System is a database used to collect and...

  18. Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-12-01

    We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

  19. Reporting Incidents Of Security Concern

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-04-03

    To enhance the Department of Energy (DOE) Incidents of Security Concern Reporting Program through more consistent reporting, better information tracking, and interactive coordination. DOE N 251.54, dated 07/08/03, extends this directive until 07/08/04. Cancels Deputy Secretary Glauthier memorandum, subject: Reporting Security Incidents, dated 9-7-99.

  20. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations.

  1. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. No cancellations. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09.

  2. Recovery of the lost individual: a Deweyan examination of individuality and community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pope, Nakia S

    1999-01-01

    In 1929 - 1930, John Dewey wrote a series of essays which became the work "Individualism Old and New.'' In this work, he describes a type of individual which he terms "lost.'' The lost individual is disconnected, disoriented, and disassociated...

  3. Modelling Lost Person Behaviour and Intelligent Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in a Wilderness Search and Rescue Scenario 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeRiggi, John

    2013-01-11

    ’re lost should be reasonable input variables into a model attempting to predict the lost person’s most likely path. Taken a significant step further, if unmanned aerial vehicles enabled with terrain recognition and navigation capabilities derived from...

  4. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval; Nedkova, Teodora [Kaiser Aluminum

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  5. Lost River Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguidedand Long BeachLost River

  6. Traffic Incident Analysis on Urban Arterials Using Extended Spectral Envelope Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhen-zhen; Gao, Zi-you; Sun, Ya-fu; Guo, Sheng-min

    2015-01-01

    A traffic incident analysis method based on extended spectral envelope (ESE) method is presented to detect the key incident time. Sensitivity analysis of parameters (the length of time window, the length of sliding window and the study period) are discussed on four real traffic incidents in Beijing. The results show that: (1) Moderate length of time window got the best accurate in detection. (2) The shorter the sliding window is, the more accurate the key incident time are detected. (3) If the study period is too short, the end time of an incident cannot be detected. Empirical studies show that the proposed method can effectively discover the key incident time, which can provide a theoretic basis for traffic incident management.

  7. Computer Security Incident Handling Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Security Incident Handling Guide Recommendationsof the National Institute of Standards Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD Tom Millar United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team National Cyber Security Division

  8. Cyber Security Incident Management Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-08

    The manual establishes minimum requirements for a structured cyber security incident detection and management process for detecting, identifying, categorizing, containing, reporting, and mitigating cyber security incidents involving DOE information and information systems operated by DOE or by contractors on behalf of the Department. Admin Chg 1 dated 9-1-09; Admin Chg 2 dated 12-22-09. Canceled by DOE O 205.1B.

  9. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

  10. MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

    2004-01-01

    MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

  11. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  12. Advanced lost foam casting technology. 1995 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B.A.; Sheldon, D.S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production; Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency; Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects; Task 4: Pattern Gating; and Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers. This report summarizes the work done in the past two years and the conclusions drawn from the work.

  13. Mixing energy analysis of Bingham plastic fluids for severe lost circulation prevention using similitude 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massingill, Robert Derryl, Jr.

    2006-04-12

    , efforts have been focused on developing new Lost Circulation Materials (LCM?s) that are more effective and that minimize the operation costs by achieving sufficient FCS to allow drilling to continue.7,8 A variety of products have been proposed with a... chemical lost circulation treatments have emerged that focus on rapid application and effectively widening the mud weight window, therefore, minimizing drilling costs. Among the most popular LCM?s used while treating minor lost circulations are blended...

  14. A Lost Generation: The Trafficking of China’s Left-Behind Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellmann, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    McGirk, Yanning Wei A Lost Generation: The Trafficking ofhis son. “For the older generation, they feel like such a

  15. Do you think that DOTS may have your bicycle? DOTS currently has hundreds of bicycles in our bicycle impound that have been lost, abandoned, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Do you think that DOTS may have your bicycle? DOTS currently has hundreds of bicycles in our bicycle impound that have been lost, abandoned, or impounded. Many of these bikes are similar models and colors and therefore we are unable to identify your bicycle without detailed information and time to look

  16. An Estimate of Tidal Energy Lost to Turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    An Estimate of Tidal Energy Lost to Turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK Scripps an estimate of 3 1.5 GW of tidal energy lost to turbulence dissipation within 60 km of the ridge and Toole 1997). Another closely related question is that of where tidal energy gets removed from the ocean

  17. JULY 2005 1 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    JULY 2005 1 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK1 of the ridge, giving an estimate of 3±1.5 GW of tidal energy lost to turbulence dissipation within 60 km relation- ship between the energy in the semi-diurnal internal tide (E) and the depth

  18. Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Businger, Steven

    Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 1 Steven Businger and Selen Yildiz SOEST at University of Hawaii at Manoa This research is supported by ONR Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 2 Hurricane Force (HF) Wind Fields

  19. Incident Response Planning for Selected Livestock Shows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomascik, Chelsea Roxanne

    2012-02-14

    Incidents affecting the livestock industry are unavoidable in today's society. These incidents can happen at livestock shows across the country putting thousands of exhibitors, visitors, employees and livestock in danger. The purpose of this study...

  20. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi; Griffin, John A.

    2014-03-31

    With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (? 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

  1. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  2. Campus Security Authority Incident Report Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    Crimes Murder/NonNegligent Manslaughter Negligent Manslaughter Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Crimes Definitions & Incident Classifications CLERY REPORTABLE CRIMES Murder

  3. Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Incidence algebra of a presentation Eric Reynaud D´epartement de Math´ematiques, Universit´e de an incidence algebra of a poset associated to a presentation by a quiver and relations of a finite dimensional algebra. We provide an exact sequence relying the fundamental groups of the incidence algebra

  4. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "We cannot rest on our laurels; otherwise, we put our workers and project at risk," said Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler. The site's remedial action...

  5. Asymptotic Optimality of Constant-Order Policies for Lost Sales Inventory Models with Large Lead Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A.

    Sciences, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, e-mail: yingdong@us.ibm.com § Business Analytics and Mathematical Sciences, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, e-mail: mxsharma@us.ibm.com ¶ Business Analytics and Mathematical Sciences, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, e-mail: mss@us.ibm.com 1 #12;([35, 34, 12

  6. Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named Mineralogical Society of America Fellow XuY-12

  7. Moab Project Logs 2 Million Work Hours Without Lost-Time Injury or Illness

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment.Efficiency Rebate ProgramTheofTheRidgeItIllness

  8. Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Lacledeutilities.EnergyKirstinMetals Plant is shownIllness | Department

  9. WIPP Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *415, 2014 Waste8,2,, 2Workers

  10. Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energyDepartment of Energy Portsmouth ScienceFacility

  11. Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time Injury,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy6-09.docAERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1,Ridge |MoabIllness |

  12. Violation of Laws, Losses, and Incidents of Security Concerns

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-15

    To set forth Department of Energy (DOE) procedures to assure timely and effective action relating to violations of criminal, laws, loses, and incidents of security concern to DOE. Cancels DOE O 5631.5. Canceled by DOE O 470.1 of 9-28-1995.

  13. Get 2 Free Days of NeverLost!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is void. Advance reservations are required. Blackout periods may apply. Min- imum 5 day rental is required must be provided at time of reservation or offer is void. Advance reservations are required. Blackout

  14. Fact #901: November 30, 2015 States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for States Assessing Fees on Electric Vehicles to Make Up For Lost Fuel Tax Revenue

  15. Wanderl[o]st: Lost Identities and Losing Place in the New World (Dis)Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, Kendall Abbott

    2009-04-22

    Through the investigation of works by contemporary Spanish and Spanish-American writers--Roberto Bolańo, Abilio Estévez, Lucía Etxebarria, Ray Loriga, and Antonio José Ponte--this project explores subjects that get lost ...

  16. A review of "The Romantic Legacy of Paradise Lost: Reading against the grain" by Jonathan Shears 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urban, David V.

    2013-01-01

    ? and ?contextual studies.? As a snapshot of recent work by both junior and senior scholars in the ?eld, To Repair the Ruins speaks to the methodological vigor, diversity, and eclecticism of American Milton studies today. Jonathan Shears. ?e Romantic Legacy... and Romantic literature? and ?the legacy that Romantic readings of Paradise Lost have held, and still hold, on the critical consciousness? (?). Respecting but consciously setting his argument against Lucy Newlyn?s Paradise Lost and the Romantic Reader...

  17. Evaluation of equipment and methods to map lost circulation zones in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, W.J.; Leon, P.A.; Pittard, G.

    1981-05-01

    A study and evaluation of methods to locate, characterize, and quantify lost circulation zones are described. Twenty-five methods of mapping and quantifying lost circulation zones were evaluated, including electrical, acoustical, mechanical, radioactive, and optical systems. Each tool studied is described. The structured, numerical evaluation plan, used as the basis for comparing the 25 tools, and the resulting ranking among the tools is presented.

  18. Nuclear Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Incident Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

  19. PROPERTY RIGHTS AND THE SOCIAL INCIDENCE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    PROPERTY RIGHTS AND THE SOCIAL INCIDENCE OF MANGROVE CONVERSION IN VIETNAM by W. Neil Adger Mick INCIDENCE OF MANGROVE CONVERSION IN VIETNAM by W. Neil Adger1 Mick Kelly1,2 Nguyen Huu Ninh3 Ngo Cam Thanh3 and Univesity College London 2 Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia 3 Centre for Environment

  20. Acoustic recovery of lost power in pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Gardner, D.L.; Backhaus, S.

    1999-02-01

    In an efficient Stirling-cycle cryocooler, the cold piston or displacer recovers power from the gas. This power is dissipated into heat in the orifice of an orifice pulse tube refrigerator, decreasing system efficiency. Recovery of some of this power in a pulse tube refrigerator, without sacrificing the simplicity and reliability inherent in a system with no cold moving parts, is described in this paper. In one method of such power recovery, the hot ends of both the regenerator and the pulse tube are connected to the front of the piston driving the refrigerator. Experimental data is presented demonstrating this method using a thermoacoustic driver instead of a piston driver. Control of time-averaged mass flux through the refrigerator is crucial to this power recovery, lest the refrigerator{close_quote}s cooling power be overwhelmed by a room-temperature mass flux. Two methods are demonstrated for control of mass flux: a barrier method, and a hydrodynamic method based on turbulent irreversible flow. At {minus}55{degree}C, the refrigerator provided cooling with 9{percent} of the Carnot coefficient of performance. With straightforward improvements, similar refrigerators should achieve efficiencies greater than those of prior pulse tube refrigerators and prior standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerators, while maintaining the advantages of no moving parts. {copyright} {ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.}

  1. Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-09-12

    This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

  2. Incident Prevention, Warning, and Response (IPWAR) Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-30

    This Manual defines a structured, cohesive, and consistent process for performing incident prevention, warning, and response for DOE's Federal information systems and is consistent with the requirements of Federal laws, Executive orders, national security directives, and other regulations. The Manual also provides requirements and implementation instructions for the Department's Incident Prevention, Warning and Response process, and supplements DOE O 205.1, Department of Energy Cyber Security Management Program, dated 3-21-03. DOE N 205.17 cancels this manual. This manual cancels DOE N 205.4, Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents, dated 3/18/2002.

  3. PROFESSIONS DE FOI, CTPU FEVRIER 2010 Christopher Newfield: You think the strikes lost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    PROFESSIONS DE FOI, CTPU FEVRIER 2010 Christopher Newfield: You think the strikes lost? Isabelle, as well as the professions de foi which explain what each list stands for. As far as I can tell that in practice one votes not for a collection of individual candidates but rather for a profession de foi. I

  4. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was exam- ined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic. The speciation of carbon de- pends on the chemical and physical conditions prevailing in the reservoir, and itsCarbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade

  5. Bridge Funding Bridge funding is designed to stabilize meritorious research programs that have lost extramural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    Bridge Funding Overview: Bridge funding is designed to stabilize meritorious research programs that have lost extramural funding. Bridge funds are for one year and are intended to enhance the likelihood by the applicant's Department/Division. Applicants may only request bridge funding once per calendar year. Bridge

  6. Connection Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lai Wa

    2013-01-01

    2008-2009. Documentary film. Williams, Patricia J. The2008-2009. Documentary film. Yosso, Tara. Critical Race

  7. Connection Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lai Wa

    2013-01-01

    me Waipo Grandma’s dumpling recipe? From:   Sent:   To:  tea. Haha you want to make dumplings? I will mail recipe.It is Waipo’s recipe. Remember don’t put too much filing in

  8. Something Lost 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1983-01-01

    D, giving the closest the spoken 'words 0 ;; If you ":JOuld come this 1tlay, [{entlemen 9 II "'food said.. Kirk \\'IA,tohed thc,m go, slightly disturhed hy the Hay that the last lTI,-"nhe2' of the p'p,:cty to leave carried his tail bet\\Kirk's tempcT. L?t~. Pro}-:'C1sko. came OVer to him. ~;I'm sorrY9 sirs there's notbinrs? to inclicate ':[here tb['.t fJl"l1ell migrlt be coming from. J~ncl we CEi,n I t cle?a1.' it until H0 find tho source...

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Techniques (Presentation) Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Nanocomposites by Grazing-Incidence X-Ray...

  10. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006 Management (CISM): Group Crisis Intervention, 4th Edition, June 2006, International Critical Incident Stress

  11. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  12. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  13. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  14. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  15. A Monte Carlo approach to modeling lost person behavior in wilderness areas using a geographic information system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Lori

    1995-01-01

    Monte Carlo modeling techniques using mean information fields (MIF), developed by Torsten Hagerstrand in the 1950s, were integrated with a geographic information system (GIS) to simulate lost person behavior in wilderness areas. Big Bend Ranch State...

  16. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  17. Mapping incident photosynthetically active radiation from MODIS data over China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    Mapping incident photosynthetically active radiation from MODIS data over China Ronggao Liu a Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is a key input parameter for almost all terrestrial ecosystem models of incident photosynthetically active radiation from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data. Journal

  18. A Decision Support System for chemical incident information 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    2002-01-01

    . This thesis proposes the development of such a DSS based on chemical incident information. Chemical incident information is mostly qualitative in nature. Therefore, mathematical and statistical analysis of this information is an extremely challenging...

  19. ORISE: Incident Command System (ICS) Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic ScienceHow to Work WithIncident Command

  20. Information conservation is fundamental: recovering the lost information in Hawking radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baocheng Zhang; Qing-yu Cai; Ming-sheng Zhan; Li You

    2013-05-27

    In both classical and quantum world, information cannot appear or disappear. This fundamental principle, however, is questioned for a black hole, by the acclaimed "information loss paradox". Based on the conservation laws of energy, charge, and angular momentum, we recently show the total information encoded in the correlations among Hawking radiations equals exactly to the same amount previously considered lost, assuming the non-thermal spectrum of Parikh and Wilczek. Thus the information loss paradox can be falsified through experiments by detecting correlations, for instance, through measuring the covariances of Hawking radiations from black holes, such as the manmade ones speculated to appear in LHC experiments. The affirmation of information conservation in Hawking radiation will shine new light on the unification of gravity with quantum mechanics.

  1. Crosshole EM for oil field characterization and EOR monitoring: Field examples from Lost Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C.; Wratcher, M.; Lambert, I.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Tseng H.W.

    1996-07-16

    A steamflood recently initiated by Mobil Development and Production U.S. at the Lost Hills No 3 oil field in California is notable for its shallow depth and the application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques to monitor the subsurface steam flow. Steam was injected into three stacked eastward-dipping unconsolidated oil sands at depths from 60 to 120 m; the plume is expected to develop as an ellipsoid aligned with the regional northwest-southeast strike. Because of the shallow depth of the sands and the high viscosity of the heavy oil, it is important to track the steam in the unconsolidated sediments for both economic and safety reasons. Crosshole and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic imaging were applied for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. The crosshole EM data were collected to map the interwell distribution of the high-resistivity oil sands and to track the injected steam and hot water. Measurements were made in two fiberglass-cased observation wells straddling the steam injector on a northeast-southwest profile. Field data were collected before the steam drive, to map the distribution of the oil sands, and then 6 and 10 months after steam was injected, to monitor the expansion of the steam chest. Resistivity images derived from the collected data clearly delineated the distribution and dipping structure of the target oil sands. Difference images from data collected before and during steamflooding indicate that the steam chest has developed only in the middle and lower oil sands, and it has preferentially migrated westward in the middle oil sand and eastward in the deeper sand. Surface-to-borehole field data sets at Lost Hills were responsive to the large-scale subsurface structure but insufficiently sensitive to model steam chest development in the middle and lower oil sands. As the steam chest develops further, these data will be of more use for process monitoring.

  2. THE MASS OF KOI-94d AND A RELATION FOR PLANET RADIUS, MASS, AND INCIDENT FLUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lauren M.

    We measure the mass of a modestly irradiated giant planet, KOI-94d. We wish to determine whether this planet, which is in a 22 day orbit and receives 2700 times as much incident flux as Jupiter, is as dense as Jupiter or ...

  3. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  4. Security incidents on the Internet, 1989--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an analysis of trends in Internet security based on an investigation of 4,299 Internet security-related incidents reported to the CERT{reg_sign} Coordination Center (CERT{reg_sign}/CC) from 1989 through 1995. Prior to this research, knowledge of actual Internet security incidents was limited and primarily anecdotal. This research: (1) developed a taxonomy to classify Internet attacks and incidents, (2) organized, classified, and analyzed CERT{reg_sign}/CC incident records, (3) summarized the relative frequency of the use of tools and vulnerabilities, success in achieving access, and results of attacks, (4) estimated total Internet incident activity, (5) developed recommendations for Internet users and suppliers, and (6) developed recommendations for future research. With the exception of denial-of-service attacks, security incidents were found to be increasing at a rate less than Internet growth. Estimates showed that most, if not all, severe incidents were reported to the CERT{reg_sign}/CC, and that more than one out of three above average incidents (in terms of duration and number of sites) were reported. Estimates also indicated that a typical Internet site was involved in, at most, around one incident (of any kind) per year, and a typical Internet host in, at most, around one incident in 45 years. The probability of unauthorized privileged access was around an order of magnitude less likely. As a result, simple and reasonable security precautions should be sufficient for most Internet users.

  5. How is open solar magnetic flux lost over the solar cycle? M. J. Owens,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    How is open solar magnetic flux lost over the solar cycle? M. J. Owens,1,2 N. U. Crooker,3 and M 2011. [1] The Sun's open magnetic field, magnetic flux dragged out into the heliosphere by the solar wind, varies by approximately a factor of 2 over the solar cycle. We consider the evolution of open

  6. Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Sara Shammni

    2011-10-21

    information using folder search as well as word search option via a user friendly interface. A program coded in JAVA is prepared for integrating the incident database with a Management of Change (MOC) software prototype. A collection of keywords... for the users to retrieve incident was developed using JAVA. Besides folder search, the users are provided with the option of word search to retrieve incident information. Folder searching along with word searching will help narrow down the users? scope...

  7. Silica phase changes: Diagenetic agent for oil entrapment, Lost Hills field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julander, D.R.; Szymanski, D.L. )

    1991-02-01

    The siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target at Lost Hills. Silica phase changes have influenced the distribution and entrapment of hydrocarbons. With increasing temperature, opal A phase diatomite is converted to opal CT and finally quartz phase rock. All phases are low in permeability. The opal A diatomite is characteristically high in oil saturation and productive saturation. Productivity from this phase is dependent on structural position and fieldwide variations in oil viscosity and biodegradation. The deeper chert reservoir coincides with the opal CT to quartz phase transition. Porosity is again reduced in this transition, but saturations in the quartz phase rocks increase. Tests in the chert reservoir indicate a single, low-permeability system, suggesting the importance of matric contribution. resistivity and porosity in the diatomite, and resistivity and velocity in the chert, are the physical properties which best reflect saturation. Methods exploiting these properties (FMS, BHTV, borehole, and surface shear wave studies) should be helpful in further characterizing the reservoirs and identifying future pay.

  8. Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahdiyati, -

    2012-07-16

    incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining...

  9. INCIDENT CONTAMINATION LEPTON DOSES MEASURED USING RADIOCHROMIC FILM IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    INCIDENT CONTAMINATION LEPTON DOSES MEASURED USING RADIOCHROMIC FILM IN RADIOTHERAPY MARTIN J) AbstractĐMeasurement of lepton contamination is achieved across a radiotherapy photon beam and peripheral in air to measure incident contamination without the eects of phantom scatter. Surface dose was measured

  10. Novel applications of data mining methodologies to incident databases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Sumit

    2006-08-16

    similar to the one proposed by Chung et. al [17] was used after incorporating changes required for the NRC database. 21 Following categories of type of equipment failure involved were created: 1. Storage Vessel ? this includes all the storage... 1.4 Incident Investigation...........................................................................5 II INCIDENT DATABASES.............................................................................7 2.1...

  11. Time Reversal of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Toulouse III, CNRS, 31062 Toulouse (France)

    2008-08-15

    Using Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we study the time reversibility of Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in kicked optical lattices, showing that in the regime of quantum chaos, the dynamics can be inverted from explosion to collapse. The accuracy of time reversal decreases with the increase of atom interactions in BEC, until it is completely lost. Surprisingly, quantum chaos helps to restore time reversibility. These predictions can be tested with existing experimental setups.

  12. Application and Continued Development of Thin Faraday Collectors as a Lost Ion Diagnostic for Tokamak Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Ed Cecil

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishment of sixteen years of work toward the development of thin foil Faraday collectors as a lost energetic ion diagnostic for high temperature magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Following initial, proof of principle accelerator based studies, devices have been tested on TFTR, NSTX, ALCATOR, DIII-D, and JET (KA-1 and KA-2). The reference numbers refer to the attached list of publications. The JET diagnostic KA-2 continues in operation and hopefully will provide valuable diagnostic information during a possible d-t campaign on JET in the coming years. A thin Faraday foil spectrometer, by virtue of its radiation hardness, may likewise provide a solution to the very challenging problem of lost alpha particle measurements on ITER and other future burning plasma machines.

  13. The Lost Ones: Post-Gatekeeper U.S. Latina Fiction and the Construction of Cultural Trauma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caminero-Santangelo, Marta

    2010-01-13

    Studies. The Lost Ones: Post-Gatekeeper U.S. Latina Fiction and the Construction of Cultural Trauma By Marta Caminero-Santangelo, University of Kansas When violence and state repression in El Salvador and Guatemala in the 1980s caused large... The Guardians (2007), Reyna Grande’s Across a Hundred Mountains (2006), and Alicia Gaspar de Alba’s Desert Blood: The Juárez Murders (2005).2 In this essay, I argue that such Chicana texts are 1 I am...

  14. A preliminary evaluation of a speed threshold incident detection algorithm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolb, Stephanie Lang

    1996-01-01

    and California algorithm #8 using Fuzzy Logic to evaluate the new algorithm's effectiveness in detecting incidents on freeways. To test these algorithms, real data from TransGuide were run through the algorithms. Algorithm output were compared with CCTV (closed...

  15. Bloggers as Citizen Journalists: The 2012 Pink Slime Incident 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannone, Anthony

    2013-08-22

    and added to ground beef to make lean affordable beef blends. News reports questioning the safety and quality of LFTB began in March 2012. A qualitative content analysis was performed on 44 blogs that mentioned the pink slime incident between...

  16. Tax Incidence Varies Across the Price Distribution Jeffrey M. Perloff*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    , CA 94720-3310 #12;Tax Incidence Varies Across the Price Distribution Standard treatments of tax pass a generic good at marginal cost: p = m. A branded-good manufacturer--a dominant firm--sells its

  17. ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

  18. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in themore »soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.« less

  19. Advanced grazing-incidence techniques for modern soft-matter materials analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The complex nano-morphology of modern soft-matter materials is successfully probed with advanced grazing-incidence techniques. Based on grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (GISAXS, GIWAXS, GISANS and GIWANS), new possibilities arise which are discussed with selected examples. Due to instrumental progress, highly interesting possibilities for local structure analysis in this material class arise from the use of micro- and nanometer-sized X-ray beams in micro- or nanofocused GISAXS and GIWAXS experiments. The feasibility of very short data acquisition times down to milliseconds creates exciting possibilities forin situandin operandoGISAXS and GIWAXS studies. Tuning the energy of GISAXS and GIWAXS in the soft X-ray regime and in time-of flight GISANS allows the tailoring of contrast conditions and thereby the probing of more complex morphologies. In addition, recent progress in software packages, useful for data analysis for advanced grazing-incidence techniques, is discussed.

  20. Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obidullah, A.S.M.

    2007-04-25

    Many incidents have occurred because industries have ignored past incidents or failed to learn lessons from the past. Incident databases provide an effective option for managing large amounts of information about the past ...

  1. Creating a Lost/Write-Off Retirement Document On the Main Menu screen under the Lookup and Maintenance box in the middle of the screen look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creating a Lost/Write-Off Retirement Document On the Main Menu screen under the Lookup to the main screen of the document and the asset number is showing in the Asset Number field you must click

  2. 2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Chapter 11, Incidents of Security Concern

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 11, Incidents of Security Concern Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for reporting, investigating, and correcting Incidents of Security Concern.

  3. IPA Derivatives for Make-to-Stock Production-Inventory Systems With Lost Sales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and random production capacity, where the finished- goods inventory is controlled by a continuous-time base to the base-stock level and a parameter of the production rate process. These formulas are comprehensive random production processes, as well as feedback information from inventory to production facilities

  4. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Littleton; John Griffin

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (�¢����Energy SMARRT�¢���) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU�¢����s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU�¢����s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  5. Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

    2000-04-01

    This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

  6. Lost alpha-particle diagnostics from a D-T plasma by using nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasao, Mamiko [Organization for Research Initiative and Development, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Wada, Motoi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsutaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    Among various methods proposed for alpha-particles loss measurement, we studied on those by measuring gamma rays of three cases, from (1) nuclear reactions induced by alpha particles, (2) those from short-life-time activities and (3) those from long-life-time activities induced by alpha particles. The time evolution of local alpha flux may possibly be measured by using the {sup 9}Be (a, n) {sup 12}C reaction (1). Using the same system, but with a target set up close to the first wall, activation measurement on site right after turning-off the discharge is possible (2). Nuclear reaction, {sup 25}Mg (a, p) {sup 28}Al, that produce radioisotopes of short lifetime of 2.2 minutes in one of the best candidates. As to the activation to a long lifetime (3), it is predicted that the gamma ray yield from {sup 19}F (a, n) {sup 22}Na reaction is enough for the measurement at the reactor site.

  7. How to Aviod Danger, Damage, and Dollars Lost in Steam Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risko, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    -06-31 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 It becomes such a simple economic analysis to determine the return on investment for fixing leaking steam traps that this practice becomes... time period when traps will be surveyed with failures replaced – there could be ESL-IE-15-06-31 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 additional 1,000 or 2,000 new failures...

  8. Lost in secular evolution: the case of a low mass classical bulge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Kanak

    2015-01-01

    The existence of a classical bulge in disk galaxies holds important clue to the assembly history of galaxies. Finding observational evidence of very low mass classical bulges particularly in barred galaxies including our Milky Way, is a challenging task as the bar driven secular evolution might bring significant dynamical change to these bulges alongside the stellar disk. Using high-resolution N-body simulation, we show that if a cool stellar disk is assembled around a non-rotating low-mass classical bulge, the disk rapidly grows a strong bar within a few rotation time scales. Later, the bar driven secular process transform the initial classical bulge into a flattened rotating stellar system whose central part also have grown a bar-like component rotating in sync with the disk bar. During this time, a boxy/peanut (hereafter, B/P) bulge is formed via the buckling instability of the disk bar and the vertical extent of this B/P bulge being slightly higher than that of the classical bulge, it encompasses the whol...

  9. CLERY INCIDENT REPORT FORM NON-POLICE CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    to promote crime awareness and to enhance campus safety through reliable statistical records. The purpose reportable crimes and/or non-criminal hate motivated incidents that have occurred within one of the four.depts.ttu.edu/ttpd/. For the purposes of CLERY, CSA's are required to document certain reportable crimes and non-criminal hate motivated

  10. PSM case history: Regulatory compliance can prevent catastrophic incidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiihne, E.J.; Mannan, M. [RMT/Jones and Neuse, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration promulgated on February 24, 1992 the Process Safety Management (PSM) rule: 29 CFR 1910.119. The PSM rule represents a holistic program which requires facilities to develop, implement and practice 14 different elements. Each of the 14 elements are significant in the protection of health and safety of all employees and personnel working in and around the plant site. PSM programs developed in compliance with the PSM rule are expected to reduce the probability and consequence of occurrence of hazardous incidents. This paper presents a real life incident that occurred in a plant before a PSM program was put in place. A detailed description of the incident is provided with appropriate discussions of non compliance with the PSM rule. Finally, the paper provides a theoretical scenario where a fully operational PSM program would have prevented the incident. The case history and discussion provided in this paper also reinforces the concept of maintaining process and equipment integrity through multiple barriers of safety. A fully operational PSM program represents such a multiple barrier safety system.

  11. A categorical model for traffic incident likelihood estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchangi, Shamanth

    2007-04-25

    In this thesis an incident prediction model is formulated and calibrated. The primary idea of the model developed is to correlate the expected number of crashes on any section of a freeway to a set of traffic stream characteristics, so that a...

  12. 16 November 2015 UCT investigating allegation of rape incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadross, Mark

    16 November 2015 UCT investigating allegation of rape incident Please cite Gerda Kruger, Executive allegations on social media of a rape that allegedly occurred in a building on its campus. Once it was made the matter properly. We ask people to consider the fact that rape and sexual assault is a dreadful reality

  13. Skin cancer detection by oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Elizabeth Brooks

    2009-05-15

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer and it is on the rise. If skin cancer is diagnosed early enough, the survival rate is close to 90%. Oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance (OIR) spectroscopy offers a technology that may be used...

  14. The Japan Times Printer Friendly Articles By AKEMI NAKAMURA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HOME The Japan Times Printer Friendly Articles By AKEMI NAKAMURA With Tuesday's decision for France will take the lead in developing the promising energy source. Lost ITER bid elicits mixed reactions Where policy on chasing fusion. Soon after the six parties involved in the ITER project -- China, Japan, Russia

  15. Incidents at nuclear power plants caused by the human factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashin, V. A.

    2012-09-15

    Psychological analysis of the causes of incorrect actions by personnel is discussed as presented in the report 'Methodological guidelines for analyzing the causes of incidents in the operation of nuclear power plants.' The types of incorrect actions and classification of the root causes of errors by personnel are analyzed. Recommendations are made for improvements in the psychological analysis of causes of incorrect actions by personnel.

  16. TimesTimesFLORIDA STATE Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southeast By Gary Fineout Every year, Floridians are told to get ready for the oncoming hurricane season their legislators. If current budget predictions hold, the state's public universities will have lost a quarter

  17. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamada, Tomomi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine (Japan); Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  18. Final Technical Report Quantification and Standardization of Pattern Properties for the Control of the Lost Foam Casting Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Michaels

    2005-09-30

    This project takes a fresh look at the ''white side'' of the lost foam casting process. We have developed the gel front hypothesis for foam pyrolysis behavior and the magnetic metal pump method for controlling lost foam casting metal fill event. The subject of this report is work done in the improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process. The original objective of this project was to improve the control of metal fill by understanding the influence of foam pattern and coating properties on the metal fill event. Relevant pattern properties could then be controlled, providing control of the metal fill event. One of the original premises of this project was that the process of metal fill was relatively well understood. Considerable previous work had been done to develop fluid mechanical and heat transfer models of the process. If we could just incorporate measured pattern properties into these models we would be able predict accurately the metal fill event. As we began to study the pyrolysis behavior of EPS during the metal fill event, we discovered that the chemical nature of this event had been completely overlooked in previous research. Styrene is the most prevalent breakdown product of EPS pyrolysis and it is a solvent for polystyrene. Much of the styrene generated by foam pyrolysis diffuses into intact foam, producing a molten gel of mechanically entangled polystyrene molecules. Much of the work of our project has centered on validation of this concept and producing a qualitative model of the behavior of EPS foam undergoing pyrolysis in a confined environment. A conclusion of this report is that styrene dissolution in EPS is a key phenomenon in the pyrolysis process and deserves considerable further study. While it is possible to continue to model the metal fill event parametrically using empirical data, we recommend that work be undertaken by qualified researchers to directly characterize and quantify this phenomenon for the benefit of modelers, researchers, and workers in the field. Another original premise of this project was that foam pattern and coating properties could be used to efficiently control metal fill. After studying the structure of EPS foam in detail for the period of this contract, we have come to the conclusion that EPS foam has an inherent variability at a scale that influences metal fill behavior. This does not allow for the detailed fine control of the process that we originally envisioned. We therefore have sought other methods for the control of the metal fill event. Of those, we now believe that the magnetic metal pump shows the most promise. We have conducted two casting trials using this method and preliminary results are very encouraging. A conclusion of our report is that, while every effort should continue to be made to produce uniform foam and coatings, the use of the magnetic metal pump should be encouraged and closed loop control mechanisms should be developed for this pouring method.

  19. Collaborative Research: Barotropic Radiation Experiment (BARX) The question of how energy flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dushaw, Brian

    flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents comprising the general and vorticity. Intellectual Merit. A fundamental process by which ocean currents lose the energy acquired from will provide a benchmark on a phenomenon that is important to the dynamics of ocean currents but is difficult

  20. Additional or Lost Gillnet Tag Order Form All NE multispecies Category A, E, and F Day gillnet vessels fishing for NE multispecies and/or vessels fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vessels fishing for NE multispecies and/or vessels fishing under a monkfish DAS using gillnet gear must tag their gillnets with BLUE gillnet tags. Vessel owners are required to account for the total number of tags issued. Should tags be lost, missing, or destroyed, vessel owners/operators must report

  1. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebi, Junko; Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ?6, ?12, ?24, and ?36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (?65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ?6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  2. Lost in Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traywick, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    setting off rumors of murder, torture and a US conspiracy.Cardeńo’s death into a local murder mystery. But it was thelater fuel speculation of murder and conspiracy. This is the

  3. Finding Lost Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eden, Ashley Michelle

    2010-01-01

    66] ed. Leslie Farkas. Anthropometry of the Head and Face.2005. [39] L.G. Farkas. Anthropometry of the head and faceof anthropometric data. Anthropometry is the science of

  4. Lost in Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traywick, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    of the security company gave the family about $500 to helpthe security company and the military to answer the family’sthe family’s, the army’s, and the security company’s —detail

  5. Socioeconomic status and prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates among the diverse population of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    MN, Smith E, Siadaty M, Hauck FR, Pickle LW (2006) Spatial analysis of prostate cancer incidence and race in Virginia,

  6. INCIDENCE OF CULL LOBSTERS, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, IN COMMERCIAL AND RESEARCH CATCHES OFF THE MAINE COASTI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that commercially caught lobsters from ports off Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island had incidences of missing

  7. ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer underI REEECNO OFChicago No-Noticel lIncident

  8. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSEHow ORISE is Making a DifferenceRadiological Incident

  9. Forecasting Spatiotemporal Impact of Traffic Incidents on Road Networks Bei Pan, Ugur Demiryurek, Cyrus Shahabi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Forecasting Spatiotemporal Impact of Traffic Incidents on Road Networks Bei Pan, Ugur Demiryurek and quantifying the impact of traffic incidents. Traffic incidents include any non-recurring events on road networks, including accidents, weather hazard, road construction or work zone closures. By analyzing

  10. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Han Jo; Boland, Patrick J.; Meredith, Dennis S.; Lis, Eric; Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji; Yamada, Yoshiya J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  11. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  12. Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

  13. UNM PCI Incident Response Plan V1.2 Last Updated: 6/14/13 Credit Card (PCI) Security Incident Response Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    UNM PCI Incident Response Plan V1.2 Last Updated: 6/14/13 Credit Card (PCI) Security IncidentCard, American Express, Discover & JCB) jointly established the PCI Security Standards Council to administer the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI DSS) that provide specific guidelines for safeguarding

  14. Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan,T.

    2009-06-30

    If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

  15. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  16. Normal-Incidence Photoemission Electron Microscopy (NI-PEEM) for Imaging Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschlimann, Martin

    Philip Kahl & Simone Wall & Christian Witt & Christian Schneider & Daniela Bayer & Alexander Fischer-incidence photoemission microscopy P. Kahl :S. Wall :C. Witt :M. Horn-von Hoegen : F.

  17. Modeling the Coastal Ocean over a Time Period of Several April 8, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    , lost objects or oil spill over long periods of time in near coastal ocean areas. Such methods would. The final target of this program is to develop methods to forecast the drift of things like con- tainers be of interest for services in charge of maritime safety, environmental studies or pollution impact assessment

  18. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research effort to develop an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real-time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns, and monitoring of the mold filling process. This will reduce scrap, improve product quality, and save energy.

  19. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  20. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  1. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-10-15

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  2. Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial analysis of air pollution and cancer incidence rates in Haifa Bay, Israel Ori Eitan with historically high air pollution levels. This work tests whether persistent spatial patterns of metrics of chronic exposure to air pollutants are associated with the observed patterns of cancer incidence rates

  3. Laser pointing stability measured by an oblique-incidence optical transmittance difference technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Laser pointing stability measured by an oblique-incidence optical transmittance difference an oblique-incidence optical transmittance technique for determining the pointing stability of a laser. In this technique, we follow the angular drift of a monochromatic laser beam by measuring the relative changes

  4. Migration/inversion for Incident Waves Synthesized from Common-Shot Data Gathers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleistein, Norman

    to incident plane waves. The primary objective of a migration/inversion process is to detect reflectorsMigration/inversion for Incident Waves Synthesized from Common-Shot Data Gathers Norman Bleistein Presented at the International Meeting of the SEG, 2006 Keywords Kirchhoff inversion, migration

  5. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 -Aug 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-001248 THOMPSON ROAD Gas leak Security , Toronto Fire, Toronto Police, and Occupational Health and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas leak in the area of the Life Science BuildingWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 - Aug 18, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  6. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 -Feb 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas leak Security and Toronto Fire responded to a report of a natural gas odour in B-wing. TorontoWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 - Feb 12, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building\\Const. Security, York Fire Prevention and Toronto Fire responded to a fire alarm. The cause of the alarm

  7. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 -Jul 15, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The building was checked and no natural gas was found. Toronto Fire determined that all was in order. 7/12/2012 07:31 AM HazardousWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 - Jul 15, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  8. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 -May 5, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-000845 YORK LANES RETAIL Gas leak Security, Toronto Fire and Enbridge Gas responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The source of the odour was located in a restaurant kitchen. EnbridgeWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 - May 5, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  9. Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    Cancer incidences in Europe related to mortalities, and ethnohistoric, genetic, and geographic We have previously shown that geographic differences in cancer mortalities in Europe are related of 45 male and 47 female cancers. Differences in cancer incidences are correlated moder- ately, first

  10. Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants D Laurier 1 living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present herein results about the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results

  11. High frequency acoustic transmission loss of perforated plates at normal incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    High frequency acoustic transmission loss of perforated plates at normal incidence Vincent Phonga conducted on the transmission loss of perforated plates at normal incidence. The investigation includes microphone measurements of transmission loss for 11 perforated plates with variable thickness, hole size

  12. On the incident solar radiation in CMIP5 models Linjiong Zhou1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Minghua

    On the incident solar radiation in CMIP5 models Linjiong Zhou1,2,3 , Minghua Zhang3,4 , Qing Bao1 of Sciences, Beijing, China Abstract Annual incident solar radiation at the top of atmosphere should solar radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is the most important forcing of the climate system

  13. internally, and how much of it is lost back into space?The key common source of energy in our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couzin, Iain D.

    solar system is the Sun, and this energy is distrib- uted either through radiation or via the solar wind. Since the time of formation of our solar system, some energy has been stored internally in the planetary bodies as thermal, chemical, or rotational energy. Energy also reaches us from outside our solar system

  14. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    =forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME to account for net present value of money r = assumed interest rate i = index over variation points Cost Expected cost summed over all relevant time intervals Cost spent to build variation point i at time r

  15. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

  16. Evaluation of internal contamination levels after a radiological dispersal device incident using portal monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.C.; Hertel, Nolan; Ansari, A.; Manger, Ryan P; Freibert, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Following a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) incident, it may be necessary to evaluate the internal contamination levels of a large number of potentially affected individuals to determine if immediate medical follow-up is necessary. Since the current laboratory capacity to screen for internal contamination is limited, rapid field screening methods can be useful in prioritizing individuals. This study evaluated the suitability of a radiation portal monitor for such screening. A model of the portal monitor was created for use with models of six anthropomorphic phantoms in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP) X-5 Monte Carlo Team (MCNP A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5. LA-CP-03-0245. Vol. 2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2004.). The count rates of the portal monitor were simulated for inhalation and ingestion of likely radionuclides from an RDD for each of the phantoms. The time-dependant organ concentrations of the radionuclides were determined using Dose and Risk Calculation Software Eckerman, Leggett, Cristy, Nelson, Ryman, Sjoreen and Ward (Dose and Risk Calculation Software Ver. 8.4. ORNL/TM-2001/190. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2006.). Portal monitor count rates corresponding to a committed effective dose E(50) of 10 mSv are reported.

  17. Modelling Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  18. Quantum Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  19. Accident/Incident Statistics 2010 Number of Work/Study-Related Injuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Department LWD = Lost Workday(s) Cause of Work/Study-Related Injuries Figure 1 summarizes the causes for all injury cases, 4 of them were due to inadequate protection of eyes. Department No. of Accidents Total LWD=0 0LWD3 LWD>3 ACPF 1 1 BCB 3 3 CBME 1 1 CHEM 2 2 CLS 1 1 CSO 1 1 DMSF 1 1 FMO 11 1 2 8 LANG 1 1 LIB

  20. An account of scientific transfer to the industry: the co-development of an incident analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    about their need of an incident analysis method. The company wanted a tool that would help them better

  1. Chemical laboratory incident, December 5, 2011, Lab Sciences Building Release of Lachrymator Agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    , supply and exhaust air to the laboratories was shut down, thereby preventing the exhaust Emergency room, Pg. 1 Description of the incident by the Principle Investigator (PI) Pg. 2 Analysis

  2. Metalized Polyethylene Mulch to Reduce Incidence of Huanglongbing and Improve Growth of New Citrus Plantings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croxton, S.; Stansly, P.

    2014-01-01

    7.14 P Metalized Polyethylene Mulch to Reduce Incidence ofNorth, Immokalee, FL, USA Polyethylene mulch was evaluatedUV reflective low density polyethylene mulch metalized with

  3. Consumers' Dependency on Media for Information about Food Safety Incidents Related to the Beef Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charanza, Ashley

    2012-10-19

    Food safety has become an important topic in today's mainstream media. Food safety incidents, specifically related to the beef industry, have the potential to damage the beef industry severely, and negative coverage in the media can alter consumers...

  4. Root cause analysis of solder flux residue incidence in the manufacture of electronic power modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Pranav

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the root causes of the incidence of solder flux residue underneath electronic components in the manufacture of power modules. The existing deionized water-based centrifugal cleaning process was ...

  5. Climate and Landscape Factors Associated with Buruli Ulcer Incidence in Victoria, Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Ravensway, Jenni; Benbow, Mark Eric; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Pierce, Steven J.; Campbell, Lindsay P.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.; Hayman, John A.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Wallace, John R.; Qi, Jiaguo

    2012-12-10

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (M. ulcerans), is a necrotizing skin disease found in more than 30 countries worldwide. BU incidence is highest in West Africa; however, cases have substantially increased in coastal...

  6. Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    European populations. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2008, 107:389-as: Marshall et al. : Recent breast cancer incidence trendsTeachers Study cohort. Breast Cancer Research 2010 12:R4.

  7. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kV Transmission Line Reroute Project, Montrose County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-20

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to reroute a section of the Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, in Montrose County, Colorado. A portion of the transmission line, situated 11 miles southeast of Montrose, Colorado, crosses Waterdog Peak, an area of significant geologic surface activity, which is causing the transmission line's lattice steel towers to shift. This increases stress to structure hardware and conductors, and poses a threat to the integrity of the transmission system. Western proposes to relocate the lattice steel towers and line to a more geologically stable area. The existing section of transmission line and the proposed relocation route cross Bureau of Land Management and private land holdings.

  8. Diabetes and tuberculosis: the impact of the diabetes epidemic on tuberculosis incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Catherine R.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Roglic, Gojka; Williams, Brian G.; Lauer, Jeremy A.; Dye, Christopher; Unwin, Nigel

    2007-09-06

    number not for citation purposes) tion, as well as estimates stratified by age and sex. The published 95% confidence intervals for the relative risks The proportion by which the incidence rate of the out- come of interest (here, incident tuberculosis... of charge "BioMed Central will be the most significant development for disseminating the results of biomedical research in our lifetime." Sir Paul Nurse, Cancer Research UK Your research papers will be: available free of charge to the entire biomedical...

  9. NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2010-01-16

    DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY A Dissertation by ALEJANDRO GARCIA URIBE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2009 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering NON-INVASIVE OPTICAL DETECTION OF EPITHELIAL CANCER USING OBLIQUE INCIDENCE DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY A Dissertation by ALEJANDRO GARCIA URIBE...

  10. The incidence and significance of anaerobic bacteria in the equine uterus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Dean Roger

    1987-01-01

    THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCF.... December I 987 Major Subject: Veterinary Medical Sciences THE INCIDENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA IN THE EQUINE UTERUS A Thesis by DEAN ROGER BOLINGER Approved as to style and content by: Ronnie G. Elmore (Chairman of Committee...

  11. Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driggers, S.A.

    1994-03-10

    The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

  12. DSS-mediated Inhibition of Quantitative Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Jaspreet

    2011-08-04

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis (UC), is on the rise. UC is modeled in rodents by the consumption of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a...

  13. Kodama time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abreu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    In a general time-dependent (3+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime, the so-called Kodama vector is a naturally defined geometric quantity that is timelike outside the evolving horizon and so defines a preferred class of fiducial observers. However the Kodama vector does not by itself define any preferred notion of time. We demonstrate that a preferred time coordinate - which we shall call Kodama time - can be introduced by taking the additional step of applying the Clebsch decomposition theorem to the Kodama vector. We thus construct a geometrically preferred coordinate system for any time-dependent spherically symmetric spacetime, and explore its properties. In particular we use this formalism to construct a general class of conservation laws, generalizing Kodama's energy flux. We study the geometrically preferred fiducial observers, and demonstrate that it is possible to define and calculate a generalized notion of surface gravity that is valid throughout the entire evolving spacetime. Furthermor...

  14. Characterizing and Mitigating Work Time Inflation in Task Parallel Programs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olivier, Stephen L.; de Supinski, Bronis R.; Schulz, Martin; Prins, Jan F.

    2013-01-01

    Task parallelism raises the level of abstraction in shared memory parallel programming to simplify the development of complex applications. However, task parallel applications can exhibit poor performance due to thread idleness, scheduling overheads, and work time inflation – additional time spent by threads in a multithreaded computation beyond the time required to perform the same work in a sequential computation. We identify the contributions of each factor to lost efficiency in various task parallel OpenMP applications and diagnose the causes of work time inflation in those applications. Increased data access latency can cause significant work time inflation in NUMAmore »systems. Our locality framework for task parallel OpenMP programs mitigates this cause of work time inflation. Our extensions to the Qthreads library demonstrate that locality-aware scheduling can improve performance up to 3X compared to the Intel OpenMP task scheduler. « less

  15. New opportunities for quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering at steady-state sources using mechanical selection of the incident and final neutron energy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mamantov, Eugene

    2015-06-12

    We propose a modification of the neutron wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) device that enables inelastic (in particular, quasielastic) scattering measurements not relying on the neutron time-of-flight. The proposed device is highly suitable for a steady-state neutron source, somewhat similar to a triple-axis spectrometer, but with simultaneous selection of the incident and final neutron energy over a broad range of scattering momentum transfer. Both the incident and final neutron velocities are defined by the WAVES geometry and rotation frequency. The variable energy transfer is achieved through the natural variation of the velocity of the transmitted neutrons as a function of themore »scattering angle component out of the equatorial plane.« less

  16. to the PORTAL servers, including count, occupancy, and time mean speeds in each lane. PORTAL also includes incident and variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    measures are temperature, visibility, wind speed, and rainfall. From the basic sensor data PORTAL computes and is often broken into three component areas: environmental, economic, and social (3). Environmental consumption of nonrenewable fossil fuels. Economic Sustainability The cost of fuel consumed for transportation

  17. Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

    2011-08-23

    We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

  18. Quantum time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootters’s conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  19. Chow Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  20. Soft x ray/extreme ultraviolet images of the solar atmosphere with normal incidence multilayer optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The first high resolution Soft X-Ray/Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) images of the Sun with normal incidence multilayer optics were obtained by the Standford/MSFC Rocket X-Ray Spectroheliograph on 23 Oct. 1987. Numerous images at selected wavelengths from 8 to 256 A were obtained simultaneously by the diverse array of telescopes flown on-board the experiment. These telescopes included single reflection normal incidence multilayer systems (Herschelian), double reflection multilayer systems (Cassegrain), a grazing incidence mirror system (Wolter-Schwarzschild), and hybrid systems using normal incidence multilayer optics in conjunction with the grazing incidence primary (Wolter-Cassegrain). Filters comprised of approximately 1700{Angstrom} thick aluminum supported on a nickel mesh were used to transmit the soft x ray/EUV radiation while preventing the intense visible light emission of the Sun from fogging the sensitive experimental T-grain photographic emulsions. These systems yielded high resolution soft x ray/EUV images of the solar corona and transition region, which reveal magnetically confined loops of hot solar plasma, coronal plumes, polar coronal holes, supergranulation, and features associated with overlying cool prominences. The development, testing, and operation of the experiments, and the results from the flight are described. The development of a second generation experiment, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, which is scheduled to fly in the summer of 1990, and a recently approved Space Station experiment, the Ultra-High Resolution XUV Spectroheliograph, which is scheduled to fly in 1996 are also described.

  1. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel. Large increases in Reynolds stress occur due to onset of the small-scale concentrations of vorticity immediately downstream of separation; substantial increases at locations further downstream arise from development of the large-scale vorticity concentrations.

  2. Investigation of the hydrogen release incident at the AC Transit Emeryville Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Aaron P.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Levin, Jamie [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA] [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA; Butler, Dennis [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA] [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), Oakland, CA

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the investigation of the release of approximately 300kg of hydrogen at the AC Transit Facility in Emeryville, CA. The hydrogen release was avoidable in both the root cause and contributing factors. The report highlights the need for communication in all phases of project planning and implementation. Apart from the failed valve, the hydrogen system functioned as designed, venting the hydrogen gas a safe distance above surrounding structures and keeping the subsequent fire away from personnel and equipment. The Emeryville Fire Department responded appropriately given the information provided to the Incident Commander. No injuries or fatalities resulted from the incident.

  3. EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.

    2007-04-24

    The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

  4. Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar, J.C.; Sun, Y.; Haberl, J.

    2013-01-01

    -11-02 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Energy Procedia 00 (2013) 000–000 www.elsevier.com/locate/procedia 2013 ISES Solar World Congress Improved Methodology to Measure Normal Incident Solar Radiation with a Multi-Pyranometer Array Juan...-Carlos Baltazar*, Yifu Sun, Jeff Haberl Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, The Texas A&M University System College Station, TX 77845, U.S.A. Abstract An improved methodology to estimate the normal incident solar radiation...

  5. Surface Response of Tungsten to Helium and Hydrogen Plasma Flux as a Function of Temperature and Incident Kinetic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sefta, Faiza

    2013-01-01

    fusion reaction and ion energies as reproduced from http://incident helium kinetic energy with and without equilibriummi- crostructure evolution in low energy helium irradiated

  6. Household catastrophic payments for tuberculosis care in Nigeria: incidence, determinants, and policy implications for universal health coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ukwaja, Kingsley; Alobu, Isaac; Abimbola, Seye; Hopewell, Philip

    2013-01-01

    for tuberculosis care in Nigeria: incidence, determinants,Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. 2 National TuberculosisAbakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. 3 National Primary Health

  7. Systme de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    Systčme de rapports d'incidents conforme aux normes ITIL pour le réseau A.S.T.R.I.D Mémoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Aper¸cu d'ITIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Objectifs de ce m´emoire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 ITIL 4 2.1 Introduction

  8. EMPLOYEE ACCIDENT / INCIDENT / QUALITY IMPROVEMENT REPORT UoW 1018 (Rev. 3/05)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    provided to affected party (originator). University Risk Management Box 351276 UWB Administrative Services the Labor and Industries (L&I) "Report of Industrial Injury or Occupational Disease." Your doctor should mail this form to the University Risk Management Office. UoW 1018 Accident/Incident Form L&I Injury

  9. A WBAnalysis The incident that forms our running example occurred on 5 September 1995 at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    at Brussels Airport (BRU). As reported in our primary source of information in Sec- tion 2.1.1, a DC10 in the source article is simple, and we shall extend it to a rigorous analysis of the incident which

  10. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  11. What Should Aviation Safety Incidents Teach Us? William S. Greenwell John C. Knight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    involved the failure of a ground-based warn- ing system that contributed to an accident with extensive aviation incidents involving failures of safety-critical software systems. Based on our analysis, these systems are used both on board aircraft and at air traffic control facilities to assist pilots

  12. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  13. Metalized Polyethylene Mulch to Reduce Incidence of Huanglongbing and Improve Growth of New Citrus Plantings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    7.14 P Metalized Polyethylene Mulch to Reduce Incidence of Huanglongbing and Improve Growth of New and Education Center Polyethylene mulch was evaluated for deterring colonization by Asian citrus psyllid (ACP growth of young citrus. UV reflective low density polyethylene mulch metalized with aluminum, low density

  14. SPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    space weather impacts the electricity market in the PJM power grid. The starting point of this paperSPACE WEATHER AND THE INCIDENCE OF REACTIVE "OFF-COST" OPERATIONS IN THE PJM POWER GRID 7.6 Kevin F the price of electricity in the PJM power grid. In this paper we examine one of the mechanisms by which

  15. Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

  16. Extension of the binary-encounter-dipole model to relativistic incident electrons Yong-Ki Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -encounter-Bethe BEB model are extended to relativistic incident electron energies. Total ionization cross sectionsV and dominate the cross section thereafter. A simple modification of the original BED-BEB formulas is proposed and nonrelativistic BEB cross sections are compared to the K-shell ionization cross sections by electron impact

  17. Architectures for Cyber-Security Incident Reporting in Safety-Critical Systems Chris W. Johnson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    of air navigation services and equipment, and maintenance organisations have the necessary procedures and policies for voluntary reporting of events that could affect aviation safety" (ICAO Resolution A32-15: ICAO Global Aviation Safety Plan) International support for voluntary incident reporting systems includes near

  18. Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    -492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

  19. The Curious Incident of the Investment in the Market: Real Options and a Fair Gamble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    design this market in such a way that it seems unnatural for the manager to be able to take advantageThe Curious Incident of the Investment in the Market: Real Options and a Fair Gamble Jonathan in the Market: Real Options and a Fair Gamble "Is there any point to which you would wish to draw my attention

  20. Control of incident irradiance on a batch operated flat-plate photobioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    microalgae growth rate. Then, the feed-forward inversion control scheme adjusted the incident irradiance biomass and lipid productivity in microalgae cultivation. The present approach can rapidly identify and productivity of microalgae. This was illustrated with Nannochloropsis oculata batch grown in a flat-plate PBR

  1. A. Name: Information Systems Security Incident Response Policy B. Number: 20070103-secincidentresp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Page 1 I. Title A. Name: Information Systems Security Incident Response Policy B. Number: 20070103 and Responsibility Information Systems and Computing is responsible for the operation of Penn's data networks (Penn-secincidentresp C. Author(s): David Millar (ISC Information Security) and Lauren Steinfeld (Chief Privacy Officer

  2. GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL STABILITY FOR A VIRUS DYNAMICS MODEL WITH NONLINEAR INCIDENCE OF INFECTION AND REMOVAL PAUL GEORGESCU AND YING-HEN HSIEH Abstract. Global dynamics of a compartmental model which describes virus and the removal rate of the virus are assumed to be nonlinear. In the case where the functional quotient between

  3. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection of biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection (OI-RD) microscope, a form of polarization-modulated imaging ellipsometer, for label on the polarizer­ compensator­sample­analyzer scheme and under the off-null condition, a polarization-modulated OI

  4. Near-and sub-barrier fusion of 20O incident ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    University April 2012 #12;Outline · Background · Neutron Star Crust · Fusion and Reference ReactionsNear- and sub-barrier fusion of 20O incident ions with 12C target nuclei Kyle Brown G410 Indiana observed from accreting neutron stars · Models cannot reproduce conditions needed for superbursts · 24O

  5. Research Article Increased Lung and Bladder Cancer Incidence in Adults after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Research Article Increased Lung and Bladder Cancer Incidence in Adults after In Utero and Early resulted in increased mortality in adults from several outcomes, including lung and bladder cancer. Methods data. Subjects included 221 lung and 160 bladder cancer cases diagnosed in northern Chile from 2007

  6. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that contralateral breast doses and LAR were comparable to WBRT, despite their added complexity. The smaller irradiated volume of the ABPI plan contributed to a halving of LAR for contralateral breast compared with the other plan types. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for a left breast protocol using kilovoltage CBCT contributed <10% to LAR for the majority of organs, and did not exceed 22% of total organ dose. Conclusions: Phantom measurements and calculations of LAR from the BEIR VII models predict that complex breast radiotherapy techniques do not increase the theoretical risk of second cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

  7. Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M. Berrill,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M 2007 The output energy dependence of high repetition rate grazing incidence pumped Ni-like Mo, Ni-like Ag, and Ne-like Ti transient collisional soft x-ray lasers on the duration of the pump pulse

  8. Inferred influence of nutrient availability on the relationship between Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and incident irradiance in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Dan

    fluorescence and incident irradiance in the Bering Sea Christina Schallenberg,1 Marlon R. Lewis,1 Dan E. Kelley fluorescence and incident solar irradiance as a potential diagnostic of the nutritional status of phytoplankton normalized to the absorption of light by pigments were analyzed as a function of irradiance to describe

  9. SPOT Mirror and Incidence Angles Consider the Earth centered at E with radius r, a SPOT satellite S at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    how far off-nadir the focus point is. For the SPOT HRV sensors it can range from -27 (west) to +27 (east) of the ground track. In SCIE metadata records the mirror angle is described by an integer "mirror and incidence angle values recorded in the SCIE metadata, respectively, and if s is the incidence angle computed

  10. (BBA) is competent for investigations on incidents of poisoning honey bees due to the use of pesti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (BBA) is competent for investigations on incidents of poisoning honey bees due to the use of pesti in the case of honey-bee poisoning by pesticides' [Amtl Pfl Best (Berlin-Dahlem), NF 36/5, 179-182]. An overview of the poisoning incidents shows a clear decline in the last years. The most impor- tant

  11. Using the IEC 61508 Lifecycle and Common Requirements to Guide the Investigation and Analysis of Incidents Involving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    to the design and operation of future safety-critical systems. Version 1: 30th January 2003 ­ initial version the causes of an incident or accident if designers are to guard against any future recurrence. Causal support for this class of incidents and near misses. Appendix A presents the criteria that guided our

  12. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  13. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  14. Upgrade on risk analysis following the 080919 incident in the LHC sector 3-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorowski, M; Modlinski, Z; Polinski, J; Tavian, L; Wach, J; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2010-01-01

    On 19th September 2008, during powering tests of the main dipole circuit in sector 3-4 of the LHC, an electrical fault occurred producing an electrical arc and resulting in mechanical and electrical damage, release of about 6 tons of helium from the magnet cold mass to the insulation vacuum enclosure and consequently to the tunnel, via the spring-loaded relief discs on the vacuum enclosure. The helium discharge from the cold mass to the vacuum enclosure exceeded by an order of magnitude, the maximum credible incident (MCI) flow described in the preliminary risk analysis performed in 1998. Based on the experience gained from the 19th September 2008 incident, a new MCI has been formulated and the cryogenic risk analysis has been revised and updated. The recommendations concerning the safety relief system protecting the vacuum vessels and the mechanical properties of the doors installed in the tunnel have been formulated.

  15. Linking Climate to Incidence of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (L. major) in Pre-Saharan North Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bounoua, Lahouari; Kahime, Kholoud; Houti, Leila; Blakey, Tara; Ebi, Kristie L.; Zhang, Ping; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thome, Kurtis; Dudek, Claire; Sahabi, Salah A.; Messouli, Mohammed; Makhlouf, Baghdad; EI Laamrani, Abderahmane; Boumezzough, Ali

    2013-08-20

    Shifts in surface climate may have changed the dynamic of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the pre-Saharan zones of North Africa. Caused by Leishmania major, this form multiplies in the body of rodents serving as reservoirs of the disease. The parasite is then transmitted to human hosts by the bite of a Phlebotomine sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) that was previously fed by biting an infected reservoir. We examine the seasonal and interannual dynamics of the incidence of this ZCL as a function of surface climate indicators in two regions covering a large area of the semi-arid Pre-Saharan North Africa. Results suggest that in this area, changes in climate may have initiated a trophic cascade that resulted in an increase in ZCL incidence.

  16. Final Report for "Accurate Numerical Models of the Secondary Electron Yield from Grazing-incidence Collisions".

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seth A Veitzer

    2008-10-21

    Effects of stray electrons are a main factor limiting performance of many accelerators. Because heavy-ion fusion (HIF) accelerators will operate in regimes of higher current and with walls much closer to the beam than accelerators operating today, stray electrons might have a large, detrimental effect on the performance of an HIF accelerator. A primary source of stray electrons is electrons generated when halo ions strike the beam pipe walls. There is some research on these types of secondary electrons for the HIF community to draw upon, but this work is missing one crucial ingredient: the effect of grazing incidence. The overall goal of this project was to develop the numerical tools necessary to accurately model the effect of grazing incidence on the behavior of halo ions in a HIF accelerator, and further, to provide accurate models of heavy ion stopping powers with applications to ICF, WDM, and HEDP experiments.

  17. Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-06-30

    On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

  18. Handling Cyber Security Alerts and Advisories and Reporting Cyber Security Incidents

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-03-18

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and responsibilities for reporting cyber security incidents involving classified and unclassified systems and responding to cyber security alerts and advisories; and to implement requirements of DOE N 205.1, Unclassified Cyber Security Program, and DOE M 471.2-2, Classified Information Systems Security Manual. DOE N 205.13, dated 7-6-04, extends this notice until 7-6-05. Cancels DOE M 471.2-2, Chapter III, section 8.

  19. Analysis of incident-energy dependence of delayed neutron yields in actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasir, Mohamad Nasrun bin Mohd Metorima, Kouhei Ohsawa, Takaaki Hashimoto, Kengo

    2015-04-29

    The changes of delayed neutron yields (?{sub d}) of Actinides have been analyzed for incident energy up to 20MeV using realized data of precursor after prompt neutron emission, from semi-empirical model, and delayed neutron emission probability data (P{sub n}) to carry out a summation method. The evaluated nuclear data of the delayed neutron yields of actinide nuclides are still uncertain at the present and the cause of the energy dependence has not been fully understood. In this study, the fission yields of precursor were calculated considering the change of the fission fragment mass yield based on the superposition of fives Gaussian distribution; and the change of the prompt neutrons number associated with the incident energy dependence. Thus, the incident energy dependent behavior of delayed neutron was analyzed.The total number of delayed neutron is expressed as ?{sub d}=?Y{sub i} • P{sub ni} in the summation method, where Y{sub i} is the mass yields of precursor i and P{sub ni} is the delayed neutron emission probability of precursor i. The value of Y{sub i} is derived from calculation of post neutron emission mass distribution using 5 Gaussian equations with the consideration of large distribution of the fission fragments. The prompt neutron emission ?{sub p} increases at higher incident-energy but there are two different models; one model says that the fission fragment mass dependence that prompt neutron emission increases uniformly regardless of the fission fragments mass; and the other says that the major increases occur at heavy fission fragments area. In this study, the changes of delayed neutron yields by the two models have been investigated.

  20. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)] [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  1. Spin-dependent delay time in ferromagnet/insulator/ferromagnet heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, ZhengWei; Zheng Shi, De; Lv, HouXiang

    2014-07-07

    We study theoretically spin-dependent group delay and dwell time in ferromagnet/insulator/ferromagnet (FM/I/FM) heterostructure. The results indicate that, when the electrons with different spin orientations tunnel through the FM/I/FM junction, the spin-up process and the spin-down process are separated on the time scales. As the self-interference delay has the spin-dependent features, the variations of spin-dependent dwell-time and spin-dependent group-delay time with the structure parameters appear different features, especially, in low incident energy range. These different features show up as that the group delay times for the spin-up electrons are always longer than those for spin-down electrons when the barrier height or incident energy increase. In contrast, the dwell times for the spin-up electrons are longer (shorter) than those for spin-down electrons when the barrier heights (the incident energy) are under a certain value. When the barrier heights (the incident energy) exceed a certain value, the dwell times for the spin-up electrons turn out to be shorter (longer) than those for spin-down electrons. In addition, the group delay time and the dwell time for spin-up and down electrons also relies on the comparative direction of magnetization in two FM layers and tends to saturation with the thickness of the barrier.

  2. Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Precomputed Radiance Transfer for Real-Time Rendering in Dynamic, Low-Frequency Lighting a new, real-time method for rendering diffuse and glossy objects in low-frequency lighting environments-frequency incident lighting into transferred radiance which includes global effects like shadows and interreflections

  3. and, partly because they were under their influence, also the Americans, who came to register significantly in mathematics only in the 1890s but then made up for lost time rather speedily.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canales, Jimena

    isolated are the first two pieces, which treat aspects of the early non-common algebras, first in the hands is omitted, and, moreover, in silence. But why not treat, for example, Boole in the 1840s helping to launch formal logic with an algebra that was created heavily under the influence of the calculus of differential

  4. How to Enhance Dephasing Time in Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cywinski; R. M. Lutchyn; C. P. Nave; S. Das Sarma

    2008-04-22

    We theoretically investigate the influence of designed pulse sequences in restoring quantum coherence lost due to background noise in superconducting qubits. We consider both 1/f noise and Random Telegraph Noise, and show that the qubit coherence time can be substantially enhanced by carefully engineered pulse sequences. Conversely, the time dependence of qubit coherence under external pulse sequences could be used as a spectroscopic tool for extracting the noise mechanisms in superconducting qubits, i.e. by using Uhrig's pulse sequence one can obtain information about moments of the spectral density of noise. We also study the effect of pulse sequences on the evolution of the qubit affected by a strongly coupled fluctuator, and show that the non-Gaussian features in decoherence are suppressed by the application of pulses.

  5. How to Enhance Dephasing Time in Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cywinski, L; Nave, C P; Sarma, S D

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the influence of designed pulse sequences in restoring quantum coherence lost due to background noise in superconducting qubits. We consider both 1/f noise and Random Telegraph Noise, and show that the qubit coherence time can be substantially enhanced by carefully engineered pulse sequences. Conversely, the time dependence of qubit coherence under external pulse sequences could be used as a spectroscopic tool for extracting the noise mechanisms in superconducting qubits, i.e. by using Uhrig's pulse sequence one can obtain information about moments of the spectral density of noise. We also study the effect of pulse sequences on the evolution of the qubit affected by a strongly coupled fluctuator, and show that the non-Gaussian features in decoherence are suppressed by the application of pulses.

  6. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  7. Incidence, Risks, and Sequelae of Posterior Fossa Syndrome in Pediatric Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korah, Mariam P.; Esiashvili, Natia; Mazewski, Claire M.; Hudgins, Roger J.; Tighiouart, Mourad; Janss, Anna J.; Schwaibold, Frederick P.; Crocker, Ian R.; Curran, Walter J.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, risks, severity, and sequelae of posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) in children with medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1990 and 2007, 63 children with medulloblastoma at Emory University and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta were treated with craniectomy followed by radiation. Fifty-one patients were assigned to a standard-risk group, and 12 patients were assigned to a high-risk group. Five patients had <1.5-cm{sup 2} residual tumor, 4 had >=1.5-cm{sup 2} residual tumor, and the remainder had no residual tumor. Eleven patients had disseminated disease. Patients received craniospinal irradiation at a typical dose of 23.4 Gy or 36 Gy for standard- or high-risk disease, respectively. The posterior fossa was given a total dose of 54 or 55.8 Gy. Nearly all patients received chemotherapy following cooperative group protocols. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. PFS developed in 18 patients (29%). On univariate analysis, brainstem invasion, midline tumor location, younger age, and the absence of radiographic residual tumor were found to be predictors of PFS; the last two variables remained significant on multivariate analysis. From 1990 to 2000 and from 2001 to 2007, the proportions of patients with no radiographic residual tumor were 77% and 94%, respectively. During the same eras, the proportions of patients with PFS were 17% and 39%. Only 4 patients had complete recovery at last follow-up. Conclusions: The incidence of PFS increased in the latter study period and is proportional to more aggressive surgery. Children with midline tumors exhibiting brainstem invasion are at increased risk. With the increased incidence of PFS and the permanent morbidity in many patients, the risks and benefits of complete tumor removal in all patients need to be reexamined.

  8. Time and Labor Manual -Time Keepers -LSUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor Manual

  9. Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go Everyone starts the week with the same number of hours. So, why does your time go so fast? Let's find out! Number of hours of sleep each night ____ x 7 preparation/clean-up time) ____ x 7 = ____ Travel time to and from campus ___ x __ = ____ Number of hours per

  10. PET image reconstruction with system matrix based on point spread function derived from single photon incidence response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin, Fan; Ming-Kai, Yun; Xiao-Li, Sun; Xue-Xiang, Cao; Shuang-Quanm, Liu; Pei, Chai; Dao-Wu, Li; Long, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques appear particularly promising since they can provide accurate physical model and geometric system description. The reconstructed image quality mainly depends on the system matrix model which describes the relationship between image space and projection space for the IR method. The system matrix can contain some physics factors of detection such as geometrical component and blurring component. Point spread function (PSF) is generally used to describe the blurring component. This paper proposes an IR method based on the PSF system matrix, which is derived from the single photon incidence response function. More specifically, the gamma photon incidence on a crystal array is simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and then the single photon incidence response functions are obtained. Subsequently, using the single photon incidence response functions, the coincidence blurring factor is acquired according to the...

  11. Fabrication and characterization of fibers with built-in liquid crystal channels and electrodes for transverse incident-light modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Lei

    We report on an all-in-fiber liquid crystal (LC) structure designed for the modulation of light incident transverse to the fiber axis. A hollow cavity flanked by viscous conductors is introduced into a polymer matrix, and ...

  12. TOMATO: Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.), `Florida 47' CONTROL OF SILVERLEAF WHITEFLY AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS ON STAKED TOMATO WITH NEONICOTINOID AND OTHER INSECTICIDES, 2005 (SLW) and whitefly-borne tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) are major constraints to tomato

  13. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. ); Ponce, V.H. ); Echenique, P.M. )

    1992-10-19

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He{sup +} ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the {l angle}100{r angle} direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1.

  14. Risk analysis update of the LHC cryogenic system following the 19th September 2008 incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorowski, M; Modlinski, Z; Polinski, J; Tavian, L; Wach, J

    2011-01-01

    On 19th September 2008, during powering tests of the main dipole circuit of the Large Hadron Collider, an electrical fault occurred producing an electrical arc and resulting in mechanical and electrical damage, release of helium from the magnet cold mass to the insulation vacuum enclosure and consequently to the tunnel, via the spring-loaded relief discs on the vacuum enclosure. The pressurization of the vacuum space exceeded significantly the allowed design value. Mathematical modeling based on a thermodynamic approach has enabled the revision of the helium discharge system protecting the vacuum enclosure against the over-pressurization in case of a redefined maximum credible incident (MCI) occurrence.

  15. Incident energy dependence of p(t) correlations at relativistic energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, BD; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, GS; Badyal, SK; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, LS; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, VV; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, BI; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, AK; Bhatia, VS; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, LC; Blyth, CO; Bonner, BE; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, AV; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, RV; Cai, XZ; Caines, H.; Sanchez, MCDB; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, HF; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, JP; Cormier, TM; Cramer, JG; Crawford, HJ; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, MM; Dedovich, TG; Derevschikov, AA; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, SM; Dong, WJ; Dong, X.; Draper, JE; Du, F.; Dubey, AK; Dunin, VB; Dunlop, JC; Mazumdar, MRD; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, WR; Efimov, LG; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, MS; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, JE; Gos, H.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, SM; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, TD; Hallman, TJ; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, JW; Heinz, M.; Henry, TW; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, GW; Huang, HZ; Huang, SL; Hughes, EW; Humanic, TJ; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, WW; Jedynak, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, PG; Judd, EG; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, VY; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, EM; Klay, J.; Klein, SR; Koetke, DD; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kowalik, KL; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, VI; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, AI; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, RK; Kuznetsov, AA; Lamont, MAC; Landgraf, JM; Lange, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lehocka, S.; LeVine, MJ; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, SJ; Lisa, MA; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, L.; Liu, QJ; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, WJ; Long, H.; Longacre, RS; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Love, WA; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, GL; Ma, JG; Ma, YG; Magestro, D.; Mahajan, S.; Mahapatra, DP; Majka, R.; Mangotra, LK; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Marx, JN; Matis, HS; Matulenko, YA; McClain, CJ; McShane, TS; Meissner, F.; Melnick, Y.; Meschanin, A.; Miller, ML; Minaev, NG; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, DK; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, CF; Morozov, DA; Munhoz, MG; Nandi, BK; Nayak, SK; Nayak, TK; Nelson, JM; Netrakanti, PK; Nikitin, VA; Nogach, LV; Nurushev, SB; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pal, SK; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, SY; Pavlinov, AI; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, VA; Phatak, SC; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, AM; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, BVKS; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ravel, O.; Ray, RL; Razin, SV; Reichhold, D.; Reid, JG; Reinnarth, J.; Renault, G.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, HG; Roberts, JB; Rogachevskiy, OV; Romero, JL; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Savin, I.; Sazhin, PS; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, RP; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Shao, W.; Sharma, M.; Shen, WQ; Shestermanov, KE; Shimanskiy, SS; Sichtermann, E.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, RN; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, TDS; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, AAP; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Sumbera, M.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, TJM; de Toledo, AS; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, AH; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, JH; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, OD; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, DG; Buren, GV; Van Buren, G.; Vander Molen, AM; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, IM; Vasiliev, AN; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, SE; Viyogi, YP; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, SA; Waggoner, WT; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, XL; Wang, Y.; Wang, ZM; Ward, H.; Watson, JW; Webb, JC; Westfall, GD; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, SW; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, ZZ; Yamamoto, E.; Yepes, P.; Yurevich, VI; Zborovsky, I.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, WM; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, ZP; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, AN; STAR Collaboration.

    2005-01-01

    REVIEW C 72, 044902 (2005) Incident energy dependence of pt correlations at relativistic energies J. Adams,3 M. M. Aggarwal,29 Z. Ahammed,43 J. Amonett,20 B. D. Anderson,20 D. Arkhipkin,13 G. S. Averichev,12 S. K. Badyal,19 Y. Bai,27 J. Balewski,17 O.... Billmeier,46 L. C. Bland,4 C. O. Blyth,3 B. E. Bonner,34 M. Botje,27 A. Boucham,38 J. Bouchet,38 A. V. Brandin,25 A. Bravar,4 M. Bystersky,11 R. V. Cadman,1 X. Z. Cai,37 H. Caines,48 M. Caldero?n de la Barca Sa?nchez,17 J. Castillo,21 O. Catu,48 D. Cebra,7...

  16. Cloudy with a Chance of Breach: Forecasting Cyber Security Incidents Yang Liu1, Armin Sarabi1, Jing Zhang1, Parinaz Naghizadeh1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mingyan

    Cloudy with a Chance of Breach: Forecasting Cyber Security Incidents Yang Liu1, Armin Sarabi1, Jing In this study we characterize the extent to which cyber security incidents, such as those referenced by Verizon to understand the extent to which one can forecast if an organization may suffer a cyber security incident

  17. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. ); Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M. )

    1994-01-15

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He[sup +] ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the [l angle]100[r angle] direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., [approx]0.9 for 53 MeV B[sup 4+] and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces.

  18. Electron-impact excitation of xenon at incident energies between 15 and 80 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filipovic-acute-accent, D.; Marinkovic-acute-accent, B.; Pejcev, V.; Vuskovic-acute-accent, a.L.

    1988-01-15

    Normalized, absolute differential cross sections (DCS's) have been measured for the 20 lowest electronic states of xenon. Incident electron energies were 15, 20, 30, and 80 eV and the scattering angles ranged from 5/sup 0/ to 150/sup 0/. The energy resolution was 40 meV. Absolute elastic DCS's have been obtained by normalizing the relative values to the recently published absolute elastic DCS's by Register et al. (J. Phys. B 19, 1685 (1986)). Elastic-to-inelastic intensity ratios, at different incident energies for the 6s((3/2)/sub 1/ state were determined. These ratios were utilized as secondary standards to establish the absolute scale for the other inelastic processes in accordance with intensity ratios of lines in energy-loss spectra. The absolute inelastic DCS's were extrapolated to 0/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ and integrated to yield the integral cross sections (ICS's). A comparison of the present DCS's with the only available measurements at 20 eV impact energy shows satisfactory agreement in shape but considerable difference in absolute value.

  19. Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

    2009-03-24

    In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a “governing” entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term “Peace Officer” is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: • TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products • OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies • NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel • NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: • NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs • NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems • NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) • NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

  20. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pinnix, Chelsea C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sheu, Tommy [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Memon, Nada [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rozner, Marc A. [Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dougherty, Anne H. [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving thoracic PBT be followed closely.

  1. Tensions in collaborative cyber security and how they affect incident detection and response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Glenn A.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2009-12-01

    Security often requires collaboration, but when multiple stakeholders are involved, it is typical for their priorities to differ or even conflict with one another. In today’s increasingly networked world, cyber security collaborations may span organizations and countries. In this chapter, we address collaboration tensions, their effects on incident detection and response, and how these tensions may potentially be resolved. We present three case studies of collaborative cyber security within the U.S. government and discuss technical, social, and regulatory challenges to collaborative cyber security. We suggest possible solutions, and present lessons learned from conflicts. Finally, we compare collaborative solutions from other domains and apply them to cyber security collaboration. Although we concentrate our analysis on collaborations whose purpose is to achieve cyber security, we believe that this work applies readily to security tensions found in collaborations of a general nature as well.

  2. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2014-09-28

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064 nm illumination of 10 mW/cm˛~ 1 kW/cm˛, compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  3. Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2013-09-01

    If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4?M{sub 0}{sup 2}, or about 7.509M{sub 0}{sup 2} ? 6.268 × 10{sup 76}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M{sub 0}{sup 2} ? 1.254 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, and then decreases back down to 4?M{sub 0}{sup 2} = 1.049 × 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}.

  4. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study, these results should be viewed as hypothesis generating.

  5. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  6. A Computational Model Incorporating Neural Stem Cell Dynamics Reproduces Glioma Incidence across the Lifespan in the Human Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Roman; Stoll, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert...

  7. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

    2010-12-22

    This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

  8. Isospin relaxation time in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba; Ko, Che Ming.

    1998-01-01

    Using an isospin-dependent transport model, we have studied the isospin and momentum relaxation times in the heavy residues formed in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies. It is found that only at incident energies below the Fermi energy...

  9. Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) -Sanitary Sewer Overflow Incident Form (rev. 12/2014) STEP 1 Immediately call EH&S at (510) 642-3073 with the following details of the incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) - Sanitary Sewer Overflow Incident Form (rev. 12 a drainage channel that flows to a surface water body gallons Estimated spill volume recovered from a drainage channel that flows to a surface water body gallons Estimated spill volume discharged directly

  10. Space time and the passage of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F. R. Ellis; Rituparno Goswami

    2012-08-26

    This paper examines the various arguments that have been put forward suggesting either that time does not exist, or that it exists but its flow is not real. I argue that (i) time both exists and flows; (ii) an Evolving Block Universe (`EBU') model of spacetime adequately captures this feature, emphasizing the key differences between the past, present, and future; (iii) the associated surfaces of constant time are uniquely geometrically and physically determined in any realistic spacetime model based in General Relativity Theory; (iv) such a model is needed in order to capture the essential aspects of what is happening in circumstances where initial data does not uniquely determine the evolution of spacetime structure because quantum uncertainty plays a key role in that development. Assuming that the functioning of the mind is based in the physical brain, evidence from the way that the mind apprehends the flow of time prefers this evolving time model over those where there is no flow of time.

  11. Realizing thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles from commercially available planar circuit materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Brian B; Whites, Kieth W; Radway, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    In this study, recent work on engineering R-card surface resistivity with printed metallic patterns is extended to the design of thin electromagnetic absorbers. Thin electromagnetic absorbers for wide incidence angles and both polarizations have recently been computationally verified by Luukkonen et al.. These absorbers are analytically modeled high-impedance surfaces with capacitive arrays of square patches implemented with relatively high dielectric constant and high loss substrate. However, the advantages provided by the accurate analytical model are largely negated by the need to obtain high dielectric constant material with accurately engineered loss. Fig. I(c) illustrates full-wave computational results for an absorber without vias engineered as proposed by Luukkonen et al.. Unique values for the dielectric loss are required for different center frequencies. Parameters for the capacitive grid are D=5.0 mm and w=O.l mm for a center frequency of 3.36 GHz. The relative permittivity and thickness is 9.20(1-j0.234) and 1=3.048 mm. Consider a center frequency of5.81 GHz and again 1=3.048 mm, the required parameters for the capacitive grid are D=2.0 mm and w=0.2 mm where the required relative permittivity is now 9.20(1-j0.371) Admittedly, engineered dielectrics are themselves a historically interesting and fruitful research area which benefits today from advances in monolithic fabrication using direct-write of dielectrics with nanometer scale inclusions. However, our objective in the present study is to realize the advantages of the absorber proposed by Luukkonen et al. without resort to engineered lossy dielectrics. Specifically we are restricted to commercially available planer circuit materials without use of in-house direct-write technology or materials engineering capability. The materials considered here are TMM 10 laminate with (35 {mu}lm copper cladding with a complex permittivity 9.20-j0.0022) and Ohmegaply resistor conductor material (maximum 250 {Omega}/sq.). A thin electromagnetic absorber for incidence angles greater than 30deg. but less than 60deg. and both polarizations is computationally demonstrated. This absorber utilizes high-permittivity, low-loss microwave substrate in conjunction with an engineered lossy sheet impedance. The lossy sheet impedance is easily engineered with simple analytical approximations and can be manufactured from commercially available laminate materials on microwave substrate.

  12. Manage Your Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lynn

    2000-06-27

    People view time in different ways, but we all could do a better job of managing our time. This publication explains three different time management tools: the 24-hour time log and chart; a self-assessment of thinking styles and time management...

  13. Discrimination and quantification of contamination and implanted solar wind in Genesis collector shards using grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray techniqies: Initial results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Eng, P.; Ghose, S.; Burnett, D.

    2006-12-13

    Grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence is a non-destructive technique that can differentiate the embedded solar wind component from surface contamination and collector background in the Genesis shards. Initial solar Fe abundance in D30554 is 8 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. Accurate knowledge of the composition of the Sun provides a baseline, which allows an understanding of how the solar system has evolved over time and how solar processes and solar wind mechanics behave. Unfortunately, the errors in photospheric abundances are too large for many planetary science problems and this hampers our understanding of these different processes. Analyses of solar wind implanted in meteorites or lunar soils have provided more precise data but alteration processes on these bodies may complicate such information. In response to this need for pristine solar wind samples, NASA developed and launched the Genesis Probe. Unfortunately, the probe smashed into the Utah desert shattering the 300 collector plates into 15,000+ pieces all of which are now coated in a both a fine terrestrial dust and Si and Ge powder from the disrupted collectors themselves. The solar wind penetration depth is 100-200 nm and the superposed contamination layers are typically 40-50 nm. Stringent cleaning regimes have the potential of removing the solar wind itself. The best solution is to have sufficient spatial resolution to separately analyze the surface contamination and penetrated solar wind. To that end, three Genesis collector array shards and their appropriate flight spares were characterized via grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence and x-ray reflectivity. The goals were (1) to evaluate the various cleaning methods used to eliminate contamination, (2) to identify the collector substrates most suited for this technique, (3) to determine whether the solar wind signature could be deconvolved from the collector background signature, and (4) to measure the relative abundances of Ca to Ge in the embedded solar wind.

  14. Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser inertial fusion energy power plants*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    1 Grazing incidence liquid metal mirrors (GILMM) for radiation hardened final optics for laser final optics in a laser inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The amount of laser light the GILMM substrate, adaptive (deformable) optics, surface tension and low Reynolds number, laminar flow in the film

  15. Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies constantly, the rate of change in stomatal conductance to fluc- tuating irradiance may have with very different irradiance patterns, assuming that rates of stomatal opening and closing were similar

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 81, 014607 (2010) Fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    , and Nuclear Engineering, NES 1-25, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180, USA 2 Los Alamos National Lab, Los; published 19 January 2010) A new method of measuring fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy are necessary for accurate, detailed neutronics calculations for new

  17. Numerical Simulation of Ground Rotations along 2D Topographical Profiles under the Incidence of Elastic Plane Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komatitsch, Dimitri

    derivatives or analytical expressions to compute the rotational Green's tensor. We validate the method using Numerical Simulation of Ground Rotations along 2D Topographical Profiles under the Incidence-Sesma, R. Madec, and D. Komatitsch Abstract The surface displacement field along a topographical profile

  18. TOMATO: Lycopersicon esculentum (Mill.) `Florida 47' `Tygress' CONTROL OF SILVERLEAF WHITEFLY AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    AND INCIDENCE OF TOMATO YELLOW LEAF CURL VIRUS ON STAKED TOMATO WITH INSECTICIDES AND RESISTANT VARIETIES, 2006 to whitefly-borne tomato yellow leafcurl virus (TYLCV) is a major constraint to tomato production in southwest-susceptible `Florida 47' and left untreated to serve as the untreated check and as source of whiteflies and virus

  19. Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some 100 significant cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Learning of the rootfactors of incidents potentially impacting the biofuel supply chains from some.riviere(cb.ineris.fr guy.marlair@iineris.fr alexis. vignestcbjneris.fr Abstract A biofuel is most often defined as a liquid. There are numerous potential supply chains for the production of biofuels, depending on feedstock, conventional

  20. Refraction of electromagnetic energy for wave packets incident on a negative-index medium is always negative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Refraction of electromagnetic energy for wave packets incident on a negative-index medium is always, including the model of Valanju et al., the energy and mo- mentum of the wave refract negatively. Since February 2004 We analyze refraction of electromagnetic wave packets on passing from an isotropic positive

  1. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) and LEED studies of adsorption and growth of Xe on Nb(110)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) and LEED studies of adsorption and growth of Xe and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) from 32 K to 100 K. The results show that Xe grows a (111 chamber with a base pressure below 1 x 10-10 torr. The chamber is equipped with an Omicron rear-view LEED

  2. Evaluation of pressure response in the Los Alamos controlled air incinerator during three incident scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vavruska, J.S. [Equinox, Ltd., Santa Fe, NM (United States); Elsberry, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Thompson, T.K.; Pendergrass, J.A. [T.K. Thompson, Inc., White Rock, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is a system designed to accept radioactive mixed waste containing alpha-emitting radionuclides. A mathematical model was developed to predict the pressure response throughout the offgas treatment system of the CAI during three hypothetical incident scenarios. The scenarios examined included: (1) loss of burner flame and failure of the flame safeguard system with subsequent reignition of fuel gas in the primary chamber, (2) pyrolytic gas buildup from a waste package due to loss of induced draft and subsequent restoration of induced draft, and (3) accidental charging of propellant spray cans in a solid waste package to the primary chamber during a normal feed cycle. For each of the three scenarios, the finite element computer model was able to determine the transient pressure surge and decay response throughout the system. Of particular interest were the maximum absolute pressures attainable at critical points in the system as well as maximum differential pressures across the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Modeling results indicated that all three of the scenarios resulted in maximum HEPA filter differential pressures well below the maximum allowable levels.

  3. Of Disasters and Dragon Kings: A Statistical Analysis of Nuclear Power Incidents & Accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheatley, Spencer; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We provide, and perform a risk theoretic statistical analysis of, a dataset that is 75 percent larger than the previous best dataset on nuclear incidents and accidents, comparing three measures of severity: INES (International Nuclear Event Scale), radiation released, and damage dollar losses. The annual rate of nuclear accidents, with size above 20 Million US$, per plant, decreased from the 1950s until dropping significantly after Chernobyl (April, 1986). The rate is now roughly stable at 0.002 to 0.003, i.e., around 1 event per year across the current fleet. The distribution of damage values changed after Three Mile Island (TMI; March, 1979), where moderate damages were suppressed but the tail became very heavy, being described by a Pareto distribution with tail index 0.55. Further, there is a runaway disaster regime, associated with the "dragon-king" phenomenon, amplifying the risk of extreme damage. In fact, the damage of the largest event (Fukushima; March, 2011) is equal to 60 percent of the total damag...

  4. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D; Chung, W; Shin, D; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  5. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streelight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streelight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltage were beyond the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some do the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C N

    1989-04-01

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. On Time. 6b: Quantum Mechanical Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. K. Raju

    2008-08-09

    The existence of small amounts of advanced radiation, or a tilt in the arrow of time, makes the basic equations of physics mixed-type functional differential equations. The novel features of such equations point to a microphysical structure of time. This corresponds to a change of logic at the microphysical level. We show that the resulting logic is a quantum logic. This provides a natural and rigorous explanation of quantum interference. This structured-time interpretation of quantum mechanics is briefly compared with various other interpretations of q.m.

  8. Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

    1998-04-14

    Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

  9. CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes and probe, to produce a fourth, the anti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes diagram for the production of a CARS signal. The three incident waves pump, probe (both of frequency p) and Stokes (S) combine to produce an anti-Stokes signal, frequency as. Figure 2. Schematic of the CARS system

  10. Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare Guse, MS; Amy Schlo2hauer, MPH; Peter Layde, MD, MSc IntroducEon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare groups for both intenEonal opioid and non-opioid poisonings Opioid range: 6 and ICD -10 codes were used to divide poisoning incidents by agent (opioid vs

  11. Where can I go to report an incident of sexual assault, da6ng violence, domes6c violence, sexual harassment, or stalking?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Where can I go to report an incident of sexual assault, da6ng violence confiden3al repor3ng and private but not confiden3al? When you disclose an incident involving sexual assault, da6ng violence, domes6c violence, sexual harassment

  12. DTERMINATION GRAPHIQUE DES COEFFICIENTS DE FRESNEL EN INCIDENCE OBLIQUE A LA SURFACE DE SPARATION D'UN MILIEU TRANSPARENT ET D'UN MILIEU ABSORBANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    294. DÉTERMINATION GRAPHIQUE DES COEFFICIENTS DE FRESNEL EN INCIDENCE OBLIQUE A LA SURFACE DE coefficients de Fresnel ainsi obtenus, on a également déterminé pour diverses incidences le facteur de. Cette précision atteint I/I000 en valeur relative pour les coefficients de Fresnel et quelques milličmes

  13. Yet another time about time - Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plamen L. Simeonov

    2015-08-29

    This paper presents yet another personal reflection on one the most important concepts in both science and the humanities: time. This elusive notion has been not only bothering philosophers since Plato and Aristotle. It goes throughout human history embracing all analytical and creative (anthropocentric) disciplines. Time has been a central theme in physical and life sciences, philosophy, psychology, music, art and many more. This theme is known with a vast body of knowledge across different theories and categories. What has been explored concerns its nature (rational, irrational, arational), appearances/qualia, degrees, dimensions and scales of conceptualization (internal, external, fractal, discrete, continuous, mechanical, quantum, local, global, etc.). Of particular interest have been parameters of time such as duration ranges, resolutions, modes (present, now, past, future), varieties of tenses (e.g. present perfect, present progressive, etc.) and some intuitive, but also fancy phenomenological characteristics such as arrow, stream, texture, width, depth, density, even scent. Perhaps the most distinct characteristic of this fundamental concept is the absolute time constituting the flow of consciousness according to Husserl, the reflection of pure (human) nature without having the distinction between exo and endo. This essay is a personal reflection upon the meaning of time in modern physics and phenomenological philosophy.

  14. Predicting Risk for Incidences of Homelessness Among Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motupalli, Venkat

    2015-12-18

    screener, with no added time or data collection burden. Further, a freeware script, compatible with all common data collection and storage systems, was developed to provide a baseline for further digital management efforts....

  15. Universal Time Tunneling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenter Nimtz

    2009-01-26

    How much time does a tunneling wave packet spent in traversing a barrier? Quantum mechanical calculations result in zero time inside a barrier . In the nineties analogous tunneling experiments with microwaves were carried out. The results agreed with quantum mechanical calculations. Electron tunneling time is hard to measure being extremely short and parasitic effects due to the electric charge of electrons may be dominant. However, quite recently the atomic ionization tunneling time has been measured. Experimental data of photonic, phononic, and electronic tunneling time is available now and will be presented. It appears that the tunneling time is a universal property independent of the field in question.

  16. Oblique-incidence sputtering of Ru intermediate layer for decoupling of intergranular exchange in perpendicular recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Shin; Inoue, Ken; Takahashi, Migaku

    2011-04-01

    During the Ru deposition process for granular type perpendicular magnetic recording media, both a reduction in the Ru intermediate layer thickness and lowering of sputtering gas pressure were successfully achieved by focusing on a self-shadowing effect. Oblique-incidence sputtering with a 60 deg. incident angle under an Ar gas pressure of 0.6 Pa yielded (1) columnar Ru grains with a growth direction of 30 deg. from the film normal, (2) c-plane sheet texture by epitaxial growth on the Pt underlayer, and (3) a flat envelope of the surface and a deep gap at grain boundaries. This change in the Ru structure significantly contributes to reducing exchange coupling among magnetic grains, especially in the initial growth region in an overlying granular medium.

  17. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a Cu(100) projected band-gap surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbard, J A; Kohlhoff, M; Rennick, C J; So, E; Ford, M; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01

    The charge transfer (ionization) of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number $n=25-34$) incident at a Cu(100) surface is investigated. Unlike fully metallic surfaces, where the Rydberg electron energy is degenerate with the conduction band of the metal, the Cu(100) surface has a projected bandgap at these energies, and only discrete image states are available through which charge transfer can take place. Resonant enhancement of charge transfer is observed at hydrogen principal quantum numbers for which the Rydberg energy matches the energy of one of the image states. The integrated surface ionization signals show clear periodicity as the energies of states with increasing $n$ come in and out of resonance with the image states. The velocity dependence of the surface ionization dynamics is also investigated. Decreased velocity of the incident H atom leads to a greater mean distance of ionization and a lower field required to extract the ion. The surface-ionization profiles (signal versus applied field) ...

  18. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering: application to the study of quantum dot lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja Radi?, Nikola; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Draži?, Goran; Bogdanovi?-Radovi?, Iva; Holý, Václav

    2012-01-01

    The modelling of grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) from three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is described. The ordering of quantum dots in three-dimensional quantum dot lattices is investigated by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Theoretical models describing GISAXS intensity distributions for three general classes of lattices of quantum dots are proposed. The classes differ in the type of disorder of the positions of the quantum dots. The models enable full structure determination, including lattice type, lattice parameters, the type and degree of disorder in the quantum dot positions and the distributions of the quantum dot sizes. Applications of the developed models are demonstrated using experimentally measured data from several types of quantum dot lattices formed by a self-assembly process.

  19. Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma mortality (1950–1999) and incidence (1969–1999) in the Eldorado uranium workers cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zablotska, Lydia B.; Lane, Rachel S.D.; Frost, Stanley E.; Thompson, Patsy A.

    2014-04-01

    Uranium workers are chronically exposed to low levels of radon decay products (RDP) and gamma (?) radiation. Risks of leukemia from acute and high doses of ?-radiation are well-characterized, but risks from lower doses and dose-rates and from RDP exposures are controversial. Few studies have evaluated risks of other hematologic cancers in uranium workers. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiation-related risks of hematologic cancers in the cohort of Eldorado uranium miners and processors first employed in 1932–1980 in relation to cumulative RDP exposures and ?-ray doses. The average cumulative RDP exposure was 100.2 working level months and the average cumulative whole-body ?-radiation dose was 52.2 millisievert. We identified 101 deaths and 160 cases of hematologic cancers in the cohort. Overall, male workers had lower mortality and cancer incidence rates for all outcomes compared with the general Canadian male population, a likely healthy worker effect. No statistically significant association between RDP exposure or ?-ray doses, or a combination of both, and mortality or incidence of any hematologic cancer was found. We observed consistent but non-statistically significant increases in risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) incidence and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) mortality with increasing ?-ray doses. These findings are consistent with recent studies of increased risks of CLL and NHL incidence after ?-radiation exposure. Further research is necessary to understand risks of other hematologic cancers from low-dose exposures to ?-radiation. - Highlights: • We analyzed long-term follow-up for hematologic cancers of the Eldorado uranium workers. • Workers were exposed to a unique combination of radon decay products (RDP) and gamma (?) ray doses. • Exposures to RDP and ?-ray doses were not associated with significantly increased risks of cancers. • Radiation risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Hodgkin lymphoma were increased. • Study findings provide additional support for radiation-related risks of CLL.

  20. Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Upgrading RESRAD-RDD and Planning for Improvised Nuclear Device Incidents--The RESRAD-RDD&IND Abstract: The RESRAD-RDD code was developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT) to assist decision makers, emergency responders, and emergency preparedness planners for response to radiological dispersal device incidents (RDD). The RESRAD-RDD code was released as a companion software tool in 2009 to support the OGT Manual—Preliminary Report on Operational Guidelines Developed for Use in Emergency Preparedness and Response to a Radiological Dispersal Device Incident (DOE/HS-0001). The original RESRAD-RDD code was Microsoft Excel based software with the user interface written in Visual Basic. This version of RESRAD-RDD is being converted to a database driven software that runs on Windows 7 operating system in the .NET environment. The new RESRAD-RDD code is being tested to make sure it reproduces old code results. The new code runs faster than the old spreadsheets code by a factor of 10 or so, fewer clicks are required for the same calculations, operational guidelines can be easily located, and the reports can be written to PDFs instead of HTML. Additional radionuclides are also being added to the new RESRAD-RDD code. An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) scenario is also being added to the code and about 44 - 60 radionuclides will be added to handle IND incident. A new OGT Task Group is in the process of updating the OGT Manual and providing guidance on the development of the IND scenario and methodology. The new code, RESRAD-RDD&IND is expected to be released in early 2015. Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; Jing-Jy Cheng, Argonne National Laboratory; Sunita Kamboj, Argonne National Laboratory; David LePoire, Argonne National Laboratory; Paul Flood, Argonne National Laboratory

  1. Survey of historical incidences with Controls-Structures Interaction and recommended technology improvements needed to put hardware in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.

    1989-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey for the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center. The purpose of the survey was to collect information documenting past incidences of problems with CSI during design, analysis, ground development, test and/or flight operation of space systems in industry. The survey was conducted to also compile recommended improvements in technology to support future needs for putting hardware into space. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Time Asymmetric Quantum Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bohm

    1999-02-26

    Mathematical and phenomenological arguments in favor of asymmetric time evolution of micro-physical states are presented.

  3. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  4. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  5. Absolute Time Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matolcsi; P. Van

    2006-10-23

    A four dimensional treatment of nonrelativistic space-time gives a natural frame to deal with objective time derivatives. In this framework some well known objective time derivatives of continuum mechanics appear as Lie-derivatives. Their coordinatized forms depends on the tensorial properties of the relevant physical quantities. We calculate the particular forms of objective time derivatives for scalars, vectors, covectors and different second order tensors from the point of view of a rotating observer. The relation of substantial, material and objective time derivatives is treated.

  6. Time scales in LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pireaux

    2007-03-23

    The LISA mission is a space interferometer aiming at the detection of gravitational waves in the [$10^{-4}$,$10^{-1}$] Hz frequency band. In order to reach the gravitational wave detection level, a Time Delay Interferometry (TDI) method must be applied to get rid of (most of) the laser frequency noise and optical bench noise. This TDI analysis is carried out in terms of the coordinate time corresponding to the Barycentric Coordinate Reference System (BCRS), TCB, whereas the data at each of the three LISA stations is recorded in terms of each station proper time. We provide here the required proper time versus BCRS time transformation. We show that the difference in rate of station proper time versus TCB is of the order of $5 10^{-8}$. The difference between station proper times and TCB exhibits an oscillatory trend with a maximum amplitude of about $10^{-3}$ s.

  7. Time in Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curt A. Moyer

    2013-05-23

    The failure of conventional quantum theory to recognize time as an observable and to admit time operators is addressed. Instead of focusing on the existence of a time operator for a given Hamiltonian, we emphasize the role of the Hamiltonian as the generator of translations in time to construct time states. Taken together, these states constitute what we call a timeline, or quantum history, that is adequate for the representation of any physical state of the system. Such timelines appear to exist even for the semi-bounded and discrete Hamiltonian systems ruled out by Pauli's theorem. However, the step from a timeline to a valid time operator requires additional assumptions that are not always met. Still, this approach illuminates the crucial issue surrounding the construction of time operators, and establishes quantum histories as legitimate alternatives to the familiar coordinate and momentum bases of standard quantum theory.

  8. ~ AND CORNELL 5 lost in Albertan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montello, Daniel R.

    operations (2nd onvironment and ·sign. New York: JK: Cambridge ~ and practice. rch management IOffipson, W. B professions depend on a detailed understanding of anatomy, which involves such spatial concepts as the shape

  9. We've Lost our Leader 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodenough, Harry [writer of accompanying material

    2012-03-05

    . How do you like this close weather - it makes one feel proper tired - My Trivett is much better again. My cold still bad but will be better soon. Hope you will keep feeling fit - so thumbs up for present - with fondest love from Your Always Affect. son...

  10. Lost! The Social Psychology of Missing Possessions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    in their 70s are leaving a Starbucks in a small Northernthat it would be at the Starbucks that I had been to roughlylooked around my table at Starbucks and asked the employees

  11. Though Lost to Sight to Memory Dear 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack [writer of accompanying material

    2012-03-05

    TRANSCRIPTION; MESSAGE: Come [and] live here till the war is over. How are you all getting along. Rec'd your nice letter in answer to cable [and] I am anxiously looking forward for more. I have written lots of letters to ...

  12. In the Beginning of Penderecki's Paradise Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Scott

    2013-08-12

    ;±#21; #19;#25; #25; #21; < #22;±#20; #19;#20;#21; #20;#20; #21; #22;±#21; #19;#20;#26; #20;#25; #21; #22;±#22; #19;#25;#26; #25;#20; #21; #23;±#20; #19;#20;#21;#22; #20;#20;#20; #21; #23;±#21; #19;#20;#21;#27; #20;#20;#25; #21; #23;±#22; #19;#20;#26;#27; #20;#25;#20...; #21; #23;±#23; #19;#20;#26;#25; #20;#25;H #20; < #23;±#24; #19;#25;#26;#27; #25;#20;#20; #21; #23;±#25; #19;#25;#26;#20; #25;#20;#25; #20; < #24;±#20; #19;#20;#21;#22;#23; #20;#20;#20;#20; #21; #24;±#21; #19;#20;#21;#22;#28; #20;#20;#20;#25; #21; #24;±#22...

  13. The Economics of a Lost Deal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , such as concrete ceilings or levies on carbon imports; "environmental restoration payments" to be made on excess emissions; and credits for sequestration activities in Annex B countries. It demonstrates, there would have been substantial room for compromise on payments of $35 to $100 per ton of carbon. Examining

  14. Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent fewer materials than traditional processes.

  15. The Lost Soul of the Body Politic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chupp, Jesse

    2012-07-16

    conception of the state changed from one of a natural organic unity of diverse corporate members to a consent-based compact among atomized individuals. This change can be traced in the Body Politic metaphor of four authors: John of Salisbury, Christine de...

  16. Improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casting is an energy-intensive manufacturing process within the metal casting and aluminum industries, requiring natural gas to melt aluminum and electricity to run equipment. The higher-than...

  17. The natural history of a lost sense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Siri Lefren

    2005-01-01

    This thesis is an investigation of the vomeronasal organ, which senses pheromones. It traces the use of the organ in land-dwelling vertebrates, and suggests evidence that the organ is vestigial in humans and Old World ...

  18. THE LOST SIBLINGS OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F.

    2009-05-01

    The anomalous chemical abundances and the structure of the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt observed in the solar system constrain the initial mass and radius of the star cluster in which the Sun was born to M {approx_equal} 500-3000M {sub sun} and R {approx_equal} 1-3 pc. When the cluster dissolved, the siblings of the Sun dispersed through the galaxy, but they remained on a similar orbit around the Galactic center. Today these stars hide among the field stars, but 10-60 of them are still present within a distance of {approx}100 pc. These siblings of the Sun can be identified by accurate measurements of their chemical abundances, positions, and their velocities. Finding even a few will strongly constrain the parameters of the parental star cluster and the location in the Galaxy where we were born.

  19. Lost Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguidedand Long Beach HarborsI

  20. Lost Lakes Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguidedand Long Beach

  1. REPORTING LOST, STOLEN, FORGOTTEN or UNRECOVERED BADGE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery andInnovations ThatChallengesREGIONALREMOTE

  2. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  3. Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyo Eyo Ita III; Chopin Soo; Hoi-Lai Yu

    2015-02-06

    Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

  4. Time functions as utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Minguzzi

    2009-09-04

    Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K^+ relation (Seifert's relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg's and Levin's theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K^+ (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin's theorem and smoothing techniques.

  5. Real-time x-ray studies of Mo-seeded Si nanodot formation during ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozaydin, Gozde; Oezcan, Ahmet S.; Wang, Yiyi; Ludwig, Karl F.; Zhou Hua; Headrick, Randall L.; Siddons, D. Peter [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2005-10-17

    The formation of self-organized Si nanostructures induced by Mo seeding during normal incidence Ar{sup +} ion bombardment at room temperature is reported. Silicon surfaces without Mo seeding develop only power-law roughness during 1000 eV ion bombardment at normal incidence, in agreement with scaling theory expectations of surface roughening. However, supplying Mo atoms to the surface during ion bombardment seeds the development of highly correlated, nanoscale structures ('dots') that are typically 3 nm high with a spatial wavelength of approximately 30 nm. With time, these saturate and further surface roughening is dominated by the growth of long-wavelength corrugations.

  6. Time Domain Reflectometry Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    Time Domain Reflectometry Theory Application Note 1304-2 For Use with Agilent 86100 Infiniium DCA #12;2 The most general approach to evaluating the time domain response of any electromagnetic system a concise presentation of the fundamentals of TDR and then relates these fundamentals to the parameters

  7. Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denise Baclawski

    2010-03-08

    The University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy (FSA) applied for grant funding to develop and deliver programs for municipal, rural, and volunteer firefighters. The FSA specializes in preparing responders for a variety of emergency events, including flammable liquid fires resulting from accidents, intentional acts, or natural disasters. Live fire training on full scale burnable props is the hallmark of FSA training, allowing responders to practice critical skills in a realistic, yet safe environment. Unfortunately, flammable liquid live fire training is often not accessible to municipal, rural, or volunteer firefighters due to limited department training budgets, even though most department personnel will be exposed to flammable liquid fire incidents during the course of their careers. In response to this training need, the FSA developed a course during the first year of the grant (Year One), Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters. During the three years of the grant, a total of 2,029 emergency responders received this training. In Year Three, two new courses, a train-the-trainer for Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community and Management of Large-Scale Disasters for Public Officials were developed and pilot tested during the Real-World Disaster Management Conference held at the FSA in June of 2007. Two research projects were conducted during Years Two and Three. The first, conducted over a two year period, evaluated student surveys regarding the value of the flammable liquids training received. The second was a needs assessment conducted for rural Nevada. Both projects provided important feedback and a basis for curricula development and improvements.

  8. AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORBERS ALONG GAMMA-RAY BURST SIGHT LINES: THE END OF THE MYSTERY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucchiara, A.

    In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along ...

  9. The incidence of popular complaints of farmers on land compensation : a case study of two villages in Dalian, Liaoning Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Li, S.M. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    2006-01-01

    The thesis analyzed the reason for the incidence of lodging popular complaints triggered by a land requisition in two villages in Dalian, Liaoning Province, China. The thesis only took the popular protests on land compensation ...

  10. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Feder, R.; Ko, Jinseok; Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.

    2008-10-15

    The paper describes a new scheme for wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence by a matched pair of spherically bent crystals to eliminate the astigmatism, which is a well-known imaging error of spherical mirrors. In addition to x rays, the scheme should be applicable to a very broad spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation, including microwaves, infrared and visible light, as well as UV and extreme UV radiation, if the crystals are replaced with appropriate spherical reflectors. The scheme may also be applicable to the imaging with ultrasound.

  11. A Geographic Information Science (GISc) Approach to Characterizing Spatiotemporal Patterns of Terrorist Incidents in Iraq, 2004-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Siebeneck, Laura K. [University of Utah; Hepner, George F. [University of Utah

    2011-01-01

    As terrorism on all scales continues, it is necessary to improve understanding of terrorist and insurgent activities. This article takes a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to advance the understanding of spatial, social, political, and cultural triggers that influence terrorism incidents. Spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal patterns of terrorist attacks are examined to improve knowledge about terrorist systems of training, planning, and actions. The results of this study aim to provide a foundation for understanding attack patterns and tactics in emerging havens as well as inform the creation and implementation of various counterterrorism measures.

  12. Effects of "own" versus "alien" suckling on incidence of ovarian luteal activity, estrus and secretion of luteinizing hormone, oxytocin and prolactin in early postpartum beef cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silveira, Patrice Auvern

    1992-01-01

    EFFECTS OF "OWN" VERSUS "ALIEN" SUCKLING ON INCIDENCE OF OVARIAN LUTEAL ACTIVITY, ESTRUS AND SECRETION OF LUTEINIZING HORMONE, OXYTOCIN AND PROLACTIN IN EARLY POSTPARTUM BEEF COWS A Thesis by PATRICE AUVERN SILVEIRA Submitted to the Office... of Graduate Studies of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction EFFECTS OF "OWN" VERSUS "ALIEN" SUCKLING ON INCIDENCE OF OVARIAN LUTEAL...

  13. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  14. Digital time delay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  15. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  16. The Williston time capsule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, David (David Patrick)

    2015-01-01

    This project is a time capsule of the oil economy, created by entombing everyday objects made from and powered by petroleum into a landscape that spatially recreates the processes of drilling and fracking a contemporary ...

  17. Sublinear Time Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinfeld, Ronitt

    Sublinear time algorithms represent a new paradigm in computing, where an algorithm must give some sort of an answer after inspecting only a very small portion of the input. We discuss the types of answers that one can ...

  18. Time, energy & form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnis, Martha Jane

    1982-01-01

    Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

  19. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  20. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  1. Time in quantum mechanics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapin, Kimberly R.

    1997-01-01

    TIME IN QUANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Marian O. Scully (Chair... of Committee) Edward S. Fry (Member) aan Laane (Member) Thomas W. Adair, III (Head of Department) August 1997 Major Subject: Physics TIME IN QIJANTUM MECHANICS A Thesis by KIMBERLY R. CHAPIN Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  2. The thermodynamics of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dries Sels; Michiel Wouters

    2015-01-22

    The problem of time is a deep paradox in our physical description of the world. According to Aristotle's relational theory, time is a measure of change and does not exist on its own. In contrast, quantum mechanics, just like Newtonian mechanics, is equipped with a master clock that dictates the evolution of a system. This clock is infinitely precise and tacitly supplied free of charge from outside physics. Not only does this absolute time make it notoriously difficult to make a consistent theory of quantum gravity, it is also the underlying problem in establishing the second law. Indeed, contrary to our experience, the Wheeler-deWitt equation --a canonical quantization of general relativity-- predicts a static universe. Similarly, when simply concerned with the dynamics of a closed quantum system, there is no second law because the Von Neumann entropy is invariant under unitary transformations. Here we are mainly concerned with the latter problem and we show that it can be resolved by attributing a minimal amount of resources to the measurement of time. Although there is an absolute time in quantum mechanics, an observer can only establish a time by measuring a clock. For a local measurement, the minimal entropy production is equal to the number of ticks. This lower bound is attained by a black hole.

  3. One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (Thermal Sensitivity) of ANPZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, P.; Hust, G.; McClelland, M.; Gresshoff, M.

    2014-11-12

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. This report summarizes the recent ODTX experimental data and modeling results for 2,6-diamino-3,5-dintropyrazine (ANPZ).

  4. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Bock, Robert Eldon [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  5. Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll -HCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper Payroll - HCSD Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor 9.1 Time

  6. Timed Alternating-Time Temporal Logic Thomas A. Henzinger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henzinger, Thomas A.

    equally powerful options for updating the state of the game, advancing time, or blocking time. Second, we in order to specify real-time objectives for games played on timed structures. We define the semantics Timed games are a formal model for the synthesis of real-time systems [22, 20]. While much research

  7. Time-Resolved

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesisSediments andTheTime-Resolved Time-Resolved

  8. Short-time Evolution of Alkane-in-Water Nanoemulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    German Urbina-Villalba; Kareem Rahn-Chique

    2013-03-06

    The stability of alkane-in-water nanoemulsions during the sub-stationary regime is studied by means of Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS). The effects of Ostwald ripening, flocculation, coalescence, gravity, and hydration forc- es are considered. According to these calculations flocculation and coalescence are predominant during the first few seconds after the preparation of the emulsion. This favors the generation of a right-skewed Drop Size Distribu- tion (DSD). As the system evolves, the drops grow larger and more repulsive causing a slow down of the flocculation process. In the case of dodecane (C12) and hexadecane (C16) the referred phenomena, reinforce the ripening trend to subvert the initial DSD variation, producing a meta-stable distribution which is preserved during several minutes. After this time, Ostwald ripening dominates: the skirt of the distribution changes progressively from right-skewed to left-skewed. Consistent with these changes, the cube average radius of the emulsion increases rapidly at first, but progressively diminishes generating a concave-downward curve that stabilizes asymptotically. In the case of dodecane and hexadecane the complete dissolution of the drops promoted by ripening is prevented at all times due to coalescence. In the case of octane (C8) a substantial amount of drops is lost by dissolution, forbidding the attain- ment of a stable DSD. In all cases the molecular exchange only favors a decrease of the average radius as a function of time. It is the elimination of drops either by dissolution or coalescence which causes an increase of the average radius of the emulsion.

  9. Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Time Activity Time Activity Time Activity Tuesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 2-Jun-15 Wednesday CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE CLOSED CONFERENCE 3-Jun-15 Thursday CLOSED

  10. Time in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Brout; R. Parentani

    1999-02-05

    The notion of time in cosmology is revealed through an examination of transition matrix elements of radiative processes occurring in the cosmos. To begin with, the very concept of time is delineated in classical physics in terms of correlations between the succession of configurations which describe a process and a standard trajectory called the clock. The total is an isolated system of fixed energy. This is relevant for cosmology in that the universe is an isolated system which we take to be homogeneous and isotropic. Furthermore, in virtue of the constraint which arises from reparametrization invariance of time, it has total energy zero. Therefore the momentum of the scale factor is determined from the energy of matter. In the quantum theory this is exploited through use of the WKB approximation for the wave function of the scale factor, justified for a large universe. The formalism then gives rise to matrix elements describing matter processes. These are shown to take on the form of usual time dependent quantum amplitudes wherein the temporal dependence is given by a background which is once more fixed by the total energy of matter.

  11. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  12. Presenter:! Time & Date: !

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    a checkbook, you can understand which energy options have the promise of supporting humankind - wind, hydro://cfcpwork.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/cafe! A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! #12;A Reality Check on Alternative Energy! Presenter: Liz Moyer! Time a bigger, richer population without fossil fuels (which will definitely run out someday)? Energy is a hot

  13. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  14. Time reversal communication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  15. Extended-range grazing-incidence spectrometer for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet measurements on an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Träbert, E.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    A high-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps for performing very high-resolution measurements in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet region spanning from below 10 Ĺ to above 300 Ĺ. The instrument operates without an entrance slit and focuses the light emitted by highly charged ions located in the roughly 50 ?m wide electron beam onto a cryogenically cooled back-illuminated charge-coupled device detector. The measured line widths are below 0.025 Ĺ above 100 Ĺ, and the resolving power appears to be limited by the source size and Doppler broadening of the trapped ions. Comparisons with spectra obtained with existing grating spectrometers show an order of magnitude improvement in spectral resolution.

  16. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  17. Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persinger, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

  18. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  19. Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

    2012-05-01

    The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

  20. Metrology for Industry for use in the Manufacture of Grazing Incidence Beam Line Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, James P.; Parks, Robert E.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this SBIR was to determine the slope sensitivity of Specular Reflection Deflectometry (SRD) and whether shearing methods had the sensitivity to be able to separate errors in the test equipment from slope error in the unit under test (UUT), or mirror. After many variations of test parameters it does not appear that SRD yields results much better than 1 ? radian RMS independent of how much averaging is done. Of course, a single number slope sensitivity over the full range of spatial scales is not a very insightful number in the same sense as a single number phase or height RMS value in interferometry does not tell the full story. However, the 1 ? radian RMS number is meaningful when contrasted with a sensitivity goal of better than 0.1 ? radian RMS. Shearing is a time proven method of separating the errors in a measurement from the actual shape of a UUT. It is accomplished by taking multiple measurements while moving the UUT relative to the test instrument. This process makes it possible to separate the two errors sources but only to a sensitivity of about 1 ? radian RMS. Another aspect of our conclusions is that this limit probably holds largely independent of the spatial scale of the test equipment. In the proposal for this work it was suggested that a test screen the full size of the UUT could be used to determine the slopes on scales of maybe 0.01 to full scale of the UUT while smaller screens and shorter focal length lenses could be used to measure shorter, or smaller, patches of slope. What we failed to take into consideration was that as the scale of the test equipment got smaller so too did the optical lever arm on which the slope was calculated. Although we did not do a test with a shorter focal length lens over a smaller sample area it is hard to argue with the logic that the slope sensitivity will be about the same independent of the spatial scale of the measurement assuming the test equipment is similarly scaled. On a more positive note, SRD does appear to be a highly flexible, easy to implement, rather inexpensive test for free form optics that require a dynamic range that exceeds that of interferometry. These optics are quite often specified to have more relaxed slope errors, on the order of 1 ? radian RMS or greater. It would be shortsighted to not recognize the value of this test method in the bigger picture.

  1. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  2. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  3. Space-time diamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; T. C. Ralph

    2015-07-02

    We show that the particle number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localised in a finite space-time region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  4. A finite-time exponent for random Ehrenfest gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjay Moudgalya; Sarthak Chandra; Sudhir R. Jain

    2015-07-29

    We consider the motion of a system of free particles moving on a plane with regular hard polygonal scatterers arranged in a random manner. Calling this the Ehrenfest gas, which is known to have a zero Lyapunov exponent, we propose a finite-time exponent to characterize its dynamics. As the number of sides of the polygon goes to infinity, when polygon tends to a circle, we recover the usual Lyapunov exponent for the Lorentz gas from the exponent proposed here. To obtain this result, we generalize the reflection law of a beam of rays incident on a polygonal scatterer in a way that the formula for the circular scatterer is recovered in the limit of infinite number of vertices. Thus, chaos emerges from pseudochaos in an appropriate limit.

  5. Time Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    malicious attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel signature model ­ Time Valid One-Time Signature (TVTime Valid One-Time Signature for Time-Critical Multicast Data Authentication Qiyan Wang, Himanshu-OTS) ­ to boost the efficiency of regular one-time signature schemes. Based on the TV-OTS model, we design

  6. Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-01-01

    studies evaluating the advertising of ED wait times. Only 1potentially used for advertising may be inaccurate. AccessedE ditorial Advertising Emergency Department Wait Times Scott

  7. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 162 Fall 2001. Date: Wednesday December 12, 2001. Time: 7:00 pm -9:00 pm. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  8. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 161 Fall 2001. Date: Friday December 14, 2001. Time: 8:00 am -10:00 am. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  9. 1. 2 , 4 2 ( Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    format with double line spacing (font Times New Roman, 12 pt; margins: left and up -- 30 mm, right , . 20. , , . 1. 2 , 4 2 ( Times New Roman, 12 pt

  10. Denoising Deterministic Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven P. Lalley; Andrew B. Nobel

    2006-04-21

    This paper is concerned with the problem of recovering a finite, deterministic time series from observations that are corrupted by additive, independent noise. A distinctive feature of this problem is that the available data exhibit long-range dependence and, as a consequence, existing statistical theory and methods are not readily applicable. This paper gives an analysis of the denoising problem that extends recent work of Lalley, but begins from first principles. Both positive and negative results are established. The positive results show that denoising is possible under somewhat restrictive conditions on the additive noise. The negative results show that, under more general conditions on the noise, no procedure can recover the underlying deterministic series.

  11. Real time automated inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

    1985-05-21

    A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

  12. A new coral disease from the southern Arabian Gulf During an ecological survey of coral communities at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence of coral diseases was observed. Although. We acknowledge funding assistance by the Dubai Municipality and Charles Martin of Martin Mid East coral disease outbreak at Fahl Island, Gulf of Oman, Indian Ocean. Coral Reefs 13: 242 Littler MM

  13. arXiv:hepex/0306028 Coherent pair production by photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range incident on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arXiv:hep­ex/0306028 v2 24 Jun 2004 Coherent pair production by photons in the 20-170 GeV energy: June 24, 2004) The cross section for coherent pair production by linearly polarised photons in the 20-170 GeV energy range was measured for photon aligned incidence on ultra-high quality diamond and germa

  14. FRoM BIRD-BANDING, VoL. 48, No.4, PP J70-J7I Autumn 1977 Incidence of Oil Contamination on Breeding Common Terns-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    FRoM BIRD-BANDING, VoL. 48, No.4, PP J70-J7I Autumn 1977 Incidence of Oil Contamination on Breeding oil contamination. Since even very small amounts of oil on the plumage of incubating birds may contaminate eggs and reduce their hatchability (Hnrtung, 1965; Albers, 1977; Szaro and Albers, 1977) knowledge

  15. U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant Incident; U.S. Monitoring Control Strategy Explained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant about radiation contamination from the Japanese nuclear power plant incident and on the control potential routes by which seafood contaminated with radionuclides from the Japanese nuclear power plant

  16. Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety. The GIMM lowers the effective laser power flux without much loss of reflectivity, thus prolonging [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant

  17. A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2013-09-01

    A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

  18. Incident Type Traffic Offense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    :30 2015-00008299 11/04/2015 12:10 2115 BAKER DR Boulder CO 80309 CRIMINAL MISCHIEF - LESS THAN $300 Under

  19. Enterprise Incidents Issue 5 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1984-01-01

    have a suitable replacement for Mr. Spock here. Mr. De Salle. That's his file. You'll find him quite competent - he's served on the Excalibur, among others.1I "I'm sure he'll be quite suitable, sir," Kirk said politely. "And the... replacement... affect my relationship with my crew. I'm sure Mr. De Salle will fit in just fine." 9 A tall, fresh-faced man with an air of authority about him stepped forward as Kirk left Bryce's office. "Captain Kirk? I'm Joseph De Salle, Commander Spock...

  20. Enterprise Incidents Issue 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1987-01-01

    , sitting; beside him, was holding; his hand. "Spock?" he asked. Visible relief p ???? d over the Vulcan's face. "How tio ?ou feel, Captain?" Kirk made a fac.. "As if a herd of stampeding buffalo had charged right over m .... "I'll call Dr. Mc...'Mara if there was any chance of getting more power." "Very little," T'Mara replied. "But I'm not an engineer. Mr. Scott may be able to help. Meanwhile, Captain Kirk, as acting commander of the Falcon, I must ask you if it is possible for our injured...

  1. Enterprise Incidents Issue 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1981-01-01

    breast. His dark face Has olean-shaven and his hair close oropped. His hands oonstantly rubbed nervously together. Eventually he fooused on Kirk, a stream of alien words babbling cut. Kirk smiled ruefully and shook his llead. "I'm afraid Klingonose... betHeen the two ships. Hv[ell, Hell, Capt3,in Kirk! EOH delightful to see you again! Ii uA pleasure 9 I 'm sure~ Captain Koloth, tI smiled Kirk. "Ro'" long has it been?!? "Too long, my dear friend. Vlhy, ><0 haven't met since that unfortunate 3...

  2. Enterprise Incidents Issue 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Sheila

    1977-01-01

    only hope that they would understand why he heed to let them die. Tho enomy interrogator 'iwtched him carufully, intently, 2. glO[\\m of snd istic plec.sure showing doep in tho dark eyes, rmd Kirk knew thnt tho being hoped that he would remain silont... forthcoming zincs by sending n .S.i.E or addressed envelope and IRC to Sheila Clark 6 Craigmill Cottnges Strathmnrtino by Dundee Scotland 1 DU'I'Y DElfAt,1JlS ??? Captnin Jnmes T. Kirk str[\\ightoned himself as best he oould, hand raised defiantly...

  3. Enterprise Incidents Issue 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodison, Lorraine

    1981-01-01

    OeUFHNdRhsUNFBHOSBsNesBKPNBSUNMuBvOUmNTRUN HSBFPsOeUFeKNMXNqBuMFhHUNBssMdPNHRUNHMHBsNHSB5UeHMSKNMXNHRUNBFeRMSNHMNyUNbhPOBssKNHSBe

  4. Incidents of Security Concern

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation StandardsEnergy In Case You12/17/1998 | Department

  5. Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitasova, Helena

    to quantify elevation change trends, map dynamic and stable locations, identify new and lost buildings surface elevation, and homes built within the shoreline dynamics band have already been lost. The raster 2003), including assessment of major storm and hurricane impacts (Sallenger et al. 2006). The high

  6. Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Time's Ontic Voltage Craig Callender Philosophy of time, as practiced throughout the last hundred venue for attacking questions about the nature of time--in sharp contrast to the primary venue slowly in philosophy of time.1 Since twentieth-century analytic philosophy as a whole often drew

  7. Untameable Timed Automata! (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    are a widely studied model for real­time systems. Since 8 years, several tools implement this model­life systems. 1 Introduction Real­Time Systems ­ Since their introduction by Alur and Dill in [AD94], timed au­ tomata are one of the most studied models for real­time systems. Numerous works have been devoted

  8. Untameable Timed Automata! (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    model for real-time systems. Since 8 years, several tools implement this model and are successfully used for a restricted class of timed automata, which has been sufficient for modeling numerous real-life systems. 1 Introduction Real-Time Systems - Since their introduction by Alur and Dill in [AD94], timed au- tomata are one

  9. Time calibration with atmospheric muon tracks in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bogazzi, C; Bormuth, R; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatŕ, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herrero, A; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, G; Lattuada, D; Lefčvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Neff, M; Nezri, E; P?v?la?, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Saldańa, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tönnis, C; Turpin, D; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúńiga, J

    2015-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment consists of an array of photomultipliers distributed along 12 lines and located deep underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. It searches for astrophysical neutrinos collecting the Cherenkov light induced by the charged particles, mainly muons, produced in neutrino interactions around the detector. Since at energies of $\\sim$10 TeV the muon and the incident neutrino are almost collinear, it is possible to use the ANTARES detector as a neutrino telescope and identify a source of neutrinos in the sky starting from a precise reconstruction of the muon trajectory. To get this result, the arrival times of the Cherenkov photons must be accurately measured. A to perform time calibrations with the precision required to have optimal performances of the instrument is described. The reconstructed tracks of the atmospheric muons in the ANTARES detector are used to determine the relative time offsets between photomultipliers. Currently, this method is used to obtain the time calibration constants for ph...

  10. Grazing incidence angle based sensing approach integrated with fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for remote and label-free detection of medical device contaminations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Moinuddin Ilev, Ilko

    2014-10-15

    Contamination of medical devices has become a critical and prevalent public health safety concern since medical devices are being increasingly used in clinical practices for diagnostics, therapeutics and medical implants. The development of effective sensing methods for real-time detection of pathogenic contamination is needed to prevent and reduce the spread of infections to patients and the healthcare community. In this study, a hollow-core fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methodology employing a grazing incidence angle based sensing approach (FO-FTIR-GIA) was developed for detection of various biochemical contaminants on medical device surfaces. We demonstrated the sensitivity of FO-FTIR-GIA sensing approach for non-contact and label-free detection of contaminants such as lipopolysaccharide from various surface materials relevant to medical device. The proposed sensing system can detect at a minimum loading concentration of approximately 0.7 ?g/cm{sup 2}. The FO-FTIR-GIA has the potential for the detection of unwanted pathogen in real time.

  11. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine?, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon-#12;fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning a timing-belt based hydroEngine ?powertrain: 1. Can a belt handle the high torques and power loads demanded by the SLH? (Yes.) 2. Can the SLH blades be mounted to belt with a connection that can withstand the loads encountered in operation? (Yes.) 3. Can the belt, with blade attachments, live through the required cyclic loading? (Yes.) The research adds to the general understanding of sustainable small hydropower systems by using innovative system testing to develop and demonstrate performance of a novel powertrain solution, enabling a new type of hydroelectric turbine to be commercially developed. The technical effectiveness of the methods investigated has been shown to be positive through an extensive design and testing process accommodating many constraints and goals, with a major emphasis on high cycle fatigue life. Economic feasibility of the innovations has been demonstrated through many iterations of design for manufacturability and cost reduction. The project is of benefit to the public because it has helped to develop a solution to a major problem -- despite the large available potential for new low-head hydropower, high capital costs and high levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) continue to be major barriers to project development. The hydroEngine? represents a significant innovation, leveraging novel fluid mechanics and mechanical configuration to allow lower-cost turbine manufacture and development of low head hydropower resources.

  12. Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent timing channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Dead-time optimized time-correlated photon counting instrument with synchronized, independent timing channels Michael Wahla and Hans-Jürgen Rahn PicoQuant GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29, D-12489 Berlin December 2006; accepted 19 February 2007; published online 23 March 2007 Time-correlated single photon

  13. Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.

    2013-07-01

    In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved

  14. Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper -HCSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor 9.1 Time Keeper - HCSD Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS Copyright create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall

  15. Date of Injury Date Time In Time Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : NORMAL Work Schedule (ie: MF, 8am5pm)First Name Last Name # of hours missed from work #12;RISK MGTDate of Injury Date Time In Time Out Total time worked medical appt no work within restrictions Next Medical Appointment(s): Tuesday of each week. Risk Mgt email: workcomp@colostate.edu; fax

  16. A High Resolution, Multi-stop, Time-to-Digital Converter for Nuclear Time-of-Flight Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. F. Spencer; J. Cole; M. Drigert; R. Aryaeinejad

    2006-01-01

    A high-resolution, multi-stop, time-to-digital converter (TDC) was designed and developed to precisely measure the times-of-flight (TOF) of incident neutrons responsible for induced fission and capture reactions on actinide targets. The minimum time resolution is ±1 ns. The TDC design was implemented into a single, dual-wide CAMAC module. The CAMAC bus is used for command and control as well as an alternative data output. A high-speed ECL interface, compatible with LeCroy FERA modules, was also provided for the principle data output path. An Actel high-speed field programmable gate array (FPGA) chip was incorporated with an external oscillator and an internal multiple clock phasing system. This device implemented the majority of the high-speed register functions, the state machine for the FERA interface, and the high-speed counting circuit used for the TDC conversion. An external microcontroller was used to monitor and control system-level changes. In this work we discuss the performance of this TDC module as well as its application.

  17. Time translation of quantum properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Vanni; R. Laura

    2008-12-03

    Based on the notion of time translation, we develop a formalism to deal with the logic of quantum properties at different times. In our formalism it is possible to enlarge the usual notion of context to include composed properties involving properties at different times. We compare our results with the theory of consistent histories.

  18. Time machines and quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J Hadley

    2006-12-02

    There is a deep structural link between acausal spacetimes and quantum theory. As a consequence quantum theory may resolve some "paradoxes" of time travel. Conversely, non-time-orientable spacetimes naturally give rise to electric charges and spin half. If an explanation of quantum theory is possible, then general relativity with time travel could be it.

  19. ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge Requests for Time Due February...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy systems. Responding to natural and man-made disasters or incidents; e.g. hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, pandemics. Broadening the community of researchers capable...

  20. Prediction of global solar irradiance based on time series analysis: Application to solar thermal power plants energy production planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Luis; Marchante, Ruth; Cony, Marco; Zarzalejo, Luis F.; Polo, Jesus; Navarro, Ana

    2010-10-15

    Due to strong increase of solar power generation, the predictions of incoming solar energy are acquiring more importance. Photovoltaic and solar thermal are the main sources of electricity generation from solar energy. In the case of solar thermal energy plants with storage energy system, its management and operation need reliable predictions of solar irradiance with the same temporal resolution as the temporal capacity of the back-up system. These plants can work like a conventional power plant and compete in the energy stock market avoiding intermittence in electricity production. This work presents a comparisons of statistical models based on time series applied to predict half daily values of global solar irradiance with a temporal horizon of 3 days. Half daily values consist of accumulated hourly global solar irradiance from solar raise to solar noon and from noon until dawn for each day. The dataset of ground solar radiation used belongs to stations of Spanish National Weather Service (AEMet). The models tested are autoregressive, neural networks and fuzzy logic models. Due to the fact that half daily solar irradiance time series is non-stationary, it has been necessary to transform it to two new stationary variables (clearness index and lost component) which are used as input of the predictive models. Improvement in terms of RMSD of the models essayed is compared against the model based on persistence. The validation process shows that all models essayed improve persistence. The best approach to forecast half daily values of solar irradiance is neural network models with lost component as input, except Lerida station where models based on clearness index have less uncertainty because this magnitude has a linear behaviour and it is easier to simulate by models. (author)

  1. The LCLS Timing Event System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

  2. Setting and Maintaining Arecibo Observatory's Timing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frequency Standard 14 Time Code Generators TRAK Synchronized Time Code Generator 38 EECO Time Code Generator the time codes if the TRAC Synchronized Time Code Generator fails. Soon the TrueTime time code generator) Time Code Generator TRAK Synchronized Time Code Generator EECO Time Code Generator Transfer standard

  3. Local-time effect on small space-time scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Panchelyuga; V. A. Kolombet; M. S. Panchelyuga; S. E. Shnoll

    2006-10-18

    The paper presents an investigation of local-time effect - one of the manifestations of macroscopic fluctuations phenomena. Was shown the existence of the named effect for longitudinal distance between locations of measurements up to 500 meters. Also a structure of intervals distribution in neighborhood of local-time peak was studied and splitting of the peak was found out. Obtained results lead to conclusion about sharp anisotropy of space-time.

  4. Time interval and lattice vibration in Raman effect, photoelectric effect and plane mirror reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kumar; S. Sahoo

    2012-07-02

    Time interval between the incident and scattered photon in Raman effect and absorption of photon and emission of electron in photoelectric effect has not been determined till now. This is because there is no such high level instrument discovered till now to detect time interval to such a small level. But this can be calculated theoretically by applying a basic principle of physics like impulse is equal to the change in momentum. Considering the collision between electron and photon as perfect inelastic collision in photoelectric effect, elastic and inelastic collision in Raman effect and elastic collision in plane mirror reflection and the interaction between electron and photon as strong gravitational interaction we calculate the required time interval. During these phenomena there is lattice vibration which can be quantized as phonon particles.

  5. Time Consistent Risk Measure Under Stopping Time Framework ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-13

    to the stochastic volatility of security markets and constantly change of economic and financial information, the earliest target reaching time is random, it then ...

  6. 348 Book Reviews Nonlinear Time Series: Nonparametric and Parametric Methods.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianqing

    diagnostics, and then computes optimal predictors for future values of the series. Autoregressive moving aver of topics covered in this book makes for a large and awk- ward load. It is like coming home from the grocery, and breaks, and some items are lost altogether. This book has scratches scattered throughout, in the form

  7. On the Flow of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F R Ellis

    2008-12-01

    Current theoretical physics suggests the flow of time is an illusion: the entire universe just is, with no special meaning attached to the present time. This paper points out that this view, in essence represented by usual space-time diagrams, is based on time-reversible microphysical laws, which fail to capture essential features of the time-irreversible nature of decoherence and the quantum measurement process, as well as macro-physical behaviour and the development of emergent complex systems, including life, which exist in the real universe. When these are taken into account, the unchanging block universe view of spacetime is best replaced by an evolving block universe which extends as time evolves, with the potential of the future continually becoming the certainty of the past; spacetime itself evolves, as do the entities within it. However this time evolution is not related to any preferred surfaces in spacetime; rather it is associated with the evolution of proper time along families of world lines. The default state of fundamental physics should not be taken to be a time irreversible evolution of physical states: it is an ongoing irreversible development of time itself.

  8. Time is not the problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Dreyer

    2009-04-22

    Attempts to quantize general relativity encounter an odd problem. The Hamiltonian that normally generates time evolution vanishes in the case of general relativity as a result of diffeomorphism invariance. The theory seems to be saying that time does not exist. The most obvious feature of our world, namely that time seems to progress and that the world changes accordingly becomes a problem in this presumably fundamental theory. This is called the problem of time. In this essay we argue that this problem is the result of an unphysical idealization. We are caught in this "problem of time" trap because we took a wrong turn in the early days of relativity by permanently including a split of geometry and matter into our physical theories. We show that another possibility exists that circumvents the problem of time and also sheds new light on other problems like the cosmological constant problem and the horizon problem in early universe cosmology.

  9. Three-body dwell time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, N. G.

    2010-06-15

    The lifetime of an unstable state or resonance formed as an intermediate state in two-body scattering is known to be related to the dwell time or the time spent within a given region of space by the two interacting particles. This concept is extended to the case of three-body systems and a relation connecting the three-body dwell time with the two-body dwell times of the substructures of the three-body system is derived for the case of separable wave functions. The Kapur-Peierls formalism is revisited to discover one of the first definitions of dwell time in the literature. An extension of the Kapur-Peierls formalism to the three-body case shows that the lifetime of a three-body resonance can indeed be given by the three-body dwell time.

  10. Reactor control rod timing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  11. Reactor control rod timing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, P.T.

    1982-02-09

    A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (Above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

  12. Commencement Ceremony Department Time Location Department and Major Time Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    Engineering 15:30 Bldg. 63 Classroom 01 (2nd Fl.) Industrial and Management Systems Engineering 15:30 Bldg. 63 and Management 15:30 Bldg. 63 Classroom 01 (2nd Fl.) Department Time Location Department and Major Time Location:30 Bldg. 57 202 Modern Mechanical Engineering 10:30 Bldg. 57 202 Industrial and Management Systems

  13. 49 Stress-timed vs. Syllable-timed Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehler, Jacques

    49 Stress-timed vs. Syllable- timed Languages Marina Nespor Mohinish Shukla Jacques Mehler 1; Prince 1983; Nespor & Vogel 1989; chapter 43: representations of word stress), the element that "establishes order" in the flow of speech is stress: universally, stressed and unstressed positions alternate

  14. Understanding the Contribution of Degraded Modes of Operation as a Cause of Incidents and Accidents in Air Traffic Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Chris

    of ground movement radar; factors which contributed to a degraded working environment. The Überlingen mid-air collision occurred when Air Traffic Control Officers (ATCOs) had to perform the manual correlation of radar failures. Hence most applications are routinely operated for short periods of time with some form

  15. Time Structure of Muonic Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cazon; R. A. Vazquez; A. A. Watson; E. Zas

    2003-11-10

    An analytical description of the time structure of the pulses induced by muons in air showers at ground level is deduced assuming the production distance distribution for the muons can be obtained elsewhere. The results of this description are compared against those obtained from simulated showers using AIRES. Major contributions to muon time delays are identified and a relation between the time structure and the depth distribution is unveiled.

  16. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    v List of Tables Comparison of time migration and depthof seismic imaging: time migration and depth migration. TimeComparison of time migration and depth migration Adequate

  17. Time and maps Menno-Jan Kraak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and maps Menno-Jan Kraak Time and maps ! · Why interested in time? · What is time and · How is time perceived? · How is time represented? Why interested in time? GIScience perspective) - analysis of changes over time - analysis of patterns of change over time ! · Development of methods

  18. Quantum gravity, the origin of time and time's arrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffat, J.W. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-03-01

    The local Lorentz and diffeomorphism symmetries of Einstein's gravitational theory are spontaneously broken by a Higgs mechanism by invoking a phase transition in the early universe, at a critical temperature [Tc] below which the symmetry is restored. The spontaneous breakdown of the vacuum state generates an external time, and the wave function of the universe satisfies a time-dependent Schroedinger equation, which reduces to the Wheeler-deWitt equation in the classical regime for T<[Tc], allowing a semiclassical WKB approximation to the wave function. The conservation of energy is spontaneously violated for T>[Tc], and matter is created fractions of seconds after the big bang, generating the matter in the Universe. The time direction of the vacuum expectation value of the scalar Higgs field generates a time asymmetry, which defines the cosmological arrow of time and the direction of increasing entropy as the Lorentz symmetry is restored at low temperatures. 52 refs.

  19. Time Dependence of ACIS Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    Time Dependence of ACIS Contamination Chandra Calibration Workshop 27 October 2003 Catherine Grant Source · Measuring the decay · Monitoring contamination with the ECS · Models of ECS time dependence · Monitoring contamination with the LETG · Agreement between models #12;ACIS External Calibration Source

  20. STARBASE: MANAGING CONTENTION AND TIMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    systems (RT­DBMS) has primarily based on simulation. This chapter discusses how current real­time technology has been applied to architect an actual RT­DBMS on a real­time microkernel operating system. A real RT­DBMS must confront many practical issues which simulations typically ignore: race conditions

  1. The Time of Our Lives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor, David Hugh

    2001-01-01

    The article shows how McTaggart’s distinction between A- and B-series ways of locating events in time prompted and enabled the twentieth century’s most important advances in the philosophy of time. It argues that, even if the B-series represents...

  2. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R N Manchester

    2006-04-13

    Given sufficient sensitivity, pulsar timing observations can make a direct detection of gravitational waves passing over the Earth. Pulsar timing is most sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies in the nanoHertz region, with the most likely astronomical sources being binary super-massive black holes in galaxy cores. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to make precision timing observations of a sample of about 20 millisecond pulsars with a principal goal of making a direct detection of gravitational waves. Observations commenced about one year ago and so far sub-microsecond timing residuals have been achieved for more than half of these pulsars. New receiver and software systems are being developed with the aim of reducing these residuals to the level believed necessary for a positive detection of gravitational waves.

  3. Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the time-dependent generalization of an 'ordinary' autonomous human musculo-skeletal biomechanics. We start with the configuration manifold of human body, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF). This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. On this extended configuration space we develop time-dependent biomechanical Lagrangian dynamics, using derived jet spaces of velocities and accelerations, as well as the underlying geometric evolution of the mass-inertia matrix. Keywords: Human time-dependent biomechanics, configuration manifold, jet spaces, geometric evolution

  4. Contribution of major lifestyle risk factors for incident heart failure in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Gobbo, Liana C.; Kalantarian, Shadi; Imamura, Fumiaki; Lemaitre, Rozenn; Siscovick, David S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-07-06

    be mediated through prevention of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, obesity, CHD, and type 202 2 diabetes; all major risk factors for HF (15). Our findings that moderate energy expenditure through leisure activity 203 is associated with lower HF... questionnaire 95 (National Cancer Institute) (11), and again in 1995-1996 using a validated Willett food-frequency questionnaire 96 (12). Dietary patterns were evaluated as a time-varying exposure, with the cumulative average of intakes from the 97 two FFQs...

  5. New protection scheme and pressure relief-valve staging of the LHC insulation vacuum enclosure following the 19th September 2008 incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruikshank, P; Perin, A; Tavian, L

    2010-01-01

    This note defines the new protection scheme and the pressure relief valve staging of the LHC insulation vacuum enclosure which has to be implemented following the 19th September 2008 incident in the Sector 3-4. This note covers all the equipment located in the arcs, dispersion suppressors, matching sections and inner-triplets, including the QRL cryogenic line. As part of the machine will not be consolidated until the long shutdown scheduled after the first LHC operation years, a temporary protection scheme is also defined allowing a safe LHC operation at reduced beam energy.

  6. eFRMAC Overview: Data Management and Enabling Technologies for Characterization of a Radiological Release A Case Study: The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, Daniel J. [NNSA; Clark, Harvey W. [NSTec; Essex, James J. [NSTec; Wagner, Eric C. [NSTec

    2013-07-01

    The eFRMAC enterprise is a suite of technologies and software developed by the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Emergency Response to coordinate the rapid data collection, management, and analysis required during a radiological emergency. This enables the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center assets to evaluate a radiological or nuclear incident efficiently to facilitate protective actions to protect public health and the environment. This document identifies and describes eFRMAC methods including (1) data acquisition, (2) data management, (3) data analysis, (4) product creation, (5) quality control, and (6) dissemination.

  7. Time parallel gravitational collapse simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas; Ruprecht, Daniel; Krause, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates the applicability of the parallel-in-time method Parareal to the numerical solution of the Einstein gravity equations for the spherical collapse of a massless scalar field. To account for the shrinking of the spatial domain in time, a tailored load balancing scheme is proposed and compared to load balancing based on number of time steps alone. The performance of Parareal is studied for both the sub-critical and black hole case; our experiments show that Parareal generates substantial speedup and, in the super-critical regime, can also reproduce the black hole mass scaling law.

  8. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  9. Effort, memory, attention and time : paths to more effective personal information management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Kleek, Max, 1980-

    2011-01-01

    With the widespread availability of digital tools for storing, accessing, and sharing information, why is so much information still lost, forgotten, or kept on paper? The work in this thesis finds that such disorganization ...

  10. Maps and mortality in the time of cholera. by Steven Shapin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapin, Steven

    , 2006 After Katrina, cholera. On August 31, 2005--two days after the hurricane made landfall--the Bush, and as much as a litre of water may be lost per hour--your eyes become sunken; your body is racked

  11. Optimizing Wireless Network Protocols Using Real-Time Predictive Propagation Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    on the battlefield [1] and emergency disaster relief personnel coordinating efforts after a hurricane or earthquake in the network before they cause packets to be lost or delayed. Hardware Control (power, antenna, thresholds, etc

  12. Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2006 You --Yes, You --Are TIME's Person of the Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    also worked. Like crazy. We made Facebook profiles and Second Life avatars and reviewed books at Amazon, who actually sits down after a long day at work and says, I'm not going to watch Lost tonight. I

  13. User Experiment Time-Line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Experiment Time-Line Event Target Call for proposal 2 months before proposals are due PAC Proposals Due 7 weeks before PAC meeting TAC Report for PAC Proposals (includes...

  14. Time Machine at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ya. Aref'eva; I. V. Volovich

    2007-10-25

    Recently, black hole and brane production at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been widely discussed. We suggest that there is a possibility to test causality at the LHC. We argue that if the scale of quantum gravity is of the order of few TeVs, proton-proton collisions at the LHC could lead to the formation of time machines (spacetime regions with closed timelike curves) which violate causality. One model for the time machine is a traversable wormhole. We argue that the traversable wormhole production cross section at the LHC is of the same order as the cross section for the black hole production. Traversable wormholes assume violation of the null energy condition (NEC) and an exotic matter similar to the dark energy is required. Decay of the wormholes/time machines and signatures of time machine events at the LHC are discussed.

  15. Vocal Timing in the Bat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis, Jenna N

    2013-05-01

    respond to continuous noise by increasing their call rate, and that the switch between the responses to intermittent noise and continuous noise occurs at a duty cycle of 50% or higher. Overall, this dissertation establishes that bats alter the timing...

  16. TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    MASTER CON TIME SCHEDULE WINTER QUARTER 1970 ADVANCE REGISTRATION NOVEMBER 3-21 IN, please leave it or pass it along so that other students may use it. #12;Winter Quarter 1970. Examination

  17. Modeling of Time with Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor I. Smolyaninov; Yu-Ju Hung

    2011-05-12

    Metamaterials have been already used to model various exotic "optical spaces". Here we demonstrate that mapping of monochromatic extraordinary light distribution in a hyperbolic metamaterial along some spatial direction may model the "flow of time". This idea is illustrated in experiments performed with plasmonic hyperbolic metamaterials. Appearance of the "statistical arrow of time" is examined in an experimental scenario which emulates a Big Bang-like event.

  18. Geothermal Exploration Cost and Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, Scott

    2013-02-13

    The Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL.

  19. On the Nature of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radovan, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The paper puts forward a conceptual framework in which the phenomenon of time can be presented and discussed in a proper way. We argue that change is ontologically and epistemologically a more basic phenomenon than time. Time is an abstract entity created by the human mind on the basis of the experience of change. Physical reality is a process of ceaseless becoming and vanishing; time is not a part of that process. Time is the abstract bank in relation to which we measure the intensity and amount of the flow (change) of physical reality. We must differentiate physical reality from abstract entities (language) by means of which we speak about this reality. It is necessary to differentiate a formal description (formulas) from its interpretation: a correct formal description can be interpreted in a logically inconsistent and factually wrong way. We argue that the discourse about the relativity of time joins (mixes) physical reality and language, and gives an inconsistent interpretation of correct formulas. Regar...

  20. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  1. Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) Develop over time and can take a long time to heal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in plastic bag. Dispose of in a low-level, radioactive waste container. Monitor area, hands and shoes ...............................919-668-ERGO(3746) Visitor Injuries/Illnesses Respond to injured. Report incident to Duke Police-related injuries/illnesses regardless of the severity must be reported to your supervisor. Fill out a Report

  2. Measuring time with physical clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esteban Castro-Ruiz; Flaminia Giacomini; ?aslav Brukner

    2015-07-07

    In general relativity, the picture of spacetime assigns an ideal clock to each spacetime point. Being ideal, gravitational effects due to these clocks are ignored and the flow of time according to one clock is not affected by the presence of surrounding clocks. However, if time is defined operationally, as a pointer position of a physical clock that obeys the laws of quantum mechanics and general relativity, such a picture is at most a convenient fiction. We show that the mass-energy equivalence implies gravitational interaction between the clocks, while the superposition of energy eigenstates leads to a non-fixed metric background. Based only on the assumption that both quantum mechanics and general relativity are valid in this situation, we show that the clocks necessarily get entangled through time dilation effect, which eventually leads to a loss of coherence of a single clock. Hence, the time as measured by a single clock is not well-defined. However, the general relativistic notion of time is recovered in the classical limit of clocks.

  3. Static timing analysis in VLSI design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shuo

    2006-01-01

    II.B Static Timing AnalysisStatic Timing Analysis in the Design Flow FalseChip Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I.C Static Timing

  4. Time Series Analysis 1 Time series in astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    (supernovae, gamma-ray bursts) Difficulties in astronomical time series Gapped data streams: Diurnal & monthly phenomena: thermonuclear (novae, X-ray bursts), magnetic reconnection (solar/stellar flares), star death); pulsation (helioseismology, Cepheids) Stochastic phenomena: accretion (CVs, X-ray binaries, Seyfert gals

  5. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  6. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE�s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE�s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  7. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  8. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1994-07-26

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured. 3 figs.

  9. High resolution time interval counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A high resolution counter circuit measures the time interval between the occurrence of an initial and a subsequent electrical pulse to two nanoseconds resolution using an eight megahertz clock. The circuit includes a main counter for receiving electrical pulses and generating a binary word--a measure of the number of eight megahertz clock pulses occurring between the signals. A pair of first and second pulse stretchers receive the signal and generate a pair of output signals whose widths are approximately sixty-four times the time between the receipt of the signals by the respective pulse stretchers and the receipt by the respective pulse stretchers of a second subsequent clock pulse. Output signals are thereafter supplied to a pair of start and stop counters operable to generate a pair of binary output words representative of the measure of the width of the pulses to a resolution of two nanoseconds. Errors associated with the pulse stretchers are corrected by providing calibration data to both stretcher circuits, and recording start and stop counter values. Stretched initial and subsequent signals are combined with autocalibration data and supplied to an arithmetic logic unit to determine the time interval in nanoseconds between the pair of electrical pulses being measured.

  10. Precision Timing Via Cerenkov Radiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ) beam splitter EG&G Ortec 9306 EG&G Ortec 9306 Microchannel­plate Photo Multiplier (MCP­PMT) 1 GHz Preamplifier Semiconductor Photo Diode 1 GHz Preamplifier EG&G Ortec 9307 EG&G Ortec 9307 ``Pico Timing Converter (TAC) 10 ns delay Stop Start Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA) beam splitter EG&G Ortec 9306 1 GHz

  11. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabil Ghodbane

    2002-12-12

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  12. Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Han; Fu, Kan

    2013-11-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 °C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

  13. Theory of Earthquake Recurrence Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Saichev; D. Sornette

    2006-05-31

    The statistics of recurrence times in broad areas have been reported to obey universal scaling laws, both for single homogeneous regions (Corral, 2003) and when averaged over multiple regions (Bak et al.,2002). These unified scaling laws are characterized by intermediate power law asymptotics. On the other hand, Molchan (2005) has presented a mathematical proof that, if such a universal law exists, it is necessarily an exponential, in obvious contradiction with the data. First, we generalize Molchan's argument to show that an approximate unified law can be found which is compatible with the empirical observations when incorporating the impact of the Omori law of earthquake triggering. We then develop the full theory of the statistics of inter-event times in the framework of the ETAS model of triggered seismicity and show that the empirical observations can be fully explained. Our theoretical expression fits well the empirical statistics over the whole range of recurrence times, accounting for different regimes by using only the physics of triggering quantified by Omori's law. The description of the statistics of recurrence times over multiple regions requires an additional subtle statistical derivation that maps the fractal geometry of earthquake epicenters onto the distribution of the average seismic rates in multiple regions. This yields a prediction in excellent agreement with the empirical data for reasonable values of the fractal dimension $d \\approx 1.8$, the average clustering ratio $n \\approx 0.9$, and the productivity exponent $\\alpha \\approx 0.9$ times the $b$-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law.

  14. Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, A R; Norman, E B; Hurley, D L; Lo, B T; Chan, Y D; Guillaumon, P V; Harvey, B G

    2013-01-01

    A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found...

  15. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  16. Treating Time Travel Quantum Mechanically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John-Mark A. Allen

    2014-10-10

    The fact that closed timelike curves (CTCs) are permitted by general relativity raises the question as to how quantum systems behave when time travel to the past occurs. Research into answering this question by utilising the quantum circuit formalism has given rise to two theories: Deutschian-CTCs (D-CTCs) and "postselected" CTCs (P-CTCs). In this paper the quantum circuit approach is thoroughly reviewed, and the strengths and shortcomings of D-CTCs and P-CTCs are presented in view of their non-linearity and time travel paradoxes. In particular, the "equivalent circuit model"---which aims to make equivalent predictions to D-CTCs, while avoiding some of the difficulties of the original theory---is shown to contain errors. The discussion of D-CTCs and P-CTCs is used to motivate an analysis of the features one might require of a theory of quantum time travel, following which two overlapping classes of new theories are identified. One such theory, the theory of "transition probability" CTCs (T-CTCs), is fully developed. The theory of T-CTCs is shown not to have certain undesirable features---such as time travel paradoxes, the ability to distinguish non-orthogonal states with certainty, and the ability to clone or delete arbitrary pure states---that are present with D-CTCs and P-CTCs. The problems with non-linear extensions to quantum mechanics are discussed in relation to the interpretation of these theories, and the physical motivations of all three theories are discussed and compared.

  17. How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brion, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    P. M. (1964). Exchange and power in social life. New York:Press. Boeker, W. (1992). Power and managerial dismissal -J. F. Dovidio (Eds. ), Power, Dominance, and Non-verbal

  18. Lost and Found: Mathematically Locating Ocean Downed Aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Abstract Given the vast size of the Earth's oceans, and the dynamics of their currents, any attempt to give the effects of the ocean's currents on the fuselage at the crash site, and 4) apply Bayesian search methods the effects of ocean currents on the fuselage to determine a maximum drift. Accordingly, our model will give

  19. Fusion Power: I Think We're Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - social, regulatory, and energy issues will pose moving targets." "To compensate for the higher economic

  20. How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brion, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    The authors found that power led individuals to cheat moreaddress the extent to which power led to overestimations ofthe extent to which power led to illusions of alliance, an

  1. The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Randall James

    2009-05-15

    , shipboard items, and sections of hull; however, between 1281 and the late twentieth century the site has seen major disturbances, and the artifacts are often in poor condition. Because the site contains the remains of ships built in China and Korea...

  2. The Adventures of Dr. Tuku & the Lost Pyramids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    and in his mini Volkswagen Beetle, zipping off to the library to find out more. 3 #12;`As Dr. Tuku sat

  3. Production-Intent Lost-Motion Variable Valve Actuation Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Variable valve actuation with on/off IEGR pre-bump is an enabling technology for HCCI, PCCI, LTC and other advanced combustion techniques, and designs for production-intent equipment have been developed

  4. Geophysical Mapping of Lost Historical Sites: Brenham, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Charles

    2014-09-17

    of distance cm Centimeters – measurement of distance m 2 Squared Meters – measurement of area kHz Kilohertz, 1000 hertz – measurement of frequency MHz Megahertz, 10 6 hertz GHz Gigahertz, 10 9 hertz nT nanoTeslas... battery pack and is responsible for recording and storing of all data. Typically measurements of the geomagnetic field range from 45,000 to 50,000 nanoTeslas (nT), the G-858 magnetometer is able to measure the magnetic field with a precision of 0.1 n...

  5. Reconstructing top quark-antiquark events with one lost jet

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demina, Regina [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Harel, Amnon [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Orbaker, Douglas [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-07-01

    We present a technique for reconstructing the kinematics of pair-produced top quarks that decay to a charged lepton, a neutrino and four final state quarks in the subset of events where only three jets are reconstructed. We present a figure of merit that allows for a fair comparison of reconstruction algorithms without requiring their calibration. The new reconstruction of events with only three jets is fully competitive with the full reconstruction typically used for four-jet events.

  6. Reconstructing top quark-antiquark events with one lost jet

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demina, Regina; Harel, Amnon; Orbaker, Douglas

    2015-04-02

    We present a technique for reconstructing the kinematics of pair-produced top quarks that decay to a charged lepton, a neutrino and four final state quarks in the subset of events where only three jets are reconstructed. We present a figure of merit that allows for a fair comparison of reconstruction algorithms without requiring their calibration. The new reconstruction of events with only three jets is fully competitive with the full reconstruction typically used for four-jet events.

  7. Security on Campus The Security Office and lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teaching building (building 104). · Call 9553 7333 (24 hour hotline). Security call buttons are located are located in the Gym. Contact the Student Centre for access. Travel Smart Maps · Travel Smart maps or top up Smart Riders from the Rockingham train station or most newsagents. Maps and timetables

  8. Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Metal casting was identified as one of the top 10 energy users in manufacturing. The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent...

  9. Percentage of Wetlands Acreage Lost, 1780s1980s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    or impaired wetlands where possible. United States Office of Water EPA 843-F-01-002d Environmental Protection Office of Wetlands, September 2001 Agency Oceans and Watersheds (4502T) What Is the Status of Our Nation from urban, agricultural, silvicultural, and mining areas. ! Air pollution from cars, factories

  10. PiPe dreams? Jobs Gained, Jobs Lost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    to the Keystone XL budget and expenditures, steel sourcing, and the costs of environmental damage. #12;Corne drilling. If the industry's jobs estimates made in the context of KXL are any indication, then this broader

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lost Creek - WY 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont,Manufacturing - OH 40Loma Mill - CO 03NMLost

  12. Lost Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon: EnergyLloyd, NewBranchLongweiLosCerrillos,Creek, Texas:

  13. Center for Inverse Design: Lost SharePoint Password?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1,Center OrganizationInfraredEFRC Researchers in

  14. REQUEST FOR LOST/STOLEN BADGE REPLACEMENT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-D rendering ofForm documents the circumstances

  15. Lost Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedListguidedand Long Beach HarborsIHills,

  16. Lost films chronicle dawn of hydroelectric power in the Northwest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to localPartnership will aid

  17. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Manchester

    2007-11-12

    Detection and study of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is a major goal of current astrophysics. Ground-based laser-interferometer systems such as LIGO and VIRGO are sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies of order 100 Hz, whereas space-based systems such as LISA are sensitive in the millihertz regime. Precise timing observations of a sample of millisecond pulsars widely distributed on the sky have the potential to detect gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. Potential sources of such waves include binary super-massive black holes in the cores of galaxies, relic radiation from the inflationary era and oscillations of cosmic strings. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of such a system in which 20 millisecond pulsars have been observed using the Parkes radio telescope at three frequencies at intervals of two -- three weeks for more than two years. Analysis of these data has been used to limit the gravitational wave background in our Galaxy and to constrain some models for its generation. The data have also been used to investigate fluctuations in the interstellar and Solar-wind electron density and have the potential to investigate the stability of terrestrial time standards and the accuracy of solar-system ephemerides.

  18. Timing the Parkes Multibeam Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Manchester; A. G. Lyne; F. Camilo; V. M. Kaspi; I. H. Stairs; F. Crawford; D. J. Morris; J. F. Bell; N. D'Amico

    1999-11-17

    Measurement of accurate positions, pulse periods and period derivatives is an essential follow-up to any pulsar survey. The procedures being used to obtain timing parameters for the pulsars discovered in the Parkes multibeam pulsar survey are described. Completed solutions have been obtained so far for about 80 pulsars. They show that the survey is preferentially finding pulsars with higher than average surface dipole magnetic fields. Eight pulsars have been shown to be members of binary systems and some of the more interesting results relating to these are presented.

  19. Regression quantiles for time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Zongwu

    2002-02-01

    ~see, e+g+, Ibragimov and Linnik, 1971, p+ 316!+ Namely, partition REGRESSION QUANTILES FOR TIME SERIES 187 $1, + + + , n% into 2qn 1 1 subsets with large block of size r 5 rn and small block of size s 5 sn+ Set q 5 qn 5 ? n rn 1 sn? , (A.7) where {x...! are the standard Lindeberg–Feller conditions for asymptotic normality of Qn,1 for the independent setup+ Let us first establish ~A+8!+ To this effect, we define the large-block size rn by rn 5 {~nhn!102} and the small-block size sn 5 {~nhn!1020log n}+ Then, as n r...

  20. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  1. Time Scales in Spectator Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schwarz; for the ALADIN collaboration

    2000-09-07

    Proton-proton correlations and correlations of p-alpha, d-alpha, and t-alpha from spectator decays following Au + Au collisions at 1000 AMeV have been measured with an highly efficient detector hodoscope. The constructed correlation functions indicate a moderate expansion and low breakup densities similar to assumptions made in statistical multifragmentation models. In agreement with a volume breakup rather short time scales were deduced employing directional cuts in proton-proton correlations. PACS numbers: 25.70.Pq, 21.65.+f, 25.70.Mn

  2. Time-Bounded Verification Joel Ouaknine1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, James

    Time-Bounded Verification Jo¨el Ouaknine1 , Alexander Rabinovich2 , and James Worrell1 1 Oxford prob- lems for timed automata over time intervals of fixed, bounded length. One of our main results is that time-bounded language inclusion for timed automata is 2EXPSPACE-complete. We also investigate the satis

  3. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, David

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  4. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2008-02-27

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  5. Global Warming in Geologic Time

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Archer

    2010-01-08

    The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere / ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial / interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

  6. Real time analysis under EDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneberk, D.

    1985-07-01

    This paper describes the analysis component of the Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) developed for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Four different types of analysis are performed on data acquired through EDS: (1) absorption spectroscopy on laser-generated spectral lines, (2) mass spectrometer analysis, (3) general purpose waveform analysis, and (4) separation performance calculations. The information produced from this data includes: measures of particle density and velocity, partial pressures of residual gases, and overall measures of isotope enrichment. The analysis component supports a variety of real-time modeling tasks, a means for broadcasting data to other nodes, and a great degree of flexibility for tailoring computations to the exact needs of the process. A particular data base structure and program flow is common to all types of analysis. Key elements of the analysis component are: (1) a fast access data base which can configure all types of analysis, (2) a selected set of analysis routines, (3) a general purpose data manipulation and graphics package for the results of real time analysis. Each of these components are described with an emphasis upon how each contributes to overall system capability. 3 figs.

  7. Light incoherence theory revisited by Heisenberg time-energy uncertainty challenges solar cell optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Aline; Deparis, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of the efficiency of solar cells is a major challenge for renewable energies. Using a rigorous theoretical approach, we show that the photocurrent generated in a solar cell depends strongly on the degree of coherence of the incident light. In accordance with Heisenberg uncertainty time-energy, incoherent light at photons of carrier energy lower than the active material bandgap can be absorbed whereas coherent light at the same carrier energy cannot. We identify cases where incoherence does enhance efficiency. This result has a dramatical impact on the way solar cells must be optimized regarding sunlight. As an illustration, surface-corrugated GaAs and c-Si thin-film solar cells are considered.

  8. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction Francesco Sottile LSI, Ecole Polytechnique (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Palaiseau, 7 February 2012 1 / 32 #12;Outline 1 Frontiers 4 Perspectives and Resources Francesco Sottile (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

  9. INVESTIGATION Genomic Background and Generation Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Michael

    INVESTIGATION Genomic Background and Generation Time Influence Deleterious Mutation Rates variation is generated and how selection shapes mutation rates over evolutionary time requires knowledge, genomic background and generation time, on deleterious mutation in Daphnia pulicaria, a cyclically

  10. AUTOMATIC PROGRAM TIMING PROFILES WITH FTN4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Richard.

    2010-01-01

    September 22-25, 1980 AUTOMATIC PROGRAM TIMING PROFILES WITHW-7405-ENG-48 LBL-1l290 Automatic Program Timing ProfilesW-1405-ENG-48 LBL-11290 Automatic Program Timing Profiles

  11. Time Travel and the Reality of Spontaneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. K. Raju

    2008-04-05

    Contrary to the informed consensus, time travel implies spontaneity (as distinct from chance) so that time travel can only be of the second kind.

  12. Incident at Morales 6/16/14 INCIDENT AT MORALES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xinzhong

    of Mechanical Engineers William J. Lhota, P.E., American Electric Power Clint W. Murchison Chair of Free, are virtually empty. It's early. SUPER: State Courthouse, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico Stiff and uncomfortable. DOMINIQUE (in French) Yes, yes, yes. Their decision is final. So, we build the plant in Mexico. I'll see you

  13. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  14. Can we treat CO? well blowouts like routine plumbing problems? A study of the incidence, impact, and perception of loss of well control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porse, Sean L.; Wade, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2014-12-31

    Risk communication literature suggests that for a number of reasons, the public may perceive a risk to be greater than indicated by its statistical probability. Public concern over risk can lead to significant and costly delays in project permitting and operations. Considering these theories, media coverage of CO?-related well blowouts in 2013 gave rise to the questions: What is the risk of CO? well blowouts associated with CCUS through CO? EOR? What is the potential public perception of those risks? What information could be used to respond to public concern? To address these questions, this study aims to: 1) provide a framework for understanding the nature of onshore well blowouts, 2) quantify the incidence of such events for three specific geographic regions of Texas, 3) relate this data to CCUS and findings from other studies, and 4) explore the potential implications for public perception of this risk associated with CCUS projects. While quantifying answers to these questions proved to be challenging, the results from this study suggest that (1) the perceived risk of CO? well blowouts may exceed the statistical risk and (2) information that could be used to address this gap could be made more readily available to the greater benefit of industry and stakeholders who support the development of CCUS as an option for addressing anthropogenic CO? emissions. The study also suggests approaches to best conduct such data inquiries.

  15. Can we treat CO? well blowouts like routine plumbing problems? A study of the incidence, impact, and perception of loss of well control

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Porse, Sean L.; Wade, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2014-12-31

    Risk communication literature suggests that for a number of reasons, the public may perceive a risk to be greater than indicated by its statistical probability. Public concern over risk can lead to significant and costly delays in project permitting and operations. Considering these theories, media coverage of CO?-related well blowouts in 2013 gave rise to the questions: What is the risk of CO? well blowouts associated with CCUS through CO? EOR? What is the potential public perception of those risks? What information could be used to respond to public concern? To address these questions, this study aims to: 1) providemore »a framework for understanding the nature of onshore well blowouts, 2) quantify the incidence of such events for three specific geographic regions of Texas, 3) relate this data to CCUS and findings from other studies, and 4) explore the potential implications for public perception of this risk associated with CCUS projects. While quantifying answers to these questions proved to be challenging, the results from this study suggest that (1) the perceived risk of CO? well blowouts may exceed the statistical risk and (2) information that could be used to address this gap could be made more readily available to the greater benefit of industry and stakeholders who support the development of CCUS as an option for addressing anthropogenic CO? emissions. The study also suggests approaches to best conduct such data inquiries.« less

  16. Orbital effects of a monochromatic plane gravitational wave with ultra-low frequency incident on a gravitationally bound two-body system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-09-12

    We analytically compute the long-term orbital variations of a test particle orbiting a central body acted upon by an incident monochromatic plane gravitational wave. We assume that the characteristic size of the perturbed two-body system is much smaller than the wavelength of the wave. Moreover, we also suppose that the wave's frequency is much smaller than the particle's orbital one. We make neither a priori assumptions about the direction of the wavevector nor on the orbital geometry of the planet. We find that, while the semi-major axis is left unaffected, the eccentricity, the inclination, the longitude of the ascending node, the longitude of pericenter and the mean anomaly undergo non-vanishing long-term changes. They are not secular trends because of the slow modulation introduced by the tidal matrix coefficients and by the orbital elements themselves. They could be useful to indepenedently constrain the ultra-low frequency waves which may have been indirectly detected in the BICEP2 experiment. Our calculation holds, in general, for any gravitationally bound two-body system whose characteristic frequency is much larger than the frequency of the external wave. It is also valid for a generic perturbation of tidal type with constant coefficients over timescales of the order of the orbital period of the perturbed particle.

  17. Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

    2013-12-27

    A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

  18. High-resolution grazing-incidence grating spectrometer for temperature measurements of low-Z ions emitting in the 100–300 Ĺ spectral band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K., E-mail: widmann1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We have constructed a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer designed for measuring the ion temperature of low-Z elements, such as Li{sup +} or Li{sup 2+}, which radiate near 199 Ĺ and 135 Ĺ, respectively. Based on measurements at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap we have shown that the instrumental resolution is better than 48 mĹ at the 200 Ĺ setting and better than 40 mĹ for the 135-Ĺ range. Such a high spectral resolution corresponds to an instrumental limit for line-width based temperature measurements of about 45 eV for the 199 Ĺ Li{sup +} and 65 eV for the 135 Ĺ Li{sup 2+} lines. Recently obtained survey spectra from the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory show the presence of these lithium emission lines and the expected core ion temperature of approximately 70 eV is sufficiently high to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing our high-resolution spectrometer as an ion-temperature diagnostic.

  19. LANL responds to radiological incident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent...

  20. Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response.  This model has been adopted and...