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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident Portsmouth Site Plant Surpasses Five Years Without Lost-Time Accident November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. Russ Hall, environment, safety and health supervisor, changes the DUF6 project sign to mark five years without a lost-time accident. BWCS employees from all departments of the DUF6 project at the Portsmouth site come together to mark five years without a lost-time accident.

2

Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction hits one ... Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has worked one million hours, covering a 633-day period, without a lost-time injury. Some 285 people including building trade crafts, non-manual staff and escorts worked without a lost-time accident during this period. The Construction team's last lost workday was in September 2010. A celebration was held today to mark the safety milestone. Senior leaders from National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office (NPO) and B&W Y-12 were on hand to congratulate the workers. Jim Haynes, B&W Y-12 senior vice president and deputy general manager for projects, said, "Congratulations are due the men and women of

3

Pantex celebrates three million hours without a lost time injury | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three million hours without a lost time injury | National three million hours without a lost time injury | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex celebrates three million hours without a ... Pantex celebrates three million hours without a lost time injury Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA Blog

4

WIPP Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident CARLSBAD, N.M., February 22, 2001 - Workers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) reached a safety milestone Feb. 19 by working two million man-hours without a lost-time accident. According to the National Safety Council, facilities with the same industry code as WIPP lose an average of 20.6 workdays (or 164.8 man-hours) a year to accidents. "Safety is at the core of all WIPP operations," said Dr. Inés Triay, Manager of DOE's Carlsbad Field Office. "We are particularly pleased that WIPP workers reached the two million mark during the time in which they mined a new panel and increased shift work." "To make safety a number one priority means more than creating a safe

5

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One application of travel time information explored in this thesis is freeway incident detection. It is vital to develop reliable methods for automatically detecting incidents to facilitate the quick response and removal of incidents before they cause breakdowns in traffic flow. The use of real-time travel time data to monitor freeway conditions has the advantages over conventional loop detectors of taking into account the dynamic, longitudinal nature of traffic flow and requiring data from only a portion of the traffic stream. This study employed the Standard Normal Deviate (SND) Model to test the feasibility of using travel time data to detect lane blocking incidents. The fundamental concept of the SND Model was based on the comparison of real-time travel time data to historical travel time data for given freeway segments during specified times. The travel time and incident reports used were collected through the Real-Time Traffic Information System (RTTIS) in the north freeway corridor of Houston, Texas using probe vehicles equipped with cellular telephones. The data were compiled on 39 freeway links from October 1991 through August 1992 on weekdays during morning and afternoon data collection periods. The results of incident detection tests, applying the SND Model to incident and travel time me data from the North Freeway, indicated high successful incident detection rates. However, high false alarm rates also resulted from the SND Model test applications. An optimum SND value of 2.0 was observed for the North Freeway test data. At this value the SND tests produced successful incident detection rates of 70 percent and higher during both the morning and afternoon periods. False alarm rates were also 70 percent. The best results were achieved on those freeway sections where the most incident and travel time data had been collected. The overall results of the incident detection tests on the North Freeway demonstrated that the SND Model was a feasible incident detection algorithm, but required an extensive historical travel time data base.

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Lost Circulation Experience in Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and cementing in geothermal wells is a problem common to most geothermal areas. Material and rig time costs due to lost circulation often represent one fourth or more of the total well cost. Assessment of the general drilling and completion practices commonly used for handling lost circulation have been surveyed and evaluated under a study sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. Results of this study, including interviews with geothermal production companies and with drilling fluid service companies, are reported in the paper. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for control of lost circulation during geothermal operations. Recent improvements in lost circulation materials and techniques and potential equipment solutions to the lost circulation problem are discussed. Research needs are also identified.

Goodman, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lost and Found  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lost and Found Lost and Found The items listed below have been found at the SEU Test Facility. You can click on the check box to the left of an item if you believe that the item belongs to you. Enter your name, e-mail address and/or phone number in the spaces provided below the list of items and press the 'Submit' button to send us the information. We will be in touch with you shortly thereafter. You can also contact us in a more conventional way by telephone, fax or snail mail if you prefer. Or you can e-mail the information to Vladimir Zajic, Jim Alessi or Chuck Carlson. We Found The Following Items At Our Facility Check the items that may belong to you, enter your name and either an e-mail address or a phone number Fluke Model 8062A True RMS Multimeter SN 3515144 - Control Data Corp. 5768

8

Lost Circulation Technology Development Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the U.S. Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30-50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1991-March, 1992.

Glowka, David A.; Schafer, Diane M.; Loeppke, Glen E.; Scott, Douglas D.; Wernig, Marcus D.; Wright, Elton K.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

Lost circulation technology development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April 1991--March 1992. 8 refs.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D.; Wright, E.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Lost circulation technology development status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50% through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April 1991--March 1992. 8 refs.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Scott, D.D.; Wernig, M.D.; Wright, E.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Status of lost circulation research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes progress made in the Lost Circulation Technology Development Program over the period March, 1992--April, 1993. The program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy, Geothermal division. The goal of the program is to develop technology to reduce lost circulation costs associated with geothermal drilling by 30--50%.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Wright, E.K.; Whitlow, G.L.; Bates, C.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

DOE lost circulation technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is a problem common in both the geothermal and the solution mining industries. In both cases, drilling is on a relatively large scale (geothermal holes can be as large as 26 inches). Lost circulation technology development for geothermal drilling has been in progress at Sandia National Laboratories for more than 15 years. The initial work centered on lost circulation materials, but testing and modeling indicated that if the aperture of a loss zone is very large (larger than the drill bit nozzles) it cannot be plugged by simply adding materials to the drilling fluid. Thus, the lost circulation work evolved to include: (1) Development of metering techniques that accurately measure and characterize drilling fluid inflow and outflow for rapid diagnosis of los circulation and/or fluid balance while drilling. (2) Construction of a laboratory facility for testing drillable straddle packers (to improve the plugging efficiency of cementing operations) and the actual testing of components of the straddle packer. (3) Construction of a laboratory facility for the testing of candidate porous fabrics as a part of a program to develop a porous packer that places polyurethane foam into a loss zone. (4) Implementing (with Halliburton and CalEnergy Company), a program to test cementitious lost circulation material as an alternative to Portland cement.

Glowka, D.A.; Staller, G.E.; Sattler, A.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Grazing incidence extreme ultraviolet spectrometer fielded with time resolution in a hostile Z-pinch environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This recently developed diagnostic was designed to allow for time-gated spectroscopic study of the EUV radiation (4 nm power generator (1 MA, 100 ns risetime) at University of Nevada, Reno on a series of wire array z-pinch loads. Within this harsh z-pinch environment, radiation yields routinely exceed 20 kJ in the EUV and soft x-ray. There are also strong mechanical shocks, high velocity debris, sudden vacuum changes during operation, energic ion beams, and hard x-ray radiation in excess of 50 keV. The spectra obtained from the precursor plasma of an Al double planar wire array contained lines of Al IX and AlX ions indicating a temperature near 60 eV during precursor formation. Detailed results will be presented showing the fielding specifications and the techniques used to extract important plasma parameters using this spectrometer.

Williamson, K. M.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Wilcox, P. G.; Cline, W.; Batie, S.; LeGalloudec, B.; Nalajala, V.; Astanovitsky, A. [Plasma Physics and Diagnostics Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

LOST CREEK ISR, LLC, LOST CREEK IN SITU RECOVERY FACILITY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission (NRC) staff and representatives of Lost Creek ISR, LLC (LCI) was held to discuss LCI’s application for a license to construct and operate a uranium in situ recovery facility (ISR) in Wyoming. The NRC staff had completed its review of LCI’s application and prepared an internal draft of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER). The conference call was held as a follow-up to the conference call between the NRC and LCI on September 25, 2009 (ML093130083) to discuss open issues that NRC staff identified in preparing the draft SER. A summary of the meeting is enclosed. Within 30 days of receipt of this letter, please either provide the information identified in the meeting summary or inform us of the date you expect to provide the information. At this point in the review process, NRC staff has presented all open issues to LCI regarding the Lost Creek facility SER. The staff previously provided written discussions of incomplete responses and open issues on April 23, 2009 and November 9, 2009. The staff is therefore curtailing any further work until resolution of the open issues. Note that a delay in providing information may result in a delay in NRC staff’s completion of the SER. If you have any questions regarding this letter or the enclosed meeting summary, please contact me at (301) 415-6142, or by email at

Mr. Wayne; W. Heili

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

RFI - Comments on Computer Security Incident Coordination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 21:49 To: incidentcoordination@nist.gov Subject: Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

16

Lost-motion valve actuator  

SciTech Connect

A lost-motion valve actuator is described for a bore closure valve employed in a well bore, comprising: operating connector means adapted to move the bore closure valve between open and closed positions through longitudinal movement of the operating connector means. The operating connector means comprises an operating connector and a connector insert defining a recess therebetween; locking dog means comprising at least one locking dog received in the recess and spring biasing means adapted to urge at least one locking dog radially inwardly; and mandrel means slidably received within the operating connector means and including dog slot means associated therewith. The dog slot means comprises an annular slot on the exterior of the mandrel means adapted to lockingly receive at least one inwardly biased locking dog when proximate thereto, whereby longitudinal movement of the mandrel means is transmitted to the operating connector means.

Burris, W.J. III; Ringgenberg, P.D.

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

Glowka, D.A.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

Glowka, D.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

Glowka, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

Glowka, David A. (Tijeras, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermal Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is an expensive and often encountered problem when drilling into geothermal formations. A method is needed to more accurately describe loss zones encountered during geothermal drilling to allow for more realistic testing since present testing techniques are inadequate. A Lost Circulation Zone Mapping Tool (LCZMT) is being developed that will quickly locate a loss zone and then provide a visual image of this zone as it intersects the wellbore. A modified Sandia high temperature Acoustic Borehole Televiewer should allow modeling of geothermal loss zones, which would in turn lead to testing that can be performed to evaluate lost circulation materials under simulated downhole conditions. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Bauman, T.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

23

Lost Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lost Creek Wind Farm Lost Creek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lost Creek Wind Farm Facility Lost Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Associated Electric Cooperative Location DeKalb County MO Coordinates 39.98080324°, -94.55009937° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.98080324,"lon":-94.55009937,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Lost Lakes Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakes Wind Farm Lakes Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lost Lakes Wind Farm Facility Lost Lakes Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Energy Purchaser Market Location Dickinson County IA Coordinates 43.32401°, -95.264354° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32401,"lon":-95.264354,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Pantex celebrates three million hours without a lost time injury...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

all of our activities at Pantex," he said. The hard work of the members of the division led to Pantex being named the High Explosives Center of Excellence for High Explosives...

26

Fuzzy expert system for solving lost circulation problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lost circulation is the most common problem encountered while drilling oil wells. This paper describes a distributed fuzzy expert system, called Smart-Drill, aimed in helping petroleum engineers to diagnose and solve lost circulation problems. To represent ... Keywords: Finite ordinal scales, Fuzzy algebra, Fuzzy expert system, Knowledge representation, Lost circulation problem, Multi-sets, Oil well drilling

Leonid Sheremetov; Ildar Batyrshin; Denis Filatov; Jorge Martinez; Hector Rodriguez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Estimating the value of lost telecoms connectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a practical method for estimating the economic cost of outages in electronic communications networks, accommodating temporal, geographical and sectoral variations in incidence. The method is illustrated with two types of examples: a hypothetical ... Keywords: Cost of outages, Economic analysis, Service continuity, Telecommunications, Value

Sean Lyons; Edgar Morgenroth; Richard S. J. Tol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Lost Soul of the Body Politic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modern nation-state is the product of a gradual process in which the religiously concerned medieval political and ecclesiastical synthesis became more secular and centralized. Mirroring this external institutional development, the theoretical conception of the state changed from one of a natural organic unity of diverse corporate members to a consent-based compact among atomized individuals. This change can be traced in the Body Politic metaphor of four authors: John of Salisbury, Christine de Pizan, Johannes Althusius, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. In this project, I argue that the Body Politic metaphor, particularly the inclusion or exclusion of a soul of the Body Politic, is uniquely appropriate for capturing the complexity of political life in general across differing levels of aggregation and for elucidating the political and religious commitments of the authors who employ it, as they critique their own contemporary political and religious institutions and describe their ideal societies. In the conclusion, I suggest that the loss of a strongly organic conception of the state has denied modern society and political theory a well established means for incorporating corporate entities and for explaining the existence of the modern nation-state in any kind of transcendental moral context, thus the lost soul of the Body Politic.

Chupp, Jesse

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluating candidate lost circulation materials for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories' Geothermal Technology Development Division is working to advance the state of the art of lost circulation prevention and control. For this purpose, a large-scale lost Circulation Test Facility was designed and built. This paper addresses the evaluation of candidate lost circulation materisl using this facility and also using the recommended practice of API RP 131. Test results from these facilities are compared and discussed for the materials tested.

Loeppke, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Progress toward using hydraulic data to diagnose lost circulation zones  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several wellbore hydraulic models have been examined to determine their applicability in measuring the characteristics of lost circulation zones encountered in geothermal drilling. Characteristics such as vertical location in the wellbore, fracture size, effective permeability, and formation pressure must be known in order to optimize treatment of such zones. The models that have been examined to date are a steady-state model, a standpipe-pressure model, a raising-the-drill-bit model, a mud-weight model, a hydrofracture model, and several time-dependent models. None of these models yet have been found to adequately match the field data obtained from six loss zones in three geothermal wells. The development of these models is presented in this paper, and a discussion of their limitations is provided.

Mansure, A.J.; Glowka, D.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Progress in The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50{percent} through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1990--March, 1991. 4 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Wright, E.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Design and evaluation of lost circulation materials for severe environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An independent analysis of lost circulation materials for geothermal applications has been completed using unique laboratory tools developed for the purpose. Test results of commercial materials as well as mathematical models for evaluating their performance are presented. Physical attributes that govern the performance of lost circulation materials are identified and correlated with test results. 9 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

Loeppke, G.E.; Glowka, D.A.; Wright, E.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Lost circulation technology workshop, October 9-10, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the presentations and discussions of a workshop on lost circulation technology. The workshop identified and defined lost circulation problem areas in field operations, materials, mud effects, and standards. Problem solution needs were also categorized as requiring analytical evaluation and procedure, instrument, and material development.

Caskey, B.C. (ed.)

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Incident Handling Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] Incident Handling Activities. Since 1989 the National Institute of Standards ...

35

Parallel performance prediction using lost cycles analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most performance debugging and tuning of parallel programs is based on the "measure-modify" approach, which is heavily dependent on detailed measurements of programs during execution. This approach is extremely time-consuming and does not lend itself ...

Mark E. Crovella; Thomas J. LeBlanc

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Research in lost circulation control for geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews recent progress at Sandia National Laboratories in the area of lost circulation control for geothermal wells. The Lost Circulation Program has three major elements: (1) Detection and characterization of loss zones, (2) Development of new techniques and materials for control of loss zones, and (3) Integration of the first two items for wellsite application. Most of our work to date has been in the area of developing new techniques and materials. We report here on progress that has been made in the past two years in the development of new, pumpable cementitious muds, in situ mixing and placement of polyurethane foams, and fundamental analysis of and materials development for particulate lost circulation materials. Plans for work in the area of zone detection and characterization, including development of a transient, lost circulation hydraulics simulator and field zone characterization using an advanced wellbore televiewer, are discussed.

Ortega, A.; Loeppke, G.E.; Givler, R.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fuzzy Expert System for Solving Lost Circulation Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lost circulation is the most common problem encountered when drilling. This paper describes a distributed hybrid intelligent system, called SmartDrill, using fuzzy logic, expert system framework and web services for helping petroleum engineers to diagnose ...

Leonid Sheremetov; Ildar Batyrshin; Jorge Martinez; Hector Rodriguez; Denis Filatov

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Save the tree of life or get lost in the woods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of life or get lost in the woods Biology Direct 2010, 5:44of life or get lost in the woods Ruben E Valas* 1 and PhilipOtherwise one gets lost in the woods of neutral evolution.

Valas, Ruben E; Bourne, Philip E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lost Creek - WY 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lost Creek - WY 01 Lost Creek - WY 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Lost Creek (WY.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation of the period do not provide sufficient information to warrant further search of historical records for information on these sites. These site files remain "open" to

40

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting December 18, 2009 - 2:43pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What are the key facts? Metal casting was identified as one of the top 10 energy users in manufacturing. The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent fewer materials than traditional processes. One example of this technology is being used by General Motors to make lightweight engine blocks for the fuel-efficient vehicles they manufacture. A government-funded effort to support development of foam metal casting helped reduce an estimated 9.4 million tons of solid waste between 1994 and 2005, which saved industry an estimated 3 trillion Btu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chemical Grouting Lost-Circulation Zones with Polyurethane Foam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is developing polyurethane foam as a chemical grout for lost circulation zones. In past work polyurethane foam was tried with limited success in laboratory tests and GDO sponsored field tests. Goals were that the foam expanded significantly and harden to a chillable firmness quickly. Since that earlier work there have been improvements in polyurethane chemistry and the causes of the failures of previous tests have been identified. Recent success in applying pure solution grouts (proper classification of polyurethane--Naudts) in boreholes encourages reevaluating its use to control lost circulation. These successes include conformance control in the oil patch (e.g. Ng) and darn remediation projects (Bruce et al.). In civil engineering, polyurethane is becoming the material of choice for sealing boreholes with large voids and high inflows, conditions associated with the worst lost circulation problems. Demonstration of a delivery mechanism is yet to be done in a geothermal borehole.

Mansure, A.J.; Westmoreland, J.J.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

Joint Cross Well and Single Well Seismic Studies at Lost Hills, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were con- ducted in a diatomite reservoir to monitor theWater Saturation in Diatomite using Wireline Logs, Losttechniques. Lost Hills Diatomite The reservoir at Lost Hills

Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Is security a lost cause? Chris J Mitchell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is security a lost cause? Chris J Mitchell c.mitchell@rhul.ac.uk Information Security Group Royal security, namely: (a) what do current technological trends mean for future information security, and (b) what effect do conflicts between security/privacy requirements and economic and technological pressures

Sheldon, Nathan D.

44

Ramanujan’s “Lost Notebook ” and the Virasoro Algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, by using the theory of vertex operator algebras, we gave a new proof of a famous Ramanujan’s (modulus 5) modular equation from his ”Lost Notebook ” (p.139 [R]). Moreover, we obtained an infinite list of q–identities for all the odd moduli; thus we generalized the result of Ramanujan. 1

Antun Milas

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable...

46

January 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a recent cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of...

47

July 2013 Cyber Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information ...

48

Incidents of Security Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1210-2012 September 2012 DOE STANDARD Incidents of Security Concern U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1210-2012 INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1210-2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS PARAGRAPH PAGE FOREWORD ................................................................................................................................ IV INCIDENTS OF SECURITY CONCERN......................................................................................1 1. SCOPE ....................................................................................................................................1 2. PURPOSE...............................................................................................................................1

49

Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Incident Investigation and Reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a model procedure for incident investigations based on an examination of programs at fourteen utilities believed to have good and effective procedures. The model was compiled by an expert who also drew on materials from other industries. An outline presents the basic procedure while the main text discusses in more detail alternate methods that may be preferable for a specific utility.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Lost circulation in geothermal wells: survey and evaluation of industry experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and completion of geothermal wells can be a severe problem, particularly in naturally fractured and/or vugular formations. Geothermal and petroleum operators, drilling service companies, and independent consultants were interviewed to assess the lost circulation problem in geothermal wells and to determine general practices for preventing lost circulation. This report documents the results and conclusions from the interviews and presents recommendations for needed research. In addition, a survey was also made of the lost circulation literature, of currently available lost circulation materials, and of existing lost circulation test equipment.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Lost River Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Electric Coop Inc River Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Lost River Electric Coop Inc Place Idaho Utility Id 11211 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Controlled Outdoor Lighting Lighting Commercial Space Heating Service Commercial Commercial Stock Pump Service Commercial Commercial, School, Church and Public Buildings Commercial Farm Stock Pump Service Commercial Farm and Home Controlled Outdoor Lighting Lighting Farm and Home Service Commercial

53

Thermal Test of Cast Iron Cooling Stave Produced by Lost Foam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The producing of cooling stave using lost foam casting process has the advantages of .... Numerical simulation of microwave absorption of regenerative heat ...

54

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality  

SciTech Connect

This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE...

56

Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and others who require it. This report summarizes the rise in frequency of cyber attacks, describes the perpetrators, and identifies the means of attack. This type of analysis, when used in conjunction with vulnerability analyses, can be used to support a proactive approach to prevent cyber attacks. CSSC will use this document to evolve a standardized approach to incident reporting and analysis. This document will be updated as needed to record additional event analyses and insights regarding incident reporting. This report represents 120 cyber security incidents documented in a number of sources, including: the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) Industrial Security Incident Database, the 2003 CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey, the KEMA, Inc., Database, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Energy Incident Database, the INL Cyber Incident Database, and other open-source data. The National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT) database was also interrogated but, interestingly, failed to yield any cyber attack incidents. The results of this evaluation indicate that historical evidence provides insight into control system related incidents or failures; however, that the limited available information provides little support to future risk estimates. The documented case history shows that activity has increased significantly since 1988. The majority of incidents come from the Internet by way of opportunistic viruses, Trojans, and worms, but a surprisingly large number are directed acts of sabotage. A substantial number of confirmed, unconfirmed, and potential events that directly or potentially impact control systems worldwide are also identified. Twelve selected cyber incidents are presented at the end of this report as examples of the documented case studies (see Appendix B).

Robert J. Turk

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Full-scale facility for evaluating lost circulation materials and techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has designed and built a full-scale facility for the evaluation of lost circulation materials and techniques under simulated down-hole geothermal wellbore conditions. System capabilities include a maximum temperature of 400/sup 0/F, maximum allowed working pressure of 1150 psi, and a variable pumping rate up to 280 gpm at 1000 psi. The system will be utilized to evaluate candidate lost circulation materials and techniques that may be useful to solving geothermal well drilling lost circulation problems.

Loeppke, G.E.; Caskey, B.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

MIDAS : minor incident decision analysis software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIDAS is the minor incident decision analysis software that acts as an advisory tool for plant decision makers and operators to analyze the available decision alternatives for resolving minor incidents. The minor incidents ...

Horng, Tze-Chieh, 1964-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

60

LANL responds to radiological incident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of equipment and methods to map lost circulation zones in geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study and evaluation of methods to locate, characterize, and quantify lost circulation zones are described. Twenty-five methods of mapping and quantifying lost circulation zones were evaluated, including electrical, acoustical, mechanical, radioactive, and optical systems. Each tool studied is described. The structured, numerical evaluation plan, used as the basis for comparing the 25 tools, and the resulting ranking among the tools is presented.

McDonald, W.J.; Leon, P.A.; Pittard, G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a fire at an oilfield waste disposal facility (hereafter, disposal facility) near Rosharon, Texas, south of Houston. The fire occurred as two vacuum trucks were off-loading liquid wastes from oil and gas production wells. The trucks arrived at the disposal facility within a few minutes of each other and were parked approximately 16 feet apart. The two drivers got out of their trucks, left the engines running, and told the disposal facility employees that the trucks were to be drained and rinsed out. Both drivers then went to the drivers ’ shed to complete paperwork and to wait for the washout to be completed. (1) The fire was caused by the ignition of hydrocarbon vapor released during the off-loading of basic

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Risk Insights Gained from Fire Incidents  

SciTech Connect

There now exist close to 20 years of history in the application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the analysis of fire risk at nuclear power plants. The current methods are based on various assumptions regarding fire phenomena, the impact of fire on equipment and operator response, and the overall progression of a fire event from initiation through final resolution. Over this same time period, a number of significant fire incidents have occurred at nuclear power plants around the world. Insights gained from US experience have been used in US studies as the statistical basis for establishing fire initiation frequencies both as a function of the plant area and the initiating fire source.To a lesser extent, the fire experience has also been used to assess the general severity and duration of fires. However, aside from these statistical analyses, the incidents have rarely been scrutinized in detail to verify the underlying assumptions of fire PRAs. This paper discusses an effort, under which a set of fire incidents are being reviewed in order to gain insights directly relevant to the methods, data, and assumptions that form the basis for current fire PRAs. The paper focuses on the objectives of the effort, the specific fire events being reviews methodology, and anticipated follow-on activities.

Kazarians, Mardy; Nowlen, Steven P.

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cyber Security Incidents, Information Technology Division, ITD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reporting Computing Security Incidents Reporting Computing Security Incidents Incident Reporting Hotline: 631-344-8484 Security Incidents A computer security incident can range from a simple virus to the disclosure of sensitive information. Incidents can be minor, important, or significant. Incidents that must be reported include computer or network related activity, internal or external to the Laboratory, that may impact the Laboratory's mission. Examples of such activities include: the possibility of: loss of data; denial of services; compromise of computer security; unauthorized access to data that the Laboratory is required to control by law, regulation, or DOE orders; investigative activity by legal, law enforcement, bureaucratic, or political authorities; or a public relations embarrassment.

65

Design, Development and Testing of a Drillable Straddle Packer for Lost Circulation Control in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost Circulation is a widespread problem encountered when drilling geothermal wells, and often represents a substantial portion of the cost of drilling a well. The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these lost circulation expenditures. Sandia has developed a down hole tool that improves the effectiveness and reduces th cost of lost circulation cement treatment while drilling geothermal wells. This tool, the Drillable Straddle Packer, is a low-cost disposable device that is used to isolate the loss zone and emplace the cement treatment directly into the region of concern. This report documents the design and development of the Drillabe Straddle Packer, the laboratory and field test results, and the design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

Gabaldon, J.; Glowka, D.A.; Gronewald, P.; Knudsen, S.D.; Raymond, D.W.; Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wise, J.L.; Wright, E.K.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A drillable straddle packer for lost circulation control in geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost circulation is a persistent problem in geothermal drilling and often accounts for a significant fraction of the cost of drilling a typical geothermal well. The US Department of Energy sponsors work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop technology for reducing lost circulation costs. This paper describes a downhole tool that has been developed at Sandia for improving the effectiveness and reducing the cost of cementing operations used to treat lost circulation zones. This tool, known as the drillable straddle packer, is a low-cost, disposable assembly used for isolating a loss zone and directing the flow of cement into the zone. This paper describes the tool concept, hardware design, deployment procedure, laboratory testing, and technical issues addressed during the development process.

Glowka, D.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Analysis of fracturing pressures in the South Belridge and Lost Hills Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A presentation is made of both theories and rules of thumb believed applicable to everyday fracturing situations in the Lost Hills and South Belridge fields. Pressure analysis is featured with emphasis on bottom hole fracturing pressure calculation and interpretation. Suggestions for the application of findings are offered in hopes of increasing the efficiency of current frac completion and treating methods. 3 refs.

Swanson, G.S.; Meeken, R.B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents  

SciTech Connect

The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

Charles Solbrig

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Definition: Angle of incidence | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angle of incidence Angle of incidence Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Angle of incidence In reference to solar energy systems: the angle a ray of sun makes with a line perpendicular to a surface; for example, a surface directly facing the sun has an angle of incidence of zero, and a surface parallel to the sun (such as a sunrise striking a horizontal rooftop) has an angle of incidence of 90°. Sunlight with an incident angle of 90° tends to be absorbed, while lower angles tend to be reflected.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Angle of incidence is a measure of deviation of something from "straight on", for example: in the approach of a ray to a surface, or the angle at which the wing or horizontal tail of an airplane is installed on the fuselage, measured relative to the axis of the fuselage.

70

Cyber Incident Information | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Services » Guidance » Privacy » Cyber Incident Information Cyber Incident Information July 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred at the end of July and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of federal employee Personally Identifiable Information (PII). January 2013 Cyber Incident The Department of Energy (DOE) has confirmed a cyber incident that occurred in mid-January 2013 which targeted the Headquarters' network and resulted in the unauthorized disclosure of employee and contractor Personally Identifiable Information (PII). Tips to Monitor Your Identity Here is a suggested list of tips to monitor and protect yourself. Assistive Technology Forms Guidance Capital Planning Information Collection Management

71

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management » JC3 Incident Reporting Management » JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting JC3 Incident Reporting Procedures U.S. Department of Energy Facilities/Contractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all cyber security incidents involving information or information systems, including privacy breaches, under DOE or DOE contractor control must be identified, mitigated, categorized, and reported to the Joint Cybersecurity Coordination Center (JC3) in accordance with JC3 procedures and guidance." This document outlines the referenced JC3 reporting procedures and guidance to facilitate your reporting and CIRC's response activity. CIRC should be informed of all reportable cyber security incidents as specified below.

72

Lost Trail Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lost Trail Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Lost Trail Hot Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Sula, Montana Coordinates 45.8365869°, -113.9817463° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

73

Priest Rapids Dam flow curtailment: Incident report, January 7, 1961  

SciTech Connect

This incident report deals with mechanical damage (caused by falling rocks) to the power line supplying station power, Priest Rapids Dam lost all generating flow at 4:23 p.m., cutting discharge from 71,700 cfs to about 12,000 cfs. Within five minutes, spillway gates were opened, bringing river flow back to greater than 36,000 cfs in about 10 minutes. The flow at 181-B dropped from 72,000 cfs to a minimum of 56,000 cfs at about 5:25 p.m. Priest Rapids generators returned to service at 4:45 p.m., the indicated flow at the gauge reaching 71,700 cfs again at about 8:00 p.m. River temperatures at the gauge increased 0.5 C following the interruption, but not at 181-B. Prompt HAPO notification of the flow reduction as provided for in the agreement between the PUD and the AEC was not made on this occasion; the first notice came from the 251 Substation.

Kramer, H.A.; Corley, J.P.

1961-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

A New Method for Time Series Filtering near Endpoints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series filtering (e.g., smoothing) can be done in the spectral domain without loss of endpoints. However, filtering is commonly performed in the time domain using convolutions, resulting in lost points near the series endpoints. Multiple ...

Anthony Arguez; Peng Yu; James J. O’Brien

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Dynamic detection of nuclear reactor core incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surveillance, safety and security of evolving systems are a challenge to prevent accident. The dynamic detection of a hypothetical and theoretical blockage incident in the Phenix nuclear reactor is investigated. Such an incident is characterized by abnormal ... Keywords: Contrast, Dynamic detection of perturbations, Evolving system, Fast-neutron reactor, Neighbourhood, Noise

Laurent Hartert; Danielle Nuzillard; Jean-Philippe Jeannot

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A SAS-macro for estimation of the cumulative incidence using Poisson regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In survival analyses, we often estimate the hazard rate of a specific cause. Sometimes the main focus is not the hazard rates but the cumulative incidences, i.e., the probability of having failed from a specific cause prior to a given time. The cumulative ... Keywords: Competing risks, Cox regression, Cumulative incidence, Hazard rate, Poisson regression, Survival analysis

Berit Lindum Waltoft

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Chapter_11_Incidents_of_Security_Concern  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Incidents of Security Concern This chapter covers the DOE HQ implementation of DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, Attachment 5, Incidents of Security Concern. HS-91 manages the HQ Security Incidents Program. Incidents of Security Concern (henceforth referred to as Incidents) are actions, inactions, or events that are believed to: * Pose threats to national security interests and/or DOE assets * Create potentially serious or dangerous security situations * Significantly affect the safeguards and security program's capability to protect DOE safeguards and security interests * Indicate failure to adhere to security procedures * Reveal that the system is not functioning properly, by identifying and/or mitigating potential threats (e.g., detecting suspicious activity, hostile acts, etc.).

78

ORISE: Incident Command System (ICS) Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Command System (ICS) Training Incident Command System (ICS) Training The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports the emergency response community by promoting interagency cooperation and developing training that enhances response efforts. An example of such support involves the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Response and its compliance efforts toward the Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5 (HSPD-5), which includes the implementation of National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and the National Response Framework (NRF). The ICS, which has been recognized for its training curricula that has exceeded national standards, is an on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept that was originally designed for emergency management agencies, but

79

Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

Overview of Incidents Related to Live Working  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of progress in the research on injury and fatality information among workers who perform energized (live) and/or de-energized work. While every effort is made in the industry to avoid incidents during work on energized and de-energized lines, they do occur, and there are lessons embedded within every incident from which the utility industry can benefit, if the incidents are thoroughly analyzed, root causes are identified, and corrective actions are taken. The primary objective of...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reclaiming lost capability in power plant coal conversions: an innovative, low-cost approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the capability lost during coal conversion can be recovered for midrange/peaking power generation through low cost, turbine cycle and economizer modifications. The additional output can be realized by shutting off adjacent high pressure feedwater heaters (as specified by turbogenerator manufacturers) and simultaneously increasing heat input to the economizer. The supplemental economizer heat input makes up for heat lost to the feedwater when extraction steam is shut off. Several options for applying this novel approach to capability recovery are described. The reclaimed capability is realized at somewhat lower efficiency but at low cost, compared to the overall cost of a coal conversion. Rather than return converted units to up to 100% oil or gas firing during periods of high system demand, the proposed method allows the continued comsumption of coal for the base-load portion of the plant's output. The development of the low NO/sub x/ Slagging Combustor will allow even the added economizer heat input to be supplied by relatively low cost coal. Following a brief review of factors affecting boiler capability in coal conversions and current approaches to coal conversion in this country and overseas, the results of a preliminary study that apply the proposed novel concept to a West Coast power plant are described.

Miliaras, E.S.; Kelleher, P.J.; Fujimura, K.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Environment Induced Time Arrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

Janos Polonyi

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

83

Definition: Cyber Security Incident | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Security Incident Security Incident Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Cyber Security Incident Any malicious act or suspicious event that: Compromises, or was an attempt to compromise, the Electronic Security Perimeter or Physical Security Perimeter of a Critical Cyber Asset, or, Disrupts, or was an attempt to disrupt, the operation of a Critical Cyber Asset.[1] Related Terms Electronic Security Perimeter References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Cyber_Security_Incident&oldid=480296" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

84

JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy FacilitiesContractors Only DOE O 205.1-B Chg 2 4.(c)(13) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM requires a defined "process for incident reporting that requires all...

85

The incident at Stagg Field  

SciTech Connect

A brief history of the events leading up to the first controlled release of atomic energy under the abandoned West Stands of Scagg Field at the University of Chicago on December 2, 1942. This experiment was a milestone in a multifaceted project geared toward producing an atomic bomb in time to affect the outcome of World War II. This article traces the origins of the Manhattan Project from the first letter written by Einstein to the first successful graphite modulated chain reacting pile and including a brief afterward on the use of the bombs produced by this project on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Other articles in this magazine also discuss various aspects of the project and serve, along with this article, as a commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

Moore, M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

87

AMI Cyber Security Incident Response Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is intended to be used by system and asset owners to assist in the preparation and response to AMI cyber security incidents. This document was developed by conducting interviews with EPRI members, AMI asset owners, and vendors, regarding practices involved in responding to AMI cyber security incidents and mapping the responses to requirements put forth by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Open Smart Grid (Open-SG) Working ...

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Development of CFD Software To Support the Engineering of Lost Foam Pattern Blowing and Steaming  

SciTech Connect

This CFD Project has led to a new commercial software package (Arena-flow-eps) for advanced engineering of lost foam pattern formation. Specifically, the new software models all fluid/particle/thermal phenomena during both the bead-blowing and the pattern-fusing cycles--within a single, integrated computational tool. Engineering analysis with Arena-flow-eps will enable foundries to now obtain desirable foam pattern characteristics in a reliable (consistent) manner, aided by an understanding of the fundamental fluid/thermal physics of the process. This will lead to significant reductions in casting scrap and energy usage, as well as enable future castings to satisfy stringent requirements on high-power-density and low-emissions in tomorrow's automotive and watercraft engines.

Dr. Kenneth A. Williams; Dr. Dale M. Snider

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

89

Information conservation is fundamental: recovering the lost information in Hawking radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In both classical and quantum world, information cannot appear or disappear. This fundamental principle, however, is questioned for a black hole, by the acclaimed "information loss paradox". Based on the conservation laws of energy, charge, and angular momentum, we recently show the total information encoded in the correlations among Hawking radiations equals exactly to the same amount previously considered lost, assuming the non-thermal spectrum of Parikh and Wilczek. Thus the information loss paradox can be falsified through experiments by detecting correlations, for instance, through measuring the covariances of Hawking radiations from black holes, such as the manmade ones speculated to appear in LHC experiments. The affirmation of information conservation in Hawking radiation will shine new light on the unification of gravity with quantum mechanics.

Zhang, Baocheng; Zhan, Ming-sheng; You, Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

PLUTONIUM RELEASE INCIDENT OF NOVEMBER 20, 1959  

SciTech Connect

A nonnuclear explosion involving an evaporator occurred in a shielded cell in the Radiochemical Processing Pilot Plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on Nov. 20, 1959. Plutonium was released from the processing cell, probably as an aerosol of fine particles of plutonium oxide. It is probable that this evaporator system had accumulated -1100 g of nitric acid-insoluble plutonium in the steam stripper packing; the explosion released an estimated 150 g inside Cell 6, with about 135 g in the evaporator subcell, and about 15 g in the larger main cell. No radioactive material was released from the ventilation stacks; no contamination of grounds and facilities occurred outside of a relatively small area of OaK Ridge National Laboratory immediately adjacent to the explosion. No one was injured by the explosion, and no one received more than 2% of a lifetime body burden of plutonium or an overexposure to sources of ionizing radiation either at the time of the incident or daring subsequent cleanup operations. The explosion is considerdd to be the result of rapid reaction of nitrated organic compounds formed by the inadvertent nitration of about 14 liters of a proprietary decontaminating reagent. In cleanup the contamination was bonded to the nearby street and building surfaces with tar, paint, roofing compound, or masonry sealer, as appropriate to the surface. Decontamination of the interior of the pilot-plant building, except the processing cells, was 95% complete on Sept. 1, 1960. Decontamination of the processing cells was delayed 8 months until building modifications could be made to improve containment. Modifications to the pilot plant have been proposed which will preclude dischanges into the laboratory area and its environment of concentrations or amounts of radioactive materials that would be injurious to health or interfere with other laboratory programs. (auth)

King, L.J.; McCarley, W.T.

1961-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part I: Use of the tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for incidence studies  

SciTech Connect

More than 30 years ago, population-based tumor registries were established in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report, the first of a series of papers on cancer incidence, describes methodological aspects of the tumor registries and discusses issues of data quality in the context of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, the major atomic bomb survivor population. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are characterized by active case ascertainment based on abstraction of medical records at area hospitals, augmented by tissue registries operational in the area and a number of clinical and pathological programs undertaken over the years among the atomic bomb survivors. Using conventional measures of quality, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries have a death certificate-only (DCO) rate of less than 9%, a mortality/incidence (M/I) ratio of about 50%, and a histological verification (HV) rate in excess of 70%, which place these registries among the best in Japan and comparable to many established registries worldwide. All tumor registry data pertaining to the LSS population were assembled, reviewed and handled with special attention given to the quality and uniformity of data based on standardized procedures. Special studies and monitoring programs were also introduced to evaluate the quality of the tumor incidence data in the LSS. Analyses were performed to examine the quality of incidence data overall and across various substrata used for risk assessment such as age, time and radiation dose groups. No significant associations were found between radiation dose and data quality as measured by various indices. These findings warrant the use of the present tumor registry-based data for studies of cancer incidence in the atomic bomb survivors. 41 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Preston, D.L. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sumio (Hiroshima Perfectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Crosshole EM for oil field characterization and EOR monitoring: Field examples from Lost Hills, California  

SciTech Connect

A steamflood recently initiated by Mobil Development and Production U.S. at the Lost Hills No 3 oil field in California is notable for its shallow depth and the application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques to monitor the subsurface steam flow. Steam was injected into three stacked eastward-dipping unconsolidated oil sands at depths from 60 to 120 m; the plume is expected to develop as an ellipsoid aligned with the regional northwest-southeast strike. Because of the shallow depth of the sands and the high viscosity of the heavy oil, it is important to track the steam in the unconsolidated sediments for both economic and safety reasons. Crosshole and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic imaging were applied for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. The crosshole EM data were collected to map the interwell distribution of the high-resistivity oil sands and to track the injected steam and hot water. Measurements were made in two fiberglass-cased observation wells straddling the steam injector on a northeast-southwest profile. Field data were collected before the steam drive, to map the distribution of the oil sands, and then 6 and 10 months after steam was injected, to monitor the expansion of the steam chest. Resistivity images derived from the collected data clearly delineated the distribution and dipping structure of the target oil sands. Difference images from data collected before and during steamflooding indicate that the steam chest has developed only in the middle and lower oil sands, and it has preferentially migrated westward in the middle oil sand and eastward in the deeper sand. Surface-to-borehole field data sets at Lost Hills were responsive to the large-scale subsurface structure but insufficiently sensitive to model steam chest development in the middle and lower oil sands. As the steam chest develops further, these data will be of more use for process monitoring.

Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C.; Wratcher, M.; Lambert, I.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Tseng H.W.

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Collisionless absorption of light waves incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisionless absorption of laser light incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients is studied analytically and numerically. For the normal incidence case, it is shown that both sheath inverse bremsstrahlung and the anomalous skin effect are limiting cases of the same collisionless absorption mechanism. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, the effects of finite sheath-transit time and finite density gradient are investigated. The analyses are extended to oblique incident cases. For p-polarized obliquely incident light, the results are significantly different from those for the normal incidence case. Most noticeable is the absorption enhancement for the p-polarized light due to the interaction of the electrons with the normal (parallel to the density gradient) component of the laser electric field in the sheath region.

Yang, T.Y.B.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident Recordkeeping and Reporting Accident/Incident Recordkeeping and Reporting CAIRS logo Computerized Accident Incident Reporting System CAIRS Database The Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System is a database used to collect and analyze DOE and DOE contractor reports of injuries, illnesses, and other accidents that occur during DOE operations. Injury and Illness Dashboard The Dashboard provides an alternate interface to CAIRS information. The initial release of the Dashboard allows analysis of composite DOE-wide information and summary information by Program Office, and site. Additional data feature are under development. CAIRS Registration Form CAIRS is a Government computer system and, as such, has security requirements that must be followed. Access to the

95

Incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Southeast Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background and Aims: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a well-known consequence of chronic liver disease (CLD). The aim of this study was to extract the HCC incidence rate in the province of Kerman, located in southern part of Iran, and compare the data with other parts of the country. Materials and Methods: All medical records related to HCC were collected through hospitals or outpatient services in public or private centers. The records of all oncology, radiotherapy, and pathology centers in Kerman province were actively searched between 1999 and 2006. The annual incidence of HCC around the country was calculated, using the

A Rticle; Sodaif Darvish Moghaddam; Ali-akbar Haghdoost; Seyed Hamed Hoseini; Rashid Ramazani; Mohammad Rezazadehkermani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mortality in Appalachian coal mining regions: the value of statistical life lost  

SciTech Connect

We examined elevated mortality rates in Appalachian coal mining areas for 1979-2005, and estimated the corresponding value of statistical life (VSL) lost relative to the economic benefits of the coal mining industry. We compared age-adjusted mortality rates and socioeconomic conditions across four county groups: Appalachia with high levels of coal mining, Appalachia with lower mining levels, Appalachia without coal mining, and other counties in the nation. We converted mortality estimates to VSL estimates and compared the results with the economic contribution of coal mining. We also conducted a discount analysis to estimate current benefits relative to future mortality costs. The heaviest coal mining areas of Appalachia had the poorest socioeconomic conditions. Before adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual age-adjusted deaths in coal mining areas ranged from 3,975 to 10,923, depending on years studied and comparison group. Corresponding VSL estimates ranged from $18.563 billion to $84.544 billion, with a point estimate of $50.010 billion, greater than the $8.088 billion economic contribution of coal mining. After adjusting for covariates, the number of excess annual deaths in mining areas ranged from 1,736 to 2,889, and VSL costs continued to exceed the benefits of mining. Discounting VSL costs into the future resulted in excess costs relative to benefits in seven of eight conditions, with a point estimate of $41.846 billion.

Hendryx, M.; Ahern, M.M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COEIDTR01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incident and Disaster Tolerance/Response Policy COE­IDTR­01 1.0 Purpose To provide College faculty or disaster within a College-operated network closet. 2.0 Scope 2.1 Incident Response: Incident response for developing and implementing Disaster Tolerance/Recovery plans. 3.0 Policy 3.1 Incident Response: Any desktop

Demirel, Melik C.

98

Continuous review inventory models with a mixture of backorders and lost sales under fuzzy demand and different decision situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, continuous review inventory models in which a fraction of demand is backordered and the remaining fraction is lost during the stock out period are considered under fuzzy demands. In order to find the optimal decision under different situations, ... Keywords: Continuous review inventory model, Defuzzification, Differential evolution algorithm, Fuzzy simulation, Possibilistic mean value

Lin Wang; Qing-Liang Fu; Yu-Rong Zeng

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

100

An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

Koch, Daniel B [ORNL; Payne, Patricia W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Calls for Suggestions to Speed Computer Incident Teams Responses. From NIST Tech Beat: June 28, 2013. ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

103

Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Comparative analysis of hydrogen fire and explosion incidents: quarterly report No. 2, December 1, 1977--February 28, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional hydrogen incident reports compiled during this quarter have increased the size of the computerized data base to a current total of 280 incidents. Listings of 165 incidents that have occurred in industrial and transportation operations since 1968 are presented here. Sample case histories in six different cause categories are provided together with a discussion of common safety problems contributing to these incidents. Some of these problems are inadequate detection measures for hydrogen leaks and fires and ineffective purging with inert gas. A preliminary comparison of losses due to natural gas fires/explosions and hydrogen incidents indicates that hydrogen explosions have been, on the average, four-to-six times as damaging as natural gas explosions. Some tentative explanations for this result are presented but await confirmation from a more sophisticated statistical analysis.

Zalosh, R.G.; Short, T.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analysis of the incidence angle of the beam radiation on CPC. [Compound Parabolic Concentrator  

SciTech Connect

Analytic expressions have been derived for the projected incidence angles {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub 2} from a two-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator solar collector. For a CPC the fraction of the incident rays on the aperture at angle {var theta}, which reaches the absorber, depends only on the {var theta}{sub 1} angle. In this paper, a mathematical expression for {var theta}{sub 1} and {var theta}{sub t} has been calculated to determine the times at which acceptance of the sun's beam radiation begins and ceases for a CPC consisting of arbitrary orientation.

Pinazo, J.M.; Canada, J.; Arago, F. (Univ. Politecnica de Valencia (Spain))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect

This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (�¢����Energy SMARRT�¢���) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU�¢����s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU�¢����s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Harry Littleton; John Griffin

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

109

Recent Racial Incidents in Higher Education: A Contemporary Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Racial Incidents in Higher Education 1987b. "King Wants1988. "Hispanics Higher Education's Missing People." Change12-65. Chronicle of Higher Education. 1987. "Racial Brawl

Farrell, Walter C. Jr.; Jones, Cloyzelle K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In his after-action analysis, Haley has been surprised by the number of similarities in response planning, even when disaster scenarios differ dramatically. "Like this incident,...

111

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, EPRI published a Technical Update report, "Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching" (EPRI report 1016830), which introduced a report format and form designed to allow utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database. This new report summarizes work performed on the database in 2009.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

A survey SCADA of and critical infrastructure incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze several cyber-security incidents involving critical infrastructure and SCADA systems. We classify these incidents based on Source Sector, Method of Operations, Impact, and Target Sector. Using this standardized taxonomy we can ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, cyber attack, cyber security, information assurance and security, scada, security

Bill Miller; Dale Rowe

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Active and Knowledge-based Process Safety Incident Retrieval System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sustainability and continued development of the chemical industry is to a large extent dependent on learning from past incidents. The failure to learn from past mistakes is rather not deliberate but due to unawareness of the situation. Incident databases are excellent resources to learn from past mistakes; however, in order to be effective, incident databases need to be functional in disseminating the lessons learned to users. Therefore, this research is dedicated to improving user accessibility of incident databases. The objective of this research is twofold. The first objective is improving accessibility of the database system by allowing the option of word search as well as folder search for the users. This will satisfy research needs of users who are aware of the hazards at hand and need to access the relevant information. The second objective is to activate the database via integration of the database with an operational software. This will benefit research needs of users who are unaware of the existing hazards. Literature review and text mining of Major Accident Reporting System (MARS) database short reports are employed to develop an initial taxonomy, which is then refined and modified by expert review. The incident reports in MARS database is classified to the right folders in the taxonomy and implemented in a database system based on Microsoft Excel, where the users can retrieve information using folder search as well as word search option via a user friendly interface. A program coded in JAVA is prepared for integrating the incident database with a Management of Change (MOC) software prototype. A collection of keywords on hazardous substances and equipment is prepared. If the keywords exist in the MOC interface, they will be highlighted, and with the click of a button, will return up to ten relevant incident reports. Using an active and knowledge-based system, people can learn from incidents and near-misses and will be more active to reduce the frequency of recurring incidents.

Khan, Sara Shammni

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Arc Flash Issues in Transmission and Substation Environments: Modeling of Incident Thermal Energy of Long Arcs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc flashes are a serious hazard that may put people in life-threatening situations and cause great damage to existing assets. The National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) introduced requirements for electric utilities to perform arc flash hazard assessment of their facilities operating at and above 1000 V. Most methods available at this time for analyzing the incident thermal energy of arc flash were developed for low and medium-voltage industri...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cyber Security Incident Management Program, Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0787 The Department of Energy operates numerous interconnected computer networks and systems to help accon~plishit s strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science, and the environment. These systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could potentially affect the Department's ability to carry out its mission. During Fiscal Year 2006, the Department experienced 132 incidents of sufficient severity to require reporting to law enforcement, an increase of 22 percent over the prior year. These statistics, troubling as they may be, are not unique to the Department; they are, in fact, reflective of a trend in cyber attacks throughout the government.

116

Climate Influences on Meningitis Incidence in Northwest Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of meningitis. In this study, the influence of climate on monthly meningitis incidence was examined. Monthly counts of clinically diagnosed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected from ...

Auwal F. Abdussalam; Andrew J. Monaghan; Vanja M. Dukic; Mary H. Hayden; Thomas M. Hopson; Gregor C. Leckebusch; John E. Thornes

117

Public health: emergency management: capability analysis of critical incident response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 9/11 terrorist incident, homeland security efforts and the readiness of local emergency management agencies have become focal points in the war on terrorism. A significant issue faced by front line responders has been the significant increase ...

Thomas F. Brady

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS)...

119

Estimation of Incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation from GOES Visible Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important parameter for terrestrial ecosystem models. Because of its high temporal resolution, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations are very suited to ...

Tao Zheng; Shunlin Liang; Kaicun Wang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Efficiency of critical incident management systems: Instrument development and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is much literature in the area of emergency response management systems. Even so, there is in general a lacuna of literature that deals with the issue of measuring the effectiveness of such systems. The aim of this study is to develop and validate ... Keywords: Critical incident management system (CIMS), Decision support, Emergency response systems, Instrument, Measurement, Media richness theory, National incident management systems (NIMS), Validation

Jin Ki Kim; Raj Sharman; H. Raghav Rao; Shambhu Upadhyaya

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Finding Lost Children  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a ground truth of skin color 5-8. The middle table is fora ground truth of skin color 5 ? 8. The middle table is fortable is for age. The rows correspond to images with the ground truth

Eden, Ashley Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into action. Much work needs to be accomplished to enhance nuclear preparedness and to substantially bolster and clarify the capacity to deploy competent resources. Until detailed plans are scripted, and personnel and other resources are postured, and exercised, IND specific planning remains an urgent need requiring attention and action. Although strategic guidance, policies, concepts of operations, roles, responsibilities, and plans governing the response and consequence management for the IND scenario exist, an ongoing integration challenge prevails regarding how best to get capable and competent surge capacity personnel (disaster reservists) and other resources engaged and readied in an up-front manner with pre-scripted assignments to augment the magnitude of anticipated demands of expertise. With the above in mind, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) puts science to work to create and deploy practical, high-value, cost-effective nuclear solutions. As the Department of Energy's (DOE) applied research and development laboratory, SRNL supports Savannah River Site (SRS) operations, DOE, national initiatives, and other federal agencies, across the country and around the world. SRNL's parent at SRS also employs more than 8,000 personnel. The team is a great asset that seeks to continue their service in the interest of national security and stands ready to accomplish new missions. Overall, an integral part of the vision for SRNL's National and Homeland Security Directorate is the establishment of a National Security Center at SRNL, and development of state of the science capabilities (technologies and trained technical personnel) for responding to emergency events on local, regional, or national scales. This entails leveraging and posturing the skills, knowledge and experience base of SRS personnel to deliver an integrated capability to support local, state, and federal authorities through the development of pre-scripted requests for assistance, agreements, and plans. It also includes developing plans, training, exercises, recruitment strategies, and processes to e

Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

US DOE/NNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation US DOENNSA Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident- Data and Documentation NNSADataRepositoryGuide.pdf...

124

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

125

Spatial Estimation of Populations at Risk from Radiological Dispersion Device Terrorism Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delineation of the location and size of the population potentially at risk of exposure to ionizing radiation is one of the key analytical challenges in estimating accurately the severity of the potential health effects associated with a radiological terrorism incident. Regardless of spatial scale, the geographical units for which population data commonly are collected rarely coincide with the geographical scale necessary for effective incident management and medical response. This paper identifies major government and commercial open sources of U.S. population data and presents a GIS-based approach for allocating publicly available population data, including age distributions, to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical response strategies. In summary: The gravity model offers a straight-forward, empirical tool for estimating population flows, especially when geographical areas are relatively well-defined in terms of accessibility and spatial separation. This is particularly important for several reasons. First, the spatial scale for the area impacted by a RDD terrorism event is unlikely to match fully the spatial scale of available population data. That is, the plume spread typically will not uniformly overlay the impacted area. Second, the number of people within the impacted area varies as a function whether an attack occurs during the day or night. For example, the population of a central business district or industrial area typically is larger during the day while predominately residential areas have larger night time populations. As a result, interpolation techniques that link population data to geographical units and allocate those data based on time-frame at a spatial scale that is relevant to enhancing preparedness and response. The gravity model's main advantage is that it efficiently allocates readily available, open source population data to geographical units appropriate for planning and implementing incident management and medical monitoring strategies. The importance of being able to link population estimates to geographic areas during the course of an RDD incident can be understood intuitively: - The spatial distribution of actual total dose equivalents of ionizing radiation is likely to vary due to changes in meteorological parameters as an event evolves over time; - The size of the geographical area affected also is likely to vary as a function of the actual release scenario; - The ability to identify the location and size of the populations that may be exposed to doses of ionizing radiation is critical to carrying out appropriate treatment and post-event medical monitoring; - Once a spatial interaction model has been validated for a city or a region, it can then be used for simulation and prediction purposes to assess the possible human health consequences of different release scenarios. (authors)

Regens, J.L.; Gunter, J.T. [Center for Biosecurity Research, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Managing Incidents in Smart Grids à la Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the Cloud Computing paradigm has emerged as a panacea for many problems in traditional IT infrastructures. Much has been said about the potential of Cloud Computing in the context of the Smart Grid, but unfortunately it is still ... Keywords: Smart Grid, SCADA systems, Incident Management, Cloud Computing, Cryptography, Searchable Encryption

Cristina Alcaraz; Isaac Agudo; David Nunez; Javier Lopez

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

SSM/I Brightness Temperature Corrections for Incidence Angle Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incidence angles of the SSM/I radiometers on the DMSP satellites vary from satellite to satellite and exhibit variations of up to 1.5° during one orbit. The effects of these variations on the measured brightness temperatures are investigated ...

Rolf Fuhrhop; Clemens Simmer

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Database of Incidents and Near Misses in Power Switching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary results of a research task sponsored by EPRI's Power Switching Safety and Reliability (PSS&R) project to develop a report format and form that will allow multiple utilities to submit reports of power switching-related incidents to a shared database.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Boundary conditions for NLTE polarized radiative transfer with incident radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarized NLTE radiative transfer in the presence of scattering in spectral lines and/or in continua may be cast in a so-called reduced form for six reduced components of the radiation field. In this formalism the six components of the reduced source function are angle-independent quantities. It thus reduces drastically the storage requirement of numerical codes. This approach encounters a fundamental problem when the medium is illuminated by a polarized incident radiation, because there is a priori no way of relating the known (and measurable) Stokes parameters of the incident radiation to boundary conditions for the reduced equations. The origin of this problem is that there is no unique way of deriving the radiation reduced components from its Stokes parameters (only the inverse operation is clearly defined). The method proposed here aims at enabling to work with arbitrary incident radiation field (polarized or unpolarized). In previous works an ad-hoc treatment of the boundary conditions, applying to case...

Faurobert, Marianne; Atanackovic, Olga

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Managing time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professionals overwhelmed with information glut can find hope from new insights about time management.

Peter J. Denning

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many incidents have occurred because industries have ignored past incidents or failed to learn lessons from the past. Incident databases provide an effective option for managing large amounts of information about the past incidents. Analysis of data stored in existing databases can lead to useful conclusions and reduction of chemical incidents and consequences of incidents. An incident database is a knowledge based system that can give an insight to the situation which led to an incident. Effective analysis of data from a database can help in development of information that can help reduce future incidents: cause of an incident, critical equipment, the type of chemical released, and the type of injury and victim. In this research, Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) database has been analyzed focusing on manufacturing events in Texas from 1993-2004. Between thirteen to sixteen states have participated in the HSEES incident reporting system and it does not include all the near miss incidents. Petroleum related incidents are also excluded from the HSEES system. Studies show that HSEES covers only 37% of all incidents in the US. This scaling ratio was used to estimate the total universe size.

Obidullah, A.S.M.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USAEC SHIPMENTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, 1957-1961  

SciTech Connect

Data are summarized on incidents that have been sustained by the AEC in the transport of radioactive materials from 1957 through 1981. In the period covered by this report there were 47 incidents reported. Twenty-nine did not result in the release of radioactive materials. Of the remaining 18 cases there was none that involved any serious radiological consequences or involved costly cleanup. Six of the incidents involved onsite movements of materials. The incidents are classified in accordance with the type of radiation release that occurred, mode of transport, and type of incident. Photographs are included for a number of the incidents. (C.H.)

Patterson, D.E.; DeFatta, V.P.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Self-Organized Criticality in Daily Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous periodogram power spectral analysis of daily incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) reported at a leading hospital for cardiology in Pune, India for the two-year period June 1992 to May 1994 show that the power spectra follow the universal and unique inverse power law form of the statistical normal distribution. Inverse power law form for power spectra of space-time fluctuations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and have been identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. The unique quantification for self-organized criticality presented in this paper is shown to be intrinsic to quantumlike mechanics governing fractal space-time fluctuation patterns in dynamical systems. The results are consistent with El Naschie's concept of cantorian fractal spacetime characteristics for quantum systems.

A. M. Selvam; D. Sen; S. M. S. Mody

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

Entropic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Feature: Washing Your Laundry in Public - An Analysis of Recent High-Publicity Security Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is, reportedly, a significant rise in the frequency of information security incidents. Quite obviously, there is a very significant rise in the public reporting of such incidents. Whereas all of us are more or less experienced in protecting our ...

Matthew Pemble

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL IN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES, JANUARY-DECEMBER 1956  

SciTech Connect

Pertinert details of the incidents are given. Some are illustrated with photographs or diagrams. (M.H.R.)

Hayes, D.F.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Incidence of neoplasms in ages 0-19 Y in parts of Sweden with high {sup 137}Cs fallout after the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect

The incidence of neoplasms in childhood and adolescence in northern and central Sweden before and after the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident was investigated in an ecologic study, 1978 to 1992. The study included all parishes in the six most contaminated counties classified after aerial mapping of ground radiation form {sup 137}Cs and investigated 746 cases of neoplasms in ages 0-19 y, diagnosed in the six counties. Incidence and relative risks of neoplasms were compared in areas with high, intermediate, and low contamination after versus before the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A continuous increase of brain tumor incidence in the ages 0-19 y during the period 1978-92 without clear relationship to the Chernobyl fallout was discovered. No clear relationship between the incidence of brain tumor and the exposure to varying levels of radiation from {sup 137}Cs was apparent. A some-what decreased relative risk of acute lymphatic leukemia appeared in areas with increased exposure. Other neoplasms showed no changes in incidence over time or with regard to exposure. Until now, there is no indication that the Chernobyl accident has affected the incidence of childhood and adolescence neoplasms in Sweden, but it is still too early for any final conclusion about the effect of this event. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Tondel, M.; Flodin, U.; Skoeldestig, A.; Axelson, O. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden)] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

139

Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

Wells, M.A. [Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stearns, L.J. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Monroeville, PA (United States); Davie, A.D. [Shaw Environmental, Inc, Alpharetta, GA (United States); Day, E. [PELL Resources Company, Manassas, VA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Gamma-Rays from Grazing Incidence Cosmic Rays in the Earth’s Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions of grazing incidence, ultra high energy cosmic rays with the earth’s atmosphere may provide a new method of studying energetic cosmic rays with gamma-ray satellites. It is found that these cosmic ray interactions may produce gamma-rays on millisecond time scales which may be detectable by satellites. An extremely low gamma-ray background for transient gamma-ray events and a large area of interaction, the earth’s surface, make the scheme plausible. The effective cross section of detection of interactions for cosmic rays above 1020 eV is found to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than earth based detection techniques. This method may eventually offer an efficient way of probing this region of the cosmic ray energy spectrum where events are scarce. In this paper, a conceptual model is presented for the production of short bursts of gamma-rays based on these grazing incidence encounters with the earth’s atmosphere. Subject headings: atmospheric effects- cosmic rays- Earth- gamma-rays: bursts

Andrew Ulmer

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. =}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

Kim, Han Jo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Boland, Patrick J. [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Meredith, Dennis S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)] [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

TIMING APPARATUS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

1956-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

Measuring Solar Spectral and Angle-ofIncidence Effects on Photovoltaic Modules and Solar Irradiance Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation. INTRODUCTION It is common knowledge to people familiar with photovoltaic technology that the electrical current generated by photovoltaic devices is influenced by the spectral distribution (spectrum) of sunlight. It is also commonly understood that the spectral distribution of sunlight vari...

David L. King; Jay A. Kratochvil; William E. Boyson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electromagnetic energy within a magnetic infinite cylinder and scattering properties for oblique incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we analytically calculate the time-averaged electromagnetic energy stored inside a nondispersive magnetic isotropic cylinder which is obliquely irradiated by an electromagnetic plane wave. An expression for the optical-absorption efficiency in terms of the magnetic internal coefficients is also obtained. In the low absorption limit, we derive a relation between the normalized internal energy and the optical-absorption efficiency which is not affected by the magnetism and the incidence angle. This mentioned relation, indeed, seems to be independent on the shape of the scatterer. This universal aspect of the internal energy is connected to the transport velocity and consequently to the diffusion coefficient in the multiple scattering regime. Magnetism favors high internal energy for low size parameter cylinders, which leads to a low diffusion coefficient for electromagnetic propagation in 2D random media.

Tiago Jose Arruda; Alexandre Souto Martinez

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel asymmetric-cut variable-incident-angle monochromator was constructed and tested in 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The monochromator was originally designed as a high heat load monochromator capable of handling 5-10 kW beams from a wiggler source. This was accomplished by spreading the x-ray beam out on the surface an asymmetric-cut crystal and by using liquid metal cooling of the first crystal. The monochromator turned out to be a highly versatile monochromator that could perform many different types of experiments. The monochromator consisted of two 18 deg. asymmetrically cut Si crystals that could be rotated about 3 independent axes. The first stage ({Phi}) rotates the crystal around an axis perpendicular to the diffraction plane. This rotation changes the angle of the incident beam with the surface of the crystal without changing the Bragg angle. The second rotation ({Psi}) is perpendicular to the first and is used to control the shape of the beam footprint on the crystal. The third rotation ({Theta}) controls the Bragg angle. Besides the high heat load application, the use of asymmetrically cut crystals allows one to increase or decrease the acceptance angle for crystal diffraction of a monochromatic x-ray beam and allows one to increase or decrease the wavelength bandwidth of the diffraction of a continuum source like a bending-magnet beam or a normal x-ray-tube source. When the monochromator is used in the doubly expanding mode, it is possible to expand the vertical size of the double-diffracted beam by a factor of 10-15. When this was combined with a bending magnet source, it was possible to generate an 8 keV area beam, 16 mm wide by 26 mm high with a uniform intensity and parallel to 1.2 arc sec that could be applied in imaging experiments.

Smither, R. K.; Fernandez, P. B.; Mills, D. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Graber, T. J. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident  

SciTech Connect

If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48 hours +). A few weeks later, a one day full-scale exercise was conducted for the late phase (recovery) response to an RDD event. The lessons learned from this study are not available as of June 30, 2009. The objective of this report is to review and summarize anticipated Federal and State response actions and the roles and responsibilities of various agencies (DHS, EPA, DOE, NY-DEP, NY-DEC) with respect to decontamination issues that would arise from a radiological dispersion device (RDD), e.g., dirty bomb attack. These issues arise in the late phase of the response (48 hours and beyond) after the area has been stabilized and forensic information has been obtained. Much of the information provided in this report is taken directly from published guidance that is readily available.

Sullivan,T.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Digestion time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

148

Development of metrology instruments for grazing incidence mirrors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) from high-brightness sources requires the use of optical components with very smooth surfaces and extremely precise shapes. Most manufacturers are not capable of measuring the figure and finish quality of the aspheric optics required for use in grazing incidence beam lines. Over the past several years we have developed measurement techniques and metrology instrumentation that have allowed us to measure the surface profile and roughness of large cylinder optics, up to one meter in length. Based on our measurements and feedback, manufacturers have been able to advance the state-of-the-art in mirror fabrication and are now able to produce acceptable components. Our analysis techniques enable designers to write meaningful specifications and predict the performance of real surfaces in their particular beamline configurations. Commercial instruments are now available for measuring surface microroughness with spatial periods smaller than about one millimeter. No commercial instruments are available for measuring the surface figure on cylindrical aspheres over long spatial periods, from one millimeter up to one meter. For that reason we developed a Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that measures surface profile over the long period range in a non-contact manner to extremely high accuracy. Examples of measured surfaces and data analysis techniques will be discussed, and limitations on the quality of optical surfaces related to intrinsic material properties will also be discussed. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Army Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (USA)); Qian, Shi-nan (China Univ. of Science and Technology, Hefei, AH (China). Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liu, Wuming (Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

THE ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE INCIDENCE OF GALACTIC TIDAL FEATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a sample of 54 galaxy clusters (0.04 < z < 0.15) containing 3551 early-type galaxies suitable for study, we identify those with tidal features both interactively and automatically. We find that {approx}3% have tidal features that can be detected with data that reach a 3{sigma} sensitivity limit of 26.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. Regardless of the method used to classify tidal features, or the fidelity imposed on such classifications, we find a deficit of tidally disturbed galaxies with decreasing clustercentric radius that is most pronounced inside of {approx}0.5 R{sub 200}. We cannot distinguish whether the trend arises from an increasing likelihood of recent mergers with increasing clustercentric radius or a decrease in the lifetime of tidal features with decreasing clustercentric radius. We find no evidence for a relationship between local density and the incidence of tidal features, but our local density measure has large uncertainties. We find interesting behavior in the rate of tidal features among cluster early-types as a function of clustercentric radius and expect such results to provide constraints on the effect of the cluster environment on the structure of galaxy halos, the build-up of the red sequence of galaxies, and the origin of the intracluster stellar population.

Adams, Scott M.; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bildfell, Chris; Pritchet, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Plasma particle and energy reflection at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The particle and energy reflection coefficients are calculated for a plasma incident at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field. The salient result of these calculations is that the reflection coefficients can approach unity when the magnetic field is incident at grazing angles. This reflection of particles and energy will be an important process in determining the particle and energy balance in the edge plasma.

Knize, R.J.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis of the HSEES Chemical Incident Database Using Data and Text Mining Methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical incidents can be prevented or mitigated by improving safety performance and implementing the lessons learned from past incidents. Despite some limitations in the range of information they provide, chemical incident databases can be utilized as sources of lessons learned from incidents by evaluating patterns and relationships that exist between the data variables. Much of the previous research focused on studying the causal factors of incidents; hence, this research analyzes the chemical incidents from both the causal and consequence elements of the incidents. A subset of incidents data reported to the Hazardous Substance Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) chemical incident database from 2002-2006 was analyzed using data mining and text mining methodologies. Both methodologies were performed with the aid of STATISTICA software. The analysis studied 12,737 chemical process related incidents and extracted descriptions of incidents in free-text data format from 3,316 incident reports. The structured data was analyzed using data mining tools such as classification and regression trees, association rules, and cluster analysis. The unstructured data (textual data) was transformed into structured data using text mining, and subsequently analyzed further using data mining tools such as, feature selections and cluster analysis. The data mining analysis demonstrated that this technique can be used in estimating the incident severity based on input variables of release quantity and distance between victims and source of release. Using the subset data of ammonia release, the classification and regression tree produced 23 final nodes. Each of the final nodes corresponded to a range of release quantity and, of distance between victims and source of release. For each node, the severity of injury was estimated from the observed severity scores' average. The association rule identified the conditional probability for incidents involving piping, chlorine, ammonia, and benzene in the value of 0.19, 0.04, 0.12, and 0.04 respectively. The text mining was utilized successfully to generate elements of incidents that can be used in developing incident scenarios. Also, the research has identified information gaps in the HSEES database that can be improved to enhance future data analysis. The findings from data mining and text mining should then be used to modify or revise design, operation, emergency response planning or other management strategies.

Mahdiyati, -

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

NIST SP 800-83, Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Special Publication 800-83 Sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling ...

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

154

Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort  

SciTech Connect

High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Coccidioidomycosis Incidence in Arizona Predicted by Seasonal Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The environmental mechanisms that determine the inter-annual and seasonal variability in incidence of coccidioidomycosis are unclear. In this study, we use Arizona coccidioidomycosis case data for 1995–2006 to generate a timeseries of monthly estimates of exposure rates in Maricopa County, AZ and Pima County, AZ. We reveal a seasonal autocorrelation structure for exposure rates in both Maricopa County and Pima County which indicates that exposure rates are strongly related from the fall to the spring. An abrupt end to this autocorrelation relationship occurs near the the onset of the summer precipitation season and increasing exposure rates related to the subsequent season. The identification of the autocorrelation structure enabled us to construct a ‘‘primary’ ’ exposure season that spans August-March and a ‘‘secondary’ ’ season that spans April– June which are then used in subsequent analyses. We show that October–December precipitation is positively associated with rates of exposure for the primary exposure season in both Maricopa County (R = 0.72, p = 0.012) and Pima County (R = 0.69, p = 0.019). In addition, exposure rates during the primary exposure seasons are negatively associated with concurrent precipitation in Maricopa (R = 20.79, p = 0.004) and Pima (R = 20.64, p = 0.019), possibly due to reduced spore dispersion. These associations enabled the generation of models to estimate exposure rates for the primary exposure season. The models explain 69 % (p = 0.009) and 54 % (p = 0.045) of the variance in the study period for Maricopa and Pima counties, respectively. We did not find any significant predictors for exposure rates during the secondary season. This study

James D. Tamerius; Andrew C. Comrie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

On the Incidence and Kinematics of Strong Mg II Absorbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of two investigations into the nature of strong (rest equivalent width > 1.0 Ang) Mg II absorption systems at high redshift. The first line of questioning examines the complete SDSS- DR3 set of quasar spectra to determine the evolution of the incidence of strong Mg II absorption. The redshift evolution of the comoving line-of-sight number density, l(x), is characterized by a roughly constant value at z > 0.8, indicating that the product of the number density and gas cross-section of halos hosting strong Mg II is unevolving at these redshifts. At z gas cross-section to strong Mg II absorption and therefore a decline in the physical processes relevant to such absorption. This evolution roughly tracks the global evolution of the SFR density. The decrease of l(x) is more pronounced for larger equivalent width systems. We also present the results of a search for strong Mg II absorption in 91 high resolution quasar spectra, which allow us to investigate the kinematics of such systems. These systems are characterized by the presence of numerous components spread over a ~200 km/s velocity width and the presence of more highly ionized species, which display kinematic profiles similar to the corresponding Mg II absorption. We consider these results in light of two competing theories to explain strong Mg II absorption: post-starburst, SN-driven galactic winds and accreting gas in the halos of massive galaxies. The later model is disfavored by the absence of evolution in l(x) at z > 1. We argue that the strong Mg II phenomenon primarily arises from feedback processes in relatively low mass galactic halos related to star formation.

Gabriel E. Prochter; Jason X. Prochaska; Scott Burles

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

157

Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

Nakos, James Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Time Brightness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Cosmology from . . . Time Brightness ... . . . 50-100 Fields Lunar Calendar Scheduled Follow-Up Imaging at Hubble, Cerro Tololo, WIYN, Isaac Newton Scheduled Follow-Up Spectroscopy at Keck Almost 1000 Galaxies per Field RESULT: ~24 Type Ia supernovae discovered while still brightening, at new moon Berkeley Lab Keck WIYN Cerro Tololo Isaac Newton Hubble Strategy We developed a strategy to guarantee a group of supernova discoveries on a certain date. Just after a new moon, we observe some 50 to 100 high-galactic lattitute fields-each containing almost a thousand high-redshift galaxies-in two nights on the Cerro Tololo 4-meter telescope with Tyson & Bernstein's wide-field camera. We return three weeks later to observe the same

160

Components of an Incident Management Simulation and Gaming Framework and Related Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's emergency responders need to work in a coordinated, well-planned manner to best mitigate the impact of an emergency incident. They need to be trained and ready to act in view of the increased security threat. The training has been traditionally ... Keywords: architecture, component, emergency response, gaming, incident management, integration, modeling, simulation

Sanjay Jain; Charles R. Mclean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

On the Surface Temperature Sensitivity of the Reflected Shortwave, Outgoing Longwave, and Net Incident Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global-mean top-of-atmosphere incident solar radiation (ISR) minus the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and the reflected shortwave radiation (RSW) is the net incident radiation (NET). This study analyzes the global-mean NET sensitivity to a ...

Hartmut H. Aumann; Alexander Ruzmaikin; Ali Behrangi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs.

Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Izumi, Shizue; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ron, E.; Tokunaga, Masayoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sachio (Hiroshima City Medical Association (Japan)); Sugimoto, Sumio (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Arrival time and magnitude of airborne fission products from the Fukushima, Japan, reactor incident as measured in Seattle, WA, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of air monitoring started due to the recent natural catastrophe on 11 March 2011 in Japan and the severe ensuing damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex. On 17-18 March 2011, we registered the first arrival of the airborne fission products 131-I, 132-I, 132-Te, 134-Cs, and 137-Cs in Seattle, WA, USA, by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. We measured the evolution of the activities over a period of 23 days at the end of which the activities had mostly fallen below our detection limit. The highest detected activity amounted to 4.4 +/- 1.3 mBq/m^3 of 131-I on 19-20 March.

J. Diaz Leon; D. A. Jaffe; J. Kaspar; A. Knecht; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase  

SciTech Connect

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985  

SciTech Connect

An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Tokunaga, Masayoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Municipal Hospital (Japan); Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluation of internal contamination levels after a radiological dispersal device incident using portal monitors  

SciTech Connect

Following a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) incident, it may be necessary to evaluate the internal contamination levels of a large number of potentially affected individuals to determine if immediate medical follow-up is necessary. Since the current laboratory capacity to screen for internal contamination is limited, rapid field screening methods can be useful in prioritizing individuals. This study evaluated the suitability of a radiation portal monitor for such screening. A model of the portal monitor was created for use with models of six anthropomorphic phantoms in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP) X-5 Monte Carlo Team (MCNP A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5. LA-CP-03-0245. Vol. 2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2004.). The count rates of the portal monitor were simulated for inhalation and ingestion of likely radionuclides from an RDD for each of the phantoms. The time-dependant organ concentrations of the radionuclides were determined using Dose and Risk Calculation Software Eckerman, Leggett, Cristy, Nelson, Ryman, Sjoreen and Ward (Dose and Risk Calculation Software Ver. 8.4. ORNL/TM-2001/190. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2006.). Portal monitor count rates corresponding to a committed effective dose E(50) of 10 mSv are reported.

Palmer, R.C. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ansari, A. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Freibert, E.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part III: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, 1950-1987  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of data on the incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from late 1950 through the end of 1987 (93,696 survivors accounting for 2,778,000 person-years). These analyses add 9 additional years of follow-up for leukemia and 12 for myeloma to that in the last comprehensive reports on these diseases. This is the first analysis of the lymphoma incidence data in the cohort. Using both the Leukemia Registry and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, a total of 290 leukemia, 229 lymphoma and 73 myeloma cases were identified. The primary analyses were restricted to first primary tumors diagnosed among residents of the cities or surrounding areas with Dosimetry Systems 1986 dose estimates between 0 and 4 Gy kerma (231 leukemias, 208 lymphomas and 62 myelomas). Analyses focused on time-dependent models for the excess absolute risk. Separate analyses were carried out for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and adult T-cell leukemia in this population. There was strong evidence of radiation-induced risks for all subtypes except ATL, and there were significant subtype differences with respect to the effects of age at exposure and sex and in the temporal pattern of risk. The AML dose-response function was nonlinear, whereas there was no evidence against linearity for the other subtypes. When averaged over the follow-up period, the excess absolute risk (EAR) estimates (in cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) for the leukemia subtypes were 0.6, 1.1 and 0.9 for ALL, AML and CML, respectively. The corresponding estimated average excess relative risks at 1 Sv are 9.1, 3.3 and 6.2, respectively. There was some evidence of an increased risk of lymphoma in males (EAR = 0.6 cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) but no evidence of any excess in females. 64 refs., 14 figs., 19 tabs.

Preston, D.L.; Izumi, Shizue; Kusumi, Shizuyo (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Tomonaga, Masao (A-bomb Institute of Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Ron, E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Dohy, Hiroo (Hiroshima A-bomb Hospital (Japan)); Matsui, Tatsuki (Nagasaki City Hospital (Japan)); Nonaka, Hiroaki (George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of implant (learning curve). Over the course of the program, we have deliberately reduced the number of needles and OR time per patient, which have potentially minimized intraoperative trauma and may have contributed to less toxicity. A learning curve in prostate brachytherapy programs affect not only the outcome but also the toxicity from the treatment.

Keyes, Mira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]. E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moravan, Veronika M.Sc. [Population and Preventive Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Agranovich, Alexander [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Wu, Jonn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Attitudes and Perceptions of Texas Public Safety Training Officers Regarding the Effectiveness of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis sought to understand reasons for noncompliant respondents and ineffective leadership in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) by Texas public safety training officers. Research has been conducted on the policies and their implications for NIMS, organizational culture and its impact on NIMS, and the hierarchy network of the Incident Command System (ICS). However, research evaluating the attitudes and perceptions regarding the effectiveness of NIMS is scarce. Training officers from rural fire departments, emergency medical services, and law enforcement agencies were the population for this study (n=33). The results of this study have implications for combined fire department, emergency medical services, and law enforcement training (interoperability), simplification of the management structure, and a mentoring program. This study should be explored further in an urban setting, based on this model. This study showed that respondents agreed that rural emergency responders tend to be noncompliant with NIMS. Respondents mentioned that rural emergency responders disagree with the effectiveness of NIMS. This study showed that a correlation occurred between the effectiveness of NIMS and the number of times a respondent was involved in a formal NIMS incident command. The following recommendations were made based on the findings and conclusions of this study. Researchers should continue to look at what public safety training officers believe affects the adaptability of NIMS. Training officers should consider contributing to the future NIMS curriculum. Training officers should focus on interoperability issues through increased field exercises. Research should be conducted to determine what improvements to curriculum effect future NIMS compliance. Further research should be conducted on the effectiveness of individual compliance, and achievement.

Wilson, Jason

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica Agency/Company /Organization Resources for the Future Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy Topics Finance, Market analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.rff.org/RFF/Documen Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica[1] Abstract "Although fuel taxes are a practical means of curbing vehicular air pollution, congestion, and accidents in developing countries-all of which are typically major problems-they are often opposed on distributional

171

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Lagrangian Drifter Dispersion in the Surf Zone: Directionally Spread, Normally Incident Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian drifter statistics in a surf zone wave and circulation model are examined and compared to single- and two-particle dispersion statistics observed on an alongshore uniform natural beach with small, normally incident, directionally ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

US DOE/NNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US DOENNSA and DoD Response to 2011 Fukushima Incident: Radiological Soil Samples BusinessUSA DataTools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov ...

174

A Simple Physical Model to Estimate Incident Solar Radiation at the Surface from GOES Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a model designed to estimate the incident solar radiation at the suface from GOES satellite brightness measurements in clear and cloudy conditions. In this simple physical model, the effect of Rayleigh scattering is taken into account. ...

Catherine Gautier; Georges Diak; Serge Masse

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Some Effects of the Yellowstone Fire Smoke Cloud on Incident Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the 1988 Yellowstone National Park fire, smoke cloud on incident broadband and spectral solar irradiance was studied using measurements made at the Solar Energy Research Institute's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, Golden, ...

Roland L. Hulstrom; Thomas L. Stoffel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Use of DFDR Information in the Analysis of a Turbulence Incident over Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital flight data recorder (DFDR) tapes from commercial aircraft can provide useful information about the mesoscale environment of severe turbulence incidents. Air motion computations from these data and their errors are briefly described. An ...

Peter F. Lester; Orhan Sen; R. E. Bach Jr.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

Austin, B.A.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Relationship between leukemia incidence and residing and/or working near the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine whether a strong association between leukemia incidence between 1978 and 1986 and potential for exposure to radiation emitted from the Pilgrim 1 nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts was a spurious finding resulting from either (1) failure to account for temporal variation in the level of radioactivity released from the plant or (2) inattention to certain potentially confounding factors, additional age/sex-matched case-control analyses controlled for the effects of socioeconomic status (SES), work history, and cigarette smoking were performed with data collected in the Southeastern Massachusetts Health Investigation -- a study of leukemia among residents aged 13 and older of 22 southeastern Massachusetts towns. None of the additional analyses, including incorporation of emissions data into the exposure-assessment scheme and crude attempts to control for (1) medical-radiation exposure, (2) potential for exposure to pesticides sprayed on cranberry bogs, or (3) workplace exposure to radiation, chemical solvents, dust, or fumes, altered the finding of a statistically significant dose-response relationship between leukemia incidence and potential for exposure to radioactive emissions. The trend in the association over time was not entirely consistent, however, with the hypothesis that unusually large amounts of radioactivity reportedly released from the plant during the mid-1970s were responsible for the observed effects. Recommendations were made for further study of the Plymouth-area population for studies of this problem elsewhere.

Morris, M.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP). Appendix F, remediation analysis with Decision Support Tools (DSTs) for wide-area chemical hazards.  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) commissioned an assessment of the Consequence Management (CM) plans in place on military bases for response to a chemical attack. The effectiveness of the CM plans for recovering from chemical incidents was modeled using a multiple Decision Support Tools (DSTs). First, a scenario was developed based on an aerial dispersion of a chemical agent over a wide-area of land. The extent of contamination was modeled with the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) tool. Subsequently, the Analyzer for Wide Area Restoration Effectiveness (AWARE) tool was used to estimate the cost and time demands for remediation based on input of contamination maps, sampling and decontamination resources, strategies, rates and costs. The sampling strategies incorporated in the calculation were designed using the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) tool. Based on a gaps assessment and the DST remediation analysis, an Enhanced Chemical Incident Response Plan (ECIRP) was developed.

Hassig, Nancy L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Pulsipher, Brent A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Prevention of a wrong-location misadministration through the use of an intradepartmental incident learning system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A series of examples are presented in which potential errors in the delivery of radiation therapy were prevented through use of incident learning. These examples underscore the value of reporting near miss incidents. Methods: Using a departmental incident learning system, eight incidents were noted over a two-year period in which fields were treated 'out-of-sequence,' that is, fields from a boost phase were treated, while the patient was still in the initial phase of treatment. As a result, an error-prevention policy was instituted in which radiation treatment fields are 'hidden' within the oncology information system (OIS) when they are not in current use. In this way, fields are only available to be treated in the intended sequence and, importantly, old fields cannot be activated at the linear accelerator control console. Results: No out-of-sequence treatments have been reported in more than two years since the policy change. Furthermore, at least three near-miss incidents were detected and corrected as a result of the policy change. In the first two, the policy operated as intended to directly prevent an error in field scheduling. In the third near-miss, the policy operated 'off target' to prevent a type of error scenario that it was not directly intended to prevent. In this incident, an incorrect digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) was scheduled in the OIS for a patient receiving lung cancer treatment. The incorrect DRR had an isocenter which was misplaced by approximately two centimeters. The error was a result of a field from an old plan being scheduled instead of the intended new plan. As a result of the policy described above, the DRR field could not be activated for treatment however and the error was discovered and corrected. Other quality control barriers in place would have been unlikely to have detected this error. Conclusions: In these examples, a policy was adopted based on incident learning, which prevented several errors, at least one of which was potentially severe. These examples underscore the need for a rigorous, systematic incident learning process within each clinic. The experiences reported in this technical note demonstrate the value of near-miss incident reporting to improve patient safety.

Ford, Eric C.; Smith, Koren; Harris, Kendra; Terezakis, Stephanie [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program, IG-0878  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program DOE/IG-0878 December 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits & Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 11, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy operates numerous networks and systems to help accomplish its strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science and the environment. The systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could impact the Department's

182

EP&R Standards Project Report: Technical Review of National Incident Management Standards  

SciTech Connect

The importance and necessity for a fully developed and implemented National Incident Management System (NIMS) has been demonstrated in recent years by the impact of national events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Throughout the history of emergency response to major disasters, especially when multiple response organizations are involved, there have been systemic problems in the consistency and uniformity of response operations. Identifying national standards that support the development and implementation of NIMS is key to helping solve these systemic problems. The NIMS seeks to provide uniformity and consistency for incident management by using common terminology and protocols that will enable responders to coordinate their efforts to ensure an efficient response.

Stenner, Robert D.

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Incident-Energy Dependent Quenching of the Analyzing Power in Pre-Equilibrium Composite Particle Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton-induced pre-equilibrium process in the energy range of 100 to 160 MeV, which leads to emission of composite ejectiles such as {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles, is discussed. New cross section and analyzing power measurements for the (p,{sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 93}Nb at an incident energy of 160 MeV are presented, and these are found to be in agreement with the prediction of a statistical multistep theoretical formulation. The observed quenching of the analyzing power is also reproduced well by the theory. The results are consistent with earlier work at lower incident energies and other nuclear species.

Cowley, A. A. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dimitrova, S. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zyl, J. J. van [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Incident and Disaster Response Policy Commencement Date: 9 December, 1992 Category STATEMENT 5.1 The University shall establish a comprehensive and integrated Disaster Response Plan and appropriate measures are in place to prevent predictable or potential disasters and possible critical

185

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Colorado at Boulder, University of

186

Revised rail-stop exposure model for incident-free transport of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a model for estimating railstop doses that occur during incident-free transport of nuclear waste by rail. The model, which has been incorporated into the RADTRAN III risk assessment code, can be applied to general freight and dedicated train shipments of waste.

Ostmeyer, R.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Oscillating two stream instability at the resonance of obliquely incident radiation in inhomogeneous plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The growth rate and the threshold value were calculated for the oscillating two-stream instability for an electromagnetic wave obliquely incident on an inhomogeneous plasma. The localization of the instability is found to be in the overdense region near the threshold and to shift toward the local plasma resonance when the pump intensity increases. (auth)

Kuo, Y.Y.; Oberman, C.; Liu, C.S.; Troyon, F.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

nicter: a large-scale network incident analysis system: case studies for understanding threat landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have been developing the Network Incident analysis Center for Tactical Emergency Response (nicter), whose objective is to detect and identify propagating malwares. The nicter mainly monitors darknet, a set of unused IP addresses, to observe global ... Keywords: correlation analysis, malware analysis, network monitoring

Masashi Eto; Daisuke Inoue; Jungsuk Song; Junji Nakazato; Kazuhiro Ohtaka; Koji Nakao

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

X-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes developed for the LIL program  

SciTech Connect

This article describes x-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes, developed for the experimental program carried out on the Ligne d'Integration Laser (LIL) facility [J. P. Le Breton et al., Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001 (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), pp. 856-862] (24 kJ, UV--0.35 nm). The design includes a large target-to-microscope (400-700 mm) distance required by the x-ray ablation issues anticipated on the Laser MegaJoule facility [P. A. Holstein et al., Laser Part. Beams 17, 403 (1999)] (1.8 MJ) which is under construction. Two eight-image Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766 (1948)] with different spectral wavelength ranges and with a 400 mm source-to-mirror distance image the target on a custom-built framing camera (time resolution of {approx}80 ps). The soft x-ray version microscope is sensitive below 1 keV and its spatial resolution is better than 30 {mu}m over a 2-mm-diam region. The hard x-ray version microscope has a 10 {mu}m resolution over an 800-{mu}m-diam region and is sensitive in the 1-5 keV energy range. Two other x-ray microscopes based on an association of toroidal/spherical surfaces (T/S microscopes) produce an image on a streak camera with a spatial resolution better than 30 {mu}m over a 3 mm field of view in the direction of the camera slit. Both microscopes have been designed to have, respectively, a maximum sensitivity in the 0.1-1 and 1-5 keV energy range. We present the original design of these four microscopes and their test on a dc x-ray tube in the laboratory. The diagnostics were successfully used on LIL first experiments early in 2005. Results of soft x-ray imaging of a radiative jet during conical shaped laser interaction are shown.

Rosch, R.; Boutin, J. Y.; Le Breton, J. P.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Reverdin, C.; Soullie, G.; Lidove, G.; Maroni, R. [CEA/DIF, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-Le-Chatel (France)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Time and Frequency Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Time and Frequency Portal. Time and Frequency Portal. Programs and Projects. CODATA values of the fundamental constants ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

Time Series and Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time Series and Forecasting. Leigh, Stefan and Perlman, S. (1991). "An Index for Comovement of Time Sequences With ...

193

Office of Nuclear Energy Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Incident  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Response to Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident John E. Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies Office of Nuclear Energy U.S. Department of Energy June 15, 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors Earthquake 3/11 14:36 JST Earthquake 15:41 JST Tsunami Magnitude: 9.0 Generated a 14m Tsunami Many thousands perished More that 100 thousand people were homeless without food, water, or heat 5 Accident Sequence for Fukushima Dai-ichi Reactors  Grid power lost due to the earthquake  Plant experienced station blackout after emergency diesels were damaged by the tsunami (nearly 1 hour later)  Eventual loss of batteries and cooling to control steam driven emergency pumps  Core overheats, cladding oxidizes and melts producing hydrogen

194

Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra for the clinical linac agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using the unfolded electron energies) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 3.7%. The corresponding measured and EGSnrc-calculated transmission data agree within 1.5%, where the typical transmission measurement uncertainty on the clinical linac is 0.4% (not including the uncertainties on the incident electron parameters). Conclusions: The approach proposed in an earlier study for unfolding photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data is accurate and practical for clinical use.

Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council, M-35 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R5 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Spectrometer employing optical fiber time delays for frequency resolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides different length glass fibers for providing a broad range of optical time delays for short incident chromatic light pulses for the selective spatial and frequency analysis of the light with a single light detector. To this end, the frequencies of the incident light are orientated and matched with the different length fibers by dispersing the separate frequencies in space according to the respective fiber locations and lengths at the input terminal of the glass fibers. This makes the different length fibers useful in the field of plasma physics. To this end the short light pulses can be scattered by a plasma and then passed through the fibers for analyzing and diagnosing the plasma while it varies rapidly with time.

Schuss, Jack J. (Providence, RI); Johnson, Larry C. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Case Study: Preparing for the Smart Grids - Identifying Current Practice for Information Security Incident Management in the Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power industry faces the implementation of smart grids, which will introduce new information security threats to the power automation systems. The ability to appropriately prepare for, and respond to, information security incidents, is of utmost ... Keywords: Information security, incident respons, smart grids

Maria B. Line

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of the integrated application of intelligent transportation system technologies using stochastic incident generation and resolution modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of the microscopic vehicle traffic simulation software PARAMICS to evaluate different incident management implementation alternatives in South Carolina. This study customized the simulation model for random spatial and temporal ... Keywords: freeway service patrol, intelligent transportation systems, traffic incident management, traffic simulation

Yongchang Ma; Ryan Fries; Mashrur Chowdhury; Imran Inamdar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Note: Grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering combined with imaging ellipsometry  

SciTech Connect

The combination of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) with optical imaging ellipsometry is presented as an upgrade of the available measurement techniques at the wiggler beamline BW4 of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor. The instrument is introduced with the description of the alignment procedure to assure the measurement of imaging ellipsometry and GISAXS/GIWAXS on the same sample spot. To demonstrate the possibilities of the new instrument examples of morphological investigation on films made of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester as well as textured poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-benzo-thia-diazole) are shown.

Koerstgens, V.; Meier, R.; Ruderer, M. A.; Guo, S.; Chiang, H.-Y.; Mueller-Buschbaum, P. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionelle Materialien, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Perlich, J.; Roth, S. V.; Gehrke, R. [HASYLAB, DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Establishing Tower-Top Equipotential Zones--Case-Study of Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide protection and training for workers who perform work on de-energized and energized lines. This Technical Update report contains the draft script of a new training video on DVD under development on establishing tower-top equipotential zones. The script contains case studies and analysis of specific selected incidents that have occurred in the field. It also includes recommendations for minimizing risks and avoiding elec...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Incident-energy and system-size dependence of directed flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present STAR's measurements of directed flow for charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200$ GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity, transverse momentum and centrality. We find that directed flow depends on the incident energy, but not on the system size. We extend the validity of limiting fragmentation hypothesis to different collision systems.

Gang Wang

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London May 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis London, England - The Tuesday, May 26, 2009 edition of the Times of London includes the following opinion piece from Energy Secretary Steven Chu highlighting President Obama's commitment to improving America's energy policy and addressing the global climate crisis: America has been slow to respond to climate change, but its new Secretary of Energy, Nobel prizewinner Steven Chu, is determined to make up for lost time. He calls on fellow scientists to step up to the plate. This week, the St James's Palace Nobel Laureate Symposium is bringing together scientists and leaders to concentrate on solving the climate challenge. This effort is an example of the growing worldwide awareness of

203

Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London Secretary Chu Opinion Piece in Times of London May 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis London, England - The Tuesday, May 26, 2009 edition of the Times of London includes the following opinion piece from Energy Secretary Steven Chu highlighting President Obama's commitment to improving America's energy policy and addressing the global climate crisis: America has been slow to respond to climate change, but its new Secretary of Energy, Nobel prizewinner Steven Chu, is determined to make up for lost time. He calls on fellow scientists to step up to the plate. This week, the St James's Palace Nobel Laureate Symposium is bringing together scientists and leaders to concentrate on solving the climate challenge. This effort is an example of the growing worldwide awareness of

204

Radiology-led Follow-up System for IVC Filters: Effects on Retrieval Rates and Times  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Successful IVC filter retrieval rates fall with time. Serious complications have been reported following attempts to remove filters after 3-18 months. Failed retrieval may be associated with adverse clinical sequelae. This study explored whether retrieval rates are improved if interventional radiologists organize patient follow-up, rather than relying on the referring clinicians. Methods: Proactive follow-up of patients who undergo filter placement was implemented in May 2008. At the time of filter placement, a report was issued to the referring consultant notifying them of the advised timeframe for filter retrieval. Clinicians were contacted to arrange retrieval within 30 days. We compared this with our practice for the preceding year. Results: The numbers of filters inserted during the two time periods was similar, as were the numbers of retrieval attempts and the time scale at which they occurred. The rate of successful retrievals increased but not significantly. The major changes were better documentation of filter types and better clinical follow-up. After the change in practice, only one patient was lost to follow-up compared with six the preceding year. Conclusions: Although there was no significant improvement in retrieval rates, the proactive, radiology-led approach improved follow-up and documentation, ensuring that a clinical decision was made about how long the filter was required and whether retrieval should be attempted and ensuring that patients were not lost to follow-up.

Lee, L.; Taylor, J.; Munneke, G.; Morgan, R.; Belli, A.-M., E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George's Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Compiling for time predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the T-CREST project we work on hardware/software architectures and code-generation strategies for time-predictable embedded and cyber-physical systems. In this paper we present the single-path code generation approach that we plan to explore and ... Keywords: compilers, real-time systems, time predictability, worst-case execution-time analysis

Peter Puschner; Raimund Kirner; Benedikt Huber; Daniel Prokesch

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Certifying execution time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the framework Abstraction-Carrying CodE Platform for Timing validation (ACCEPT), designed for timing analysis of embedded real-time systems using the worst-case execution time (WCET) as the safety parameter. In the context ...

Vítor Rodrigues; João Pedro Pedroso; Mário Florido; Simão Melo de Sousa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

Rail transportation risk and accident severity: A statistical analysis of variables in FRA's accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Administration (US DOT) maintains a file of carrier-reported railroad accidents and incidents that meet stipulated threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. A thoroughly-cleaned five-year time series of this data base was subjected to unbiased statistical procedures to discover (a) important causative variables in severe (high damage cost) accidents and (b) other key relationships between objective accident conditions and frequencies. Just under 6000 records, each representing a single event involving rail freight shipments moving on mainline track, were subjected to statistical frequency analysis, then included in the construction of classification and regression trees as described by Breimann et al. (1984). Variables related to damage cost defined the initial splits,'' or branchings of the tree. An interesting implication of the results of this analysis with respect to transportation of hazardous wastes by rail is that movements should be avoided when ambient temperatures are extreme (significantly 80{degrees}F), but that there should be no a priori bias against shipping wastes in longer train consists. 2 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Saricks, C.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Janssen, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dissolution dynamics of the calcite-water interface observed in situ by glancing-incidence X-ray scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Glancing-incidence X-ray scattering measurements made at the National Synchrotron Light Source were used to investigate dissolution dynamics in situ at the calcite-water interface. The relation between calcite saturation state and roughness of the calcite (1014) cleavage surface as a function of time was examined during pH titrations of an initially calcite-saturated solution. Systematic variations in roughness were observed as a function of saturation state as pH was titrated to values below that of calcite saturation. Different steady-state values of roughness were evident at fixed values of {Delta}G{sub r}, and these were correlated with the extent of undersaturation. A significant increase in roughness begins to occur with increasing undersaturation at a {Delta}G{sub r} value of approximately {minus}2.0 kcal/mol. The dissolution rate corresponding to this increase is about 1.5 x 10{sup 7} mmol/cm {center_dot} sec. This increase in roughness is attributed to a transition in the principal rate-determining dissolution mechanism, and is consistent with both powder-reaction studies of dissolution kinetics and single-crystal dissolution studies by atomic force microscopy. These data indicate some important potential applications of GIXS in the study of mineral-water interface geochemistry.

Sturchio, N.C.; Chiarello, R.P.

1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to U.S. Nuclear Weapon Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(a)), this Instruction: a. Establishes policy and assigns responsibilities for the DoD response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents in accordance with DoDD 3150.08 (Reference (b)). b. Authorizes DoD support for the Nuclear Weapons Accident Incident Response Subcommittee (NWAIRS) to the Nuclear Command and Control System (NCCS) Committee of Principals (CoP) to address the Federal Government response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

USD(AT&L) SUBJECT: DoD Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents References: See Enclosure 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establish policy and assign responsibilities for the DoD consequence management response to U.S. nuclear weapon incidents and other nuclear or radiological incidents involving materials in DoD custody in accordance with the guidance in National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 28, the National Response Framework, and the National Incident Management System (References (b) through (d)). 2. APPLICABILITY. This Directive applies to: a. OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Joint Staff, the Combatant Commands, the Office of the Inspector General of the

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Time-Resolved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Time-Resolved Time-Resolved Print Of the four fundamental parameters that we use to perceive the physical world (energy, momentum, position, and time) three correspond to the three broad categories of synchrotron experimental measurement techniques: spectroscopy (energy), scattering (momentum), and imaging (position). The fourth parameter-time-can in principle be applied to all the techniques. At the ALS, many experiments can be carried out in real time, with data being recorded from the same sample as it changes over time. Some time-resolved experiments take advantage of the pulsed nature of the ALS's synchrotron radiation, which, like a strobe light, can capture a series of "snapshots" of a process that, when viewed sequentially, show us how a given process evolves over time. Other experiments simply require two pulses: one to "pump" energy into the sample system and a second to probe the system's excited state.

213

ASHMET: a computer code for estimating insolation incident on tilted surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer code, ASHMET, has been developed by MSFC to estimate the amount of solar insolation incident on the surfaces of solar collectors. Both tracking and fixed-position collectors have been included. Climatological data for 248 US locations are built into the code. This report describes the methodology of the code, and its input and output. The basic methodology used by ASHMET is the ASHRAE clear-day insolation relationships modified by a clearness index derived from SOLMET-measured solar radiation data to a horizontal surface.

Elkin, R.F.; Toelle, R.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electrochemically adsorbed Pb on Ag (111) studied with grazing- incidence x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect

Grazing-incidence x-ray scattering studies of the evolution of electrochemically deposited layers of lead on silver (111) as a function of applied electrochemical potential are presented. Measurements were made with the adsorbed layers in contact with solution in a specially designed sample cell. The observed lead structures are a function of the applied potential and range from an incommensurate monolayer, resulting from underpotential deposition, to randomly oriented polycrystalline bulk lead, resulting from lower deposition potentials. These early experiments demonstrate the ability of in situ x-ray diffraction measurements to determine structures associated with electrochemical deposition. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Kortright, J.B.; Ross, P.N.; Melroy, O.R.; Toney, M.F.; Borges, G.L.; Samant, M.G.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Energy current imaging method for time reversal in elastic media  

SciTech Connect

An energy current imaging method is presented for use in locating sources of wave energy during the back propagation stage of the time reversal process. During the back propagation phase of an ideal time reversal experiment, wave energy coalesces from all angles of incidence to recreate the source event; after the recreation, wave energy diverges in every direction. An energy current imaging method based on this convergence/divergence behavior has been developed. The energy current imaging method yields a smaller spatial distribution for source reconstruction than is possible with traditional energy imaging methods.

Anderson, Brian E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ulrich, Timothy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larmat, Carene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guyer, Robert A [UNR; Griffa, Michele [ETH ZURICH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Managing time, part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masterful time management means not just tracking of messages in your personal environment, but managing your coordination network with others.

Peter J. Denning; Ritu Raj

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

FREQUENCY AND TIME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... STRATWARM observed and FLARES expected ... observed and PROTON FLARE expected (- - ) STRATWARM ... time of observed solar or geophysical ...

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

QuickTime VR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QuickTime VR. Christine Piatko and Sandy Ressler. ... Sandy Ressler's Office. Plant Floor of Black & Decker in Fayetteville NC. ...

219

Timed Property Sequence Chart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Property Sequence Chart (PSC) is a novel scenario-based notation, which has been recently proposed to represent temporal properties of concurrent systems. This language balances expressive power and simplicity of use. However, the current version of ... Keywords: Property Sequence Chart, Real-time specification patterns, Timed Property Sequence Chart, Timing properties

Pengcheng Zhang; Bixin Li; Lars Grunske

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Noncommutative Two Time Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

W. Chagas-Filho

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fabrication and characterization of fibers with built-in liquid crystal channels and electrodes for transverse incident-light modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-in-fiber liquid crystal (LC) structure designed for the modulation of light incident transverse to the fiber axis. A hollow cavity flanked by viscous conductors is introduced into a polymer matrix, and ...

Wei, Lei

222

Assessment of Incident-Free Transport for Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel to Yucca Mountain Using RADTRAN 5.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the incident-free radiological impacts associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository using the RADTRAN 5.5 computer code developed by Sandia National Laboratories.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Crooks, Gavin E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantum Operation Time Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation, a linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes towards equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

Gavin E. Crooks

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Time-resolved visible and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of laser-produced tin plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blackbody radiation.emit equilibrium (blackbody) radiation characteristic of theand that lost to blackbody radiation from the reemission

O'Shay, Joseph Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Bonetto, Rita D. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge Ronco (CINDECA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Technical Review of Law Enforcement Standards and Guides Relative to Incident Management  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to locate potential law enforcement-related standards that support incident management, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contacted representatives from the National Institute of Standards-Office of Law Enforcement Standards (NIST-OLES), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Secret Service, ASTM International committees that have a law enforcement focus, and a variety of individuals from local and regional law enforcement organizations. Discussions were held with various state and local law enforcement organizations. The NIJ has published several specific equipment-related law enforcement standards that were included in the review, but it appears that law enforcement program and process-type standards are developed principally by organizations that operate at the state and local level. Input is provided from state regulations and codes and from external non-government organizations (NGOs) that provide national standards. The standards that are adopted from external organizations or developed independently by state authorities are available for use by local law enforcement agencies on a voluntary basis. The extent to which they are used depends on the respective jurisdictions involved. In some instances, use of state and local disseminated standards is mandatory, but in most cases, use is voluntary. Usually, the extent to which these standards are used appears to depend on whether or not jurisdictions receive certification from a “governing” entity due to their use and compliance with the standards. In some cases, these certification-based standards are used in principal but without certification or other compliance monitoring. In general, these standards appear to be routinely used for qualification, selection for employment, and training. In these standards, the term “Peace Officer” is frequently used to refer to law enforcement personnel. This technical review of national law enforcement standards and guides identified the following four guides as having content that supports incident management: • TE-02-02 Guide to Radio Communications Interoperability Strategies and Products • OSHA 335-10N Preparing and Protecting Security Personnel in Emergencies • NIJ 181584 Fire and Arson Scene Evidence: A Guide for Public Safety Personnel • NIJ 181869 A Guide for Explosion and Bombing Scene Investigation In conversations with various state and local law enforcement officials, it was determined that the following National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) standards are generally recognized and tend to be universally used by law enforcement organizations across the country: • NFPA 1600 Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs • NFPA 1561 Standard on Fire Department Incident Management Systems • NFPA 472 Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition) • NFPA 473 Standard for Competencies for EMS Personnel Responding to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents (2008 Edition)

Stenner, Robert D.; Salter, R.; Stanton, J. R.; Fisher, D.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

On the Time Times Temperature Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Hod proposes a lower bound on the relaxation time of a perturbed thermodynamic system. For gravitational systems this bound transforms into a condition on the fundamental quasinormal frequency. We test the bound in some spacetimes whose quasinormal frequencies are calculated exactly, as the three-dimensional BTZ black hole, the D-dimensional de Sitter spacetime, and the D-dimensional Nariai spacetime. We find that for some of these spacetimes their fundamental quasinormal frequencies do not satisfy the bound proposed by Hod.

A. Lopez-Ortega

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

Estimation of the evacuation time in an emergency situation in hospitals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a prediction model is presented that estimates the evacuation time in an emergency situation for hospitals. The model is generic enough to be used in various hospital settings. This model can provide incident managers with estimates of ... Keywords: Emergency event, Evacuation modeling, Resource allocation, Resource management, Simulation

Davood Golmohammadi; Daniel Shimshak

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

commentary / book review: Island Biogeography: Paradigm Lost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America.    A review of this book will appear in a future 1948?6596  commentary / book review  Island Biogeography: and  Wilson’s  1967  book,  and  the  earlier  but  less 

Heaney, Lawrence R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

What Time is It?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These are sometimes marketed as "atomic clocks", but ... problems include incorrectly setting your local time zone on the clock, batteries that need ...

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

232

Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

233

Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation compared with those treated with surgery alone.

Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mwmcdona@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

235

Real-time shading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real-time procedural shading was once seen as a distant dream. When the first version of this course was offered four years ago, real-time shading was possible, but only with one-of-a-kind hardware or by combining the effects of tens to hundreds of rendering ...

Marc Olano; Kurt Akeley; John C. Hart; Wolfgang Heidrich; Michael McCool; Jason L. Mitchell; Randi Rost

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Semantics, experience and time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational hypothesis, with its inherent representationalism, and the dynamical hypothesis, with its apparent absence of representations and its commitment to continuous time, stand at an impasse. It is unclear how the dynamical stance can handle ... Keywords: Computation, Experience, Invariance, Semantics, Situatedness, Time

Stephen E. Robbins

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Twisted-light-induced intersubband transitions in quantum wells at normal incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine theoretically the intersubband transitions induced by laser beams of light with orbital angular momentum (twisted light) in semiconductor quantum wells at normal incidence. These transitions become possible in the absence of gratings thanks to the fact that collimated laser beams present a component of the light's electric field in the propagation direction. We derive the matrix elements of the light-matter interaction for a Bessel-type twisted-light beam represented by its vector potential in the paraxial approximation. Then, we consider the dynamics of photo-excited electrons making intersubband transitions between the first and second subbands of a standard semiconductor quantum well. Finally, we analyze the light-matter matrix elements in order to evaluate which transitions are more favorable for given orbital angular momentum of the light beam in the case of small semiconductor structures.

Sbierski, B; Tamborenea, P I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

Tuck, J.L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Digital time delay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

Clemensen, R.E.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 5308 7/1/2013 0:41 Indian Fort Medical Emergency Hiker bit by snake on trail Report Filed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to unknown cause BFD Responded 5311 7/2/2013 13:15 Old Broom Craft Building Theft By Unlawful Taking Copper piping stolen from new construction BPD responded 5312 7/4/2013 13:45 James Hall Fire Alarm/6/2013 12:45 Visitor Center Theft By Unlawful Taking Older Huffy bicycle stolen from parking lot Report

Baltisberger, Jay H.

242

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4280 7/1/2011 12:02 Kentucky Hall Fire Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theatre Theft Copper Wiring Sheriff responded 4293 7/14/2011 16:59 Campus Vehicle Immobilized Unpaid Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded 4281 7/2/2011 9:30 James Hall Theft Glade Property Damage Hand rail FM notified 4285 7/6/2011 10:10 Draper Building Theft Sony DVD

Baltisberger, Jay H.

243

Time, energy & form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical manifestations of time occur in natural forms of all sizes. Architectural form serves as shelter while providing a built envelope of human life, simultaneously influencing and influenced by energetic activities ...

McInnis, Martha Jane

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Dogs and Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Question: I travel often and worry how leaving for long periods of time (and boarding my dog) will affect her. I wouldn't think that dogs could understand the concept of...

245

Wood Use Across Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?Forest products history and use ?Forest resource- the big picture ?Consumption- the big picture ?Trends forest products industry ? pulp & paper ? solid woodBack in Time ?1492 ? Columbus sailed the ocean blue! ? wood use- fuelwood American Indians ?1634: Jean Nicolet

Scott Bowe; United States Wood Use

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Technical Talks Timing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Talks Timing The technical talks should last a maximum of 15 minutes with 5 minutes for set-up and 5 minutes for Q&A. No teamgroup presentations are allowed. The objective of...

247

Electric-Field Enhancement by Nodular Defects in Multilayer Coatings Irradiated at Normal and 45 (degree) Incidence  

SciTech Connect

The standing-wave electric-field profile within multilayer coatings is significantly perturbated by a nodular defect. The intensity, which is proportional to the electric field squared, is increased in the high index material by {>=}3x at normal incidence and {>=}12x at 45 degrees incidence angle. Therefore it is not surprising that nodular defects are initiation sites of laser-induced damage. In this study, the impact of reflectance-band centering and incident angle are explored for a 1 {micro}m diameter nodular defect seed overcoated with a 24 layer high-reflector constructed of quarter-wave thick alternating layers of hafnia and silica. The modeling was performed using a three-dimensional finite-element analysis code.

Stolz, C J; Genin, F Y; Pistor,T V

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

Numerical simulation to determine the effects of incident wind shear and turbulence level on the flow around a building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of incident shear and turbulence on flow around a cubical building are being investigated by a turbulent kinetic energy/dissipation model (TEMPEST). The numerical simulations demonstrate significant effects due to the differences in the incident flow. The addition of upstream turbulence and shear results in a reduced size of the cavity directly behind the building. The accuracy of numerical simulations is verified by comparing the predicted mean flow fields with the available wind-tunnel measurements of Castro and Robins (1977). Comparing the authors' results with experimental data, the authors show that the TEMPEST model can reasonably simulate the mean flow.

Zhang, Y.Q.; Huber, A.H.; Arya, S.P.S.; Snyder, W.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

National Incident Management System (NIMS) Standards Review Panel Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The importance and need for full compliant implementation of NIMS nationwide was clearly demonstrated during the Hurricane Katrina event, which was clearly expressed in Secretary Chertoff's October 4, 2005 letter addressed to the State's governors. It states, ''Hurricane Katrina was a stark reminder of how critical it is for our nation to approach incident management in a coordinated, consistent, and efficient manner. We must be able to come together, at all levels of government, to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from any emergency or disaster. Our operations must be seamless and based on common incident management doctrine, because the challenges we face as a nation are far greater than capabilities of any one jurisdiction.'' The NIMS is a system/architecture for organizing response on a ''national'' level. It incorporations ICS as a main component of that structure (i.e., it institutionalizes ICS in NIMS). In a paper published on the NIMS Website, the following statements were made: ''NIMS represents a core set of doctrine, principles, terminology, and organizational processes to enable effective, efficient and collaborative incident management at all levels. To provide the framework for interoperability and compatibility, the NIMS is based on a balance between flexibility and standardization.'' Thus the NIC is challenged with the need to adopt quality SDO generated standards to support NIMS compliance, but in doing so maintain the flexibility necessary so that response operations can be tailored for the specific jurisdictional and geographical needs across the nation. In support of this large and complex challenge facing the NIC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was asked to provide technical support to the NIC, through their DHS Science and Technology ? Standards Portfolio Contract, to help identify, review, and develop key standards for NIMS compliance. Upon examining the challenge, the following general process appears to be a reasonable approach for identifying and establishing existing standards that would be applicable to NIMS compliance. The suggested generalized steps to establishing existing SDO generated standards for NIMS compliance are: (1) establish search criteria from the NIMS and its support documents, (2) search SDO databases to identify key existing nationally and/or internationally recognized standards that have potential application to NIMS compliance needs, (3) review the identified standards against the specific component needs of the NIMS, (4) identify the pertinent aspects/components of those identified standards that clearly address specific NIMS compliance needs, (5) establish a process to adopt the pertinent standards, which includes the generation of formalized FEMA Guidance that identifies the specific NIMS component compliance needs addressed in the respective standard, (6) develop performance criteria for which to measure compliance with the identified NIMS components addressed by the respective adopted standard, and (7) adopt the standard, publish the guidance and performance criteria, and incorporate it into routine FEMA/NIC NIMS management operations. This review process will also help identify real gaps in standards for which new NIMS specific standards should be developed. To jump start this process and hopefully identify some key ''low hanging fruit'' standards the NIC could use to begin such a process, a panel of first-responder experts (familiar with the current standards of common use in the first-responder community) from various response disciplines was formed and a workshop held. The workshop included a pre-workshop information gathering process. This report discusses the workshop and its findings in detail.

Stenner, Robert D.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Stanton, James R.; Shebell, Peter; Schwartz, Deborah S.; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gelston, Gariann M.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

Kulich, M., E-mail: kulich@karlin.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Sokolovska 83, CZ-186 75 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rericha, V. [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic); Rericha, R. [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic); Shore, D.L. [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)] [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, D.P. [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

NSIT Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NIST Special Publication 250-59 NIST Computer Time Services: Internet Time Service (ITS), Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS), ...

2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

252

Quantum tunneling time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model of a quantum clock is applied to the old and controversial problem of how long a particle takes to tunnel through a quantum barrier. The model I employ has the advantage of yielding sensible results for energy eigenstates, and does not require the use of time-dependant wave packets. Although the treatment does not forbid superluminal tunneling velocities, there is no implication of faster-than-light signaling because only the transit duration is measurable, not the absolute time of transit. A comparison is given with the weak-measurement post-selection calculations of Steinberg.

P. C. W. Davies

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident  

SciTech Connect

Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Vittitoe, C.N.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Probabilistic timed behavior trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Behavior Tree notation has been developed as a method for systematically and traceably capturing user requirements. In this paper we extend the notation with probabilistic behaviour, so that reliability, performance, and other dependability properties ... Keywords: behavior trees, model checking, probabilities, timed automata

Robert Colvin; Lars Grunske; Kirsten Winter

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Genepool Time Heatmaps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genepool Time Heatmaps Genepool Time Heatmaps Heatmap of Time and Slots Requested vs Time Waited (in hours) | Queue: All | Last 7 Days Time Requested Slots 1wk Job Count Longest Wait 1 23.0 (233) 0.37 (1819) 27.54 (49888) 5.85 (124593) 1.23 (39835) 0.34 (732) 0 0.4 (224) 0.02 (1) 217325 538.96 2 0 0.01 (19) 2.54 (78) 0.2 (140) 0.99 (2683) 0 0 0 0 2920 9.1 4 0.08 (1) 0 2.82 (141) 0.36 (143) 1.07 (12) 0.06 (5) 0.01 (5) 0.06 (1) 1.3 (5) 313 20.48 6 0.01 (2) 0 0.09 (32) 0.07 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 35 1.22 8 0.04 (24) 4.32 (7423) 5.31 (1999) 0.53 (316) 13.14 (2486) 0.01 (2) 1.21 (88) 1.3 (34) 8.33 (68) 12440 46.16 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8.56 (1) 0 1 8.56 16 0 0 0 0.03 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.03 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.01 (1) 1 0.01 32 0 0 0 0.04 (14) 0 0 0 0.01 (6) 0 20 0.26

256

Can reduced processing decision support interfaces improve the decision-making of less-experienced incident commanders?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer-based decision support systems have been proposed as a tool to improve the decision-making of less-experienced personnel by reducing the information processing demands necessary for decision-making. This study investigated the utility of three ... Keywords: Cognitive load, Decision-making, Experience, Expertise, Fire-fighting, Incident command

Nathan C. Perry; Mark W. Wiggins; Merilyn Childs; Gerard Fogarty

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrogen Film Cooling With Incident and Swept-Shock Interactions in a Mach 6.4 Nitrogen Free Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium ...

Olsen G. C.; Nowak R. J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American Clean Energy and Security Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Regional Incidence of a National Greenhouse Gas Emission Limit: Title VII of the American the macroeconomic costs of greenhouse gas emission reductions under Title VII of the American Clean Energy limits on domestic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). This paper analyzes the macroeconomic costs

Wing, Ian Sue

259

Internet Topology over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are few studies that look closely at how the topology of the Internet evolves over time; most focus on snapshots taken at a particular point in time. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the topology of the Autonomous Systems graph of the Internet, examining how eight commonly-used topological measures change from January 2002 to January 2010. We find that the distributions of most of the measures remain unchanged, except for average path length and clustering coefficient. The average path length has slowly and steadily increased since 2005 and the average clustering coefficient has steadily declined. We hypothesize that these changes are due to changes in peering policies as the Internet evolves. We also investigate a surprising feature, namely that the maximum degree has changed little, an aspect that cannot be captured without modeling link deletion. Our results suggest that evaluating models of the Internet graph by comparing steady-state generated topologies to snapshots of the real data ...

Edwards, Benjamin; Stelle, George; Forrest, Stephanie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Timed fast charger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a charger for rechargeable electrochemical cells, a transformer charging circuit supplies a charging current to the battery at a fast charge rate for a predetermined time followed by a continuous slow charge rate. A normally closed automatic reset thermostat in series with the rectifier diodes in the charging circuit, and thermally coupled to them, opens after a period of time, dependent upon the heat generated by the rectifier diodes and upon the thermal mass of the thermostat and diodes, and terminates the fast charge current. A resistor, shunted across the thermostat and thermally coupled to it, establishes a slow charge rate current path when the thermostat opens. Heat generated in the resistor causes the thermostat to remain open as long as the battery is connected and ac power is supplied to the transformer primary winding.

Mullersman, F.H.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Space Time Matter inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a model of power-law inflationary inflation using the Space-Time-Matter (STM) theory of gravity for a five dimensional (5D) canonical metric that describes an apparent vacuum. In this approach the expansion is governed by a single scalar (neutral) quantum field. In particular, we study the case where the power of expansion of the universe is $p \\gg 1$. This kind of model is more successful than others in accounting for galaxy formation.

Mariano Anabitarte; Mauricio Bellini

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Incidence angle modifiers in cylindrical solar collector design. Final report, June 1996--May 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis presents an analysis of the thermal performance of cylindrical solar collectors. A major contributor to performance is optics, the principle focus of this work. A tool used to compute the incidence angle modifiers (IAM`s) for cylindrical solar collectors is presented. The Monte Carlo Method is employed in a Fortran 90 computer code to compute the hemispheric IAM`s of cylindrical solar collectors. Using concentric cylinders, the tubes are modeled with and without back plane reflectors of varying size. The computed IAM`s are verified both analytically and experimentally. Outdoor experiments on an array of cylindrical tubes with various back planes and two different tube spacings are described. Agreement with TRNSYS runs in daily energy gain is excellent. Over the 38 data sets, taken on different days, a maximum error of 11.2% is observed, with an average error of 3%. Heat loss tests, used to calculate an overall heat loss coefficient for the collector, are also described. A parametric variation study is used to illustrate the effect of varying many of the collector parameters. This study provides insight into the significant design parameters for cylindrical solar collectors. This insight is used to analyze the effect of these design parameters on the annual energy delivered by the collector. In addition, a simple cost analysis illustrates the benefits of varying the design parameters. The use of this new program and a detailed Life Cycle Cost analysis are the tools needed for optimizing the design of a cylindrical solar collector. 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Ryan, J.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Ruthenium-Platinum Thin Film Analysis Using Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ruthenium (Ru, Z = 44) is a Platinum Group Metal that has a standard hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystalline structure. Platinum (Pt, Z = 78) has a face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline structure. When these metals are co-sputtered onto a silicon substrate, creating a few nm-thin film, they form an alloy with a combination of HCP and FCC structure. Direct methanol fuel cells rely on an anode catalyst to draw hydrogen from liquid methanol. Highly efficient fuel cells based on polymer electrolyte catalysts, known as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, have been developed, but require large amounts of a costly platinum catalyst. Thin-film nanostructure bimetallic alloys have been produced to reduce the amount of expensive Platinum needed for catalysis, and also to improve the electrochemical properties of the catalyst. Supported RuPt particles have been shown to have superior activity as anode catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation and demonstrate an improvement in resistance to poisoning in comparison to unalloyed Pt. The percentage of Ruthenium in a RuPt thin film and the process by which the alloy is produced will dictate the crystalline structure, and thus the electrochemical properties of the film. Pure Ruthenium, Pure Platinum, and eight intermediate samples at differing percent composition of Ruthenium were characterized by their X-ray diffraction patterns. The incident beam is from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory beam and operates at approximately a 1.4 Angstrom wavelength. The results show that 0% Ru through 46.17% Ru exhibit a majority FCC structure, 56.07% Ru and 60.61% Ru are mixed phase, and from 67.03% Ru through 100% Ru, the samples exhibit a HCP structure.

Jones, L.

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

QUADRENNIAL MCNP TIMING STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, is widely used around the world for many radiation protection and shielding applications. As a well-known standard it is also an excellent vehicle for assessing the relative performance of scientific computing platforms. Every three-to-four years a new version of MCNP is released internationally by the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For each of the past few releases, we have also done a timing study to assess the progress of scientific computing platforms and software. These quadrennial timing studies are valuable to the radiation protection and shielding community because (a) they are performed by a recognized scientific team, not a computer vendor, (b) they use an internationally recognized code for radiation protection and shielding calculations, (c) they are eminently reproducible since the code and the test problems are internationally distributed. Further, if one has a computer platform, operating system, or compiler not presented in our results, its performance is directly comparable to the ones we report because it can use the same code, data, and test problems as we used. Our results, using a single processor per platform, indicate that hardware advances during the past three years have improved performance by less than a factor of two and software improvements have had a marginal effect on performance. The most significant impacts on performance have resulted from developments in multiprocessing and multitasking. The other most significant advance in the last three years has been the accelerated improvements in personal computers. In the last timing study, the tested personal computer was approximately a factor of four slower that the fastest machine tested, a DEC Alphastation 500. In the present study, the fastest PC tested was less than a factor of two slower than the fastest platform, which is a Compaq (previously DEC) Alpha XP1000.

E. C. SELCOW; B. D. LANSRUD

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Exploiting VERITAS Timing Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 499 pixel photomultiplier cameras of the VERITAS gamma ray telescopes are instrumented with 500MHz sampling Flash ADCs. This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the best methods by which to exploit this information so as to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio for the detection of Cherenkov light pulses. The FADCs also provide unprecedented resolution for the study of the timing characteristics of Cherenkov images of cosmic-ray and gamma-ray air showers. This capability is discussed, together with the implications for gamma-hadron separation.

J. Holder; for the VERITAS Collaboration

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

What Fraction of a Kelvin Wave Incident on a Narrow Strait Is Transmitted?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameters governing the fraction of a Kelvin wave transmitted through a narrow gap or channel include time dependence, nonlinearity, friction, and strait geometry, yet only limited regions of this parameter space have been explored. Linear ...

Helen L. Johnson; Chris Garrett

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Real-time highway traffic condition assessment framework using vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII) with artificial intelligence (AI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a framework for real-time highway traffic condition assessment using vehicle kinetic information, which is likely to be made available from vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII) systems, in which vehicle and infrastructure agents ... Keywords: artificial intelligence (AI), incident detection, vehicle kinetics, vehicle-infrastructure integration (VII)

Yongchang Ma; Mashrur Chowdhury; Adel Sadek; Mansoureh Jeihani

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: Imaging based on Raman free induction decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The T-CARS experiment involves three incident electric fields, Em(r,t), with frequencies at m m P1,P2; accepted for publication 10 January 2002 A time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering CARS and the solvent, and thus increasing the detection sensitivity of CARS microscopy significantly. © 2002 American

Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

269

Short-time Evolution of Alkane-in-Water Nanoemulsions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stability of alkane-in-water nanoemulsions during the sub-stationary regime is studied by means of Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS). The effects of Ostwald ripening, flocculation, coalescence, gravity, and hydration forc- es are considered. According to these calculations flocculation and coalescence are predominant during the first few seconds after the preparation of the emulsion. This favors the generation of a right-skewed Drop Size Distribu- tion (DSD). As the system evolves, the drops grow larger and more repulsive causing a slow down of the flocculation process. In the case of dodecane (C12) and hexadecane (C16) the referred phenomena, reinforce the ripening trend to subvert the initial DSD variation, producing a meta-stable distribution which is preserved during several minutes. After this time, Ostwald ripening dominates: the skirt of the distribution changes progressively from right-skewed to left-skewed. Consistent with these changes, the cube average radius of the emulsion increases rapidly at first, but progressively diminishes generating a concave-downward curve that stabilizes asymptotically. In the case of dodecane and hexadecane the complete dissolution of the drops promoted by ripening is prevented at all times due to coalescence. In the case of octane (C8) a substantial amount of drops is lost by dissolution, forbidding the attain- ment of a stable DSD. In all cases the molecular exchange only favors a decrease of the average radius as a function of time. It is the elimination of drops either by dissolution or coalescence which causes an increase of the average radius of the emulsion.

German Urbina-Villalba; Kareem Rahn-Chique

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

270

CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes and probe, to produce a fourth, the anti-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes diagram for the production of a CARS signal. The three incident waves pump, probe (both of frequency p) and Stokes (S) combine to produce an anti-Stokes signal, frequency as. Figure 2. Schematic of the CARS system

Greenaway, Alan

271

Oblique-incidence sputtering of Ru intermediate layer for decoupling of intergranular exchange in perpendicular recording media  

SciTech Connect

During the Ru deposition process for granular type perpendicular magnetic recording media, both a reduction in the Ru intermediate layer thickness and lowering of sputtering gas pressure were successfully achieved by focusing on a self-shadowing effect. Oblique-incidence sputtering with a 60 deg. incident angle under an Ar gas pressure of 0.6 Pa yielded (1) columnar Ru grains with a growth direction of 30 deg. from the film normal, (2) c-plane sheet texture by epitaxial growth on the Pt underlayer, and (3) a flat envelope of the surface and a deep gap at grain boundaries. This change in the Ru structure significantly contributes to reducing exchange coupling among magnetic grains, especially in the initial growth region in an overlying granular medium.

Saito, Shin; Inoue, Ken [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 Japan (Japan); Takahashi, Migaku [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Center for Nanobioengineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, 220, Gung-Dong, Yuseong-Gu., Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Good Timing: NIST/CU Collaboration Adds Timing Capability ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... With the added capability to track the timing of dynamic biochemical reactions, cell ... to measure sensor signals at two points in time at a rate of up to ...

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Time Bucket Formulation for the TSP with Time Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 10, 2009 ... The Traveling Salesman Problem with Time Windows (TSPTW) is the problem of finding a ... To obtain a good partition of the time windows, we.

274

The Heliosphere in Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of the dynamic nature of the interstellar medium, the Sun should have encountered a variety of different interstellar environments in its lifetime. As the solar wind interacts with the surrounding interstellar medium to form a heliosphere, different heliosphere shapes, sizes, and particle contents result from the different environments. Some of the large possible interstellar parameter space (density, velocity, temperature) is explored here with the help of global heliosphere models, and the features in the resulting heliospheres are compared and discussed. The heliospheric size, expressed as distance of the nose of the heliopause to the Sun, is set by the solar wind - interstellar pressure balance, even for extreme cases. Other heliospheric boundary locations and neutral particle results correlate with the interstellar parameters as well. If the H0 clouds identified in the Millennium Arecibo survey are typical of clouds encountered by the Sun, then the Sun spends ~99.4% of the time in warm low density ISM, where the typical upwind heliosphere radii are up to two orders of magnitude larger than at present.

H. -R. Müller; P. C. Frisch; B. D. Fields; G. P. Zank

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

The 19 April 1996 Illinois Tornado Outbreak. Part II: Cell Mergers and Associated Tornado Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 19 April 1996 Illinois tornado outbreak, cell mergers played a very important role in the convective evolution. With a large number of cells forming within a short time period, the early stages of cell organization were marked by cell ...

Bruce D. Lee; Brian F. Jewett; Robert B. Wilhelmson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. ... The AT1 scale is run in real time using data from an ensemble of cesium standards and hydrogen masers. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Time and Frequency Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Controlled ClocksTelephone TimeDivision HistoryFrequently Asked Questions (FAQ)Time and Frequency from A to Z: An illustrated glossaryA Walk ...

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Time dependent Directional Profit Model for Financial Time Series Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time dependent Directional Profit Model for Financial Time Series Forecasting Jingtao YAO Chew Lim@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract Goodness­of­fit is the most popular criterion for neural network time series forecasting. In the context of financial time series forecasting, we are not only concerned at how good the forecasts fit

Yao, JingTao

279

Effect of fast positive ions incident on caesiated plasma grid of negative ion source  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the effect on negative ion formation on a caesiated surface of the backscattering of positive ions approaching it with energy of a few tens of eV. For a positive ion energy of 45 eV, the surface produced negative ion current density due to these fast positive ions is 12 times larger than that due to thermal atoms, thus dominating the negative ion surface production instead of the thermal atoms, as considered until now.

Bacal, M. [LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, UPMC, Universite PARIS-SUD 11, UMR CNRS 7648 (France)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

First-passage-time problems in time-aware networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First passage time or the first time that a stochastic process crosses a boundary is a random variable whose probability distribution is sought in engineering, statistics, finance, and other disciplines. The probability ...

Suwansantisuk, Watcharapan, 1978-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters  

SciTech Connect

The University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy (FSA) applied for grant funding to develop and deliver programs for municipal, rural, and volunteer firefighters. The FSA specializes in preparing responders for a variety of emergency events, including flammable liquid fires resulting from accidents, intentional acts, or natural disasters. Live fire training on full scale burnable props is the hallmark of FSA training, allowing responders to practice critical skills in a realistic, yet safe environment. Unfortunately, flammable liquid live fire training is often not accessible to municipal, rural, or volunteer firefighters due to limited department training budgets, even though most department personnel will be exposed to flammable liquid fire incidents during the course of their careers. In response to this training need, the FSA developed a course during the first year of the grant (Year One), Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters. During the three years of the grant, a total of 2,029 emergency responders received this training. In Year Three, two new courses, a train-the-trainer for Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community and Management of Large-Scale Disasters for Public Officials were developed and pilot tested during the Real-World Disaster Management Conference held at the FSA in June of 2007. Two research projects were conducted during Years Two and Three. The first, conducted over a two year period, evaluated student surveys regarding the value of the flammable liquids training received. The second was a needs assessment conducted for rural Nevada. Both projects provided important feedback and a basis for curricula development and improvements.

Denise Baclawski

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

NIST: A Walk Through Time - The "Atomic Age" of Time ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Transportation, communication, financial transactions, manufacturing, electric power and many ... The next generation of time standards is presently ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Geographic Information Science (GISc) Approach to Characterizing Spatiotemporal Patterns of Terrorist Incidents in Iraq, 2004-2009  

SciTech Connect

As terrorism on all scales continues, it is necessary to improve understanding of terrorist and insurgent activities. This article takes a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to advance the understanding of spatial, social, political, and cultural triggers that influence terrorism incidents. Spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal patterns of terrorist attacks are examined to improve knowledge about terrorist systems of training, planning, and actions. The results of this study aim to provide a foundation for understanding attack patterns and tactics in emerging havens as well as inform the creation and implementation of various counterterrorism measures.

Medina, Richard M [ORNL; Siebeneck, Laura K. [University of Utah; Hepner, George F. [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M. [Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich IP4 5PD (United Kingdom); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT, United Kingdom and School of Radiotherapy, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

USE OF INCIDENT AND REFLECTED SOLAR PARTICLE BEAMS TO TRACE THE TOPOLOGY OF MAGNETIC CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Occasionally, large solar energetic particle (SEP) events occur inside magnetic clouds (MCs). In this work, the onset time analysis, the peak intensity analysis, and the decay phase analysis of SEPs are used to investigate two large SEP events inside MCs: the 1998 May 2 and 2002 April 21 events. The onset time analysis of non-relativistic electrons and {approx}MeV nucleon{sup -1} heavy ions shows the stability of the magnetic loop structure during a period of a few hours in the events examined. The joint analysis of pitch-angle distributions and peak intensities of electrons exhibits that, depending on the particle pitch angle observed at 1 AU, in the April event the reflection point of particles may be distributed along a wide spatial range, implying that the magnetic loop is a magnetic bottle connected to the Sun with both legs. In contrast, in the May event particle reflection occurs abruptly at the magnetic mirror formed by a compressed field enhancement behind the interplanetary shock, consistent with its open field line topology.

Tan, Lun C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Malandraki, Olga E.; Dorrian, Gareth [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Observatory of Athens (Greece); Reames, Donald V. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ng, Chee K. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Wang Linghua, E-mail: ltan@umd.edu [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Computation of Domain-Averaged Shortwave Irradiance by a One-Dimensional Algorithm Incorporating Correlations between Optical Thickness and Direct Incident Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional radiative transfer algorithm that accounts for correlations between the optical thickness and the incident direct solar radiation is developed to compute the domain-averaged shortwave irradiance profile. It divides the direct ...

Seiji Kato

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Relationship between Incident and Double-Way Transmittances: An Application for the Estimate of Surface Albedo from Satellites over the African Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inference of surface reflectance from satellite observations requires the knowledge of the double-way transmittance through the atmosphere. Since the existing pyranometer networks routinely provide measurements of the incident transmittance ...

B. Pinty; D. Tanre

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. Updated monthly. Return to Archive index Leap second and UT1-UTC information. This page ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Personalised time-dependent learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-dependent instruction appears to shape next-generation learning systems, where the value of instruction is as important as the time it takes to learn. The ability to grasp the exact knowledge required to accomplish a specific task, in the ... Keywords: adaptive learning, authoring tools, knowledge management, learning granularity, learning objects, learning resources, learning technology, learning web, ontology, personalised learning, semantic web, time constraints, time-dependent learning, timeliness

R. Benlamri; Y. Atif; J. Berri

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The LCLS Timing Event System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source requires precision timing trigger signals for various accelerator diagnostics and controls at SLAC-NAL. A new timing system has been developed that meets these requirements. This system is based on COTS hardware with a mixture of custom-designed units. An added challenge has been the requirement that the LCLS Timing System must co-exist and 'know' about the existing SLC Timing System. This paper describes the architecture, construction and performance of the LCLS timing event system.

Dusatko, John; Allison, S.; Browne, M.; Krejcik, P.; /SLAC

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Judges 9:00- 9:25 Materials Science Mathew Cherukara Shock Induced Chemistry of NiAl Nano-Composites Chen, X. Gyrya, V. 9:25- 9:50 Materials Science Christian Sorensen Explosive...

293

Edge effects, not connectivity, determine the incidence and development of a foliar fungal plant disease.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a model plant-pathogen system in a large-scale habitat corridor experiment, we found that corridors do not facilitate the movement of wind-dispersed plant pathogens, that connectivity of patches does not enhance levels of foliar fungal plant disease, and that edge effects are the key drivers of plant disease dynamics. Increased spread of infectious disease is often cited as a potential negative effect of habitat corridors used in conservation, but the impacts of corridors on pathogen movement have never been tested empirically. Using sweet corn (Zea mays) and southern corn leaf blight (Cochliobolus heterostrophus) as a model plant-pathogen system, we tested the impacts of connectivity and habitat fragmentation on pathogen movement and disease development at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA. Over time, less edgy patches had higher proportions of diseased plants, and distance of host plants to habitat edges was the greatest determinant of disease development. Variation in average daytime temperatures provided a possible mechanism for these disease patterns. Our results show that worries over the potentially harmful effects of conservation corridors on disease dynamics are misplaced, and that, in a conservation context, many diseases can be better managed by mitigating edge effects.

Johnson, Brenda, L.; Haddad, Nick, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Analysis of Pump-Turbine S Instability and Reverse Waterhammer Incidents in Hydropower Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic systems continually experience dynamic transients or oscillations which threaten the hydroelectric plant from extreme water hammer pressures or resonance. In particular, the minimum pressure variations downstream of the turbine runner during the load rejection or other events may cause dangerous water column separation and subsequent rejoinder. Water column separation can be easily observed from the measurements of site transient tests, and has indeed caused serious historical damages to the machine and water conveyance system. Several technical issues regarding water column separation in draft tubes, including S instability of turbine characteristic curves, numerical instability and uncertainty of computer programs, are discussed here through case studies and available model and site test data. Catastrophic accidents experienced at a Kaplan turbine and in a long tailrace tunnel project, as well as other troubles detected in a more timely fashion, are revisited in order to demonstrate the severity of reverse water hammer. However, as there is no simple design solutions for such complex systems, this paper emphasizes that the design of hydraulic systems is always difficult, difficulties that are compounded when the phenomena in question are non-linear (water hammer), dynamic (involving wave interaction and complex devices of turbines, controls, and electrical systems), and non-monotonic (severity of response is seldom simply connected to severity of load as with vibrations and resonance, and the complexity of transient loads), and thus may lead to high economic and safety challenges and consequences.

Pejovic, Dr. Stanislav [University of Toronto; Zhang, Qin Fen [ORNL; Karney, Professor Byran W. [University of Toronto; Gajic, Prof. Aleksandar [University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

All Time, All the Time: Improving NIST Radio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... need for manual adjustments when Daylight Saving Time begins and ends, and allowing automatic resetting of clocks following a power outage.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Time Bucket Formulation for the TSP with Time Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 5, 2009 ... Abstract: The Traveling Salesman Problem with Time Windows (TSPTW) is the problem of finding a minimum-cost path visiting a set of cities ...

297

NIST: A Walk Through Time - World Time Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A Walk Through Time - Home Page ... and technologists recognized the inadequacy of timekeeping based on the motion of the Earth, which fluctuates ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ionizing Electron Incidents as an Efficient Way to Reduce Viscosity of Heavy Petroleum Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence on oil and the fact that petroleum conventional reservoirs are becoming depleted direct attentions toward unconventional-and harder to access-reservoirs. Among those, heavy and extremely heavy oil reservoirs and tar sands form a considerable portion of all petroleum resources. Conventional thermal and thermocatalytic refining methods are not affordable choices in some cases, as they demand a considerable energy investment. On the other hand, electron irradiation, as a novel technology, provides more promising results in heavy oil upgrading. Electron irradiation, as a method of delivering energy to a target molecule, ensures that most of the energy is absorbed by the molecule electronic structure. This leads to a very efficient generation of reactive species, which are capable of initiating chemical reactions. In contrast, when using thermal energy, only a small portion of the energy goes into the electronic structure of the molecule; therefore, bond rupture will result only at high energy levels. The effect of electron irradiation on different heavy petroleum fluids is investigated in this study. Radiation-induced physical and chemical changes of the fluids have been evaluated using different analytical instruments. The results show that high energy electron particles intensify the cracking of heavy hydrocarbons into lighter species. Moreover, irradiation is seen to limit any post-treatment reactions, providing products of higher stability. Depending on the characteristics of the radiolyzed fluid, irradiation may change the distribution pattern of the products, or the radiolysis process may follow the same mechanism that thermal cracking does. In addition to that, we have studied the effectiveness of different influencing variables such as reaction temperature, absorbed dose values, and additives on radiolytic reactions. More specifically, the following subjects are addressed in this study: *Radiation?induced chain reactions of heavy petroleum fluids *Complex hydrocarbon cracking mechanism *High and low temperature radiolysis *Synergetic effects of different chemical additives in radiolysis reactions *Time stability of radiation products

Alfi, Masoud

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Time-lock Puzzles and Timed-release Crypto  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our motivation is the notion of ``timed-release crypto,'''' where the goal is to encrypt a message so that it can not be decrypted by anyone, not even the sender, until a pre-determined amount of time has passed. The goal is to ``send information into ...

R. L. Rivest; A. Shamir; D. A. Wagner

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

Gross, J.E.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Reactor control rod timing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

Wu, Peter T. K. (Clifton Park, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Valuing Good Health in Vermont: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Health Care Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policymakers across the country are increasingly interested in ensuring that workers can earn paid time off to use when they are sick. In addition to concerns about workers ’ ability to respond to their own health needs, there is growing recognition that, with so many dual-earner and single-parent families, family members ’ health needs also sometimes require workers to take time off from their job. Allowing workers with contagious illness to avoid unnecessary contact with co-workers and customers has important public health benefits. Earned health care time also protects workers from being disciplined or fired when they are too sick to work, helps families and communities economically by preventing lost income due to illness, and offers savings to employers by reducing turnover and minimizing absenteeism. Legislators in Vermont are considering Bill H.208, “An Act Relating to Absence from Work for Health Care and Safety. ” Using the parameters of the proposed legislation and publicly available data, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) estimates the anticipated costs and some of the anticipated benefits of the law for employers providing new leave, as well as some of the benefits for employees. The briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Essays in time and risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lists yield systematically higher discount rates and utilityList methodology: identifying time preferences with MPLs and utilityrisk price list to inform curvature of the utility function

Sprenger, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Real time wind turbine simulator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel dynamic real-time wind turbine simulator (WTS) is developed in this thesis, which is capable of reproducing dynamic behavior of real wind turbine. The… (more)

Gong, Bing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Time and Frequency Users Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 9 TERMS USED 11 ... 135 GLOSSARY 137 INDEX ... The OIL INDUSTRY needs accurate timing to help automate oil well drilling, especially offshore. ...

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Time-critical information services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency medical services have never been more ready for the implementation of time-critical interorganizational information services for the public good.

Thomas A. Horan; Benjamin L. Schooley

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Automated Computer Time Service (ACTS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... provided since 1988 for users who need to synchronize computer clocks to ... For computers with Internet access, the Internet Time Service should be ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the infiltration of outdoor PM2.5 into a residence in the San Joaquin Valley Title Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the infiltration of outdoor PM2.5 into a residence in the San Joaquin Valley Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Tracy L. Thatcher, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4724-4732 Date Published October 15, 2003 Abstract Recent studies associate particulate air pollution with adverse health effects. The indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin is not well characterized, particularly for individual chemical species. In response to this, a field study in an unoccupied, single-story residence in Clovis, California was conducted. Real-time particle monitors were used both outdoors and indoors to quantity PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. The aggregate of the highly time-resolved sulfate data, as well as averages of these data, was fit using a time-averaged form of the infiltration equation, resulting in reasonable values for the penetration coefficient and deposition velocity. In contrast, individual values of the indoor/outdoor ratio can vary significantly from that predicted by the model for time scales ranging from a few minutes to several hours. Measured indoor ammonium nitrate levels were typically significantly lower than expected based solely on penetration and deposition losses. The additional reduction is due to the transformation of ammonium nitrate into ammonia and nitric acid gases indoors, which are subsequently lost by deposition and sorption to indoor surfaces. This result illustrates that exposure assessments based on total outdoor particle mass can obscure the actual causal relationships for indoor exposures

309

Geophysical variables and behavior: LIII. Epidemiological considerations for incidence of cancer and depression in areas of frequent UFO reports  

SciTech Connect

Luminous phenomena and anomalous physical forces have been hypothesized to be generated by focal tectonic strain fields that precede earthquakes. If these geophysical processes exist, then their spatial and temporal density should be greatest during periods of protracted, localized UFO reports; they might be used as dosimetric indicators. Contemporary epidemiological data concerning the health risks of power frequency electromagnetic fields and radon gas levels (expected correlates of certain tectonic strain fields), suggest that increased incidence (odds ratios greater 1:3) of brain tumors and leukemia should be evident within flap areas. In addition the frequency of variants of temporal lobe lability, psychological depression and posttraumatic stress should be significantly elevated. UFO field investigators, because they have repeated, intermittent close proximity to these fields, are considered to be a particularly high risk population for these disorders. 22 references.

Persinger, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dynamic investigation of gold nanocrystal assembly using in situ grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering.  

SciTech Connect

Here we investigate the dynamic self-assembly pathway of ordered gold nanocrystal arrays during the self-assembly of gold nanocrystal micelles, with and without the presence of colloidal silica precursors, using grazing-incidence X-ray scattering performed at a synchrotron source. With silica precursors present, a lattice with rhombohedral symmetry is formed from the partial collapse of a face-centered cubic structure. In the absence of silica, a transient body-centered orthorhombic phase appears, which rapidly collapses into a glassy nanocrystal film. The appearance of face-centered and body-centered structures is consistent with a phase diagram for charged colloidal particles with assembly modulated via Coulomb screening.

Dunphy, D.; Fan, H.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Brinker, C. J.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of New Mexico; SNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Adapting the U.S. Domestic Radiological Emergency Response Process to an Overseas Incident: FRMAC Without the F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earthquake and resulting tsunami in Japan led to a radiological release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plan, which in turn resulted in the rapid activation and deployment by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) emergency response teams. These teams and those from other federal agencies are typically coordinated through the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) when responding to radiological incidents in the U.S. FRMAC is the body through which the collection, analysis, and assessment of environmental radiological data are coordinated and products released to decision makers. This article discusses DOE/NNSA’s role in the U.S. response to the Fukushima accident as it implemented its components of FRMAC in a foreign country, coordinated its assets, integrated with its federal partners, and collaborated with the Government of Japan. The technical details of the various data collections and analyses are covered in other articles of this issue.

Blumenthal, Daniel J. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Bowman, David R. [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response; Remick, Alan [USDOE NA Office of Emergency Response

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Grazing Incidence Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies of the Synthesis and Growth of CdS Quantum Dots from Constituent Atoms in SiO2 Matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering was applied to study the synthesis and growth of CdS quantum dots (QDs) from Cd and S atoms implanted in SiO{sub 2}. For a dose of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}, the partial synthesis of CdS QDs occurred already during implantation, with only moderate size increase upon subsequent annealing up to T{sub a} = 1073 K. The dynamics of QD synthesis and growth were considerably different for just two times lower dose, where synthesis started only if the implanted samples were annealed at T{sub a} = 773 K or higher, with a strong increase of the size of QDs upon annealing at higher T{sub a}. The results suggest that high-dose implantation followed by low-temperature annealing could lead to better defined sizes and narrower size distributions of QDs.

Desnica, U. V. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Dubcek, P. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Desnica-Frankovic, I. D. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Buljan, M. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Italy; White, Clark W [ORNL

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Simulator for Timed CSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time is an integral aspect of computer systems. It is essential for modelling a system’s performance, but may also affect its safety or security. Timed CSP [Sch00] conservatively extends the process algebra CSP with timed primitives, where real numbers ? 0 model how time passes with reference to a single, conceptually global, clock. While there have been approaches for model checking Timed CSP ([Sch00, DHSZ06]), to the best of our knowledge we are the first to present a simulator for Timed CSP. Here, we restrict time to rational values only. Theoretically, this limits the expressibility of the language. Practically, this limitation turns out to be negligible (for instance all examples of Schneider’s book [Sch00] can be dealt with in our simulator). The simulator is the outcome of an undergraduate project at Swansea University [Dra11]. Our Timed CSP simulator extends the open source tool ProB [Leu]. ProB’s CSP simulator works as follows: The CSP specification is analyzed by a parser (written in Haskell) and translated to a representation in Prolog. A CSP Interpreter (in Prolog) stores the “firing rules” of CSP’s operational semantics. The Simulator (also in Prolog) determines the actions available and the resultant states. A GUI (written in Tcl/Tk) allows the user to interact with the Simulator. Timed CSP is closed under rational time [DNR11]. Consider, for example, the following firing rule ( t ? stands for a timed transition of duration t): P d? ? P ? (P ?d Q) d?

Marc Dragon; Andy Gimblett; Markus Roggenbach; Jens Bendisposto; Cliff Jones; Michael Leuschel; Er Romanovsky; Tiziana Margaria; Julia Padberg; Gabriele Taentzer; Marc Dragon; Andy Gimblett; Markus Roggenbach

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electric Time in Quantum Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective quantum cosmology is formulated with a realistic global internal time given by the electric vector potential. New possibilities for the quantum behavior of space-time are found, and the high-density regime is shown to be very sensitive to the specific form of state realized.

Stephon Alexander; Martin Bojowald; Antonino Marciano; David Simpson

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Time-Constrained Loop Pipelining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of Time-Constrained Loop Pipelining, i.e. given a fixed throughput, finding a schedule of a loop which minimizes resource requirements. This paper proposes a methodology, called TCLP, based on dividing the problem into ... Keywords: loop pipelining, scheduling, timing and resource contraints, register optimization

Fermin Sanchez

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Beam Time Allocation Committee (BAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Allocation Committee (BAC) Time Allocation Committee (BAC) Charter Purpose: Allocates general user beam time by instrument to promote diverse and high- impact science and a broad-based user community to meet DOE and NSSD goals. Participants: BAC Chair (appointed by NSSD Director), Instrument Group Leaders, User Office Schedule: Tied to proposal calls - expected to meet at least 2 times/year with meetings scheduled about 6 weeks after the proposal call has closed and at least 1 month prior to scheduled operations. Process: 1. Instrument Group Leaders (with group members): a. Confirm feasibility (equipment requirements and instrument capabilities) and safe operations b. Review amount of beam time requested and adjust as needed with consideration for instrument and sample environment availability.

317

Finding patterns in timed data with spike timing dependent plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My research focuses on finding patterns in events - in sequences of data that happen over time. It takes inspiration from a neuroscience phenomena believed to be deeply involved in learning. I propose a machine learning ...

Oliveira, Alexandre (Alexandre S.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many instances in which it is possible to plan ahead for an emergency evacuation (e.g., a chemical processing facility explosion). For those cases, if an accident were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other cases (e.g., the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials), there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented, and decisions must be made ad-hoc on how to proceed with an emergency evacuation. In both situations, the availability of real-time traffic information plays a critical role in the management of the evacuation operations. Due to cost constraints, only large urban areas have traffic sensor deployments that permit access to some sort of real-time traffic information; an evacuation taking place in other areas of the country would have to proceed without real-time traffic information. In order to improve operations during a vehicular emergency evacuation anywhere, a system of sensors that uses newly developed real-time traffic-information-gathering technologies to assess traffic conditions and to detect incidents on the main evacuation routes is presented in this paper. A series of tests, both in a controlled environment and in the field, were conducted to study the feasibility of such a system of traffic sensors and to assess its ability to provide real-time traffic information during an emergency evacuation. The results of these tests indicated that the prototype sensors are reliable and accurate for the type of application that is the focus of this paper.

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Zhang, Li [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mahmoud, Anas M. [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Upgrade of NSLS timing system  

SciTech Connect

We report on the progress of the new NSLS timing system. There are three types of requirements for NSLS timing system: clocks, synchronization and trigger circuits. All ring revolution frequency clocks are generated using ECL and high speed TTL logic. The synchronization circuits allows to fill both storage rings with any bunch pattern. The triggers are generated by using commercially available digital delay generators. The delay unit`s outputs are ultrastable, with a resolution of 5 ps, and are programmed by computer via IEEE 488 interface. The block diagrams, description of all major timing components and the present status are provided in this paper.

Singh, O.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Sheehan, J.; Smith, J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Logarithmic time parallel Bayesian inference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I present a parallel algorithm for exact probabilistic inference in Bayesian networks. For polytree networks with n variables, the worstcase time complexity is O(logn) on a CREW PRAM (concurrent-read, exclusive-write parallel random-access ...

David M. Pennock

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The structure of cosmic time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the approach of Julien Lesgourgues [1], we analyze the mathematical structure of the time co-ordinate of present day cosmological models, where these models include a cosmological constant term to account for the observed acceleration of the universe [2], [3]: we find that in all cases, except for a set of measure zero in the parameter space, the time is given by an (abelian) integral on a torus; the imaginary period of this integral then gives a natural periodicity in imaginary time for the universe; following Stephen Hawking [4], [5], this periodicity may be interpreted either as giving a fundamental mass scale for the universe, or (using Planck’s constant) a fundamental temperature, or both. The precise structure that emerges suggests that the structure of time can be regarded as an order parameter arising perhaps in a phase transition in the early universe; one might hope that this structure

George Sparling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Silicon photomultiplier timing performance study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many characteristics of Silicon Photomultipliers can be tuned with temperature and operation voltage. We present preliminary results of a study of the effect of these two operation parameters on the time resolution of large active area Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) manufactured by Hamamatsu. Measurements at -10 C, 0 C, and 10 C at different bias voltages were performed. The time resolution is best at low temperature and high over-voltage. Most significant improvements can be achieved in cases with low number of fired pixels (40 pixels) the effect of temperature and operation voltage becomes smaller. The timing performance still improves with decreasing temperature (~ factor of 2) but it hardly depends on the operation voltage. The study shows, that especially in applications where only few photons are available for detection a careful optimization of temperature and operation voltage are advisable to obtain optimum timing results with the MPPC.

Gama Ahmed; Paul Bühler; Johann Marton; Ken Suzuki

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

323

A real time priority scheduler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The real time priority scheduler reported herein evolved from a design effort to provide software aids for handling the interrupts that occur in hybrid computation. Since these interrupts are both internal and external (i.e., generated internal and external ...

Karl Ramsay; Jon C. Strauss

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Time-Constrained Loop Pipelining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of Time-Constrained Loop Pipelining, i.e. given a fixed throughput, finding a schedule of a loop which minimizes resource requirements. We propose a methodology, called TCLP, based on dividing the problem into two simpler and independent tasks: retiming and scheduling. TCLP explores different sets of resources, searchingfor a maximum resource utilization. This reduces area requirements. After a minimum set of resourceshas been found, the execution throughput is increased and the number of registers required by the loop schedule is reduced. TCLP attempts to generate a schedule which minimizes cost in time and area (resources and registers). The results show that TCLP obtains optimal schedules in most cases. 1 Introduction This paper presents TCLP, a methodology to solve TimeConstrained Loop Pipelining. TCLP is NP-complete [3]. Two types of timing constraints (TCs) have been considered in the literature: local TCs to specify minimum and/or maximum TCs ...

Fermn Sanchez; Jordi Cortadella

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Discrete space-time symmetries  

SciTech Connect

Symmetries have always fascinated human beings; they are found in nature, art, and architecture. Physicists, like other scientists have often used symmetries as a basis of their understanding of nature. When the dynamics is unknown, symmetries serve to delineate and define it. When the dynamics is known, symmetries are used to study structure. These two lectures review the theory and present understanding and status of two discrete space-time symmetries,, namely parity (P) and time reversal (T).

Henley, E.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Discrete space-time symmetries  

SciTech Connect

Symmetries have always fascinated human beings; they are found in nature, art, and architecture. Physicists, like other scientists have often used symmetries as a basis of their understanding of nature. When the dynamics is unknown, symmetries serve to delineate and define it. When the dynamics is known, symmetries are used to study structure. These two lectures review the theory and present understanding and status of two discrete space-time symmetries,, namely parity (P) and time reversal (T).

Henley, E.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

Title Evaluation of Inventions- Reducing Time in a DEAR Process Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Legislative changes in the U.S. and more recently Germany, require universities and research institutes to act as entrepreneurs, something that is not necessarily in their nature. Therefore, a number of Technology Transfer Organizations or Evaluation Agencies have been established to handle the evaluation, patenting and commercialization of inventions. The process of evaluating inventions, in this thesis termed DEAR, poses two major challenges for evaluation agencies: (1) the process must be aimed at keeping the inventions that will generate revenues and filtering out those that will not; and (2) the time spent on evaluation should be kept to a minimum, but must never be reduced below the point where potential commercial successes will be lost. The purpose of this thesis is to benchmark the practices of evaluation agencies in order to establish whether time can be reduced in any part of the DEAR process and if so where. We find that there are aspects in almost every stage of the DEAR process that could be made more effective. For instance, it may be worthwhile for the German agencies to reflect on the fact that their U.S. counterparts generally seem to rely on the scientific information given in the disclosure. Also, even though valuation of inventions often becomes a case of “Garbage In – Garbage Out”, such valuation may be worthwhile for younger agencies since it may signal that the DEAR process is conducted in a thorough and accurate manner.

Stefan Kristoffersson; Mathias Jonsson Division; Stefan Kristoffersson; Mathias Jonsson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DHS National Incident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Transforming Federal Cyber Security Management June 12, 2013 1 Page 2. Outline 1. Securing .gov 2. Why CDM1? ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

330

Incident Handling at BMDO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Adverse events such as natural disasters and power ... for damage by ensuring response actions are ... We must prioritize our responses to have the ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

331

May 2008 Y-12 Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 May 2008 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editor Melissa Leinart 865-574-1621 (6ml) Associate Editors Amy Alley Heidi Spurling Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Stuart Hames Sharon McConathy Patrick McCoy I N S I D E Page 3 Fire department members come to the rescue Page 4 Driving green to protect our natural resources Page 5 73s: Best regards from Y-12's hams Page8 What's the secret? Mary Murray Brett Pate Ray Smith Donna Watson Bill Wilburn Lisa Xiques times times the B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. When you see information regarding the recent Voluntary Separation Payment

332

Tough Times for the Muskrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tough Times for the Muskrats Tough Times for the Muskrats Nature Bulletin No. 3 February 24, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation TOUGH TIMES FOR THE MUSKRATS This has been a sorry year for the muskrats. The long drought, last summer and fall, dried up many of the smaller marshes and ponds where they had been living and forced them to migrate overland to new homes. Many undoubtedly were killed while enroute by mink, hawks, or dogs. Even the larger marshes and ponds were made smaller and more shallow by the drought and now this severe winter, with its long, bitter cold, has caused many of them to freeze solid to the very bottom; thus sealing the muskrats up in their lodges and preventing them from swimming around under the ice to get food.

333

Time-Off Awards Scale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

/1/2010 /1/2010 TIME OFF AWARD SCALE The following chart is recommended and should be used unless another time-off award scale has been adopted by the servicing human resources office. TIME OFF SCALE VALUE OF THE EMPLOYEE'S CONTRIBUTION HOURS TO BE AWARDED MODERATE - A contribution to a product, program or service to the public which is of sufficient value to merit formal recognition. Beneficial change or modification of operating principles or procedures. 1 - 10 Hours SUBSTANTIAL - An important contribution to the value of a product, activity, program or service to the public. Significant change or modification or operating principles or procedures. 11 - 20 Hours HIGH - A significant contribution to the value of a product, activity, program or service to

334

Dielectric Analog Space-Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We generalize the notion of a dielectric analog Schwarzschild black hole model to analog models of arbitrary space-times; in particular, the approach is not restricted to static space-times. This is done by establishing a correspondence between electrodynamics on a curved, vacuum manifold, with electrodynamics in a general linear dielectric residing in Minkowski space-time. The mapping is not unique, allowing for some freedom in the specification of equivalent materials, which could be useful for exploiting recent developments in the production of metamaterials. Some examples are considered, with special attention paid to the dielectric analog of the exterior Kerr geometry, which is found to be reproducible with regular, linear, dielectrics.

Robert T. Thompson; Jörg Frauendiener

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

335

Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Local Incident Flux Response Expansion Transport Method for Coupling to the Diffusion Method in Cylindrical Geometry  

SciTech Connect

A local incident flux response expansion transport method is developed to generate transport solutions for coupling to diffusion theory codes regardless of their solution method (e.g., fine mesh, nodal, response based, finite element, etc.) for reactor core calculations in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cylindrical geometries. In this approach, a Monte Carlo method is first used to precompute the local transport solution (i.e., response function library) for each unique transport coarse node, in which diffusion theory is not valid due to strong transport effects. The response function library is then used to iteratively determine the albedo coefficients on the diffusion-transport interfaces, which are then used as the coupling parameters within the diffusion code. This interface coupling technique allows a seamless integration of the transport and diffusion methods. The new method retains the detailed heterogeneity of the transport nodes and naturally constructs any local solution within them by a simple superposition of local responses to all incoming fluxes from the contiguous coarse nodes. A new technique is also developed for coupling to fine-mesh diffusion methods/codes. The local transport method/module is tested in 2-D and 3-D pebble-bed reactor benchmark problems consisting of an inner reflector, an annular fuel region, and a controlled outer reflector. It is found that the results predicted by the transport module agree very well with the reference fluxes calculated directly by MCNP in both benchmark problems.

Dingkang Zhang; Farzad Rahnema; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

Creveling, R.

1959-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

Influence of time-dependent factors in the evaluation of critical infrastructure protection measures.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The examination of which protective measures are the most appropriate to be implemented in order to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from attacks on critical infrastructures and key resources typically involves a comparison of the consequences that could occur when the protective measure is implemented to those that could occur when it is not. This report describes a framework for evaluation that provides some additional capabilities for comparing optional protective measures. It illustrates some potentially important time-dependent factors, such as the implementation rate, that affect the relative pros and cons associated with widespread implementation of protective measures. It presents example results from the use of protective measures, such as detectors and pretrained responders, for an illustrative biological incident. Results show that the choice of an alternative measure can depend on whether or not policy and financial support can be maintained for extended periods of time. Choice of a time horizon greatly influences the comparison of alternatives.

Buehring, W. A.; Samsa, M. E.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety of threats that result  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Grazing incidence metal mirrors in laser-driven IFE power plants are subject to a variety [4] at UCSD, and help define design windows for the GIMM in a laser-driven IFE power plant's wave scattering theory to evaluate degradation of the beam performance. For a damaged surface

Tillack, Mark

340

130 The Journal of Ocean Technology Spindrift Copyright Journal of Ocean Technology 2012 Planning for oil spill response requires identifying key hazards that could cause an incident,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, GIS data, and personnel. It activated its Disaster Response Team to provide assistance to users and services through its disaster response web site. These included an online oil spill plume trajectory model Planning for oil spill response requires identifying key hazards that could cause an incident, an analysis

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modified Hitschfeld–Bordan Equations for Attenuation-Corrected Radar Rain Reflectivity: Application to Nonuniform Beamfilling at Off-Nadir Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As shown by Takahashi et al., multiple path attenuation estimates over the field of view of an airborne or spaceborne weather radar are feasible for off-nadir incidence angles. This follows from the fact that the surface reference technique, which ...

Robert Meneghini; Liang Liao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Time of flight mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The TESLA Time Projection Chamber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

Nabil Ghodbane

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

Waste to Energy Time Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEMINAR Waste to Energy Time Activities 9:30-9:40 Brief introduction of participants 9:40-10:10 Presentation of Dr. Kalogirou, "Waste to Energy: An Integral Part of Worldwide Sustainable Waste Management" 10. Sofia Bethanis, "Production of synthetic aggregates for use in structural concrete from waste to energy

Columbia University

345

Predictable real-time software synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formal theories for real-time systems (such as timed process algebra, timed automata and timed petri nets) have gained great success in the modeling of concurrent timing behavior and in the analysis of real-time properties. However, due to the ineliminable ... Keywords: Formal methods, Program synthesis, Real-time systems

Jinfeng Huang; Jeroen Voeten; Henk Corporaal

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Vocal Timing in the Bat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bats are social organisms that live in large colonies. However, reliance upon echolocation in order to hunt and navigate, means that bats also face pressing acoustic challenges due to overlap with surrounding noise. Bats also possess fine control over the properties of their echolocation pulses. This study's goal was to determine how bats are able to effectively function in large groups despite the interfering noise generated by conspecifics. Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) were exposed to both artificially generated interfering noises and noise generated by conspecifics, and the temporal characteristics of their resulting echolocation calls were analyzed. In addition, bats were given injections of dopaminergic and serotonergic drugs, in an effort to determine which monoamine(s) were capable of altering vocal motor timing and to determine which regions of the brain play a role in regulating the timing of echolocation. I hypothesized that bats would alter the timing of emission of their own echolocation pulses in response to noise, and that drugs affecting the 5HT2A receptor would shift the timing of emission of echolocation pulses. The first part of this dissertation describes a novel temporal alteration behavior that occurs in response to artificially generated intermittent noise, and is characterized by a period of pulse suppression followed by a gradual return to normal call rates. Bats alter the timing of emission of their echolocation pulses to avoid overlap with noise and call within silent periods. The second part of this study investigated whether dopamine or serotonin, or both, could alter the timing of this vocal behavior. The results of this study were inconclusive, although I found some evidence that 5HT2A agonists can produce faster responses. Finally, I show that echolocating bats suppress pulse emission in nearby conspecifics. The resulting decrease in call rate leads to an overall increase in information throughput. This study also demonstrates that bats respond to continuous noise by increasing their call rate, and that the switch between the responses to intermittent noise and continuous noise occurs at a duty cycle of 50% or higher. Overall, this dissertation establishes that bats alter the timing of emission of their echolocation calls in response to noise, and that these mechanisms may be regulated by serotoninergic mechanisms.

Jarvis, Jenna N

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effort, memory, attention and time : paths to more effective personal information management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the widespread availability of digital tools for storing, accessing, and sharing information, why is so much information still lost, forgotten, or kept on paper? The work in this thesis finds that such disorganization ...

Van Kleek, Max, 1980-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

High resolution time interval meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mar_13Times.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MARCH 2013 MARCH 2013 inside this issue ... FIRP draws to a close Page 2 Reminisce: Y-12 turns 70 Page 4 Russia's secret city Page 5 Development retools its CONOPS Page 6 ... and other Y-12 news Miss an issue? Find us online, http://www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php MISSION, cont. on pg. 2 The National Nuclear Security Administration's Performance Evaluation Report for B&W Y-12, released Feb. 11, gave "Very Good" ratings to B&W Y-12 in areas related to all three core missions: maintaining the nuclear weapons stockpile, powering the nuclear Navy and nonproliferation. The report evaluates B&W Y-12's performance based on the Performance Evaluation Plan approved at the beginning of fi scal 2012. Programs The Y-12 Times highlighted the success of fi

350

Time-parareal parallel in time integrator solver for time-dependent neutron diffusion equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dependent spatial flux distribution in nuclear reactor is required for nuclear safety and design. The motivation present a time-parallel algorithm that simulate the kinetic of neutron2 in a nuclear reactor. We consider engine behavior and in particular its energy4 production.5 The flux distribution on the nuclear reactor

351

Why Time is Future Oriented  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assume that the universe consists of clusters which in turns have sub-clusters and the sub-clusters have sub-subclusters and so on. Confining to three-dimensional space, it is shown that the universe is expanding if entropy of the universe increases. It is also shown that clocks slow down when time progresses towards future. Our model also justifies the big bang theory.

Shahid N. Afridi; M. Khalid Khan

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

General Interest NIST Time and Frequency Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Time and Frequency Users Manual A detailed ... Fundamentals of Time and Frequency An overview of ... Lombardi, The Mechatronics Handbook, 2001. ...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Sulfur recovery in U.S. refineries is at an all-time high  

SciTech Connect

Environmental pressures are reducing allowable sulfur emissions and tightening fuel sulfur specifications on a global basis. Combined with an increasingly sour crude slate, this means that ever-greater quantities of sulfur are recovered each year. Sulfur is produced through three main routes: Frasch mining, recovery from pyrites, and recovery from crude oil and natural gas. Sulfur recovery from US refineries reached an all-time high in 1995: 13,753 metric tons/calendar day (mt/cd). Frasch mining has lost its place as the primary source of elemental sulfur. Current demand patterns for sulfur are expected to continue through the next decade. About half of world sulfur production will be used to produce phosphatic fertilizers. The other half will be used in some 30 chemically oriented industries. The data reported in this article were collected by the US Bureau of Mines/US Geological Survey, unless otherwise noted. The paper discusses sulfur from natural gas, sulfur from refineries, sulfur prices, imports and exports.

Swain, E.J. [Swain (Edward J.), Houston, TX (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Real time infrared aerosol analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Lost Creek, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

954838°, -97.8444523° 954838°, -97.8444523° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.2954838,"lon":-97.8444523,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

Lost Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.616349°, -119.6942941° 5.616349°, -119.6942941° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.616349,"lon":-119.6942941,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

No American Miltons: Melville, Zukofsky, and America's Lost Epic Tradition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

story, the reader becomes a pilgrim confronted by text thatThe Storyteller. ? exonerates pilgrim and reader alike forit really just means that the pilgrim loses his spot on the

Wood, Timothy Clayton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

"I LOST 133 LBS.!" KimHicks|37  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JessicaBaumgardner DIET TRICKS THAT DELIVER 128 GOOD HOUSEKEEPING August 2007 PHOTOGRAPHS BY MELANIE DUNEA Kim: "I was so

Gimblett, H. Randy

359

The Lost Paradise of the Tamang shaman - Origins and Fall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wanted to be trained as a tamba by Bahadur Singh, but couldnot pay enough and returned home. Subsequently, Vishnu Tamba'sapprenticeship to his grandfather imbued him with bompo's origin myths. Heknew very well the « song of the creation of the bompo... 's hair-lock (Nep. tupi, Tam. krapi, lonbo)outside his body. After people's death, it is now the lama who extracts thesoul (semla bla) from the hair-lock, having secured it with a thread andbound it to his sceptre; but the shamans, sitting on a mat...

Steinmann, Brigitte

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

How Power is Lost: Illusions of Alliance Among the Powerful  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review, 16(3), Brass, D. J. (2002). Intraorganizational532-539. Burkhardt, M. E. , & Brass, D. J. (1990). ChangingBalkundi & Kilduff, 2005; Brass, 2002; Pfeffer, 1981)

Brion, Sebastien

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1281 C.E., under the rule of Kublai Khan, the Mongols sent a fleet of more than 4000 vessels to subjugate the island nation of Japan. A powerful typhoon, called kamikaze, dashed the invading fleet into pieces on the shores of Japan and thus saved the nation from foreign rule. Historical sources suggest there were three principal vessel types involved in this event: V-shaped cargo ships for transporting provisions to the front, constructed in China’s Fukien Province; miscellaneous flat and round bottomed vessels made along the Yangtze River; and flat bottomed landing craft from Korea. In the recent past, the remains of the fleet were discovered at the Takashima underwater site in western Japan, unveiling numerous artifacts including weaponry, shipboard items, and sections of hull; however, between 1281 and the late twentieth century the site has seen major disturbances, and the artifacts are often in poor condition. Because the site contains the remains of ships built in China and Korea, the interpretation of the artifacts is also extremely complex. In order to determine the origin of the vessels, a logical framework is necessary. The author has created a timber category database, analyzed methods of joinery, and studied contemporary approaches to shipbuilding to ascertain the origins and types of vessels that composed the Mongol fleet. Although no conclusive statements can be made regarding the origins of the vessels, it appears that historical documents and archaeological evidence correspond well to each other, and that many of the remains analyzed were from smaller vessels built along the Yangtze River Valley. Large, V-shaped cargo ships and the Korean vessels probably represent a small portion of the timbers raised at the Takashima site. As the first research project of its kind in the region, this study is a starting point for understanding the real story of the Mongol invasion of Japan, as well as the history of shipbuilding in East Asia.

Sasaki, Randall James

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The mystery of lost energy in ideal capacitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The classical two-capacitor problem shows a mysterious lose of energy even under lossless conditions and questions the basic understanding of energy relation in a capacitor. Here, we present a solution to the classical two-capacitor problem. We find that by reinterpreting the energy calculations we achieve no lose of energy thereby obeying the conservation of energy law.

James, A P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Land of Lost Lakes the 2003 Desert Symposium Field Trip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Depositional Subenvironments of Trona and Associated Lithologies in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River

de Lijser, Peter

364

How much electricity is lost in transmission and distribution in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... is electricity that is generated at facilities that is not put onto the electricity transmission and distribution grid, ... How many smart meters are installed in ...

365

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

Archer, David (University of Chicago)

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

366

Comparison of point kinetics, improved quasistatic and theta method as space-time kinetics solvers in DONJON-3 simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To ensure the safety of nuclear reactors, we have to simulate accurately their normal operation and also accident cases. To perform transient calculations, coupled neutronic and fhermo-hydraulic codes are used. This article compares three neutronic solvers. The first one is the point kinetic approach where the flux shape is constant during all the transient. For the second method (the improved quasistatic method), the flux shape is constant but only during small time steps. Finally, we used the theta approach where both flux and precursors distributions vary with time and space. Transients of Lost Of Coolant Accident in CANDU-6 reactors have been simulated with DONJON and the outputs of a thermalhydraulic system code. Results show that the point kinetics is inappropriate for transient with large distortion of the flux shape. Improved quasistatic and theta methods give relatively similar results. However, the improved quasistatic approach is less stable and a little bit more sensitive on time-step and spatial discretization than the theta method is. (authors)

Chambon, R.; Marleau, G. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, 2500 chemin de la Polytechnique, Montreal, QC H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

dec11-Times.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 December 2011 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Governance Transformation at Y-12 Page 3 Employees bring benefi ts to life Pages 4 and 5 A healthy start to 2012 Page 6 A visit from Christmas past Page 8 Have a plan - just in case B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout Lisa Harris Contributors Mary Bryant Ellen Boatner Ashley Douglas Kathy Fahey Scott Fraker John Holbrook David Keim Terry Marlar Jill McNutt

368

jul10_Times.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 July 2010 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Want to know about Y-12's budget? Read what Darrel Kohlhorst said. Page 3 Y-12 employees get a LIFE Center Pages 4 and 5 Safeguards, Security and Emergency Services' Sentinel Page 6 Employees raise money for Relay for Life Page 8 Refl ections of Y-12's history B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the Y-12 National Security Complex. A newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout Lisa Harris Contributors Mary Bryant Cynthia Ensor Ryn Etter

369

Variable residence time vortex combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

Melconian, Jerry O. (76 Beaver Rd., Reading, MA 01867)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

1. First Time Designer's Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Altera provides various tools for development of hardware and software for embedded systems. This handbook complements the primary documentation for these tools by describing how to most effectively use some of these tools. It recommends design styles and practices for developing, debugging, and optimizing embedded systems using Altera-provided tools such as the Software Build Tools for Eclipse and SOPC Builder. The handbook introduces concepts to new users of Altera’s embedded solutions, and helps to increase the design efficiency of the experienced user. This handbook is not a comprehensive reference guide. For general reference and detailed information, refer to the primary documentation cited in this handbook. This first chapter of the handbook contains information about the Altera ® embedded development process and procedures for the first time user. The remaining chapters focus on specific aspects of embedded development for Altera FPGAs. This handbook does not provide information about the Qsys system integration tool.

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients for H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} incident upon spacecraft surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients were made for gas-surface interactions between the Space Shuttle reaction control jet plume gases and the solar panel array materials to be used on the International Space Station. Actual conditions were simulated using a supersonic nozzle source to produce beams of the gases with approximately the same average velocities as the gases have in the Shuttle plumes. Samples of the actual solar panel materials were mounted on a torsion balance that was used to measure the force exerted on the surfaces by the molecular beams. Measurements were made with H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} incident upon the solar array material, Kapton, SiO{sub 2}-coated Kapton, and Z93-coated Al. The measurements showed that molecules scatter from the surfaces more specularly as the angle of incidence increases and that scattering behavior has a strong dependence upon both the incident gas and velocity. These results show that for some technical surfaces the simple assumption of diffuse scattering with complete thermal accommodation is entirely inadequate. It is clear that additional measurements are required to produce models that more accurately describe the gas-surface interactions encountered in rarefied flow regimes.

Cook, S.R.; Hoffbauer, M.A.

1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Association of Inbreeding With Lung Fibrosis Incidence in Beagle Dogs That Inhaled 238PuO2 or 239PuO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of health effects in animals after exposure to internally deposited radionuclides were intended to supplement observational studies in humans. Both nuclear workers and Beagle dogs have exhibited plutonium associated lung fibrosis; however, the dogs smaller gene pool may limit the applicability of findings to humans. Data on Beagles that inhaled either plutonium-238 dioxide (238PuO2) or plutonium-239 dioxide (239PuO2) were analyzed. Wright's Coefficient of Inbreeding was used to measure genetic or familial susceptibility and was assessed as an explanatory variable when modeling the association between lung fibrosis incidence and plutonium exposure. Lung fibrosis was diagnosed in approximately 80% of the exposed dogs compared with 23.7% of the control dogs. The maximum degree of inbreeding was 9.4%. Regardless of isotope, the addition of inbreeding significantly improved the model in female dogs but not in males. In female dogs an increased inbreeding coefficient predicted decreased hazard of a lung fibrosis diagnosis. Lung fibrosis was common in these dogs with inbreeding affecting models of lung fibrosis incidence in females but not in males. The apparent protective effect in females predicted by these models of lung fibrosis incidence is likely to be minimal given the small degree of inbreeding in these groups.

Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brigantic, Andrea M.; Morgan, William F.

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Time-Varying z-Transform for the Analysis of Discrete-Time Linear Time Periodic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article deals with a new representation of linear discrete-time periodic systems. This representation, based on the time-varying z-transform, turns out to be highly efficient in the field of automatic control, when an appropriate choice of ... Keywords: Nyquist criterion, final value theorem, initial value theorem, linear discrete-time periodic systems, time-varying z-transform, time-varying frequency response, time-varying systems

A. Garcia Iturricha; J. Sabatier; A. Oustaloup

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Towards Integrated Verification of Timed Transition Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an attempt to combine theorem proving and model-checking to formally verify real-time systems in a discrete time setting. The Timed Automata Modeling Environment (TAME) has been modified to provide a formal model for Time Transition ... Keywords: PVS, Real-time, SAL, equivalence verification, model reduction, model-checking, theorem proving

Mark Lawford; Vera Pantelic; Hong Zhang

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

User manual for Timed-CSP Simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Timed Csp Simulator is based on the presentation of Timed Csp in [4]. For a brief discussion of the tool architecture see [1, 2]. The semantical questions regarding simulating Timed Csp are discussed in [3].

Hoang Nga Nguyen; Markus Roggenbach

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Real time estimation of Bayesian networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For real time evaluation of a Bayesian network when there is not sufficient time to obtain an exact solution, a guaranteed response time, approximate solution is required. It is shown that non traditional methods utilizing estimators based on an archive ...

Robert L. Welch

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Probabilistic timing analysis on conventional cache designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic timing analysis (PTA), a promising alternative to traditional worst-case execution time (WCET) analyses, enables pairing time bounds (named probabilistic WCET or pWCET) with an exceedance probability (e.g., 10-16), resulting ...

Leonidas Kosmidis, Charlie Curtsinger, Eduardo Quiñones, Jaume Abella, Emery Berger, Francisco J. Cazorla

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

March 2009 Y-12 Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 March 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday Mary Murray W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 New UPF room is out of sight Page 3 Page 3 Training simulates terrorist attack, prepares fi rst responders Page 3 Page 3 Tanker cars on the right track Page 5 Page 5 Third-generation employee follows his father's sage advice Page 7 Page 7 Car enthusiasts go into overdrive Brett Pate Ray Smith Donna Watson Mona Wright Lisa Xiques B&W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, a partnership between Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group Inc. and Bechtel National Inc., operates the

379

Time Trends in Dutch Children's Mental Health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigated time trends in Dutch children's and adolescent's mental health problems by comparing population samples from different time periods. From 1983 to 2003,… (more)

Tick, N.T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during pulse excimer laser interaction with materials Title Nanosecond time resolved thermal emission measurements during...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for...

382

Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Undergraduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive...

383

Spatial diversity in passive time reversal communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Song et al. : Spatial diversity in passive time reversaland J. Ritcey, “Spatial diversity equalization applied toSpatial diversity in passive time reversal communications H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SU?E?I?89: Real?Time Information and Decision Support for Radiological Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Emergency response and medical preparedness for radiological incidents is one of the critical cornerstones for Homeland Security

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Timed CSP: A Retrospective Joel Ouaknine 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APC 2005 Timed CSP: A Retrospective Jo¨el Ouaknine 1 Oxford University Computing Laboratory, UK Timed CSP, from its inception nearly twenty years ago to very recent semantical and algorithmic developments. Key words: Process algebra, Timed CSP. Timed CSP was first proposed in 1986 by Reed and Roscoe

Schneider, Steve

386

A review on time series data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series is an important class of temporal data objects and it can be easily obtained from scientific and financial applications. A time series is a collection of observations made chronologically. The nature of time series data includes: large in ... Keywords: Representation, Segmentation, Similarity measure, Time series data mining, Visualization

Tak-chung Fu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Real-Time Airborne Particle Analyzer  

Geology, biology, and environmental science HAZMAT Weapons inspection : Real-time method for measuring elemental composition

388

Time Constant Estimates for Radiosonde Temperature Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To correct time lag errors in radiosonde temperatures the sensor time constant has to be known. Time constants are not published for some widely used sensors and, in some cases, available time constants disagree. This study focuses on ML-405, ML-...

Marcel E. Tschudin; Steven R. Schroeder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Multiple output timing and trigger generator  

SciTech Connect

In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

Rusthoven, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: Changhu.Chen@uchsc.edu; Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Time resolved side scatter diagnostics at NOVA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Side scattering of the radiation during the interaction of a laser beam with the long scale length plasma in hohlraum is a difficult problem of relevance to the viability of ICF. It is important to measure the absolute amount of the laser side scatter as well as the angular distribution of that scatter. The OSA diagnostics has been implemented on NOVA to measure these quantities. We have implemented a fiber-optically coupled streak camera to measure the temporally and angularly resolved side scatter radiation at 351 nm at 9 different angles. Filtered PIN diodes were positioned at 31 various angles in the E-field planed and B-field plane of the incident probe beam to sample and measure the scattered radiation at the 351 nm wavelength of the probe. The diode data was used to calibrate the Brillouin power received by the 9 strategically located fiber optic channels. This presentation will describe the OSA and associated diagnostics.

Kyrala, G.A.; Evans, S.C.; Jimerson, J.R.; Fernandez, J.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. 7 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Modeling data with multiple time dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large class of problems in time series analysis can be represented by a set of overlapping time series with different starting times. These time series may be treated as different probes of the same underlying process. Such probes may follow a characteristic ... Keywords: Dendrochronology, Douglas fir, Dual-time dynamics, El Malpais, Generalized additive models, Global climate change, Non-linear dynamics, Non-linear modeling, Pinon pine, Ponderosa pine, Portfolio forecasting, Retail lending, SETI@home, Scenario-based forecasting, Search for extraterrestrial intelligence, Time series, Tree rings

Joseph L. Breeden

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Why perform time-lapse seismic monitoring? Is it to ver-ify the reservoir model? No! We should conduct time-lapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and that this implies that oil is being lost through the spill point, never to be recovered, even if that reservoir technologies, it has evolved into a test of petrophysics and reservoir models as well. The field of most, HORACIO ACEVEDO, JOSHUA I. HAATAJA, and ANASTASIA MINAEVA, Michigan Technological University, Houghton

396

X-ray preheating of window materials in direct-drive shock-wave timing experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of x-ray preheated planar-window materials relevant for shock-wave timing experiments were studied on the OMEGA Laser System. The x-ray radiation was generated by 100 ps, 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses incident on planar plastic targets, instantaneously affecting samples located {approx}0.7 mm away. An abrupt onset of strong absorption of an optical probe beam ({lambda}=532 nm) and a temporally varying refractive index were measured in polystyrene and diamond windows. The behavior of diamond windows exposed to x rays is consistent with a simple model based on the generation of free charge carriers. Polystyrene windows showed indications of optical transitions due to molecular states that are created by the ionizing radiation.

Theobald, W.; Miller, J. E.; Boehly, T. R.; Vianello, E.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Eggert, J.; Celliers, P. M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Light incoherence theory revisited by Heisenberg time-energy uncertainty challenges solar cell optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of the efficiency of solar cells is a major challenge for renewable energies. Using a rigorous theoretical approach, we show that the photocurrent generated in a solar cell depends strongly on the degree of coherence of the incident light. In accordance with Heisenberg uncertainty time-energy, incoherent light at photons of carrier energy lower than the active material bandgap can be absorbed whereas coherent light at the same carrier energy cannot. We identify cases where incoherence does enhance efficiency. This result has a dramatical impact on the way solar cells must be optimized regarding sunlight. As an illustration, surface-corrugated GaAs and c-Si thin-film solar cells are considered.

Herman, Aline; Deparis, Olivier

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NIST Summer Institute for Middle School Science Teachers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... an incident in her classroom with a student who lost consciousness during a ... to learn about the use of DNA in forensics for human identification with ...

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

399

Protection of People | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

incidence rates and lost workdays rates are about one-third of these rates for general industry. Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Facebook Twitter Youtube...

400

Development of a hybrid intelligent system for on-line real-time monitoring of nuclear power plant operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant (NPP) has an intricate operational domain involving systems, structures and components (SSCs) that vary in scale and complexity. Many of the large scale SSCs contribute to the lost availability in the ...

Yildiz, Bilge, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A stochastic model of radiation carcinogenesis: Latent time distributions and their properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model of radiation carcinogenesis is proposed that has much in common with the ideas suggested by M. Pike as early as 1966. The model allows one to obtain a parametric family of substochastic-type distributions for the time of tumor latency that provides a description of the rate of tumor development and the number of affected individuals. With this model it is possible to interpret data on tumor incidence in terms of promotion and progression processes. The basic model is developed for a prolonged irradiation at a constant dose rate and includes short-term irradiation as a special case. A limiting form of the latent time distribution for short-term irradiation at high doses is obtained. This distribution arises in the extreme value theory within the random minima framework. An estimate for the rate of convergence to a limiting distributions is given. Based on the proposed latent time distributions, long-term predictions of carcinogenic risk do not call for information about irradiation dose. As shown by computer simulation studies and real data analysis, the parametric estimation of carcinogenic risk appears to be robust to the loss of statistical information caused by the right-hand censoring of time-to-tumor observations. It seems likely that this property, although revealed by means of a purely empirical procedure, may be useful in selecting a model for the practical purpose of risk prediction. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Klebanov, L.V.; Yakovlev, A.Yu. (St. Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)); Rachev, S.T. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Apply for Beam Time | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for Beam Time Apply for Beam Time NEXT PROPOSAL DEADLINE: March 7, 2014 @ 11:59 PM (Chicago time) Submit Proposal » SEE ALSO: Calendar: deadlines, run & review dates Help Page: frequently asked questions, tips for success, common errors, blank forms, instructions Review Criteria Sectors Directory: check CAT websites for info about managed beam time The Run 2014-2 proposal submission deadline is 11:59 p.m. (Chicago time) March 7, 2014. The system will open to accept proposals beginning December 20, 2013. NEW USERS: to avoid delays and to make the most of your time on site, read Become a User. You must register as a user and receive a badge number before submitting a proposal. About the Beam Time Request Process All beam time at the APS must be requested each cycle through the web-based

403

Climatological Time Series with Periodic Correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many climatological time series display a periodic correlation structure. This paper examines three issues encountered when analyzing such time series: detection of periodic correlation, modeling periodic correlation, and trend estimation under ...

Robert Lund; Harry Hurd; Peter Bloomfield; Richard Smith

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Statistical Timing Analysis using Levelized Covariance Propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability in process parameters is making accurate timing analysis of nano-scale integrated circuits an extremely challenging task. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for statistical timing analysis using Levelized Covariance Propagation (LCP). ...

Kunhyuk Kang; Bipul C. Paul; Kaushik Roy

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Statistical characterization of library timing performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the scaling of technology, the variability of timing performances of digital circuits is increasing. In this paper, we propose a first order analytical modeling of the standard deviations of basic CMOS cell timings. The proposed model is then used ...

V. Migairou; R. Wilson; S. Engels; N. Azemard; P. Maurine

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment...

407

Space does not exist, so time can  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is often said that in general relativity time does not exist. This is because the Einstein equations generate motion in time that is a symmetry of the theory, not true time evolution. In quantum gravity, the timelessness of general relativity clashes with time in quantum theory and leads to the ``problem of time'' which, in its various forms, is the main obstacle to a successful quantum theory of gravity. I argue that the problem of time is a paradox, stemming from an unstated faulty premise. Our faulty assumption is that space is real. I propose that what does not fundamentally exist is not time but space, geometry and gravity. The quantum theory of gravity will be spaceless, not timeless. If we are willing to throw out space, we can keep time and the trade is worth it.

Fotini Markopoulou

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Phoenix: an epidemic approach to time reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harsh deployment environments and uncertain run-time conditions create numerous challenges for postmortem time reconstruction methods. For example, motes often reboot and thus lose their clock state, considering that the majority of mote platforms lack ...

Jayant Gupchup; Douglas Carlson; R?zvan Mus?loiu-E.; Alex Szalay; Andreas Terzis

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Precision Timing for Smart Grid Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... how new features and requirements for time synchronization can impact the performance of next-generation power distribution applications. ...

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Scalable Time Warp on Blue Gene Supercomputers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n this paper we illustrate scalable parallel performance for the TimeWarp synchronization protocol on the L and P variants of the IBM BlueGene supercomputer. Scalable Time Warp performance for models that communicate a large percentage of the event population ... Keywords: Time Warp, Blue Gene Supercomputer

David W. Bauer Jr.; Christopher D. Carothers; Akintayo Holder

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development of earthquake early warning system using real time signal of broadband seismogram  

SciTech Connect

Earthquake pose serious threat of live and properties for urban area near subduction zone offshore and active fault on land. Jakarta and Bandung is an example of big city that no system of Earthquake early warning (EEW) event very high urbanization, and has many important infra structure in the area. The capital city is potentially high risk ground shaking. EEW can be usefull tool for reducing earthquake hazard, if spatial relation between cities and earthquake source is favorable for such warning and their citizens are properly trained to response early warning message. An EEW and rapid response system can provide the critical information needed to minimized lost of live and property and direct rescue. Earthquake ground shaking with magnitude M>6.0 from zone of Megathrust, southern of West Java should potentially damage in the area of west java especially Bandung and Jakarta City. This research development of EEW parameter such as amplitude displacement (Pd), rapid magnitude determination (M) and Peak ground Velocity (PGV). We explore the practical approach to EEW with the use of Broadband seismogram signal. Time effective EEW which epicenter from megathrust zone has potential to provide EEW in the area of west java such as Jakarta first ground shaking more or less 60 second later and strong shaking 118 second after EEW Alarm on CISI Station. EEW notification at potentially damage in the area of west java can be predicted from the characteristic of Pd > 0.5 cm, M> 6 and PGV > 10 cm/sec. GIS as a tool for presentation of hazard mapping in the affected area.

Gunawan, Hendar; Puspito, Nanang T.; Ibrahim, Gunawan; Harjadi, Prih [Badan Meteorologi Klimatologi dan Geofisika, Jl. Angkasa I No 2 Jakarta 10720 Indonesia Institut Technologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

Method for long time scale simulations of solids: Application to crystal growth and dopant clustering  

SciTech Connect

An important challenge in theoretical chemistry is the time scale problem. Atomic motion can be simulated directly by integrating Newton's equations over a time scale of nanoseconds, but most interesting chemical reactions take place on a time scale of seconds. We have developed a methodology to bridge this time scale gap using harmonic transition state theory suitable for solid systems. Possible reactive events and their rates are found with a saddle point finding method called the dimer method. When enough events are found, a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm is used to choose which event occurs so that the system's position can be advanced in time. This technique has two major advantages over traditional kinetic Monte Carlo -- atoms do not have to map onto lattice sites for classification and kinetic events can be arbitrarily complicated. We have studied the homoepitaxial growth of aluminum and copper using an EAM potential at 80K with experimentally relevant deposition rates of monolayers per minute using a multiple time scale approach. Atomic deposition events are simulated directly with classical dynamics for several picoseconds until the incident energy has dissipated, and the long time between deposition events is simulated with the adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method. Our simulations indicate that the Al( 100) surface grows much smoother then Cu( 100) at temperature between 0 and 80K due in part to long range multi atom processes which enable aluminum atoms to easily descend from atop islands. The high rate of such processes is due to their low activation energy, which is supported by density functional theory calculations, and the trend that processes involving more atoms tend to have larger prefactors and be favored by entropy. The scheme is efficient enough to model the evolution of systems with ab-initio forces as well, for which I will show an example of the breakup of dopant clusters in silicon.

Henkelman, G. A. (Graeme A.); Uberuaga, B. P. (Blas Pedro); Jónsson, Hannes,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Time-of-flight radio location system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bi-static radar configuration measures the direct time-of-flight of a transmitted RF pulse and is capable of measuring this time-of-flight with a jitter on the order of about one pico-second, or about 0.01 inch of free space distance for an electromagnetic pulse over a range of about one to ten feet. A transmitter transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal, and a receiver samples the sequence of electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing in response to a receive timing signal, and generates a sample signal in response to the samples. A timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the sequence of electromagnetic pulses such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence and sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The receive timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that pulses in the sequence are sampled at the pulse repetition rate, and with different delays in the range of delays to produce a sample signal representing magnitude of a received pulse in equivalent time. Automatic gain control circuitry in the receiver controls the magnitude of the equivalent time sample signal. A signal processor analyzes the sample signal to indicate the time-of-flight of the electromagnetic pulses in the sequence. The sample signal in equivalent time is passed through an envelope detection circuit, formed of an absolute value circuit followed by a low pass filter, to convert the sample signal to a unipolar signal to eliminate effects of antenna misorientation. 8 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

High-Level Real-Time Concurrency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of all real-time systems is predictability. Achieving this goal requires all levels of the system to be well de ned and have a xed worst-case execution time. These needs have resulted in the creation of overly restrictive commercial real-time systems providing only ad-hoc scheduling facilities and basic concurrent functionality. Ad-hoc scheduling makes developing, verifying, and maintaining a real-time system extremely dicult and time consuming. Basic concurrent functionality forces programmers to develop complex concurrent programs without the aid of high-level concurrency features.

Ashif S. Harji; C Ashif S. Harji

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Author's personal copy The time dependent vehicle routing problem with time windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy The time dependent vehicle routing problem with time windows: Benchmark routing problems with hard or soft time windows without any alteration in its structure is presented of congested urban settings are proposed. Solution quality, time window pertur- bations, and computational time

Bertini, Robert L.

417

Time-Energy Measure for Quantum Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum mechanics sets limits on how fast quantum processes can run given some system energy through time-energy uncertainty relations, and they imply that time and energy are tradeoff against each other. Thus, we propose to measure the time-energy as a single unit for quantum channels. We consider a time-energy measure for quantum channels and compute lower and upper bounds of it using the channel Kraus operators. For a special class of channels (which includes the depolarizing channel), we can obtain the exact value of the time-energy measure. One consequence of our result is that erasing quantum information requires $\\sqrt{(n+1)/n}$ times more time-energy resource than erasing classical information, where $n$ is the system dimension.

Chi-Hang Fred Fung; H. F. Chau

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Health Services and Outcomes Research Reduction in the Incidence of Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated With a Citywide Smoking Ordinance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background—Secondhand smoke exposure increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). One study (Helena, Mont) examined the issue and found a decrease in AMI associated with a smoke-free ordinance. We sought to determine the impact of a smoke-free ordinance on AMI admission rates in another geographically isolated community (Pueblo, Colo). Methods and Results—We assessed AMI hospitalizations in Pueblo during a 3-year period, 1.5 years before and 1.5 years after implementation of a smoke-free ordinance. We compared the AMI hospitalization rates among individuals residing within city limits, the area where the ordinance applied, versus those outside city limits. We also compared AMI rates during this time period with another geographically isolated but proximal community, El Paso County, Colo, that did not have an ordinance. A total of 855 patients were hospitalized with a diagnosis of primary AMI in Pueblo between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2004. A reduction in AMI hospitalizations was observed in the period after the ordinance among Pueblo city limit residents (relative risk [RR]?0.73, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.63 to 0.85). No significant changes in AMI rates were observed among residents outside city limits (RR?0.85, 95 % CI 0.63 to 1.16) or in El Paso County during the same period (RR?0.97, 95 % CI 0.89 to 1.06). The reduction in AMI rate within Pueblo differed significantly from changes in the external control group (El Paso County) even after adjustment for seasonal trends (P?0.001).

Carl Bartecchi; Md Robert; N. Alsever; Md Christine Nevin-woods; Mph William; M. Thomas; Raymond O. Estacio; Md Becki; Bucher Bartelson; Phd Mori; J. Krantz

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Quantitative effect of combined chemotherapy and fractionated radiotherapy on the incidence of radiation-induced lung damage: A prospective clinical study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to assess the incidence of radiological changes compatible with radiation-induced lung damage as determined by computed tomography (CT), and subsequently calculate the dose effect factors (DEF) for specified chemotherapeutic regimens. Radiation treatments were administered once daily, 5 days-per-week. Six clinical protocols were evaluated: ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and DTIC) followed by 35 Gy in 20 fractions; MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) followed by 35 Gy in 20; MOPP/ABVD followed by 35 Gy in 20; CAV (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and vincristine) followed by 25 Gy in 10; and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) concurrent with either 50-52 Gy in 20-21 or 30-36 Gy in 10-15 fractions. CT examinations were taken before and at predetermined intervals following radiotherapy. CT evidence for the development of radiation-induced damage was defined as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume. The radiation dose to lung was calculated using a CT-based algorithm to account for tissue inhomogeneities. Different fractionation schedules were converted using two isoeffect models, the estimated single dose (ED) and the normalized total dose (NTD). The actuarial incidence of radiological pneumonitis was 71% for the ABVD, 49% for MOPP, 52% for MOPP/ABVD, 67% for CAV, 73% for 5-FU radical, and 58% for 5-FU palliative protocols. Depending on the isoeffect model selected and the method of analysis, the DEF was 1.11-1.14 for the ABVD, 0.96-0.97 for the MOPP, 0.96-1.02 for the MOPP/ABVD, 1.03-1.10 for the CAV, 0.74-0.79 for the 5-FU radical, and 0.94 for the 5-FU palliative protocols. DEF were measured by comparing the incidence of CT-observed lung damage in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy to those receiving radiotherapy alone. The addition of ABVD or CAV appeared to reduce the tolerance of lung to radiation. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Mah, K.; Van Dyk, J.; Braban, L.E.; Hao, Y.; Keane, T.J. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Poon, P.Y. (Univ. of British Columbia (Canada))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Average Predictability Time. Part II: Seamless Diagnoses of Predictability on Multiple Time Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new method for diagnosing predictability on multiple time scales without time averaging. The method finds components that maximize the average predictability time (APT) of a system, where APT is defined as the integral of ...

Timothy DelSole; Michael K. Tippett

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

JAVA & Parallelism/Real-time systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windowing Toolkit (AWT) in a memory-efficient way. JAVA Application Environment (JAE) Support enables the same applets and applications to run on other servers or platforms running the JAVA Virtual Machine. CHAPTER 2 Embedded and Real-Time JAVA According to the designers at Sun Microsystems, is JAVA also suitable for Embedded or Real-Time systems. Before proceeding further it is worth trying to define the phrase `real-time system' more precisely. 2.1 Definition of a real-time system There are many interpretations of the exact nature of a real-time system; however, they all have in common the notion of response time, the time taken for the system to generate output from some associated input. The Oxford Dictionary of Computing [48] gives the following definition of a real-time system. A real-time system is... Any system in which the time at which output is produced is significant. This is usually because the input corresponds to some movement in the physical world, and the output ha...

D. F. Nooren

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Property:Event/Time | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Time Time Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Event/Time Property Type String Description The time an event occurs. For events which span an entire day, please use 'All Day'. When entering a specific time, please be sure to include the timezone information, for example: '2:45 PM MDT' or '10:00 AM GST'. Pages using the property "Event/Time" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A April Fool's Day + All Day + B Blane Harvey co-facilitating a session on use of climate decision making tools with CARE and Tearfund + 13:00-14:00 + Blane Harvey facilitating a lunchtime session on Indigenous Knowledge and Adaptation + 13:00-14:00 + Blane Harvey facilitating a lunchtime session on knowledge platforms and online communities of practice + 13:00-14:00 +

423

Time and Tide Wait for No Diagram  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time plays an important role in some application domains, and can be quite difficult to deal with in diagrams. This is not only true for temporal uncertainty, but also for periodic events. We compare nine different representations that include a notion of time or that are mainly used for temporal information: Time Lines/LifeLines, AsbruView, Gantt- and PERT-Charts, Shinkansen timetables, Temporal Objects, Sets of Possible Occurrences (SOPOs), the Time Cube and Concentric Circles. Features of the different methods are presented and compared to other representations. This paper is meant to help the designer of a diagram or visualization who has to deal with time get an overview over different design ideas, and maybe get an inspiration for their own ideas. Keywords Information Visualization, Time in Problem Solving Methods, Knowledge Acquisition, Knowledge Engineering and Modeling Methodologies

Robert Kosara; Peter Messner; Silvia Miksch

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Time dependence of liquid-helium fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluorescence following an ionizing radiation event in liquid helium is observed and studied in the temperature range from 250 mK to 1.8 K. The fluorescence exhibits significant structure including a short ({approx}10 ns) strong initial pulse followed by single photons whose emission rate decays exponentially with a 1.6-{mu}s time constant. At an even longer time scale, the emission rate varies as '1/time' (inversely proportional to the time after the initial pulse). The intensity of the '1/time' component from {beta} particles is significantly weaker than those from {alpha} particles or neutron capture on {sup 3}He. It is also found that for {alpha} particles, the intensity of this component depends on the temperature of the superfluid helium. Proposed models describing the observed fluorescence are discussed.

McKinsey, D.N.; Brome, C.R.; Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; Yang, L.; Doyle, J.M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golub, R.; Habicht, K.; Korobkina, E. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin-Wannsee (Germany); Huffman, P.R.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lamoreaux, S.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Tests of timing properties of silicon photomultipliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timing measurements of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) [1] and [2] at the picosecond level were performed at Fermilab. The core timing resolution of the electronic measurement technique is approximately 2 ps. The single photoelectron time resolution (SPTR) was measured for the signals coming from the SiPM's. A SPTR of about one hundred picoseconds was obtained for SiPM's illuminated by laser pulses. The dependence of the SPTR on applied bias voltage and on the wavelength of the light was measured. A simple model is proposed to explain the difference in the SPTR for blue and red light. A time of flight system based on the SiPM's, with quartz Cherenkov radiators, was tested in a proton beam at Fermilab. The time resolution obtained is 35 ps per SiPM. Finally, requirements for the SiPM's temperature and bias voltage stability to maintain the time resolution are discussed.

Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Byrum, K.; /Argonne; Demarteau, M.; Los, S.; /Fermilab; May, E.; /Argonne; Ramberg, A.; /Fermilab; Va'vra, J.; /SLAC; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reactor control rod timing system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid driven jet-edge whistle timing system is described for control rods of a nuclear reactor for producing real-time detection of the timing of each control rod in its scram operation. An important parameter in reactor safety, particularly for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), is the time deviation between the time the control rod is released and the time the rod actually reaches the down position. The whistle has a nearly pure tone signal with center frequency (above 100 kHz) far above the frequency band in which the energy of the background noise is concentrated. Each control rod can be fitted with a whistle with a different frequency so that there is no ambiguity in differentiating the signal from each control rod.

Wu, P.T.K.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

427

Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.  

SciTech Connect

We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Significant factors in rail freight accidents: A statistical analysis of predictive and severity indices in the FRA accident/incident data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Railroad Association maintains a file of carrier-reported accidents and incidents that meet threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. Using a five year period from this data base, an investigation was conducted into the relationship between quantifiable risk factors and accident frequency and severity. Specific objectives were to identify key variables in accidents, formulate a model to predict future accidents, and assess the relative importance of these variables from the perspective of routing and shipping decision making. The temporal factors YEAR and MONTH were found to be significant predictors of risk; accident severity was greatest for accidents caused by track and roadbed defects. Train speed was an indicator of accident severity; track class and training tonnage were inversely proportional to accident severity. Investigation of the data base is continuing, with a final report expected by late summer. 15 refs., 1 fig., 10 tabs.

Lee, Tze-San; Saricks, C.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Bell's Jump Process in Discrete Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The jump process introduced by J. S. Bell in 1986, for defining a quantum field theory without observers, presupposes that space is discrete whereas time is continuous. In this letter, our interest is to find an analogous process in discrete time. We argue that a genuine analog does not exist, but provide examples of processes in discrete time that could be used as a replacement.

Jonathan Barrett; Matthew Leifer; Roderich Tumulka

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

430

Time-parallel multiscale/multiphysics framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the time-parallel compound wavelet matrix method (tpCWM) for modeling the temporal evolution of multiscale and multiphysics systems. The method couples time parallel (TP) and CWM methods operating at different spatial and temporal scales. ... Keywords: 02.00.00, 02.10.Jf, 05.10.-a, 46.15.-x, 47.70.Fw, Parallel-in-time, Wavelet-based multiscaling

G. Frantziskonis; K. Muralidharan; P. Deymier; S. Simunovic; P. Nukala; S. Pannala

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Runtime Monitoring of Timing Constraints in Distributed Real-Time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Embedded real-time systems often operate under strict timing and dependability constraints. To ensure responsiveness, these systems must be able to provide the expected services in a timely manner even in the presence of faults. In this paper, we describe a run-time environment for monitoring of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems. In particular, we focus on the problem of detecting violations of timing assertions in an environment in which the real-time tasks run on multiple processors, and timing constraints can be either inter-processor or intra-processor constraints. Constraint violations are detected at the earliest possible time by deriving and checking intermediate constraints from the user-specified constraints. If the violations must be detected as early as possible, then the problem of minimizing the number of messages to be exchanged between the processors becomes intractable. We characterize a sub-class of timing constraints that occur commonly in distribu...

Farnam Jahanian; Ragunathan Rajkumar; Sitaram C. V. Raju

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Construction Timing and Expectations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Timing and Expectations Construction Timing and Expectations Construction Timing and Expectations October 16, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Creating a detailed construction schedule that allows all the project elements to be coordinated in a timely manner is fundamental to any successful construction project. The construction schedule should take into account that many tasks cannot be started before others are finished. It should also account for special schedule considerations related to renewable energy systems. Key elements of most new construction or major renovation projects include landscape, structural, architectural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, communication systems, and renewable energy systems. Maintaining the highest quality of construction across all elements is fundamental to any

433

Sponsors : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchindex.html In-kind cost-share The New York Times Company Advance Transformer Co. Lutron Electronics, Inc. MechoShade Systems, Inc. Siemens Building...

434

Special education teachers' personal time and money.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Because of state and federal budget deficits. teachers are using thcir own time and rnoney to meet student nceds. This research seeks to determine the… (more)

Tewalt, Brandon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Real Time Grid Reliability Management 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Research Energy Systems Integration Real Time2) integration with CA ISO energy management system (EMS);2) integration with CA ISO energy management system (EMS);

Eto, Joe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

NIST Time Measurement and Analysis Service (TMAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Analysis Service (TMAS) was designed to assist ... and calibrated time measurement system which includes ... easy-to-read instruction manual makes ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

SIM Time and Frequency Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SIM Time and Frequency Metrology Course at INTI. Buenos Aires, Argentina (February 4th through February 7th, 2008). Schedule in PDF format. ...

438

SIM Time and Frequency Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... file). Schedule and Slides from Time and Frequency Metrology Course in Buenos Aires, Argentina (2/4/08 to 02/07/08). Schedule ...

439

Time fractional development of quantum systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of time fractionalization on the development of quantum systems is taken under consideration by making use of fractional calculus. In this context, a Mittag-Leffler function is introduced as an important mathematical tool in the generalization of the evolution operator. In order to investigate the time fractional evolution of the quantum (nano) systems, time fractional forms of motion are obtained for a Schroedinger equation and a Heisenberg equation. As an application of the concomitant formalism, the wave functions, energy eigenvalues, and probability densities of the potential well and harmonic oscillator are time fractionally obtained via the fractional derivative order {alpha}, which is a measure of the fractality of time. In the case {alpha}=1, where time becomes homogenous and continuous, traditional physical conclusions are recovered. Since energy and time are conjugate to each other, the fractional derivative order {alpha} is relevant to time. It is understood that the fractionalization of time gives rise to energy fluctuations of the quantum (nano) systems.

Ertik, Hueseyin; Demirhan, Dogan; Sirin, Hueseyin; Bueyuekkilic, Fevzi [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

A misuse of time and energy .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this exegesis, A Misuse of Time and Energy, I set out a contextual framework for my practice-based sculptural project. I consider two flawed and… (more)

Blackburn, Nikolas Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NIST Time and Frequency Division 1993 - Technical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... can be reached with commercial red diode ... the time scale when building and remodelling ... American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. ...

442

Commuting time geometry of ergodic Markov chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how to map the states of an ergodic Markov chain to Euclidean space so that the squared distance between states is the expected commuting time. We find a minimax characterization of commuting times, and from this we get monotonicity of commuting times with respect to equilibrium transition rates. All of these results are familiar in the case of time-reversible chains, where techniques of classical electrical theory apply. In presenting these results, we take the opportunity to develop Markov chain theory in a `conformally correct' way

Doyle, Peter G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Meykhana - The poetics of time and space.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Right before the rhythmic, improvisational and poetic genre called meykhana was forbidden to practice in Soviet Azerbaijan, it bloomed for a short time in the… (more)

Zakariyya, Zulaim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

'Dead Time' Limits Quantum Cryptography Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Not only does dead time limit the transmission rate of a message ... effects and paralyzability in high-speed quantum key distribution, New Journal of ...

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

Time Series Prediction Forecasting the Future and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time Series Prediction Forecasting the Future and Understanding the Past Santa Fe Institute Proceedings on the Studies in the Sciences of ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

NIST Time and Frequency Division History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of accurate measurements of mean solar time (from ... needs of the broadcast industry, NIST initiated ... Concurrent with the development of more recent ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

447

TIME REVERSAL ACOUSTIC NONCONTACT SOURCE - Energy Innovation ...  

The present invention provides a flexible noncontact source of wave energy through the use of time reversal. In the preferred embodiment a ...

448

Multiplicative cascades and seismicity in natural time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural time chi enables the distinction of two origins of self-similarity, i.e., the process memory and the process increments infinite variance. Employing multiplicative cascades in natural time, the most probable value of the variance kappa{sub 1}(ident to-{sup 2}) is explicitly related with the parameter b of the Gutenberg-Richter law of randomly shuffled earthquake data. Moreover, the existence of temporal and magnitude correlations is studied in the original earthquake data. Magnitude correlations are larger for closer in time earthquakes, when the maximum interoccurrence time varies from half a day to 1 min.

Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Varotsos, P. A. [Department of Physics, Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens (Greece)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Four Time Periods - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... we will be seeing a downward trend in differentials as time moves on. We expect the recent upturn in the light-heavy differentials to be ...

450

Publishers of Time and Frequency Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 Ace Software, X, Windows. Acrovista, X, Windows. Apple Computer, X, Macintosh. Atom Time, X, Windows. Beagle Software, X, X, Windows. ...

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

451

Time synchronization for underwater acoustic sensor networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The unique properties of underwater acoustic communications, such as large and time-varying propagation, low and range dependent bandwidth, and adverse operating environment make the synchronization… (more)

Khandoker, Tarik-Ul Islam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nordic Journal of Computing 10(2003), 135. TIMED CSP = CLOSED TIMED -AUTOMATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nordic Journal of Computing 10(2003), 1­35. TIMED CSP = CLOSED TIMED -AUTOMATA JO¨EL OUAKNINE CSP which significantly increase expressiveness. As a result, we are able to capture some of the most of the finite-state fragment of this augmented version of Timed CSP as that of closed timed -automata

Ouaknine, Joël

453

Nordic Journal of Computing 10(2003), 1--35. TIMED CSP = CLOSED TIMED #AUTOMATA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nordic Journal of Computing 10(2003), 1--35. TIMED CSP = CLOSED TIMED #­AUTOMATA JO Ë? EL OUAKNINE CSP which significantly increase expressiveness. As a result, we are able to capture some of the most of the finite­state fragment of this augmented version of Timed CSP as that of closed timed #­automata

Ouaknine, Joël

454

Continuous-time nonlinear model predictive control of time-delayed Wiener-type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a novel method of continuous-time model predictive control for nonlinear time-delayed systems. The problems regarding time delays are solved by incorporating delayed and undelayed model outputs in the control-law derivation. Nonlinear-mapping ... Keywords: Wiener-type model, continuous system, nonlinear predictive control, time-delayed system

Simon Oblak; Igor Škrjanc

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Fractal analysis of time varying data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Characteristics of time varying data, such as an electrical signal, are analyzed by converting the data from a temporal domain into a spatial domain pattern. Fractal analysis is performed on the spatial domain pattern, thereby producing a fractal dimension D.sub.F. The fractal dimension indicates the regularity of the time varying data.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Sadana, Ajit (Oxford, MS)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Iterative Time Reversal with Tunable Convergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose and test an iterative technique for improving the temporal focusing of a time reversal mirror. A single amplification parameter is introduced to tune the convergence of the iteration. The tunable iterative technique is validated by tests on an experimental electromagnetic time reversal mirror, as well as on a novel numerical model.

Biniyam Tesfaye Taddese; Thomas M. Antonsen; Edward Ott; Steven M. Anlage

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated.

Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Ng, Esmond G. (Concord, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Gravity in Complex Hermitian Space-Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized theory unifying gravity with electromagnetism was proposed by Einstein in 1945. He considered a Hermitian metric on a real space-time. In this work we review Einstein's idea and generalize it further to consider gravity in a complex Hermitian space-time.

Ali H. Chamseddine

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

459

Real-time var control by SCADA  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the operation and advantages of the SCADA capacitor control called CAPCON, developed by the Virginia Electric and Power Company (Virginia Power). CAPCON is used to control vars system-wide by switching substation capacitor banks based on real-time var and voltage data instead of the traditional time clock method.

Girotti, T.B.; Tweed, N.B.; Houser, N.R. (Virginia Power Co., Richmond, VA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Practical reporting times for environmental samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost time incident" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Predicting time series with advanced hybrid systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autogressive moving average (ARMA) has been widely used to model processes that generate linear time-series. Recent research activities in forecasting with artificial neutral networks (ANNs) suggest that ANNs can be a promising alternative to the traditional ... Keywords: ARMA models, fuzzy system, hybrid system, neutral networks, time series

O. Valenzuela; I. Rojas; F. Rojas; H. Pomares; J. Gonzalez; L. J. Herrera; A. Guillen

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Is the notion of time really fundamental?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the Physics point of view, time is now best described through General Relativity, as part of space-time which is a dynamical object encoding gravity. Time possesses also some intrinsic irreversibility due to thermodynamics, quantum mechanical effects... This irreversibility can look puzzling since time-like loops (and hence time machines) can appear in General Relativity (for example in the Goedel universe, a solution of Einstein's equations). We take this apparent discrepancy as a warning bell pointing to us that time as we understand it, might not be fundamental and that whatever theory, lying beyond General Relativity, may not include time as we know it as a fundamental structure. We propose therefore, following the philosophy of analog models of gravity, that time and gravity might not be fundamental per se, but only emergent features. We illustrate our proposal using a toy-model where we show how the Lorentzian signature and Nordstroem gravity (a diffeomorphisms invariant scalar gravity theory) can emerge from a timeless non-dynamical space.

Florian Girelli; Stefano Liberati; Lorenzo Sindoni

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

463

Airport Gate Scheduling with Time Windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to the existing airport gate assignment studies where flight have fixed schedules, we consider the more realistic situation where flight arrival and departure times can change. Although we minimize walking distances (or travel time) in our ... Keywords: aircraft gate scheduling, memetic algorithm, tabu search

A. Lim; B. Rodrigues; Y. Zhu

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Time series forecasting with Qubit Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a quantum learning scheme approach for time series forecasting, through the application of the new non-standard Qubit Neural Network (QNN) model. The QNN description was adapted in this work in order to resemble classical Artificial ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, artificial neural networks, quantum computing, qubit neural networks, time series forecasting

Carlos R. B. Azevedo; Tiago A. E. Ferreira

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Computing Needs Time Edward A. Lee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Toyota. #12;Computing Needs Time Edward A. Lee UC Berkeley eal@eecs.berkeley.edu February 18, 2009, and Toyota. 1 #12;E. A. Lee, Berkeley Computing Needs Time "It seems to have a computer; need I say more."1

466

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

SciTech Connect

EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

467

Integrated method for chaotic time series analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting differences between similar but different states in a nonlinear process monitor nonlinear data are disclosed. Steps include: acquiring the data; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; and determining by comparison whether differences between similar but different states are indicated. 8 figs.

Hively, L.M.; Ng, E.G.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

468

FAST: Frequency-aware static timing analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is a valuable resource in embedded systems as the lifetime of many such systems is constrained by their battery capacity. Recent advances in processor design have added support for dynamic frequency/voltage scaling (DVS) for saving energy. Recent ... Keywords: Real-time systems, dynamic voltage scaling, scheduling, worst-case execution time analysis

Kiran Seth; Aravindh Anantaraman; Frank Mueller; Eric Rotenberg

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469