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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Metal-doped organic foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

Rinde, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (? 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS] [CanmetMATERIALS; Griffin, John A. [University of Alabama - Birmingham] [University of Alabama - Birmingham

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Final Technical Report Quantification and Standardization of Pattern Properties for the Control of the Lost Foam Casting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project takes a fresh look at the ''white side'' of the lost foam casting process. We have developed the gel front hypothesis for foam pyrolysis behavior and the magnetic metal pump method for controlling lost foam casting metal fill event. The subject of this report is work done in the improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process. The original objective of this project was to improve the control of metal fill by understanding the influence of foam pattern and coating properties on the metal fill event. Relevant pattern properties could then be controlled, providing control of the metal fill event. One of the original premises of this project was that the process of metal fill was relatively well understood. Considerable previous work had been done to develop fluid mechanical and heat transfer models of the process. If we could just incorporate measured pattern properties into these models we would be able predict accurately the metal fill event. As we began to study the pyrolysis behavior of EPS during the metal fill event, we discovered that the chemical nature of this event had been completely overlooked in previous research. Styrene is the most prevalent breakdown product of EPS pyrolysis and it is a solvent for polystyrene. Much of the styrene generated by foam pyrolysis diffuses into intact foam, producing a molten gel of mechanically entangled polystyrene molecules. Much of the work of our project has centered on validation of this concept and producing a qualitative model of the behavior of EPS foam undergoing pyrolysis in a confined environment. A conclusion of this report is that styrene dissolution in EPS is a key phenomenon in the pyrolysis process and deserves considerable further study. While it is possible to continue to model the metal fill event parametrically using empirical data, we recommend that work be undertaken by qualified researchers to directly characterize and quantify this phenomenon for the benefit of modelers, researchers, and workers in the field. Another original premise of this project was that foam pattern and coating properties could be used to efficiently control metal fill. After studying the structure of EPS foam in detail for the period of this contract, we have come to the conclusion that EPS foam has an inherent variability at a scale that influences metal fill behavior. This does not allow for the detailed fine control of the process that we originally envisioned. We therefore have sought other methods for the control of the metal fill event. Of those, we now believe that the magnetic metal pump shows the most promise. We have conducted two casting trials using this method and preliminary results are very encouraging. A conclusion of our report is that, while every effort should continue to be made to produce uniform foam and coatings, the use of the magnetic metal pump should be encouraged and closed loop control mechanisms should be developed for this pouring method.

Ronald Michaels

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent fewer materials than traditional processes.

6

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (�¢����Energy SMARRT�¢���) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU�¢����s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU�¢����s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Harry Littleton; John Griffin

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Bonding Low-density Nanoporous Metal Foams Using Sputtered Solder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed for bonding low-density nanoporous metal foam components to a substrate using solder that is sputtered onto the surfaces. Metal foams have unusual properties that make them excellent choices for many applications, and as technologies for processing these materials are evolving, their use in industry is increasing dramatically. Metal foams are lightweight and have advantageous dynamic properties, which make them excellent choices for many structural applications. They also provide good acoustic damping, low thermal conductivity, and excellent energy absorption characteristics. Therefore, these materials are commonly used in the automotive, aerospace, construction, and biomedical industries. The synthesis of nanoporous metal foams with a cell size of less then 1 {micro}m is an emerging technology that is expected to lead to widespread application of metal foams in microdevices, such as sensors and actuators. One of the challenges to manufacturing components from metal foams is that they can be difficult to attach to other structures without degrading their properties. For example, traditional liquid adhesives cannot be used because they are absorbed into foams. The problem of bonding or joining can be particularly difficult for small-scale devices made from nanoporous foam, due to the requirement for a thin bond layer. The current study addresses this problem and develops a method of soldering a nanoporous metal foam to a substrate with a bond thickness of less than 2 {micro}m. There are many applications that require micro-scale metal foams precisely bonded to substrates. This study was motivated by a physics experiment that used a laser to drive a shock wave through an aluminum foil and into a copper foam, in order to determine the speed of the shock in the copper foam. To avoid disturbing the shock, the interface between the copper foam and the aluminum substrate had to be as thin as possible. There are many other applications that could benefit from the bonding technology developed in this study, such as small-scale lightweight structural members, high-strength thermal insulating layers for electronics, and micro-scale mechanical dampers, to name but a few. Each of these applications requires one or more small metal foam components precisely bonded to a substrate. Several methods for bonding metal foam components have been developed by previous researchers. Macroscopic metal foam parts have been successfully bonded by laser welding to create T-sections and butt joints. Ultrasonic welding has been used to join aluminum sheet metal to aluminum foam for structural applications. These methods work well for bonding large foam components, but reducing these methods to a smaller length scale would be challenging. One method that has shown great potential for bonding layers of metal foams to substrates is a brazing process that uses a sputter-deposited interface material. Shirzadi et al.[9] have demonstrated bonds between stainless steel foam and a stainless steel substrate using a layer of copper-titanium filler metal that is sputtered onto the interface surfaces. The foam pieces that they bonded were approximately 10 mm in diameter and 10 mm thick with a cell size of approximately 200 {micro}m. After depositing the filler material, pressing the materials together, and heating them with an induction heater, bonds were achieved without causing significant damage to the foam. The current study also uses a sputter-deposited interface material to bond foam to a substrate. However, in contrast to previous work, the current study examines bonding microscale pieces of fragile nanoporous metal foam. In this study, a method is developed to bond a thin sheet of fragile, low-density nanoporous copper foam to an aluminum foil substrate of thickness 40 {micro}m. By sputter depositing an indium-silver alloy onto the foam and the substrate, a solder joint with a thickness of less than 2 {micro}m was achieved.

Bono, M; Cervantes, O; Akaba, C; Hamza, A; Foreman, R; Teslich, N

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced lost foam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

H. Thomas Summary: Augmented Foam Sculpting for Capturing 3D Models Michael R. Marner Bruce H. Thomas University... . A designer physically sculpts a 3D model from foam using a...

9

Pyrophoric metal-carbon foam composites and methods of making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for creating a pyrophoric material according to one embodiment includes thermally activating a carbon foam for creating micropores therein; contacting the activated carbon foam with a liquid solution comprising a metal salt for depositing metal ions in the carbon foam; and reducing the metal ions in the foam to metal particles. A pyrophoric material in yet another embodiment includes a pyrophoric metal-carbon foam composite comprising a carbon foam having micropores and mesopores and a surface area of greater than or equal to about 2000 m.sup.2/g, and metal particles in the pores of the carbon foam. Additional methods and materials are also disclosed.

Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Baumann, Theodore F. (Discovery Bay, CA); Worsley, Marcus A. (Belmont, CA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method of making metal-doped organic foam products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for roducing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

Rinde, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Innovative Technologies to Manufacture Hybrid Metal Foam/Composite Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to verify the technological feasibility to realize hybrid metal-foam/composite component and the mechanical performances of the final structure. The hybrid component is composed by a cylindrical core in aluminum foam, the most used between those commercially available, and an outer layer in epoxy/S2-glass, manufactured by filament winding technology.A set of experimental tests have been carried out, to the aim to estimate the improvement of the hybrid component characteristics, compared to the sum of the single components (metal foam cylinder and epoxy/S2-glass tube).

Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Franchitti, S. [DIMP, University of Naples 'Federico II', P.le Tecchio, 80-80125 Naples (Italy); Sorrentino, L.; Tersigni, L. [DII, University of Cassino, Via G. Di Biasio, 43-03043 Cassino (Italy)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

12

Foam and gel methods for the decontamination of metallic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment. In this invention, we discuss gel and foam based diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) chemical solutions that are unique in that these solutions can be applied at room temperature; provide protection to the base metal for continued applications of the equipment; and reduce the final waste form production to one step. The HEDPA gels and foams are formulated with benign chemicals, including various solvents, such as ionic liquids and reducing and complexing agents such as hydroxamic acids, and formaldehyde sulfoxylate. Gel and foam based HEDPA processes allow for decontamination of difficult to reach surfaces that are unmanageable with traditional aqueous process methods. Also, the gel and foam components are optimized to maximize the dissolution rate and assist in the chemical transformation of the gel and foam to a stable waste form.

Nunez, Luis; Kaminski, Michael Donald

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mechanical Properties of a Metal Powder-Loaded Polyurethane Foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quasi-static compression tests have been performed on polyurethane foam specimens. The modulus of the foam exhibited a power-law dependence with respect to density of the form: E* {proportional_to} {rho}*{sup n}, where n = 1.7. The modulus data is well described by a simple geometric model (attributed to the work of Gibson and Ashby) for closed-cell foam in which the stiffness of the foam is governed by the flexure of the cell struts and cell walls. The compressive strength of the foam is also found to follow a power-law behavior with respect to foam density. In this instance, Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence. The modulus of the polyurethane foam was modified by addition of a gas atomized, spherical aluminum powder. Additions of 30 and 50 weight percent of the powder significantly increased the foam modulus. However, there were only slight increases in modulus with 5 and 10 weight percent additions of the metal powder. Strength was also slightly increased at high loading fractions of powder. This increase in modulus and strength could be predicted by combining the above geometric model with a well-known model describing the effect on modulus of a rigid dispersoid in a compliant matrix.

C. L. Neuschwanger; L. L. Whinnery; S. H. Goods

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, “Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,” submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate-scale tests will be used to bridge the gap between the small-scale foam transport studies and the field-scale demonstration. Numerical simulation studies on foam delivery under vadose conditions will be performed to simulate observed foam transport behavior under vadose zone conditions and predict the foam delivery performance at field-scale.

Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Geometric classification of open-cell metal foams using X-ray micro-computed tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geometry of foams has long been an area of interest, and a number of idealized geometric descriptions have been proposed. In order to acquire detailed, quantitative, geometric data for aluminum open-cell metal foams, X-ray {mu}CT is employed. The X-ray {mu}CT images are analyzed using specialized software, FoamView Registered-Sign , from which geometric information including strut length and pore shapes are extracted. The X-ray {mu}CT analysis allows comparison of the ideal geometric models to the actual geometric characteristics of the metal foam samples. The results reveal a high variability in ligament length, as well as features supporting the ideal geometry known as the Weaire-Phelan unit cell. The geometric findings provide information useful for improving current models of open-cell metal foam. Applications can range from predicting heat transfer or load failure to predicting liquid retention. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum open-cell metal foams are geometrically classified Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray micro-computed tomography and specialized software are used to gather geometric data Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The foams are shown to have a high variability in strut length Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Weaire-Phelan unit cell is shown to be a better representative of these foams.

Bock, Jessica, E-mail: bock6@illinois.edu; Jacobi, Anthony M., E-mail: a-jacobi@illinois.edu

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Holographic study of conventional and negative Poisson's ratio metallic foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Inhomogeneous, non-affine deformation was observed holographically in both foam materials. Introduction in this series were determined from displacement measurements of high magnification video tapes of the tensile a very useful and reliable tool to determine the Poisson's ratio of orthotropic FRP (Fiber Reinforced

Lakes, Roderic

17

Electrical conductivity of open-cell metal foams K.P. Dharmasena and H.N.G. Wadley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with high heat transfer coefficients.1 Other uses as load-supporting electrochemical storage structures alsoElectrical conductivity of open-cell metal foams K.P. Dharmasena and H.N.G. Wadley Department to represent an open-cell aluminum foam and a simplified electrical resistor network derived to model low

Wadley, Haydn

18

Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio [Laboratorio MUSP-via Turotti 9, 29122 Piacenza (Italy); Strano, Matteo [Politecnico di Milano-Dipartimento di Meccanica, via La Masa 1, 20156, Milan (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

20

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Synthesis of bulk metallic glass foam by powder extrusion with a fugitive second phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glass foams with 12 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length having a density of 4.62 g/cm{sup 3} (approximately 58.3% of theoretical) were fabricated by extruding a powder mixture comprised of 60 vol % Ni{sub 59}Zr{sub 20}Ti{sub 16}Si{sub 2}Sn{sub 3} metallic glass blended with 40 vol % brass followed by dissolution of the fugitive brass in an aqueous HNO{sub 3} solution. The final structure consists of continuously connected, high aspect ratio metallic glass struts surrounded by {approx}40 vol % of homogeneously distributed ellipsoid-shaped pores having nominal diameters between 10 and 50 {mu}m.

Lee, Min Ha; Sordelet, Daniel J. [Materials and Engineering Physics Program, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Connection Lost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

so your parents won’t feel like all hope is lost. ) Tissuesparents of your “model child” attributes to try to alleviate their panic that all is lost

Wu, Lai Wa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Method Of Bonding A Metal Connection To An Electrode Including A Core Having A Fiber Or Foam Type Structure For An Electrochemical Cell, An  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of bonding a metal connection to an electrode including a core having a fiber or foam-type structure for an electrochemical cell, in which method at least one metal strip is pressed against one edge of the core and is welded thereto under compression, wherein, at least in line with the region in which said strip is welded to the core, which is referred to as the "main core", a retaining core of a type analogous to that of the main core is disposed prior to the welding.

Loustau, Marie-Therese (Bordeaux, FR); Verhoog, Roelof (Bordeaux, FR); Precigout, Claude (Lormont, FR)

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Preparation of Mesoporous Silica Templated Metal Nanowire Films on Foamed Nickel Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed for the formation of high surface area nanowire films on planar and three-dimensional metal electrodes. These nanowire films are formed via electrodeposition into a mesoporous silica film. The mesoporous silica films are formed by a sol-gel process using Pluronic tri-block copolymers to template mesopore formation on both planar and three-dimensional metal electrodes. Surface area increases of up to 120-fold have been observed in electrodes containing a templated film when compared to the same types of electrodes without the templated film.

Campbell, Roger [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Bakker, Martin [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Havrilla, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Montoya, Velma [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Shamsuzzoha, Mohammed [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Foam patterns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The transport of foam in porous media is complicated in that the number of lamellae present governs flow characteristics such as viscosity, relative permeability, fluid distribution, and interactions between fluids. Hence, foam is a non-Newtonian fluid. During transport, foam destruction and formation occur. The net result of the two processes determines the foam texture (i.e., bubble density). Some of the foam may be trapped during transport. According to the impacts of the aqueous and gas flow rates, foam flow generally has two regimes – weak and strong foam. There is also a minimum pressure gradient to initiate foam flow and a critical capillary for foam to be sustained. Similar to other fluids, the transport of foam is described by Darcy’s law with the exception that the foam viscosity is variable. Three major approaches to modeling foam transport in porous media are the empirical, semi-empirical, and mechanistic methods. Mechanistic approaches can be complete in principal but may be difficult to obtain reliable parameters, whereas empirical and semi-empirical approaches can be limited by the detail used to describe foam rheology and mobility. Mechanistic approaches include the bubble population-balance model, the network/percolation theory, the catastrophe theory, and the filtration theory. Among these methods, all were developed for modeling polyhedral foam with the exception that the method based on the filtration theory was for the ball foam (microfoam).

Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

Liquid foams of graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Low density inorganic foams fabricated using microwaves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our work was to determine if high temperature foams could be made using microwave heating; and if so, to investigate some of their properties. Several foams were made and their compressive strengths, tensile strengths and densities were determined. Foams were made of glass, metal-glass, glass-fiber, metal-glass-fiber, and fly ash. The microwave source used was a Litton model 1521 microwave oven which operated at 2.45 GHz and had an output of 700 watts.

Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.; Gregory, T.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Research in lost circulation control for geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews recent progress at Sandia National Laboratories in the area of lost circulation control for geothermal wells. The Lost Circulation Program has three major elements: (1) Detection and characterization of loss zones, (2) Development of new techniques and materials for control of loss zones, and (3) Integration of the first two items for wellsite application. Most of our work to date has been in the area of developing new techniques and materials. We report here on progress that has been made in the past two years in the development of new, pumpable cementitious muds, in situ mixing and placement of polyurethane foams, and fundamental analysis of and materials development for particulate lost circulation materials. Plans for work in the area of zone detection and characterization, including development of a transient, lost circulation hydraulics simulator and field zone characterization using an advanced wellbore televiewer, are discussed.

Ortega, A.; Loeppke, G.E.; Givler, R.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Foam Processing of Textiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limits line speed of finishing ranges, the use of foam has led to doubling of line speeds. Foam finishing has also led to reduction in the consumption of chemical agents per unit of fabric because foam finishing provides for more uniform distribution...

Bafford, R. A.; Namboodri, C. G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

36

Foam process models.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A. (Procter & Gamble Co., West Chester, OH); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Doping of carbon foams for use in energy storage devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymeric foam precursor, wetted with phosphoric acid, is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to produce an open-cell doped carbon foam, which is utilized as a lithium intercalation anode in a secondary, organic electrolyte battery. Tests were conducted in a cell containing an organic electrolyte and using lithium metal counter and reference electrodes, with the anode located there between. Results after charge and discharge cycling, for a total of 6 cycles, indicated a substantial increase in the energy storage capability of the phosphorus doped carbon foam relative to the undoped carbon foam, when used as a rechargeable lithium ion battery. 3 figs.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Morrison, R.L.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Doping of carbon foams for use in energy storage devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymeric foam precursor, wetted with phosphoric acid, is pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to produce an open-cell doped carbon foam, which is utilized as a lithium intercalation anode in a secondary, organic electrolyte battery. Tests were conducted in a cell containing an organic electrolyte and using lithium metal counter and reference electrodes, with the anode located therebetween. Results after charge and discharge cycling, for a total of 6 cycles, indicated a substantial increase in the energy storage capability of the phosphorus doped carbon foam relative to the undoped carbon foam, when used as a rechargeable lithium ion battery.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Morrison, Robert L. (Modesto, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermal degradation of new and aged urethane foam and epon 826 epoxy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal desorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the decomposition as a function of temperature for the foam and epoxy as a function of temperature in the range of 60C to 170C. Samples were studied with one day holds at each of the studied temperatures. Both new (FoamN and EpoxyN) and aged (FoamP and EpoxyP) samples were studied. During these ~10 day experiments, the foam samples lost 11 to 13% of their weight and the EpoxyN lost 10% of its weight. The amount of weight lost was difficult to quantify for EpoxyP because of its inert filler. The onset of the appearance of organic degradation products from FoamP began at 110C. Similar products did not appear until 120C for FoamN, suggesting some effect of the previous decades of storage for FoamP. In the case of the epoxies, the corresponding temperatures were 120C for EpoxyP and 110C for EpoxyN. Suggestions for why the aged epoxy seems more stable than newer sample include the possibility of incomplete curing or differences in composition. Recommendation to limit use temperature to 90-100C for both epoxy and foam.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Mills, Bernice E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

High performance polymeric foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials (IMCB)-CNR, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy); Iannace, S. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials (IMCB)-CNR, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy) and Technological District on Polymeric and Composite Materials Engineering and Structures (IMAST), P.le E.Fermi 1, location Porto del Granatello, 80055 Portici (Naples)

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tetrade Spin Foam Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a spin foam model of four-dimensional quantum gravity which is based on the integration of the tetrads in the path integral for the Palatini action of General Relativity. In the Euclidian gravity case we show that the model can be understood as a modification of the Barrett-Crane spin foam model. Fermionic matter can be coupled by using the path integral with sources for the tetrads and the spin connection, and the corresponding state sum is based on a spin foam where both the edges and the faces are colored independently with the irreducible representations of the spacetime rotations group.

A. Mikovic

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

Foam encapsulated targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

Nuckolls, John H. (Livermore, CA); Thiessen, Albert R. (Livermore, CA); Dahlbacka, Glen H. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

Frost, C.B.

1984-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

Surfactant monitoring by foam generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

Mullen, Ken I. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low density microcellular foams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

LeMay, J.D.

1991-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Low density microcellular foams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

LeMay, James D. (Castro Valley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Foams in porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

Marsden, S.S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Long lasting decontamination foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

Demmer, Ricky L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tripp, Julia L. (Pocatello, ID); Cooper, David C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Karen E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Deformation rate effects on failure modes of open-cell Al foams and textile cellular materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 2005 Abstract The compressive behavior of open-cell aluminum alloy foam and stainless steel woven: Metallic cellular materials; Dynamic compression; Aluminum foams; Woven textile lattice 0020-7683/$ - see are of attracting interest for a variety of automotive, locomotive, marine, and aerospace applications (Gibson

Barthelat, Francois

51

Low density microcellular foams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

LeMay, James D. (Castro Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Experimental evidence of foam homogenization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of an ionization wave through a subcritical foam is studied under inertial confinement fusion conditions. Independent measurements of the ionization wave velocity are compared with hydrodynamic simulations and analytical models. It is shown that simulations of a homogeneous material at equivalent density strongly overestimate the front velocity. The internal foam structure can be accounted for with a simple model of foam homogenization that allows improving agreement between experiment and calculations.

Nicolaie, Ph.; Olazabal-Loume, M.; Tikhonchuk, V. [Univ. Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA F-33405 Talence cedex (France); Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Borisenko, N.; Gus'kov, S.; Orekov, A. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Grech, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Riazuelo, G. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Labaune, C. [Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Velechowski, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Univ. Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA F-33405 Talence cedex (France)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Method for fabricating composite carbon foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid partides being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Capacitor with a composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Spherical Foams in Flat Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regular tesselations of space are characterized through their Schlafli symbols {p,q,r}, where each cell has regular p-gonal sides, q meeting at each vertex, and r meeting on each edge. Regular tesselations with symbols {p,3,3} all satisfy Plateau's laws for equilibrium foams. For general p, however, these regular tesselations do not embed in Euclidean space, but require a uniform background curvature. We study a class of regular foams on S^3 which, through conformal, stereographic projection to R^3 define irregular cells consistent with Plateau's laws. We analytically characterize a broad classes of bulk foam bubbles, and extend and explain recent observations on foam structure and shape distribution. Our approach also allows us to comment on foam stability by identifying a weak local maximum of A^(3/2)/V at the maximally symmetric tetrahedral bubble that participates in T2 rearrangements.

Carl D. Modes; Randall D. Kamien

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Foam drilling simulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ...............................................................................................................(2.25) where; =b Pressure drop across the bit Pbh = Bottom-hole pressure nn = Nozzle velocity M = Gas molecular weight mg = Mass of gas ml = Mass of liquid Heat Capacity Like any two-phase mixture, heat capacity of foam is the average... weighted heat capacity of each phase. Heat capacity of liquid-phase which is usually water, is a constant known value, however, heat capacity of gas-phase varies with temperature and pressure. Variation of gas specific heat with pressure...

Paknejad, Amir Saman

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

Lu, Wei-Yang

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well...

62

Geophysical Monitoring of Foam used to Deliver Remediation Treatments within the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foam is a promising vehicle for delivering amendments into the vadose zone for in situ remediation; it is an approach being considered for in situ treatment and stabilization of metals and radionuclides located within the deep vadose zone of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site, WA. A central aspect of evaluating the effectiveness of this approach is the ability to monitor foam distribution, its transformation, and the reactions that it induces in the subsurface, ideally in a non-invasive manner. In this study, we performed laboratory experiments to evaluate the potential of geophysical methods (complex resistivity and time domain reflectometry, TDR) as tools for monitoring foam assisted amendment delivery in the deep vadose zone. Our results indicated great sensitivity of electrical methods to foam transportation and evolution in unsaturated porous media that were related to foam bubble coalescence and drainage processes. Specifically, we observed (1) a decrease of electrical resistivity (increase of electrical conductivity) by over an order of magnitude in both silica sand and natural sediment matrices during foam transportation; (2) an increase of resistivity (decrease of conductivity) by over two fold during foam coalescence and drainage; (3) a distinct phase and imaginary conductivity signature related to the evolution of water films on sediment grains during foam injection and evolution processes. To assist with the interpretation of these data, TDR measurements were used to monitor moisture content, which provided complementary information about foam distribution and drainage. Our results clearly demonstrated the sensitivity of electrical and TDR signals to foam transportation and evolution in unsaturated porous media and suggested the potential of these methods for monitoring the response of a system to foam based remediation treatments at field scales.

Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Wellman, Dawn M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Supercapacitors based on carbon foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m.sup.2 /g-1000 m.sup.2 /g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved.

Kaschmitter, James L. (6291 Alisal St., Pleasanton, CA 94566); Mayer, Steven T. (16026 Selborne Dr., San Leandro, CA 94578); Pekala, Richard W. (802 Cliffside Dr., Pleasant Hill, CA 94523)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Supercapacitors based on carbon foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m[sup 2]/g-1000 m[sup 2]/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figures.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Foam shell project: Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schroen-Carey, D. [WJSA (United States)

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

66

MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

William R. Rossen

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research is to lay the groundwork for more-applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

William R. Rossen

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

69

Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

Rapp, F., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT (Germany); Elsner, P., E-mail: peter.elsner@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT, Germany and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drillstring in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drillstring at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone.

Glowka, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Downhole material injector for lost circulation control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method are disclosed for simultaneously and separately emplacing two streams of different materials through a drill string in a borehole to a downhole location for lost circulation control. The two streams are mixed outside the drill string at the desired downhole location and harden only after mixing for control of a lost circulation zone. 6 figs.

Glowka, D.A.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Engineering the Quantum Foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1990 Alcubierre, within the General Relativity model for space-time, proposed a scenario for `warp drive' faster than light travel, in which objects would achieve such speeds by actually being stationary within a bubble of space which itself was moving through space, the idea being that the speed of the bubble was not itself limited by the speed of light. However that scenario required exotic matter to stabilise the boundary of the bubble. Here that proposal is re-examined within the context of the new modelling of space in which space is a quantum system, viz a quantum foam, with on-going classicalisation. This model has lead to the resolution of a number of longstanding problems, including a dynamical explanation for the so-called `dark matter' effect. It has also given the first evidence of quantum gravity effects, as experimental data has shown that a new dimensionless constant characterising the self-interaction of space is the fine structure constant. The studies here begin the task of examining to what extent the new spatial self-interaction dynamics can play a role in stabilising the boundary without exotic matter, and whether the boundary stabilisation dynamics can be engineered; this would amount to quantum gravity engineering.

Reginald T. Cahill

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessment of Oxidation in Carbon Foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon foams exhibit numerous unique properties which are attractive for light weight applications such as aircraft and spacecraft as a tailorable material. Carbon foams, when exposed to air, oxidize at temperatures as low as 500-600 degrees Celsius...

Lee, Seung Min

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Buoyancy Effects on Smoldering of Polyurethane Foam   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study has been carried out to investigate the effects of buoyancy on smoldering of polyurethane foam. The experiments are conducted with a high void fraction flexible polyurethane foam as fuel and air as ...

Torero, Jose L

1992-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

75

Determination of foam stability at constant pressure in the Plateau-Biggs borders of the foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lifetime of a foam column (or of a part of the column) is a parameter widely used as a characteristic of foam stability. During the destruction process, the pressure in the upper layers of the foam changes (the height H of the foam column decreases) and the lifetime of the different layers of the foam column will be different. Therefore, the lifetime of a foam column at constant pressure in the Plateau-Gibbs borders (constant along the height of the column and with time) is a much more accurate characteristic of foam stability.

Khristov, K.I.; Exerowa, D.R.; Kurgljakov, P.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

1 LOST PRODUCTION AS CONSEQUENSE OF SILICA SCALING IN CERRO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral scale depositation occurs in many of the Cerro Prieto wells, but the main problems occurs by silica (SiO2) scale both pipes and reservoir zones close to the downhole. In Cerro Prieto geothermal field three types of scales are found; calcium carbonate (calcite), amorphous silica (SiO2), and metallic sulfides (mainly iron, and lesser lead and cooper). The scale causes lost production and it is necessary to make around 12 workover each year to recover the steam lost. When scaling problems occurred inside casing production is more easier to recover the production that scaling occurred in the reservoir zones, because it caused a skin damage (permeability decrease) in the reservoir zones close to the bottomhole. This paper analyze and discus the scaling problems and discuss the task developed to avoid and minimized the decline wells production, as to recover the production using workover alternatives.

Prieto Geothermal; Wells Mexico; Juan De; Dios Ocampo; Díaz Sara; Lilia Moya; Jesús De; León Vivar

77

Carbon foam characterization tensile evaluation of carbon foam ligaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Gibson and Ashby [5], [6]. The materials they studied were a high purity alumina with relative densities ranging from 0.09 to 0.25, an alumina-mullite (0.08-0.23) and an alumina-10% zirconia (0.08-0.19). They used scanning electron micrographs... of foam microstructure have been developed to model the foam mechanical behavior where the deformation of the bulk sample is predicted by the deformation of the unit cell. The model most widely used is that of Gibson and Ashby which is represented as a...

Verdugo Rodriguez, Rogelio Alberto

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Analysis of Heat Transfer in Metal Hydride Based Hydrogen Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis presents a transient heat transfer analysis to model the heat transfer in the Pd/k packed column, and the impact of adding metallic foam.

Fleming, W.H. Jr.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

Spear, Jonathan D (San Francisco, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method for making thin carbon foam electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating thin, flat carbon electrodes by infiltrating highly porous carbon papers, membranes, felts, metal fibers/powders, or fabrics with an appropriate carbon foam precursor material. The infiltrated carbon paper, for example, is then cured to form a gel-saturated carbon paper, which is subsequently dried and pyrolyzed to form a thin sheet of porous carbon. The material readily stays flat and flexible during curing and pyrolyzing to form thin sheets. Precursor materials include polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethylacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde, catechol/formaldehyde, phenol/formaldehyde, etc., or mixtures thereof. These thin films are ideal for use as high power and energy electrodes in batteries, capacitors, and fuel cells, and are potentially useful for capacitive deionization, filtration and catalysis.

Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Morrison, Robert L. (Modesto, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Method for making thin carbon foam electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating thin, flat carbon electrodes by infiltrating highly porous carbon papers, membranes, felts, metal fibers/powders, or fabrics with an appropriate carbon foam precursor material is disclosed. The infiltrated carbon paper, for example, is then cured to form a gel-saturated carbon paper, which is subsequently dried and pyrolyzed to form a thin sheet of porous carbon. The material readily stays flat and flexible during curing and pyrolyzing to form thin sheets. Precursor materials include polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethylacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde, catechol/formaldehyde, phenol/formaldehyde, etc., or mixtures thereof. These thin films are ideal for use as high power and energy electrodes in batteries, capacitors, and fuel cells, and are potentially useful for capacitive deionization, filtration and catalysis.

Pekala, R.W.; Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Morrison, R.L.

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Process for epoxy foam production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 60 wt % and 90 wt %, a maleic anhydride of between approximately 1 wt % and approximately 30 wt %, and an imidazole catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt % where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-30 wt % maleic anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the maleic anhydride compound molten, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

Celina, Mathias C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

Heat exchanger using graphite foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

84

Spacetime Foam and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to quantum fluctuations, spacetime is foamy on small scales. The degree of foaminess is found to be consistent with the holographic principle. One way to detect spacetime foam is to look for halos in the images of distant quasars. Applying the holographic foam model to cosmology we "predict" that the cosmic energy density takes on the critical value; and basing only on existing archived data on active galactic nuclei from the Hubble Space Telescope, we also "predict" the existence of dark energy which, we argue, is composed of an enormous number of inert "particles" of extremely long wavelength. We speculate that these "particles" obey infinite statistics.

Y. Jack Ng

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Method of making a cyanate ester foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cyanate ester resin mixture with at least one cyanate ester resin, an isocyanate foaming resin, other co-curatives such as polyol or epoxy compounds, a surfactant, and a catalyst/water can react to form a foaming resin that can be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form a cyanate ester foam. The cyanate ester foam can be heated to a temperature greater than 400.degree. C. in a non-oxidative atmosphere to provide a carbonaceous char foam.

Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

Low density, microcellular foams, preparation, and articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microcellular low-density foam of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) particularly useful for forming targets for inertial confinement fusion has been developed. Articles made from the foam have been machined to tolerances of 0.0001 inch, although the densities of the fragile foam are low (about 10 to about 100 mg/cc) and the cell sizes are small (about 10 to about 30 ..mu..m). Methods for forming the foam and articles are given. The yield strength of the foam of the invention is higher than was obtained in other structures of this same material.

Young, A.T.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Combination nickel foam expanded nickel screen electrical connection supports for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel assembly is made, wherein rows (14, 25) of fuel cells (17, 19, 21, 27, 29, 31), each having an outer interconnection (20) and an outer electrode (32), are disposed next to each other with corrugated, electrically conducting expanded metal mesh member (22) between each row of cells, the corrugated mesh (22) having top crown portions and bottom portions, where the top crown portion (40) have a top bonded open cell nickel foam (51) which contacts outer interconnections (20) of the fuel cells, said mesh and nickel foam electrically connecting each row of fuel cells, and where there are no more metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

Draper, Robert; Prevish, Thomas; Bronson, Angela; George, Raymond A.

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Blast mitigation capabilities of aqueous foam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of tests involving detonation of high explosive blanketed by aqueous foam (conducted from 1982 to 1984) are described in primarily terms of recorded peak pressure, positive phase specific impulse, and time of arrival. The investigation showed that optimal blast mitigation occurs for foams with an expansion ratio of about 60:1. Simple analyses representing the foam as a shocked single phase mixture are presented and shown inadequate. The experimental data demonstrate that foam slows down and broadens the propagated pressure disturbance relative to a shock in air. Shaped charges and flyer plates were evaluated for operation in foam and appreciable degradation was observed for the flyer plates due to drag created by the foam.

Hartman, William Franklin; Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Boughton, Bruce A.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Activated, coal-based carbon foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxy-fired furnaces. E-glass foams were generated in a fused-81.05.K 1. Introduction Glass foams generated in glass-that the stability of E-glass foam decreased with increasing

Kim, D. S.; Dutton, Bryan C.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

Archuleta, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Process for preparing silicon carbide foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing near net shape, monolithic, porous SiC foams is disclosed. Organosilicon precursors are used to produce polymeric gels by thermally induced phase separation, wherein, a sufficiently concentrated solution of an organosilicon polymer is cooled below its solidification temperature to form a gel. Following solvent removal from the gel, the polymer foam is pretreated in an oxygen plasma in order to raise its glass transition temperature. The pretreated foam is then pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a SiC foam. 9 figs.

Whinnery, L.L.; Nichols, M.C.; Wheeler, D.R.; Loy, D.A.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Process for preparing silicon carbide foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing near net shape, monolithic, porous SiC foams is disclosed. Organosilicon precursors are used to produce polymeric gels by thermally induced phase separation, wherein, a sufficiently concentrated solution of an organosilicon polymer is cooled below its solidification temperature to form a gel. Following solvent removal from the gel, the polymer foam is pretreated in an oxygen plasma in order to raise its glass transition temperature. The pretreated foam is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere to form a SiC foam.

Whinnery, LeRoy Louis (Livermore, CA); Nichols, Monte Carl (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, David Roger (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas Anson (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Effects related to spacetime foam in astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the quantum stage spacetime had the foam-like structure. When the Universe cools the foam structure temperes and therefore the Friedman model represents only the mean picture. We show that effects of the foamed structure we observe now as the Dark Matter and Dark Energy phenomena. We also show that free particles undergo a specific scattering on the foam-like structure. This explains the origin of the diffuse component of the X-ray background and gives a rather simple picture for the origin of Gamma-ray bursts.

A. A. Kirillov

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

New Spin Foam Models of Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a brief and a critical review of the Barret-Crane spin foam models of quantum gravity. Then we describe two new spin foam models which are obtained by direct quantization of General Relativity and do not have some of the drawbacks of the Barret-Crane models. These are the model of spin foam invariants for the embedded spin networks in loop quantum gravity and the spin foam model based on the integration of the tetrads in the path integral for the Palatini action.

A. Mikovic

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud? There's an App for That David McConaughy Locus Technologies 1997-2014 4 #12;Cloud-based EMIS 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 5 #12; Cloud Synch data back to EIM cloud for analysis 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 9 #12;Mobile Apps for Data

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

98

Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel...

99

Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam. 4 figs.

Jody, B.; Daniels, E.; Libera, J.A.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forging Process to Reproduce a 3D Aluminium Foam Complex Shape  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic foams represent one of the most exciting materials introduced in the manufacturing scenario in the last years. In the study here addressed, the experimental and numerical investigations on the forging process of a simple foam billet shaped into complex sculptured parts were carried out. In particular, the deformation behavior of metallic foams and the development of density gradients were investigated through a series of experimental forging tests in order to produce a selected portion of a hip prosthesis. The human bone replacement was chosen as case study due to its industrial demand and for its particular 3D complex shape. A finite element code (Deform 3D) was utilized for modeling the foam behavior during the forging process and an accurate material rheology description was used based on a porous material model which includes the measured local density. Once the effectiveness of the utilized Finite Element model was verified through the comparison with the experimental evidences, a numerical study of the influence of the foam density was investigated. The obtained numerical results shown as the initial billet density plays an important role on the prediction of the final shape, the optimization of the flash as well as the estimation of the punch load.

Filice, Luigino; Gagliardi, Francesco; Umbrello, Domenico [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Calabria, P. Bucci, 87036 Rende (Serbia and Montenegro) (Italy); Shivpuri, Rajiv [Department of Industrial, Welding and System Engineering, Ohio State University, 1971 Neil Avenue, 210 Baker Systems, Columbus, OH 43210-1217 (United States)

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Damping of liquid sloshing by foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

Alban Sauret; François Boulogne; Jean Cappello; Emilie Dressaire; Howard A. Stone

2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Foam generator and viscometer apparatus and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and process to generate a liquid-gas-surfactant foam and to measure its viscosity and enable optical and or electronic measurements of physical properties. The process includes the steps of pumping selected and measured liquids and measured gases into a mixing cell. The mixing cell is pressurized to a desired pressure and maintained at a desired pressure. Liquids and gas are mixed in the mixing cell to produce a foam of desired consistency. The temperature of the foam in the mixing cell is controlled. Foam is delivered from the mixing cell through a viscometer under controlled pressure and temperature conditions where the viscous and physical properties of the foam are measured and observed.

Reed, Troy D.; Pickell, Mark B.; Volk, Leonard J.

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Lost Soul of the Body Politic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, James Rogers May 2012 Major Subject: Political Science iii ABSTRACT The Lost Soul of the Body Politic. (May 2012) Jesse Allen Chupp, B.S., Indiana Wesleyan University; M.A., Ball State University Chair... debt to the family relation. The family, both in the nuclear form and its extension by biological development over generations into the consanguineous tribe, is a natural starting point for an investigation of the political relation. Aristotle...

Chupp, Jesse

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Two Lost Sonnets by Sterling A. Brown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWO LOST SONNETS BY STERLING A. BROWN edited and introduced by John Edgar Tidwell and Ted Genoways The emergence of Sterling A. Brown into poetic maturity resulted from a well- known dialectical engagement with the aesthetics of African...-American folk tradition. As Brown recounted so often, these experiential and imaginative encounters derived from a benevolent conspiracy between his theologian father, the Rev. Sterling Nelson Brown, and the eminent historian Carter G. Woodson to send...

Tidwell, John E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Augmented Foam Sculpting for Capturing 3D Models Michael R. Marner Bruce H. Thomas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Augmented Foam Sculpting for Capturing 3D Models Michael R. Marner Bruce H. Thomas University. A designer physically sculpts a 3D model from foam using a hand-held hot wire foam cut- ter. Both the foamD model from foam using a hand-held hot wire foam cutter. Both the foam and cutting tool are tracked

Thomas, Bruce

106

Chemical Engineering and Processing 43 (2004) 149160 Minimum superficial gas velocity for onset of foaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Foam fractionation; Slag foaming; Glass foam 1. Introduction Semi-batch foams or pneumatic foams protein concentration [2]. In food processes or in glass melting furnaces, foam is unde- sirable since of foaming Laurent Pilona,, Raymond Viskantab a Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University

Pilon, Laurent

107

High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Rheology of nearly ideal 3d foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We probe the complex rheology of nearly ideal 3d foam by flowing through a narrow column. The foams we investigate have large bubble size, to minimize the effects of coarsening, and are very dry. Foams of this type cannot be studied via conventional rheometry. The foam flows upward through a vertical rectangular column with a 4:1 cross-sectional aspect ratio, by bubbling gas through a soapy solution at the base of our apparatus. At the column's narrow surfaces are sticky boundaries, which create shear due to the zero velocity boundary condition. As expected, the flow profile between the adjacent slippery broad faces is flat, however the profile between the narrow, sticky faces exhibits a curved velocity profile that is dependent on gas flow rate. We are able to analyze a 2d velocity profile from a 3d bulk system. We employ particle image velocimetry to measure the strain rate, and compute the stress from the pressure drop along the channel, to investigate the local stress-strain relationships in a flowing foam. We find these dry foams to have a Hershel-Bulkley exponent of 0.21, which is significantly lower (more shear thinning) than other results shown in the literature for much wetter foams.

C. D. Jones; K. N. Nordstrom; D. J. Durian

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

The physical properties of microcellular composite foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently we reported on a method of preparing microcellular composite foams. In this procedure an open-celled polystyrene foam is prepared by the polymerization of a high-internal-phase water-in-oil emulsion containing styrene, divinylbenzene, surfactant, free-radial initiator and water. After drying, the cells of the polystyrene foam are then filled with other materials such as aerogel or resoles. The physical properties of these materials, e.g., surface area, density, thermal conductivity, and compressive strength will be presented. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Nyitray, A.M.; Williams, J.M.; Onn, D.; Witek, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (USA). Applied Thermal Physics Lab.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Spin Foam Models from the Tetrad Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a class of spin foam models of four-dimensional quantum gravity which is based on the integration of the tetrad one-forms in the path integral for the Palatini action of General Relativity. In the Euclidian gravity case this class of models can be understood as a modification of the Barrett-Crane spin foam model. Fermionic matter can be coupled by using the path integral with sources for the tetrads and the spin connection, and the corresponding state sum is based on a spin foam where both the edges and the faces are colored independently with the irreducible representations of the spacetime rotations group.

A. Mikovic

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UMBC POLICY ON LOST AND FOUND PROPERTY I. POLICY STATEMENT The UMBC community will have access to a University Policy on Lost and Found Property. II. PURPOSE OF THE POLICY The purpose of the Lost and Found Property Policy is to provide procedures for the accountability and safekeeping of currency and tangible

Adali, Tulay

112

Generalized correlation for foam flow in tubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Data collected allow for the determination of material parameters. The corresponding friction factors and generalized Reynolds numbers are calculated and their relationship examined. Results indicate that the flow of foam follows the same f = 16/NRe,gen...

Cotter, Carol Lynnette

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Math of Popping Bubbles in a Foam  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in which liquids mix or in the formation of solid foams such as those used to cushion bicycle helmets. Applying these equations, they used supercomputers at DOE's National Energy...

114

Statistical Mechanics of Two-dimensional Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The methods of statistical mechanics are applied to two-dimensional foams under macroscopic agitation. A new variable -- the total cell curvature -- is introduced, which plays the role of energy in conventional statistical thermodynamics. The probability distribution of the number of sides for a cell of given area is derived. This expression allows to correlate the distribution of sides ("topological disorder") to the distribution of sizes ("geometrical disorder") in a foam. The model predictions agree well with available experimental data.

Marc Durand

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Evaluation of aqueous-foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous foams are potentially useful drilling and cleanout fluids for geothermal applications. Successful use of foams requires surfactants (foaming agents) that can survive in the high-temperature geothermal environment. In this study, solutions of aqueous-foam-forming surfactants have been exposed to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) and 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) in various chemical environments to determine if they can survive and make foams after exposure. Comparison of foams before and after exposure and the change in solution pH were used to evaluate their performance. Controlled liquid-volume-fraction foams, made in a packed-bed foam generator, were used for all tests. These tests have shown that many commercially available surfactants can survive short high-temperature cycles in mild acids, mild bases, and salt solutions as evidenced by their ability to make foams after exposure to high temperatures.

Rand, P.B.; Montoya, O.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Dissipative flows of 2D foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the flow of a liquid foam between two plates separated by a gap of the order of the bubble size (2D foam). We concentrate on the salient features of the flow that are induced by the presence, in an otherwise monodisperse foam, of a single large bubble whose size is one order of magnitude larger than the average size. We describe a model suited for numerical simulations of flows of 2D foams made up of a large number of bubbles. The numerical results are successfully compared to analytical predictions based on scaling arguments and on continuum medium approximations. When the foam is pushed inside the cell at a controlled rate, two basically different regimes occur: a plug flow is observed at low flux whereas, above a threshold, the large bubble migrates faster than the mean flow. The detailed characterization of the relative velocity of the large bubble is the essential aim of the present paper. The relative velocity values, predicted both from numerical and from analytical calculations that are discussed here in great detail, are found to be in fair agreement with experimental results.

Isabelle Cantat; Renaud Delannay

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fabrication of thin-wall hollow nickel spheres and low density syntactic foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process has been developed to fabricate thin-wall hollow spheres from conventional oxide powders at room temperature. The polymer- bonded powder shells are fired in air to sinter the walls, leaving the shells either impervious or porous. Alternatively, the oxide shells can be preferentially reduced to produce thin-wall hollow metal spheres which can be bonded together to produce an ultra light weight closed-cell foam. Processing and properties of this class of low density structures will be discussed.

Clancy, R.B.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Cochran, J.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wick for metal vapor laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Lost films chronicle dawn of hydroelectric power in the Northwest  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lost-films-chronicle-dawn-of-hydroelectric-power-in-the-Northwest Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects &...

120

Progress in The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lost circulation is the loss of drilling fluid from the wellbore to fractures or pores in the rock formation. In geothermal drilling, lost circulation is often a serious problem that contributes greatly to the cost of the average geothermal well. The Lost Circulation Technology Development Program is sponsored at Sandia National Laboratories by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the program is to reduce lost circulation costs by 30--50{percent} through the development of mitigation and characterization technology. This paper describes the technical progress made in this program during the period April, 1990--March, 1991. 4 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Glowka, D.A.; Schafer, D.M.; Loeppke, G.E.; Wright, E.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Factors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the petroleum industry. Nonaqueous foams occur in the production of and refining of crude oil. Crude oil foamsFactors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 2. Synthetic Crude Oil Systems Nael N. Zaki, Michael K can pose major problems for operators of gas/oil separation plants, causing a loss of crude

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

123

Drainage induced convection rolls in foams (revised version)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, where soap solution is added to the foam at constant flow rate, the irregular motion in the beer glass results for convection in quasi two-dimensional foams (monolayers of bubbles between two glass platesDrainage induced convection rolls in foams (revised version) S. Hutzler, S.J. Cox*, E. Janiaud

Cox, Simon

124

Effect of Heating Rate on Glass Foaming: Transition to Bulk Foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foaming of glass is an undesirable side effect of glass fining. According to a recent experimental study, the gas-phase volume in the melt heated at a constant rate dramatically increased with an increased rate of heating. This observation indicates that an increased rate of heating (a natural consequence of the increased processing rate experienced as a result of transition to oxy-fuel firing) may exert a substantial influence on glass foaming in advanced glass-melting furnaces. This paper attributes this effect to the change of mode of foam formation in response to an increased rate of heating.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Experiments for foam model development and validation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F. (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Finite element modeling of syntactic foam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A decomposition model has been developed to predict the response of removable syntactic foam (RSF) exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. RSF consists of glass micro-balloons (GMB) in a cured epoxy polymer matrix. A chemistry model is presented based on the chemical structure of the epoxy polymer, mass transport of polymer fragments to the bulk gas, and vapor-liquid equilibrium. Thermophysical properties were estimated from measurements. A bubble nucleation, growth, and coalescence model was used to describe changes in properties with the extent of reaction. Decomposition of a strand of syntactic foam exposed to high temperatures was simulated.

Hobbs, Michael L.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field Deborah S. Kelley,1 * Jeffrey A. Baross,1 Roger E. Summons,7 Sean P. Sylva4 The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field is a remarkable submarine ecosystem in which geological, chemical, and biological processes are intimately

Gilli, Adrian

128

Compressive properties of a closed-cell aluminum foam as a function of strain-rate and temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compressive constitutive behavior of a closed-cell aluminum foam (ALPORAS) manufactured by Shinko Wire Co. in Japan was evaluated under static and dynamic loading conditions as a function of temperature. High-strain-rate tests (1000-2000 s{sup -1}) were conducted using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). Quasi-static and intermediate-strain-rate tests were conducted on a hydraulic load frame. A small but discernable change in the flow stress behavior as a function of strain rate was measured. The deformation behavior of the Al-foam was however found to be strongly temperature dependent under both quasi-static and dynamic loading. Localized deformation and stress state instability during testing of metal foams is discussed in detail since the mechanical behavior over the entire range of strain rates indicates non-uniform deformation. Additionally, investigation of the effect of residual stresses created during manufacturing on the mechanical behavior was investigated.

Cady, Carl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Ill, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lovato, Manuel L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukai, T [JAPAN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Pipe viscometry of foams C. Enzendorfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pipe viscometry of foams C. Enzendorfer Institute of Drilling and Production, Mining University This paper describes a method for extracting useful information from small-scale pipe viscometer,and quality was determined in pipes of five diameters. The flow curves showed a marked dependenceon

ValkĂł, Peter

130

Spacetime Foam Model of the Schwarzschild Horizon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a spacetime foam model of the Schwarzschild horizon, where the horizon consists of Planck size black holes. According to our model the entropy of the Schwarzschild black hole is proportional to the area of its event horizon. It is possible to express geometrical arguments to the effect that the constant of proportionality is, in natural units, equal to one quarter.

Jarmo Makela; Ari Peltola

2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

Transient foam flow in porous media with CAT Scanner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transient behavior is likely to dominate over most of the duration of a foam injection field project. Due to the lack of date, little is presently known about transient foam flow behavior. Foam flow does not follow established models such as the Buckley-Leverett theory, and no general predictive model has been derived. Therefore, both experimental data and a foam flow theory are needed. In this work, foam was injected at a constant mass rate into one-dimensional sandpacks of 1-in diameter and 24-in or 48-in length that had initially been saturate with distilled water. The system was placed in a cat Scanner. Data, obtained at room temperature and low pressure at various times, include both the pressure and saturation distributions. Pressure profiles showed that the pressure gradient is much greater behind the foam front than ahead of it. Moreover, the pressure gradients keep changing as the foam advances in the sandpack. This behavior differs from Buckley-Leverett theory. The CT scan results demonstrated gas channeling near the front, but eventually the foam block all these channels and sweeps the entire cross section after many pore volumes of injection. Three series of experiments were run: (1) surfactant adsorption measurements; (2) gas displacements of surfactant-laden solutions and (3) foam displacements. The first two series of experiments were made to provide the necessary parameters required to match the foam displacements. To this end, it was necessary to smooth the saturation history data, using a Langmuir-type formula. A theory was proposed based on the principles of the fractional flow curve construction method. This foam theory treats the foam as composed of infinitesimal slugs of gas of varying viscosities. The foam front has the lowest viscosity and foam at the injection end has the highest.

Liu, Dianbin; Brigham, W.E.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

DYNAMIC FAILURE OF METALLIC CELLULAR MATERIALS S. LEE and H.D. ESPINOSA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in the protection design in automotive, locomotive, naval structures, and aerospace. Metallic not observe any rate dependency for the crashing stress of aluminum foams. These discrepancies from different within the specimen at very high strain rates. A model for shock waves in closed cell aluminum foams

Espinosa, Horacio D.

134

Self-Organized Amorphous TiO2 Nanotube Arrays on Porous Ti Foam for Rechargeable Lithium and Sodium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-organized amorphous TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTAs) were successfully fabricated on both Ti foil and porous Ti foam through electrochemical anodization techniques. The starting Ti foams were fabricated using ARCAM s Electron Beam Melting (EBM) technology. The TiO2 NTAs on Ti foam were used as anodes in lithium ion batteries; they exhibited high capacities of 103 Ahcm-2 at 10 Acm-2 and 83 Ahcm-2 at 500 Acm-2, which are two to three times higher than those achieved on the standard Ti foil, which is around 40 Ahcm-2 at 10 Acm-2 and 24 Ahcm-2 at 500 Acm-2, respectively. This improvement is mainly attributed to higher surface area of the Ti foam and higher porosity of the nanotube arrays layer grown on the Ti foam. In addition, a Na-ion half-cell composed of these NTAs anodes and Na metal showed a self-improving specific capacity upon cycling at 10 Acm-2. These results indicate that TiO2 NTAs grown on Ti porous foam are promising electrodes for Li-ion or Na-ion rechargeable batteries.

Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Menchhofer, Paul A [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming generated in crucible has been studied with a specific goal to understand the impact of increased water content on foaming in oxy-fired furnaces. E-glass foams were generated in a fused-quartz crucible located in a quartz window furnace equipped with video recording. The present study showed that humidity in the furnace atmosphere destabilizes foam, while other gases have little effect on foam stability. This study suggests that the higher foaming in oxy-fired furnace compared to air-fired is caused by the effect of water on early sulfate decomposition, promoting more efficient refining gas generation from sulfate (known as “dilution effect”).

Kim, Dong-Sang; Dutton, Bryan C.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Military housing foam application and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in sustainable communities. This project consists of two activities conducted in Hawaii that focus on performance, integration and application of energy saving technologies. Hawaii has many energy challenges, making this location an excellent testbed for these activities. Under this project, spray foam technology was applied at military housing on Oahu and the consumption data collected. A cost benefit and operational analysis of the foam was completed. The second phase of this project included design, integration, and analysis of photovoltaic systems at a military community on Oahu. This phase of the project was conducted as part of Forest City's second Solar America Showcase Award.

Torres, J. J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dynamical Heterogeneities in Grains and Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical heterogeneities have been introduced in the context of the glass transition of molecular liquids and the lengthscale associated with them has been argued to be at the origin of the observed quasi-universal behaviour of glassy systems. Dense amorphous packings of granular media and foams also exhibit slow dynamics, intermittency and heterogeneities. We review a number of recent experimental studies of these systems, where one has direct access to the relevant space-time dynamics, allowing for direct visualisations of the dynamical heterogeneities. On one hand these visualisations provide a unique opportunity to access the microscopic mechanisms responsible for the growth of dynamical correlations. On the other hand focussing on the differences in these heterogeneities in microscopically different systems allows to discuss the range of the analogies between molecular thermal glasses and athermal glasses such as granular media and foams. Finally this review is the opportunity to discuss various approaches to actually extract quantitatively the dynamical lengthscale from experimental data.

Olivier Dauchot; Douglas J. Durian; Martin van Hecke

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Design of composite plastic foams for improved cushioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. As shown in Appendix A, the three test foams for 28 this research are all nonlinear. Expanded polystyrene is a tangent-type material; polyurethane and polyethylene are anomalous-type materials. Tangent Type Anomalous Type U) (D U) Linear Type... group resins (polyester or polyether) . Poly- urethane foams are used frequently as cushioning materials because of their extremely resilient properties. For flexible foams, the polyols are primarily long- chain polyoxypropylene diols, with a small...

Eskew, James Oliver

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

ENHANCEMENT OF STRUCTURAL FOAM MATERIALS BY INCORPORATION OF GASIFIER SLAG  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As advanced gasification technology is increasingly adopted as an energy source, disposal of the resulting slag will become a problem. We have shown that gasifier slag can be incorporated into foamed glass, which is currently being manufactured as an abrasive and as an insulating material. The slag we add to foamed glass does not simply act as filler, but improves the mechanical properties of the product. Incorporation of gasifier slag can make foamed glass stronger and more abrasion resistant.

Olin Perry Norton; Ronald A. Palmer; W. Gene Ramsey

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Project Officer: Dan KingGreg Stillman Total budget: 300 K April 24 , 2013 Principal Investigator: Dr. Toshifumi...

143

Thermal Energy Storage in Metal Foams filled with Paraffin Wax.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Phase change materials (PCM) such as paraffin wax are known to exhibit slow thermal response due to their relatively low thermal conductivity. In this study,… (more)

Vadwala, Pathik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium foam fitted Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aluminium foam under either... -cell 6101 aluminium foam in relation to its fracture ... Source: Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit - Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary...

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous foam stabilized Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Minnesota Collection: Engineering 11 Self-Similar Collapse of Stationary Bulk Foams Tad W. Patzek Summary: review of the extensive literature on foam stability and Ostwald...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - amusic brain lost Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

amusic brain lost Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amusic brain lost Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Amusic Brain: Lost in Music,...

147

Potpourri of Los Alamos National Laboratory foam efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an update on microcellular foam research efforts at Los Alamos. Topics include the influence of pressure on the phase separation of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) from organic solution, a new concept of phase diagrams, physical testing of foams, and recent emulsion polymerization results.

Williams, J.M.; Wilkerson, M.H.; Wrobleski, D.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Mechanical properties and energy absorption characteristics of a polyurethane foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tension, compression and impact properties of a polyurethane encapsulant foam have been measured as a function of foam density. Significant differences in the behavior of the foam were observed depending on the mode of testing. Over the range of densities examined, both the modulus and the elastic collapse stress of the foam exhibited power-law dependencies with respect to density. The power-law relationship for the modulus was the same for both tension and compression testing and is explained in terms of the elastic compliance of the cellular structure of the foam using a simple geometric model. Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence of the collapse stress. Neither tension nor compression testing yielded realistic measurements of energy absorption (toughness). In the former case, the energy absorption characteristics of the foam were severely limited due to the inherent lack of tensile ductility. In the latter case, the absence of a failure mechanism led to arbitrary measures of energy absorption that were not indicative of true material properties. Only impact testing revealed an intrinsic limitation in the toughness characteristics of the material with respect to foam density. The results suggest that dynamic testing should be used when assessing the shock mitigating qualities of a foam.

Goods, S.H.; Neuschwanger, C.L.; Henderson, C.; Skala, D.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Factors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 1. Crude Oil Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the crude oil and the type of separation scheme used, foaming problems can curtail crude oil productionFactors Contributing to Petroleum Foaming. 1. Crude Oil Systems Michael K. Poindexter,*, Nael N, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 Received August 28, 2001 Gas/oil separation can often be accompanied

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

150

Sandia-Power Surety Task Force Hawaii foam analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) Power Surety Task Force was officially created in early 2008, after nearly two years of work in demand reduction and renewable energy technologies to support the Warfighter in Theater. The OSD Power Surety Task Force is tasked with identifying efficient energy solutions that support mission requirements. Spray foam insulation demonstrations were recently expanded beyond field structures to include military housing at Ft. Belvoir. Initial results to using the foam in both applications are favorable. This project will address the remaining key questions: (1) Can this technology help to reduce utility costs for the Installation Commander? (2) Is the foam cost effective? (3) What application differences in housing affect those key metrics? The critical need for energy solutions in Hawaii and the existing relationships among Sandia, the Department of Defense (DOD), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Forest City, make this location a logical choice for a foam demonstration. This project includes application and analysis of foam to a residential duplex at the Waikulu military community on Oahu, Hawaii, as well as reference to spray foam applied to a PACOM facility and additional foamed units on Maui, conducted during this project phase. This report concludes the analysis and describes the utilization of foam insulation at military housing in Hawaii and the subsequent data gathering and analysis.

McIntyre, Annie

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Mechanical Inhibition of Foam Formation via a Rotating Nozzle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been devel- oped to minimize the impact of foams [2]. Anti-foaming agents are added to prevent environmental disposal problems, and increase the overall process cost and complexity [3]. Non report a design for a rotating nozzle that prevents successive collocated impacts, thereby minimizing

Ristenpart, William

152

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Foams and granular media known state of mat-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foams and granular media 2 known state of mat- design glasses with de- perties on an industrial n disordered ail in this review, mod- proaches to the glass ledge of advanced liq- renormalization group, FIG a broad range of lengthscales, such as atomic (top left), colloidal (top right) systems, but also in foams

Cox, Simon

154

Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid thermoplastic polymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infustant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

Duchane, D.V.; Cash, D.L.

1984-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii ABSTRACT The Origin of the Lost Fleet of the Mongol Empire. (December 2008) Randall James Sasaki, B.A., Southwest Missouri State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Louis Filipe M. Vieira de Castro In 1281 C.E., under the rule... ................................................................................................................ xv CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................... 1 II A BRIEF HISTORY OF EAST ASIA ........................................................... 7 Before the Invasion...

Sasaki, Randall James

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Comments and Controversies Lost in localization: A minimal middle way  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article history: Received 19 March 2009 Revised 5 May 2009 Accepted 7 May 2009 Available online xxxx for a universal coordinate database. Neuroimage.) and Nielsen (Nielsen, F.A., 2009-this issue. Lost database and some possible approaches to creating one. I highlight the issue of minimal or maximal database

Hamilton, Antonia

157

RAMANUJAN, HIS LOST NOTEBOOK, ITS IMPORTANCE BRUCE C. BERNDT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAMANUJAN, HIS LOST NOTEBOOK, ITS IMPORTANCE BRUCE C. BERNDT 1. Brief Biography of Ramanujan became a clerk in the Madras Port Trust Office, where 1 #12;2 BRUCE C. BERNDT he was encouraged. Narayana Aiyar held a Master's Degree in Mathematics and at that time was probably one of the most capable

Berndt, Bruce C.

158

KOSHLIAKOV'S FORMULA AND GUINAND'S FORMULA IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KOSHLIAKOV'S FORMULA AND GUINAND'S FORMULA IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK BRUCE C. BERNDT1 , YOONBOK Mathematics Classification Numbers: Primary 33C10; Secondary 11F12, 11F20 1. Introduction At a conference held Research Program of the Korea Science & Engineering Foundation. 1 #12;2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, YOONBOK LEE

Berndt, Bruce C.

159

Fusion Power: I Think We're Lost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fusion Power: I Think We're Lost Robert L. Hirsch Consultant November 18, 2002 Presented to the Burning Plasma Assessment Committee of the National Research Council #12;2 How to Tell People Things and Technology. Summer 1997 & fall 1999. 2. Kaslow, J., et al. CRITERIA FOR PRACTICAL FUSION POWER SYSTEMS. EPRI

160

PiPe dreams? Jobs Gained, Jobs Lost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petroleum Institute that, if constructed, TransCanada's proposed Keystone XL (KXL) pipeline will generatePiPe dreams? Jobs Gained, Jobs Lost by the ConstruCtion of Keystone XL a rePort by Corne, and Induced) Jobs from Keystone XL 26 KXL Will Have Minor Impact on Unemployment Levels 27 Four Ways Keystone

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Yes, you can control lost and unaccounted-for gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1982, lost and unaccounted-for gas cost the US gas industry $1.983 billion, based on a gas worth of $5.00/1000 CF. A survey of key gas operators across the country produced a list of 23 suggestions for reducing gas losses in the areas of leakage control, measurement practices, accounting accuracy, and theft prevention.

Hale, D.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

Johansen, Tor Arne

163

Hybrid fiber reinforced Composite Phenolic foam Amit Desai, Steven R. Nutt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composite Center Hybrid Composite Phenolic foams were reinforced with glass and aramid fibers in different the hybrid foams exhibited higher strength and modulus as compared to foams reinforced with only glass with only glass fibers of different length , the elastic properties of foam such as modulus and density do

Southern California, University of

164

Foam flow around an obstacle: obstacle-wall interaction , B. Dollet2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

two-dimensional (2D) foams, such as can be made by squeezing a foam between two glass plates soFoam flow around an obstacle: obstacle-wall interaction S.J. Cox1 , B. Dollet2 , F. Graner2 1- chanics, University of Wales Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 3BZ, UK, e-mail: foams@aber.ac.uk 2 Spectrom

Cox, Simon

165

Localization of topological changes in Couette and Poiseuille flows of two-dimensional foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional (2D) foams, such as can be made by squeezing a foam between parallel glass plates until it consistsLocalization of topological changes in Couette and Poiseuille flows of two-dimensional foams S. Quasistatic simulations show that the topological changes or plastic events that occur when an aqueous foam

Cox, Simon

166

Experimental Investigation of the Effective Foam Viscosity in Unsaturated Porous Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foam has the potential to effectively carry and distribute either aqueous or gaseous amendments to the deep vadose zone for contaminant remediation. However, the transport of foam in porous media is complicated because flow characteristics such as the effective viscosity are affected not only by foam properties but also by the sediment properties and flow conditions. We determined the average effective foam viscosity via a series of laboratory experiments and found that the effective foam viscosity increased with the liquid fraction in foam, the injection rate, and sediment permeability. These impacts are quantified with an empirical expression, which is further demonstrated with data from literature. The results show that the liquid fraction in foam and sediment permeability are two primary factors affecting effective foam viscosity. These results suggest that, when foam is used in deep vadose zone remediation, foam flow will not suffer from gravitational drainage and can distribute amendments uniformly in heterogeneous sediments.

Zhang, Z. F.; Zhong, Lirong; White, Mark D.; Szecsody, James E.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

Archuleta, M.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular materials, a phenomenon called dilatancy. We have aready described a geometrical interpretation of elastic dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we complement this work in the regime of less dry 2D GG foams. In particular, we highlight the relatively strong dilatancy effects expected in the regime where we have predicted rapid Plateau border variations.

François Molino; Pierre Rognon; Cyprien Gay

2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glassglass liquid foams Francois Molino, Pierre Rognon, and Cyprien Gay #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass­glass liquid foams Fran�cois Molino: October 30, 2010) When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we

Recanati, Catherine

170

CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the experiments where the decomposition gases were vented sufficiently. The CPUF model results were not as good for the partially confined radiant heat experiments where the vent area was regulated to maintain pressure. Liquefaction and flow effects, which are not considered in the CPUF model, become important when the decomposition gases are confined.

Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Spectroscopic diagnosis of foam z-pinch plasmas on SATURN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid and annular silicon aerogel and agar foams were shot on the accelerator SATURN to study plasma initiation, acceleration, and stagnation. SATURN delivers 7 MA with a 50 nsec rise time to these foam loads. We fielded several spectroscopic diagnostics to measure plasma parameters throughout the z-pinch discharge. A spatially resolved single frame time-gated EUV spectrometer measured the extent of plasma ablation off the surface foam. A time integrated crystal spectrometer showed that characteristic K shell radiation of silicon in the aerogel and of S and Na impurities in the agar were all attenuated when the foam loads were coated with a conductive layer of gold. The time resolved pinhole camera showed that in general the quality of the pinch implosions was poor but improved with increasing efforts to improve current continuity such as prepulse and conductive coatings.

Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.; Deeney, C.; Jobe, D.; McGurn, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Graphite Foams for Lithium-Ion Battery Current Collectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite open-cell foams, with their very high electronic and thermal conductivities, may serve as high surface area and corrosion resistant current collectors for lithium-ion batteries. As a proof of principle, cathodes were prepared by sintering carbon-coated LiFePO4 particles into the porous graphite foams. Cycling these cathodes in a liquid electrolyte cell showed promising performance even for materials and coatings that have not been optimized. The specific capacity is not limited by the foam structure, but by the cycling performance of the coated LiFePO4 particles. Upon extended cycling for more than 100 deep cycles, no loss of capacity is observed for rates of C/2 or less. The uncoated graphite foams will slowly intercalate lithium reversibly at potentials less than 0.2 volts versus lithium.

Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Tiegs, Terry N [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Jang, Young-Il [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Spectroscopic diagnosis of foam z-pinch plasmas on SATURN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid and annular silicon aerogel and agar foams were imploded on the SATURN accelerator to study plasma initiation, acceleration, and stagnation. SATURN delivers 7 MA with a 50 ns rise time to these foam loads. We fielded several spectroscopic diagnostics to measure plasma parameters throughout the z-pinch discharge. A spatially resolved single frame time-gated extreme ultraviolet spectrometer measured the extent of plasma ablation off the surface of the foam. A time integrated crystal spectrometer showed that characteristic K shell radiation of silicon in the aerogel and of sulfur and sodium impurities in the agar were attenuated when the foam loads were coated with a conductive layer of gold. A time-resolved pinhole camera showed that in general the quality of the pinch implosions was poor but improved with increasing efforts to improve current continuity such as prepulse and conductive coatings. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.; Deeney, C.; Jobe, D.; Seaman, J.; Gilliland, T.; McGurn, J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States); MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Lost circulation in geothermal wells: survey and evaluation of industry experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and completion of geothermal wells can be a severe problem, particularly in naturally fractured and/or vugular formations. Geothermal and petroleum operators, drilling service companies, and independent consultants were interviewed to assess the lost circulation problem in geothermal wells and to determine general practices for preventing lost circulation. This report documents the results and conclusions from the interviews and presents recommendations for needed research. In addition, a survey was also made of the lost circulation literature, of currently available lost circulation materials, and of existing lost circulation test equipment.

Goodman, M.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

In Memoriam Cynthia Driscoll The University, and especially North Central Research & Outreach Center, lost a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center, lost a strong supporter this past September. Cynthia Driscoll lost her battle with cancer in death by her parents John C. Brackett and Mary Symons Brackett and step-mother Mary Lou Hoff. Cynthia

Minnesota, University of

177

Center for Inverse Design: Lost SharePoint Password?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUMCongratulations to CEN onWhiteLost SharePoint

178

Sulfur in peridotites and gabbros at Lost City (30N, MAR): Implications for hydrothermal alteration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minerals in samples from near the base of hydrothermal carbonate towers at Lost City show d34 S valuesSulfur in peridotites and gabbros at Lost City (30°N, MAR): Implications for hydrothermal of serpentinized peridotites and gabbros beneath the Lost City Hydrothermal Field at the southern face

Gilli, Adrian

179

Unaccounted-for gas; Lost or just misplaced  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lost and unaccounted for gas is the term used by the gas industry to define the difference between the quantity of gas received into and delivered out of a system over a specific period of time. For Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG and E) the gas is not really lost, just misplaced. The proper term is unaccounted for gas (UAF). PG and E has conducted a comprehensive research project to evaluate UAF on its gas transmission and distribution systems. This project was cofunded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI). GRI's involvement was directed, by Kirin Kothari, Manager of Metering and Operations Research. While PG and E's work began as a reaction to state regulatory agency concerns, this work will be invaluable to the rest of the gas industry in that it provides results and, more importantly, methodologies for the gas utility industry to use in taking the lead with regulatory agencies and with the energy industry regarding: Prudence of the UAF aspects of operations, Equity of allocation of UAF costs to various customer classes, Support for the position that the gas industry's contribution to the country's unburned methane emissions is small.

Grinstead, J.R.; Cowgill, R.M. (Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (US))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

Brown, Jr., Jesse J. (Christiansburg, VA); Hirschfeld, Deidre A. (Elliston, VA); Li, Tingkai (Blacksburg, VA)

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum foam core Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

core Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aluminum foam core Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The FORMGRIP Process: Foaming of Reinforced...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous foam toxicology Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Materials Science 13 Self-Similar Collapse of Stationary Bulk Foams Tad W. Patzek Summary: Figure 6. Wet foam pregenerated from a 0.4 wt. Vo aqueous solution...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid foams implanted Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUPRI-A Group Collection: Fossil Fuels 24 Self-Similar Collapse of Stationary Bulk Foams Tad W. Patzek Summary: Self-Similar Collapse of Stationary Bulk Foams Tad W. Patzek Dept....

184

Control of Vapor Dispersion and Pool Fire of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) with Expansion Foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this study aimed to obtain key parameters, such as the temperature changes of methane and foam and the extent reduction of vapor concentration. This study also focused on identifying the effectiveness of foam and thermal exclusion zone by investigating...

Yun, Geun Woong

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

185

Strain localization and cyclic damage of polyurethane foam cylinders: experimental tests and theoretical model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strain localization and cyclic damage of polyurethane foam cylinders: experimental tests subject to progressive damage. The chain of springs models the strain localization, and the second series qualitative agreement with the experiments. Keywords: polyurethane foams; strain localization; cyclic damage

Boyer, Edmond

186

The Effect of Moisture Absorption on the Physical Properties of Polyurethane Shape Memory Polymer Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and stress/strain behavior of network polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) foams has been investigated. With our ultimate goal of engineering polyurethane SMP foams...

Yu, Ya-Jen

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

187

Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

Ryan, J.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Carbon or graphite foam as a heating element and system thereof  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A temperature regulator includes at least one electrically conductive carbon foam element. The foam element includes at least two locations adapted for receiving electrical connectors thereto for heating a fluid, such as engine oil. A combustion engine includes an engine block and at least one carbon foam element, the foam element extending into the engine block or disposed in thermal contact with at least one engine fluid.

Ott, Ronald D. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Choudhury, Ashok (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Foaming of E-Glass II (Report for G Plus Project for PPG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL-15394 Foaming of E-Glass II (Report for G Plus Project for PPG) D.-S. Kim M. Portch J. Matyas Foaming of E-Glass II (Report for G Plus Project for PPG) D.-S. Kim M. Portch J. Matyas P. R. Hrma Pacific of glass batch chemical composition on E-glass foaming. The present study also included reruns of foam

Pilon, Laurent

190

OPTIMISATION OF EXTRUDED POLYMER FOAM BY THE RESIDENT TIME DISTRIBUTION APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to simulate the twin-screw extruder[1] to [11] . In this paper, we have studied the processing of polystyrene foam by extrusion in a single screw extruder coupled with a gear pump. The basic principle of foamingOPTIMISATION OF EXTRUDED POLYMER FOAM BY THE RESIDENT TIME DISTRIBUTION APPROACH Frédéric Leonardi

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Foam Control using a Fluidized Bed of Hydrophobic Particles by Clara Mata*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distillation and Delay-Coker reactors. However, foaming and defoaming are not yet understood. Foams trap gas in oil reservoirs, insulation, construction and refining processes such as Vacuum distillation and Delay gas fraction than the bubbly mixture from which it comes. The high gas hold-up in foams is undesirable

Joseph, Daniel D.

192

Composites: Part B 44 (2013) 584591 584 Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Multiscale Syntactic Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanical behavior of hollow glass microballoon-epoxy matrix syntactic foams reinforced with carbon compositions of syntactic foams, epoxy resins filled with glass microballoons are widely studied due to the extensive use of epoxy resins in aerospace applications [5-7]. Studies on these glass/epoxy syntactic foams

Gupta, Nikhil

193

1Cellular Polymers, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrostaticcompressionoffoamisofinterestinavarietyofcontextsincluding under-sea applications. Syntactic foam, for instance, consists of hollow glass1Cellular Polymers, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams © Rapra Technology, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams B. Moore, T. Jaglinski, D.S. Stone§ and R.S. Lakes

Lakes, Roderic

194

Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass foams: formation, transport properties, and heat, mass, and radiation transfer Andrei G depend, to a large extent, on foams formed on the surface of the molten glass and of the batch due models for thermophysical and transport properties and heat, mass, and radiation transfer in glass foams

Pilon, Laurent

195

Sedimenting discs in a two-dimensional foam I. T. Davies, S. J. Cox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional foams can be thought of as a monolayer of bubbles squeezed between two glass plates. We choose to probeSedimenting discs in a two-dimensional foam I. T. Davies, S. J. Cox Institute of Mathematics in a dry two-dimensional, monodisperse foam is studied. This, a variation of the classical Stokes

Cox, Simon

196

Foaming of E-Glass (Report for G Plus Project for PPG)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL-14625 Foaming of E-Glass (Report for G Plus Project for PPG) D. Kim P.. Hrma Pacific Northwest This document was printed on recycled paper. (8/00) #12;PNNL-14625 Foaming of E-Glass (Report for G Plus Project atmosphere on E-glass foaming, specifically focused on its water content to understand the effect of oxy

Pilon, Laurent

197

Experimental characterization and numerical simulations of a syntactic-foam/glass-bre composite sandwich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental characterization and numerical simulations of a syntactic-foam/glass-®bre composite core. Such core consists of a syntactic foam made by hollow glass microspheres embedded in an epoxy. Keywords: A. Glass ®bre; Composite sandwich; Syntactic foam; Mechanical tests; Numerical simulations (FE) 1

Corigliano, Alberto

198

Plateau border bulimia transition: discontinuities expected in three simple experiments on 2D liquid foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be observable. II. 2D GLASS-GLASS FOAM GEOMETRICAL VADEMECUM In the present section, we shall provide a geometri- cal description and some corresponding results for two- dimensional foams squeezed between two glass liquid foams Pierre Rognon, Fran¸cois Molino, and Cyprien Gay Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS, UPR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Plateau border bulimia transition: discontinuities expected in three simple experiments on 2D liquid foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be observable. II. 2D GLASS-GLASS FOAM GEOMETRICAL VADEMECUM In the present section, we shall provide a geometri- cal description and some corresponding results for two- dimensional foams squeezed between two glass liquid foams Pierre Rognon, Fran#24;cois Molino, and Cyprien Gay #3; Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal

Recanati, Catherine

200

Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

Celina, Mathias (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Parabolic-Dish Solar Concentrators of Film on Foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parabolic and spherical mirrors are constructed of aluminized PET polyester film on urethane foam. During construction, the chosen shape of the mirror is created by manipulating the elastic/plastic behavior of the film with air pressure. Foam is then applied to the film and, once hardened, air pressure is removed. At an f-number of 0.68, preliminary models have an optical angular spread of less than 0.25 degrees, a factor of 3.3 smaller than that for a perfectly spherical mirror. The possibility exists for creating large-lightweight mirrors with excellent shape and stiffness. These "film-on-foam" construction techniques may also be applicable to parabolic-trough solar concentrators but do not appear to be suitable for optical imaging applications because of irregularities in the film.

Barton, Sean A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ultra-low density microcellular polymer foam and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-low density, microcellular open-celled polymer foam and a method for making such foam are disclosed. A polymer is dissolved in a heated solution consisting essentially of at least one solvent for the dissolution of the polymer in the heated solution and the phase inversion of the dissolved polymer to a liquid gel upon sufficient cooling of the heated solution. The heated solution is contained in a containment means provided with a nucleating promoting means having a relatively rough surface formed of fixed nucleating sites. The heated solution is cooled for a period of time sufficient to form a liquid gel of the polymer by phase inversion. From the gel, a porous foam having a density of less than about 12.0 mg/cm{sup 3} and open porosity provided by well interconnected strut morphology is formed.

Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fracturing alliance improves profitability of Lost Hills field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 2 billion bbl of oil-in-place are present in the massive diatomite deposits of California's Lost Hills field, about 45 miles north-west of Bakersfield, Calif. Massive hydraulic fracturing treatments, 2,500-3,000 lb of proppant/net perforated ft, are an integral part of developing these reserves. An exclusive fracturing alliance initiated in 1990 between Chevron U.S.A. and Schlumberger Dowell has improved profitability of the Los Hills field. the paper describes the geology, the field before 1987, the 1987--90 period when hydraulic fracturing stimulation was found to be very costly, and after 1990 when the alliance was formed. The paper also describes the fracturing fluid, proppants, engineering evaluation, and execution of the job.

Stewart, M. (Schlumberger Dowell, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Stewart, D. (Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Gaona, M. (Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1994-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method for providing a low density high strength polyurethane foam  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for making a polyurethane closed-cell foam material exhibiting a bulk density below 4 lbs/ft.sup.3 and high strength. The present embodiment uses the reaction product of a modified MDI and a sucrose/glycerine based polyether polyol resin wherein a small measured quantity of the polyol resin is "pre-reacted" with a larger quantity of the isocyanate in a defined ratio such that when the necessary remaining quantity of the polyol resin is added to the "pre-reacted" resin together with a tertiary amine catalyst and water as a blowing agent, the polymerization proceeds slowly enough to provide a stable foam body.

Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L.; Goods, Steven H.; Skala, Dawn M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Keifer, Patrick N.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Coarse graining methods for spin net and spin foam models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We undertake first steps in making a class of discrete models of quantum gravity, spin foams, accessible to a large scale analysis by numerical and computational methods. In particular, we apply Migdal-Kadanoff and Tensor Network Renormalization schemes to spin net and spin foam models based on finite Abelian groups and introduce `cutoff models' to probe the fate of gauge symmetries under various such approximated renormalization group flows. For the Tensor Network Renormalization analysis, a new Gauss constraint preserving algorithm is introduced to improve numerical stability and aid physical interpretation. We also describe the fixed point structure and establish an equivalence of certain models.

Bianca Dittrich; Frank C. Eckert; Mercedes Martin-Benito

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electrical conductivity of dispersions: from dry foams to dilute suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new data for the electrical conductivity of foams in which the liquid fraction ranges from two to eighty percent. We compare with a comprehensive collection of prior data, and we model all results with simple empirical formul\\ae. We achieve a unified description that applies equally to dry foams and emulsions, where the droplets are highly compressed, as well as to dilute suspensions of spherical particles, where the particle separation is large. In the former limit, Lemlich's result is recovered; in the latter limit, Maxwell's result is recovered.

K. Feitosa; S. Marze; A. Saint-Jalmes; D. J. Durian

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Deformation Behavior of Nanoporous Metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoporous open-cell foams are a rapidly growing class of high-porosity materials (porosity {ge} 70%). The research in this field is driven by the desire to create functional materials with unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties where the material properties emerge from both morphology and the material itself. An example is the development of nanoporous metallic materials for photonic and plasmonic applications which has recently attracted much interest. The general strategy is to take advantage of various size effects to introduce novel properties. These size effects arise from confinement of the material by pores and ligaments, and can range from electromagnetic resonances to length scale effects in plasticity. In this chapter we will focus on the mechanical properties of low density nanoporous metals and how these properties are affected by length scale effects and bonding characteristics. A thorough understanding of the mechanical behavior will open the door to further improve and fine-tune the mechanical properties of these sometimes very delicate materials, and thus will be crucial for integrating nanoporous metals into products. Cellular solids with pore sizes above 1 micron have been the subject of intense research for many years, and various scaling relations describing the mechanical properties have been developed.[4] In general, it has been found that the most important parameter in controlling their mechanical properties is the relative density, that is, the density of the foam divided by that of solid from which the foam is made. Other factors include the mechanical properties of the solid material and the foam morphology such as ligament shape and connectivity. The characteristic internal length scale of the structure as determined by pores and ligaments, on the other hand, usually has only little effect on the mechanical properties. This changes at the submicron length scale where the surface-to-volume ratio becomes large and the effect of free surfaces can no longer be neglected. As the material becomes more and more constraint by the presence of free surfaces, length scale effects on plasticity become more and more important and bulk properties can no longer be used to describe the material properties. Even the elastic properties may be affected as the reduced coordination of surface atoms and the concomitant redistribution of electrons may soften or stiffen the material. If, and to what extend, such length scale effects control the mechanical behavior of nanoporous materials depends strongly on the material and the characteristic length scale associated with its plastic deformation. For example, ductile materials such as metals which deform via dislocation-mediated processes can be expected to exhibit pronounced length scale effects in the sub-micron regime where free surfaces start to constrain efficient dislocation multiplication. In this chapter we will limit our discussion to our own area of expertise which is the mechanical behavior of nanoporous open-cell gold foams as a typical example of nanoporous metal foams. Throughout this chapter we will review our current understanding of the mechanical properties of nanoporous open-cell foams including both experimental and theoretical studies.

Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Hamza, A V

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

Are Parent Voices Being Lost without Translation? The Importance of Spanish in Communication between Parents and Los Angeles Public School Administrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are Parent Voices Being Lost without Translation? Theon the Are Parent Voices Being Lost without Translation? 47them. Are Parent Voices Being Lost without Translation? 49

Villarreal, Belén

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor for Air Pollution Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor for Air Pollution Control Eunsung Kan, Marc A. Deshusses: 10.1002/bit.10767 Abstract: A new type of bioreactor for air pollution con- trol has been developed. The new process relies on an organic-phase emulsion and actively growing pollutant- degrading

210

Mechanistic Foam Flow Simulation in Heterogeneous and Multidimensional Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-scale simulation is a vital component of the engineering and economic evaluation of any enhanced oil recovery (EOR Copyright 1997, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. Received for review, April 24, 1997 Revised, July 23 generation, and foam propagation in rock formations. Efficient application and evaluation of candidates

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

211

Quasistatic rheology of foams II. Continuous shear flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and numerically. We extract, from the images of the sheared foam, the plastic flow profiles and the modifications AND GEORGES DEBREGEAS2 1 Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Pierce Hall, 29 in the temporal and spatial correlations of the plastic events. The spa- tial fluctuations of the static stress

212

Big Bang Day : Afternoon Play - Torchwood: Lost Souls  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Martha Jones, ex-time traveller and now working as a doctor for a UN task force, has been called to CERN where they're about to activate the Large Hadron Collider. Once activated, the Collider will fire beams of protons together recreating conditions a billionth of a second after the Big Bang - and potentially allowing the human race a greater insight into what the Universe is made of. But so much could go wrong - it could open a gateway to a parallel dimension, or create a black hole - and now voices from the past are calling out to people and scientists have started to disappear... Where have the missing scientists gone? What is the secret of the glowing man? What is lurking in the underground tunnel? And do the dead ever really stay dead? Lost Souls is a spin-off from the award-winning BBC Wales TV production Torchwood. It stars John Barrowman, Freema Agyeman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd, Lucy Montgomery (of Titty Bang Bang) and Stephen Critchlow.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

Y-12 Construction hits one million man-hour mark without a lost...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction hits one million man-hour mark without a lost-time accident | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

214

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams Francois Molino, Pierre Rognon, and Cyprien Gay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note and calculations concerning elastic dilatancy in 2D glass-glass liquid foams Fran¸cois Molino 30, 2010) When deformed, liquid foams tend to raise their liquid contents like immersed granular dilatancy in 3D foams and in very dry foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams). Here, we

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

Lost sunspot cycle in the beginning of Dalton minimum: New evidence and consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the beginning of the Dalton minimum during 1790s [Usoskin et al., 2001]. Earlier, this cycle has been combinedLost sunspot cycle in the beginning of Dalton minimum: New evidence and consequences I. G. Usoskin November 2002; published 24 December 2002. [1] We have recently suggested that one solar cycle was lost

Usoskin, Ilya G.

216

IPA Derivatives for Make-to-Stock Production-Inventory Systems With Lost Sales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPA Derivatives for Make-to-Stock Production-Inventory Systems With Lost Sales Yao Zhao Benjamin-stock policy and unsatisfied demand is lost. The paper derives formulas for IPA (Infinitesimal Perturbation nonparametric in the sense that no specific probability law need be postulated. It is further shown that all IPA

217

Record of archaeal activity at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City Hydrothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Record of archaeal activity at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City Hydrothermal Field S. M EHAY,1 of young, outer surfaces of brucite­carbonate deposits from the ultramafic-hosted Lost City hydro- thermal field were analyzed for DNA and lipid biomarker distributions and for carbon and hydrogen stable isotope

Gilli, Adrian

218

Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field S. Q. LANG,1 G environment, the Lost City hydrothermal field (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Total hydrolizable amino acid (THAA carbon (2.5­15.1%). The amino acid distributions, and the relative concentrations of these compounds

Gilli, Adrian

219

Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade May 2008 Abstract The carbon geochemistry of serpentinized peridotites and gabbroic rocks recovered at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) and drilled at IODP Hole 1309D at the central dome of the Atlantis

Gilli, Adrian

220

Assessment of net lost revenue adjustment mechanisms for utility DSM programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utility shareholders can lose money on demand-side management (DSM) investments between rate cases. Several industry analysts argue that the revenues lost from utility DSM programs are an important financial disincentive to utility DSM investment. A key utility regulatory reform undertaken since 1989 allows utilities to recover the lost revenues incurred through successful operation of DSM programs. Explicitly defined net lost revenue adjustment (NLRA) mechanisms are states` preferred approach to lost revenue recovery from DSM programs. This report examines the experiences states and utilities are having with the NLRA approach. The report has three objectives. First, we determine whether NLRA is a feasible and successful approach to removing the lost-revenue disincentive to utility operation of DSM programs. Second, we identify the conditions linked to successful implementation of NLRA mechanisms in different states and assess whether NLRA has changed utility investment behavior. Third, we suggest improvements to NLRA mechanisms. We first identify states with NLRA mechanisms where utilities are recovering lost revenues from DSM programs. We interview staff at regulatory agencies in all these states and utility staff in four states. These interviews focus on the status of NLRA, implementation issues, DSM measurement issues, and NLRA results. We also analyze regulatory agency orders on NLRA, as well as associated testimony, reports, and utility lost revenue recovery filings. Finally, we use qualitative and quantitative indicators to assess NLRA`s effectiveness. Contrary to the concerns raised by some industry analysts, our results indicate NLRA is a feasible approach to the lost-revenue disincentive.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occur where physical factors such as extreme wind fields and strong currents cause waves to mergeLost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 1 Unidata Policy Lost at Sea: Hurricane Force Wind Fields and the North Pacific Ocean Environment 2 Hurricane Force (HF

222

CO/sub 2/ foam flooding performance vs. rock wettability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO/sub 2/ flooding projects have shown large potential for oil recovery, but in many cases the volumetric sweep efficiency is greatly limited by gravity tonguing and/or viscous fingering. To reduce these effects foam could be used as an alternative to WAG CO/sub 2/ injection. Experiments on the CO/sub 2/ foam process were conducted in a 1/4 5-spot reservoir model in order to investigate the effect of rock wetting state and total CO/sub 2/ slug size on secondary and tertiary extra-oil recovery. Laboratory model results show that the process is more successful in an oil-wet medium than in a water-wet medium due to larger surfactant adsorption in the water-wet medium. Also, requirements for optimal CO/sub 2/ slug size are smaller than in the WAG process, with larger extra oil recovery for both secondary and tertiary floods.

Lescure, B.M.; Claridge, E.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effects of quantum space time foam in the neutrino sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss violations of CPT and quantum mechanics due to interactions of neutrinos with space-time quantum foam. Neutrinoless double beta decay and oscillations of neutrinos from astrophysical sources (supernovae, active galactic nuclei) are analysed. It is found that the propagation distance is the crucial quantity entering any bounds on EHNS parameters. Thus, while the bounds from neutrinoless double beta decay are not significant, the data of the supernova 1987a imply a bound being several orders of magnitude more stringent than the ones known from the literature. Even more stringent limits may be obtained from the investigation of neutrino oscillations from active galactic nuclei sources, which have an impressive potential for the search of quantum foam interactions in the neutrino sector.

H. V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; H. Päs; U. Sarkar

2000-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

224

Carbon foam characterization: sandwich flexure, tensile and shear response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pitches. More recently, new manufacturing developments have been made at Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) [4,5]. Changes in the manufacturing process have led to enhancement of certain thermal properties, and are leading the way to use of carbon foam.... As the material becomes more available to industry, the list of potential applications will continue to grow; however, there are some promising potential applications currently under development. ORNL is currently investigating and applying the unique thermal...

Sarzynski, Melanie Diane

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Comments on Cahill's Quantum Foam Inflow Theory of Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reveal an underlying flaw in Reginald T. Cahill's recently promoted quantum foam inflow theory of gravity. It appears to arise from a confusion of the idea of the Galilean invariance of the acceleration of an individual flow with what is obtained as an acceleration when a homogeneous flow is superposed with an inhomogeneous flow. We also point out that the General Relativistic covering theory he creates by substituting a generalized Painleve-Gullstrand metric into Einstein's field equations leads to absurd results.

T. D. Martin

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser inertial confinement fusion during 1987. The foam materials are polystyrene, resorcinol-formaldehyde, carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationship of their properties to target specifications are presented. Progress in the creation and testing of prototype targets is also described.

Haendler, B.L.; Buckley, S.R.; Chen, C.; Cook, A.R.; Cook, R.C.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Kramer, H.D.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Explosively driven low-density foams and powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hollow RX-08HD cylindrical charges were loaded with boron and PTFE, in the form of low-bulk density powders or powders dispersed in a rigid foam matrix. Each charge was initiated by a Comp B booster at one end, producing a detonation wave propagating down the length of the cylinder, crushing the foam or bulk powder and collapsing the void spaces. The PdV work done in crushing the material heated it to high temperatures, expelling it in a high velocity fluid jet. In the case of boron particles supported in foam, framing camera photos, temperature measurements, and aluminum witness plates suggest that the boron was completely vaporized by the crush wave and that the boron vapor turbulently mixed with and burned in the surrounding air. In the case of PTFE powder, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of residues recovered from fragments of a granite target slab suggest that heating was sufficient to dissociate the PTFE to carbon vapor and molecular fluorine which reacted with the quartz and aluminum silicates in the granite to form aluminum oxide and mineral fluoride compounds.

Viecelli, James A. (Orinda, CA); Wood, Lowell L. (Simi Valley, CA); Ishikawa, Muriel Y. (Livermore, CA); Nuckolls, John H. (Danville, CA); Pagoria, Phillip F. (Livermore, CA)

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

228

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-2-2013_Foamed Cement_20140124.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultimately, this research will provide industry the knowledge to ensure long-term well integrity and safe operation of wells in which foamed cements are used. Computed...

229

Thermal Characterization of Graphitic Carbon Foams for Use in Thermal Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Highly conductive graphitic foams are currently being studied for use as thermal conductivity enhancers (TCEs) in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. TES systems store… (more)

Drummond, Kevin P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium foam manufacturing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Metallurgy, Composites and Coatings Group Collection: Materials Science 5 Fracture and microstructure of open-cell aluminium foam1 Summary: 47 Chapter 5 Fracture and...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous foam flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Los Angeles Collection: Physics 15 Self-Similar Collapse of Stationary Bulk Foams Tad W. Patzek Summary: preformed during the initial steady- state countercurrent flow of...

232

Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pitch-based carbon foam heat sink with phase change material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a carbon foam heat sink is disclosed which obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications. The foam is encased and filled with a phase change material to provide a very efficient heat sink device.

Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Synthesis of Mesocellular Silica Foams with Tunable Window and Cell Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polystyrene microspheres coated with cationic surfactants are easily prepared by micro- emulsion templates. These silica foams resemble dense aerogels. Introduction Because of their greatly enhanced pore

Yang, Peidong

235

The use of coated micropowders to reduce radiation heat transfer in foam insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyurethane foam is the most effective insulation currently available for buildings. Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blowing agents, which have low thermal conductivities, contribute highly to the effectiveness of this insulation. ...

Marge, Arlene Lanciani

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Final Report: Use of Graphite Foam as a Thermal Performance Enhancement of Heavy Hybrid Propulsion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's graphite foam has the potential to be used as a heat exchanger for the Army's Future Combat System Manned Ground Vehicle and thus has the potential to improve its thermal performance. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program FLOW3D was used to develop a new CFD model for the graphite foam to be used in the development of a proper heat exchanger. The program was calibrated by first measuring the properties of the solid foams and determining the parameters to be used in the CFD model. Then the model was used to predict within 5% error the performance of finned foam heat sinks. In addition, the f factors and j factors commonly used to predict pressure drop and heat transfer were calculated for both the solid and finned structures. There was some evidence that corrugating the foams would yield higher j/f ratios than state of the art heat exchangers, confirming previously measured data. Because the results show that the CFD model was validated, it is recommended that the funding for Phases 2 through 5 be approved for the design of both the finned heat exchanger using tubes and round fin structures and the solid foam design using corrugated foams. It was found that the new CFD model using FLOW3D can predict both solid foam heat transfer and finned foam heat transfer with the validated model parameters. In addition, it was found that the finned foam structures exhibited j/f ratios that indicate that significant heat transfer is occurring within the fin structures due to aerodynamically induced flow, which is not present in solid aluminum fin structures. It is possible that the foam surfaces can act as turbulators that increase heat transfer without affecting pressure drop, like the vortex generators seen in state of the art heat exchangers. These numbers indicate that the foam can be engineered into an excellent heat exchanger. It was also found that corrugating the solid foams would increase the j/f ratio dramatically, allowing the solid foams to compete directly with standard heat exchangers. Although corrugated L1 foam samples have not been produced (attempts are under way), it is possible that their j/f ratio can be even higher than those of the finned structures.

Klett, James William [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Foaming of E-Glass II (Report for G Plus Project for PPG)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a previous study, the effect of the furnace atmosphere on E glass foaming was investigated with the specific goal to understand the impact of increased water content on foaming in oxy-fired furnaces. The present study extended the previous study and focused on the effect of glass batch chemical composition on E-glass foaming. The present study also included reruns of foam tests performed in a previous study, which resulted in the same trend: the foaming extent increased nearly linearly with the heating rate and no foam was produced when CO2 + 55% H2O atmosphere was introduced at 300°C. It was shown that the lack of foaming in the test with CO2 + 55% H2O atmosphere introduced at 300°C was caused by a loss of sulfate at T <1250°C because of higher water content at the early stages of melting. The tests with new batches in the present study showed that replacing quicklime with limestone tend to decrease foaming, possibly caused by increased sulfate loss during early stages of melting in the batch with limestone. The batches where Na2SO4 was replaced with NaNO3, NaNO3 + CeO2, or CeO2, produced only very limited foaming regardless of the replacing components. As expected, the foaming extent increased as the sulfate content in the batch increased. The results of the present study suggest that foaming can be reduced by using limestone over quicklime and by decreasing the sulfate addition to a minimum required for refining.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Portch, Matthew P.; Matyas, Josef; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effects of surfactants on the microstructure of porous ceramic scaffolds fabricated by foaming for bone tissue engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A porous scaffold comprising a {beta}-tricalcium phosphate matrix and bioactive glass powders was fabricated by foaming method and the effects of surfactants as foaming agent on microstructure of scaffolds were investigated. Foaming capacity and foam stability of different surfactants in water firstly were carried out to evaluate their foam properties. The porous structure and pore size distribution of the scaffolds were systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an optical microscopy connected to an image analyzer. The results showed that the foam stability of surfactant has more remarkable influence on their microstructure such as pore shape, size and interconnectivity than the foaming ability of one. Porous scaffolds fabricated using nonionic surfactant Tween 80 with large foam stability exhibited higher open and total porosities, and fully interconnected porous structure with a pore size of 750-850 {mu}m.

Wang Xi, E-mail: nano-sun@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Lushan Road South, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Ruan Jianming [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chen Qiyuan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Lushan Road South, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

239

Moab Project Exceeds 5 Years of Operations Without Lost-Time...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

JUNCTION, Colo. - It has been more than five years since workers on the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Utah had a lost-time injury or illness. This...

240

Mixing energy analysis of Bingham plastic fluids for severe lost circulation prevention using similitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the demand for oil and gas resources increases, the need to venture into more hostile environments becomes a dynamic focus in the petroleum industry. One problem associated with certain high risk formations is lost circulation. As a result...

Massingill, Robert Derryl, Jr.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Construction hits one ... Y-12 Construction hits one million-hour mark without a lost-time accident Posted: August 30, 2012 - 5:30pm The B&W Y-12 Direct-Hire Construction team has...

242

Evaluation of equipment and methods to map lost circulation zones in geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study and evaluation of methods to locate, characterize, and quantify lost circulation zones are described. Twenty-five methods of mapping and quantifying lost circulation zones were evaluated, including electrical, acoustical, mechanical, radioactive, and optical systems. Each tool studied is described. The structured, numerical evaluation plan, used as the basis for comparing the 25 tools, and the resulting ranking among the tools is presented.

McDonald, W.J.; Leon, P.A.; Pittard, G.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Polystyrene foam products equation of state as a function of porosity and fill gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO{sub 2}-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O{sub 2}-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO{sub 2} decomposes at high temperatures.

Mulford, Roberta N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Damian C [LLNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Liquid Foams D. Weaire, S.J. Cox and K. Brakke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is clumsy in English and it is elusive in French. The book is mainly based upon a series of papers of Foams (Weaire and Hutzler 1999) is a broad introduction, mostly con- centrating on liquid foams, close to the optimum for electrical or thermal conductivity (Durand et al. 2004). For other properties

Cox, Simon

245

Fracture enhanced in-situ foam remediation. Topical report, July 1995-December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the technical feasibility of soil fracturing as an enhancement to transportation of foam and foam-assisted site remediation. This project is part of an overall effort by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to develop technologies for cost-effective, in-situ remediation of soils.

Chowdiah, P.; Misra, B.R.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effect of Gas Diffusion on Mobility of Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery Lars E. Nonnekes1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Gas Diffusion on Mobility of Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery Lars E. Nonnekes1 Foam can improve the sweep efficiency of gas injected into oil reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery University William Richard Rossen Email: W.R.Rossen@tudelft.nl Abstract Transport of gas across

Cox, Simon

247

Foaming of E-Glass (Report for G Plus Project for PPG)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of foams generated in the crucible melts was investigated to study the effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming, specifically focused on its water content to understand the effect of oxy-firing. A quartz-crucible furnace equipped with video recording was used to observe the behavior and to evaluate stability of foams generated from the PPG E-glass under various atmospheres. The present study preliminarily concluded that the higher foaming in oxy-fired furnace compared to air-fired is caused by the effect of water on early sulfate decomposition, promoting more efficient refining gas generation from sulfate (known as ''dilution effect''), not by the effect of humidity on foam lamella stability. A plausible explanation for the difference between soda-lime glass and E-glass in the end result of the dilution effect on glass refining and foaming is presented. A preliminary experiment on the effect of heating rate also suggests that thermal history of glass melting can be a major factor in the rate of E-glass foaming. Approaches to develop the methods to reduce foaming in oxy-fired furnace are recommended.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent; Dutton, Bryan C.

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 34 (1999) 637 644 Cell nucleation in solid-state polymeric foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 34 (1999) 637­ 644 Cell nucleation in solid-state polymeric foams-mail: holl@u.washington.edu The mechanism for nucleation phenomenon in solid-state microcellular foams. The nucleation phenomenon is thermally activated at the effective glass transition temperature of the gas

Kumar, Vipin

249

Control of the specific growth rate of Bacillus subtilis for the production of biosurfactant lipopeptides in bioreactors with foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. However, the foam also entraps some biomass quantity and consequently reduces the biomass quantity to extract it by foaming. The control law is designed to maintain a constant specific biomass growth rate of biomass induced by the foaming. Previous experiments have provided a model of the process and values

Boyer, Edmond

250

Impact Strength of High Relative Density Solid State CO, Blown CPET Microcellular Foams Impact Strength of High Relative Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an increased glass transition temperature (T,), thus requiring higher foaming temperatures. Baldwin and SuhImpact Strength of High Relative Density Solid State CO, Blown CPET Microcellular Foams ImpactTerephthalate) Microcellular Foams Vipin KurnaW, Richard P Juntunena, and Chris Barlowb University of Washington, Seattle

Kumar, Vipin

251

Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction of foams around a circular obstacle within a long channel. In experiments, we confine the foam between liquid and glass surfaces. In simulations, we use a deterministic software, the Surface Evolver

Cox, Simon

252

Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming Dong-Sang Kim a,*, Bryan C. Dutton b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming Dong-Sang Kim a,*, Bryan C. Dutton b , Pavel R in revised form 21 August 2006 Abstract The effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming has been studied with the specific goal of understanding the impact of increased water content on foaming in oxy-fired furnaces. E-glass

Pilon, Laurent

253

Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using 'L' clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and 'picture framing' the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

Herk, A.; Baker, R.; Prahl, D.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Drag coefficient for the air-sea exchange: foam impact in hurricane conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A physical model is proposed for the estimation of the foam impact on the variation of the effective drag coefficient, C_d, with reference to the wind speed U10 in stormy and hurricane conditions. In the present model C_d is approximated by partitioning the sea surface into foam-covered and foam-free areas. Based on the available optical and radiometric measurements of the fractional foam coverage and the characteristic roughness of the sea-surface in the saturation limit of the foam coverage, the model yields the resulting dependence of C_d vs U10. This dependence is in fair agreement with that evaluated from field measurements of the vertical variation of the mean wind speed.

Golbraikh, Ephim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS surfaces; 2) inhibiting the cathodic reactions at the corrosion site of CS; 3) extending the coverage of cement over CS surfaces; and, 4) improving the adherence of the cement to CS surfaces. Thus, the CS’s corrosion rate of 176 milli inch/per year (mpy) for 1 wt% FA-foamed cement without AP was considerably reduced to 69 mpy by adding only 2 wt% AP. Addition of AP at 10 wt% further reduced this rate to less than 10 mpy.

Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Plasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam with metallic foam coremetallic foam coremetallic foam coremetallic foam core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity-- · Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006 --Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006 --Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006 --Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006

Luo, Xiaoyu

257

Applied Composite Materials, 2005. 12(3-4): p. 247-261 247 Enhancement of Energy Absorption in Syntactic Foams by Nanoclay Incorporation for Sandwich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

70803 ABSTRACT Syntactic foams are closed pore foams fabricated by the mechanical mixing of hollow glass in Syntactic Foams by Nanoclay Incorporation for Sandwich Core Applications Nikhil Gupta1 and Rahul Maharsia2 foams due to the incorporation of nano-sized clay (nanoclay) particles. A surface modified clay, Nanomer

Gupta, Nikhil

258

Method and apparatus for producing a carbon based foam article having a desired thermal-conductivity gradient  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbon based foam article is made by heating the surface of a carbon foam block to a temperature above its graphitizing temperature, which is the temperature sufficient to graphitize the carbon foam. In one embodiment, the surface is heated with infrared pulses until heat is transferred from the surface into the core of the foam article such that the graphitizing temperature penetrates into the core to a desired depth below the surface. The graphitizing temperature is maintained for a time sufficient to substantially entirely graphitize the portion of the foam article from the surface to the desired depth below the surface. Thus, the foam article is an integral monolithic material that has a desired conductivity gradient with a relatively high thermal conductivity in the portion of the core that was graphitized and a relatively low thermal conductivity in the remaining portion of the foam article.

Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Cameron, Christopher Stan (Sanford, NC) [Sanford, NC

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

259

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

260

Bright x-ray sources from laser irradiation of foams with high concentration of Ti  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-density foams irradiated by a 20 kJ laser at the Omega laser facility (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY, USA) are shown to convert more than 5% of the laser energy into 4.6 to 6.0?keV x rays. This record efficiency with foam targets is due to novel fabrication techniques based on atomic-layer-deposition of Ti atoms on an aerogel scaffold. A Ti concentration of 33 at.?% was obtained in a foam with a total density of 5?mg/cm{sup 3}. The dynamics of the ionization front through these foams were investigated at the 1 kJ laser of the Gekko XII facility (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan). Hydrodynamic simulations can reproduce the average electron temperature but fail to predict accurately the heat front velocity in the foam. This discrepancy is shown to be unrelated to the possible water adsorbed in the foam but could be attributed to effects of the foam micro-structure.

Pérez, F., E-mail: perez75@llnl.gov; Patterson, J. R.; May, M.; Colvin, J. D.; Biener, M. M.; Wittstock, A.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Satcher, J. H.; Gammon, S. A.; Poco, J. F.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Ishihara, K.; Tanaka, N.; Ikenouchi, T.; Nishimura, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Foam composition for treating asbestos-containing materials and method of using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, at least about 0.1% by weight of a source of fluoride ions, and a stable foam forming amount of a foaming agent system having both cationic and non-ionic functionality. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition in the form of a foam also disclosed.

Block, J.; Krupkin, N.V.; Kuespert, D.R.; Nishioka, G.M.; Lau, J.W.K.; Palmer, N.I.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Heat transfer in sound propagation and attenuation through gas-liquid polyhedral foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cell method is developed, which takes into account the bubble geometry of polyhedral foams, and provides for the generalized Rayleigh-Plesset equation that contains the non-local in time term corresponding to heat relaxation. The Rayleigh-Plesset equation together with the equations of mass and momentum balances for an effective single-phase inviscid fluid yield a model for foam acoustics. The present calculations reconcile observed sound velocity and attenuation with those predicted using the assumption that thermal dissipation is the dominant damping mechanism in a range of foam expansions and sound excitation frequencies.

Yuri M. Shtemler; Isaac R. Shreiber

2007-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Plastic flow of foams and emulsions in a channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to understand the flow profiles of complex fluids, a crucial issue concerns the emergence of spatial correlations among plastic rearrangements exhibiting cooperativity flow behaviour at the macroscopic level. In this paper, the rate of plastic events in a Poiseuille flow is experimentally measured on a confined foam in a Hele-Shaw geometry. The correlation with independently measured velocity profiles is quantified. To go beyond a limitation of the experiments, namely the presence of wall friction which complicates the relation between shear stress and shear rate, we compare the experiments with simulations of emulsion droplets based on the lattice-Boltzmann method, which are performed both with, and without, wall friction. Our results indicate a correlation between the localisation length of the velocity profiles and the localisation length of the number of plastic events. Finally, unprecedented results on the distribution of the orientation of plastic events show that there is a non-trivial correla...

Dollet, B; Sbragaglia, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Something Lost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the int(~ll? :i.gence to :cuDJ.iso that little problem. About the tails - He'll just h?;v(~ to hope that tnoy l; . r:i.ll c'Lccep-trank insigni.:1 in lieu of tails carried. high. It thcy':ce already in contr'..ct wit}} the IJ1ederation they must know...:'C"lnov(:cJ. from the l".mlx~,f;;Fj2.clo:cial party 0 And tha.t would nover do. T:'G Jx:.cl his own pJ.;::tDS for tho future -- and they (:id not (::ntircly coincL:lo I,vi th f)':::,T:'C':.1.1' n ??? ""Jelcome 2:,bor:?1Td th(~ Jl~ntGTpJ:'ise 9 Ambassador. 1f...

Clark, Sheila

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Developing & tailoring multi-functional carbon foams for multi-field response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As technological advances occur, many conventional materials are incapable of providing the unique multi-functional characteristics demanded thus driving an accelerated focus to create new material systems such as carbon and graphite foams...

Sarzynski, Melanie Diane

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cellular Foams: A Potential Innovative Solid Breeder Material for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic foam and cellular materials are being used in a wide variety of industries and are finding ever growing number of applications. Over the past decade advances in manufacturing of cellular materials have resulted in ceramics with highly uniform interconnected porosities ranging in size from a few {mu}m to several mm. These relatively new ceramic foam materials have a unique set of thermo-mechanical properties, such as excellent thermal shock resistance and high surface to volume ratios. Based on new advances in processing ceramic foams, we suggest the development of ceramic foams or cellular ceramics for solid breeders in fusion reactor blankets. A cellular breeder material has a number of thermo-mechanical advantages over pebble beds, which can enhance blanket performance, improve operational stability, and reduce overall blanket costs.

Sharafat, S.; Ghoniem, N.; Williams, B.; Babcock, J. [University of California Los Angeles (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrogating foam cell Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 2 List of Publications 1. E. Amsterdam, P.R. Onck, J.Th.M. De Hosson. Fracture and microstructure of Summary: of open-cell aluminium foam. Journal of Materials...

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium foam core Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 5 List of Publications 1. E. Amsterdam, P.R. Onck, J.Th.M. De Hosson. Fracture and microstructure of Summary: of open-cell aluminium foam. Journal of Materials...

270

Novel application of foam for in-situ soil remediation. Topical report, April 1992-September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the task is to evaluate the use of foams to deliver surfactants, bacteria, solvents, and/or nutrients to promote in-situ bioremediation of soils contaminated with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or to evaluate the use of foams to render contaminants available for physical collection and subsequent degradation. This task consists of two subtasks: (1) Literature Survey of Related Technologies and (2) Preliminary Experimental Investigations of Interfacial Phenomenon and the Use of Foams to Remediate Contaminated Sites. An extensive literature review was completed in which abstracts of more than one hundred technical articles were prepared. Laboratory studies to investigate the use of foams to remediate PAH-contaminated soil were performed with several Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) soils as well as with model experimental systems.

Kilbane, J.J.; Liu, B.Y.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Application of Genetic Algorithms and Thermogravimetry to Determine the Kinetics of Polyurethane Foam in Smoldering Combustion   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the kinetic parameters governing the thermal and oxidative degradation of flexible polyurethane foam are determined using thermogravimetric data and a genetic algorithm. These kinetic parameters are needed ...

Rein, Guillermo; Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Torero, Jose L; Urban, David

272

Effect of microstructure of closed cell foam on strength and effective stiffness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure of the foam. A low- boiling, inert liquid fluorocarbon is mixed in with the polyol. When the polymerization reaction takes place, the exotherm is sufficient to cause the fluorocarbon to volatilize and act as blowing agent. It should also...

Sue, Ji Woong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-2-2014_Addendum 1 to Foamed Cement...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Addendum 1 to Computed Tomography and Statistical Analysis of Bubble Size Distributions in Atmospheric-Generated Foamed Cement 6 March 2014 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-2-2014...

274

SYNTACTIC AND COMPOSITE FOAMS Whispering gallery mode-based micro-optical sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYNTACTIC AND COMPOSITE FOAMS Whispering gallery mode-based micro-optical sensors for structural and filament wound pipes has been studied, where one of the glass fibers is replaced by an optical fiber

Ă?tĂĽgen, Volkan

275

Errant Children/Scalise Sugiyama and Sugiyama ",,Once the Child is Lost He Dies"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Errant Children/Scalise Sugiyama and Sugiyama 1 ",,Once the Child is Lost He Dies": Monster Stories exposure, thirst, hunger, or predation. Parents might use stories about voracious monsters that prey of foraging environments; (2) errant children are vulnerable to injury and violent death; (3) forager parents

Sugiyama, Lawrence S.

276

IPA Derivatives for Make-to-Stock Production-Inventory Systems With Lost Sales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPA Derivatives for Make-to-Stock Production-Inventory Systems With Lost Sales Yao Zhao for IPA (Infinitesimal Perturbation Analysis) derivatives of the sample-path time averages law need be postulated. It is further shown that all IPA derivatives under study are unbiased and very

Lin, Xiaodong

277

Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractal branching organizations of Ediacaran rangeomorph fronds reveal a lost Proterozoic body plan, using parametric Lindenmayer systems, a first formal model of rangeomorph morphologies reveals a fractal-filling strategies. The fractal body plan of rangeomorphs is shown to maximize surface area, consistent

Cambridge, University of

278

Advanced geothermal foam drilling systems (AFS) -- Phase 1 final report, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced coiled-tubing foam drilling system is being developed where two concentric strings of coiled tubing are used to convey water and air to the hole bottom where they are mixed together to produce foam for underbalanced drilling. This system has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs by increasing drilling rates (due to the motor being powered by water), and reducing compressor and nitrogen costs (due to lower gas pressures and volumes).

W. C. Maurer

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

FOAM FORMATION IN THE SALTSTONE PRODUCTION FACILITY: EVALUATION OF SOURCES AND MITIGATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Production Facility receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. Influents into Tank 50H include the Effluent Treatment Project waste concentrate, H-Canyon low activity waste and General Purpose Evaporator bottoms, Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit decontaminated salt solution, and salt solution from the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjust campaign. Using the Waste Characterization System (WCS), this study tracks the relative amounts of each influent into Tank 50H, as well as the total content of Tank 50H, in an attempt to identify the source of foaming observed in the Saltstone Production Facility hopper. Saltstone has been using antifoam as part of routine processing with the restart of the facility in December 2006. It was determined that the maximum admix usage in the Saltstone Production Facility, both antifoam and set retarder, corresponded with the maximum concentration of H-Canyon low activity waste in Tank 50H. This paper also evaluates archived salt solutions from Waste Acceptance Criteria analysis for propensity to foam and the antifoam dosage required to mitigate foaming. It was determined that Effluent Treatment Project contributed to the expansion factor (foam formation) and General Purpose Evaporator contributed to foaminess (persistence). It was also determined that undissolved solids contribute to foam persistence. It was shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced both the expansion factor and foaminess of salt solutions. The evaluation of foaming in the grout hopper during the transition from water to salt solution indicated that higher water-to-premix ratios tended to produce increased foaming. It was also shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced foam formation and persistence.

Cozzi, A.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

In-situ aging of roof systems containing polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam roof insulations with permeable facers were installed in roofing systems and continuously monitored for thermal performance for four years. The foams were produced using a specific formulation that represented current technology in 1989 and were blown with CFC-11, HCFC-123, and HCFC-141b. These foams were installed in roof systems comprised of loosely-laid insulation boards covered by either a loosely-laid single ply white or black membrane. The in-situ testing was carried out on an outdoor test facility, the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). Additional specimens of these foams were aged in the laboratory and periodically evaluated using laboratory measurement equipment. This paper summarizes the in-situ data compiled to date, compares these data with the laboratory results, and examines whether the proposed laboratory procedure for accelerating the aging of foams by the slicing and scaling method accurately predicts the aging characteristics of these materials installed in roof systems. These experiments are part of a joint industry/government project established to evaluate the technical viability of alternative HCFC blowing agents for rigid closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam roof insulations. Members of the project are the US Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Society of the Plastics Industry-Polyurethane Division (SPI), the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA).

Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.; Graves, R.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (?500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico [Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Iannace, Salvatore [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples, Italy and IMAST SCRAL, Piazza Bovio 22 Napoli 80133 (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Metal aminoboranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Synthesis of High Surface Area Foams for Functional and Structural...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in porous metallic bulk materials for functional applications such as catalysts, hydrogen storage or high-sensitivity sensors. Traditionally, high surface area functional...

284

Thermal Transport in Porous Media with Application to Fuel Cell Diffusion Media and Metal Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria) Dr. David Sinton, Departmental Member (Dept. of Mechanical, University of Victoria) Dr. David Sinton, Departmental Member (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University

Victoria, University of

285

Mechanical behavior of closed-cell and hollow-sphere metallic foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) The elastic anisotropy and yield surfaces are fully characterized, and numerical equations are developed to allow the simple evaluation of the effect of geometric and material properties on the mechanical behavior ...

Sanders, Wynn Steven, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cellular solids, such as foamed polymers and metals, microtrusses and honeycombs are commonly used in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matrix "hot" structures, nano-composites, and multi-material structures. Several of his projects have, and Director, Composite Structures Laboratory at the University of Michigan. He received his B.Sc. (first class on automated manufacturability, structural integrity and damage tolerance. He is also researching ceramic

Reisslein, Martin

287

Most terrestrial vertebrates are able to replace water lost to the environment by drinking water. In amniotes, drinking is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most terrestrial vertebrates are able to replace water lost to the environment by drinking water, not drinking, because water, unlike food, is physically uniform (at least between 1 and 99 °C). Modifications the frequent need to regain lost water, drinking is secondary to feeding. Furthermore, if drinking is achieved

Behe, Michael J.

288

Efficient plasma production by intense laser irradiation of low density foam targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental investigations conducted on low density structured materials, such as foams have been presented in this paper. These low density foam targets having a density greater than the critical density of the laser produced plasma ({rho}{sub cr{approx_equal}}3 mg{center_dot}cm{sup -3} at laser wavelength 1.06 {mu}m) have been envisaged to have enhanced laser absorption. Experiments were done with an indigenously developed, focused 15 Joule/500 ps Nd: Glass laser at {lambda} = 1064 nm. The focused laser intensity on the target was in the range of I{approx_equal}10{sup 13}-2x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Laser absorption was determined by energy balance experiments. Laser energy absorption was observed to be higher than 85%. In another set of experiments, low density carbon foam targets of density 150 mg/cc were compared with the solid carbon targets. The x-ray emission in the soft x-ray region was observed to increase in foam target by about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt doped foam as compared to solid carbon. Further, investigations were also carried out to measure the energy transmitted through the sub-critical density TAC foam targets having a density less than 3 mg/cc. Such targets have been proposed to be used for smoothening of intensity ripples in a high power laser beam profile. Transmission exceeding 1.87% has been observed and consistent with results from other laboratories.

Tripathi, S.; Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D. S.; Gupta, N. K.; Dhareshwar, L. J. [Laser and Neutron Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Nataliya, B. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

SURFACTANT BASED ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY AND FOAM MOBILITY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactants makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. Also, the addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluted to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. A dual-porosity version is demonstrated as a potential scale-up tool for fractured reservoirs.

George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope; Richard E. Jackson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

'Dark Matter' as a Quantum Foam In-Flow Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The galactic `dark matter' effect is regarded as one of the major problems in fundamental physics. Here it is explained as a self-interaction dynamical effect of space itself, and so is not caused by an unknown form of matter. Because it was based on Kepler's Laws for the motion of the planets in the solar system the Newtonian theory of gravity was too restricted. A reformulation and generalisation of the Newtonian theory of gravity in terms of a velocity in-flow field, representing at a classical level the relative motion of a quantum-foam substructure to space, reveals a key dynamical feature of the phenomenon of gravity, namely the so called `dark matter' effect, which manifests not only in spiral galaxy rotation curves, but also in the borehole g anomaly, globular and galactic black holes, and in ongoing problems in improving the accuracy with which Newton's gravitational constant G is measured. The new theory of gravity involves an additional new dimensionless gravitational constant, and experimental data reveals this to be the fine structure constant. The new theory correctly predicts the globular cluster black hole masses, and that the `frame-dragging' effect is caused by vorticity in the in-flow. The relationship of the new theory of gravity to General Relativity which, like Newtonian gravity, does not have the `dark matter' dynamics, is explained.

Reginald T. Cahill

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

291

Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

companies regularly increase production by adding additional manufacturing equipment, or increasing operating hours. This approach can add large new energy loads to the electrical grid and gas distribution networks. Alternately, increasing production...Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production, Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy John Seryak Gary Epstein Mark D’Antonio Engineer jseryak@ers-inc.com President gepstein@ers-inc.com Vice President mdantonio...

Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermo-mechanical characterisation of low density carbon foams and composite materials for the ATLAS upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a result of the need to increase the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN-Geneva by 2020, the ATLAS detector requires an upgraded inner tracker. Up- grading the ATLAS experiment is essential due to higher radiation levels and high particle occupancies. The design of this improved inner tracker detector involves development of silicon sensors and their support structures. These support structures need to have well un- derstood thermal properties and be dimensionally stable in order to allow efficient cooling of the silicon and accurate track reconstruction. The work presented in this thesis is an in- vestigation which aims to qualitatively characterise the thermal and mechanical properties of the materials involved in the design of the inner tracker of the ATLAS upgrade. These materials are silicon carbide foam (SiC foam), low density carbon foams such as PocoFoam and Allcomp foam, Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite (TPG), carbon/carbon and Carbon Fibre Re- inforced Polymer (CFRP). The work involve...

Isaac, Bonad

293

Quasi-steady model for predicting temperature of aqueous foams circulating in geothermal wellbores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quasi-steady model has been developed for predicting the temperature profiles of aqueous foams circulating in geothermal wellbores. The model assumes steady one-dimensional incompressible flow in the wellbore; heat transfer by conduction from the geologic formation to the foam is one-dimensional radially and time-dependent. The vertical temperature distribution in the undisturbed geologic formation is assumed to be composed of two linear segments. For constant values of the convective heat-transfer coefficient, a closed-form analytical solution is obtained. It is demonstrated that the Prandtl number of aqueous foams is large (1000 to 5000); hence, a fully developed temperature profile may not exist for representative drilling applications. Existing convective heat-transfer-coefficient solutions are adapted to aqueous foams. The simplified quasi-steady model is successfully compared with a more-sophisticated finite-difference computer code. Sample temperature-profile calculations are presented for representative values of the primary parameters. For a 5000-ft wellbore with a bottom hole temperature of 375{sup 0}F, the maximum foam temperature can be as high as 300{sup 0}F.

Blackwell, B.F.; Ortega, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Experiments to populate and validate a processing model for polyurethane foam :  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing computational models to elucidate the expansion and dynamic filling process of a polyurethane foam, PMDI. The polyurethane of interest is chemically blown, where carbon dioxide is produced via the reaction of water, the blowing agent, and isocyanate. The isocyanate also reacts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. Here we detail the experiments needed to populate a processing model and provide parameters for the model based on these experiments. The model entails solving the conservation equations, including the equations of motion, an energy balance, and two rate equations for the polymerization and foaming reactions, following a simplified mathematical formalism that decouples these two reactions. Parameters for the polymerization kinetics model are reported based on infrared spectrophotometry. Parameters describing the gas generating reaction are reported based on measurements of volume, temperature and pressure evolution with time. A foam rheology model is proposed and parameters determined through steady-shear and oscillatory tests. Heat of reaction and heat capacity are determined through differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal conductivity of the foam as a function of density is measured using a transient method based on the theory of the transient plane source technique. Finally, density variations of the resulting solid foam in several simple geometries are directly measured by sectioning and sampling mass, as well as through x-ray computed tomography. These density measurements will be useful for model validation once the complete model is implemented in an engineering code.

Mondy, Lisa Ann; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Shelden, Bion; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Grillet, Anne; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Russick, Edward Mark; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hileman, Michael Bryan; Urquhart, Alexander; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Smith, David Michael

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Metal inks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

The high strain rate response of PVC foams and end-grain balsa wood V.L. Tagarielli, V.S. Deshpande, N.A. Fleck *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high strain rate response of PVC foams and end-grain balsa wood V.L. Tagarielli, V.S. Deshpande are adequately approximated by power-law fits. The compressive yield strength of the H250 PVC foam and balsa wood sĂ?1 . In contrast, the H100 PVC foam displays only a small elevation in uniaxial compressive

Fleck, Norman A.

297

Simulation of the Bishop Steam Foam Pilot by T.W. Patzek and N.A. h4yhiil, Shell Development Co.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,.. SEW SPE 18786 Simulation of the Bishop Steam Foam Pilot by T.W. Patzek and N.A. h4yhiil, Shell a simple model of steam foam transport and apply it to the Shell Kern River Bishop pilot. The only an incremental 5.5 percent OOIP recovery due to steam foam and additional 3 percent OOIP due to infill wells

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

298

Structural Engineering and Mechanics, Vol. 12, No. 2 (2001) 169-188 169 Mechanical behaviour of a syntactic foam/glass fibre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a syntactic foam/glass fibre composite sandwich: experimental results* Enrico Papa 1 and Alberto Corigliano 1 interconnecting the skins; the core is filled with a polymer matrix/glass microspheres syntactic foam; additional behaviour of this composite sandwich. Key words: mechanical tests; syntactic foam; glass fibre; composite

Corigliano, Alberto

299

hal-00090531,version4-6Jul2007 Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hal-00090531,version4-6Jul2007 Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle-dimensional flow of foams around a circular obstacle within a long channel. In experiments, we confine the foam between liquid and glass surfaces. In simulations, we use a deterministic software, the Surface Evolver

Boyer, Edmond

300

Validation of Heat Transfer Thermal Decomposition and Container Pressurization of Polyurethane Foam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer foam encapsulants provide mechanical, electrical, and thermal isolation in engineered systems. In fire environments, gas pressure from thermal decomposition of polymers can cause mechanical failure of sealed systems. In this work, a detailed uncertainty quantification study of PMDI-based polyurethane foam is presented to assess the validity of the computational model. Both experimental measurement uncertainty and model prediction uncertainty are examined and compared. Both the mean value method and Latin hypercube sampling approach are used to propagate the uncertainty through the model. In addition to comparing computational and experimental results, the importance of each input parameter on the simulation result is also investigated. These results show that further development in the physics model of the foam and appropriate associated material testing are necessary to improve model accuracy.

Scott, Sarah Nicole; Dodd, Amanda B.; Larsen, Marvin E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Suo-Anttila, Jill M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Erickson, Kenneth L

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Low density microcellular carbon or catalytically impregnated carbon foams and process for their preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Machinable and structurally stable, low density microcellular carbon, and catalytically impregnated carbon, foams, and process for their preparation, are provided. Pulverized sodium chloride is classified to improve particle size uniformity, and the classified particles may be further mixed with a catalyst material. The particles are cold pressed into a compact having internal pores, and then sintered. The sintered compact is immersed and then submerged in a phenolic polymer solution to uniformly fill the pores of the compact with phenolic polymer. The compact is then heated to pyrolyze the phenolic polymer into carbon in the form of a foam. Then the sodium chloride of the compact is leached away with water, and the remaining product is freeze dried to provide the carbon, or catalytically impregnated carbon, foam.

Hooper, R.W.; Pekala, R.W.

1987-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A combination of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of surfactant and significant reduction of surfactant adsorption. In addition to reduction of interfacial tension to ultra-low values, surfactants and alkali can be designed to alter wettability to enhance oil recovery. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT is more challenging since the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the interdependence of the various components for oil recovery. An alkaline surfactant process is designed to enhance spontaneous imbibition in fractured, oil-wet, carbonate formations. It is able to recover oil from dolomite core samples from which there was no oil recovery when placed in formation brine. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability. Simulated case studies demonstrate the effects of wettability.

George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller; Gary A. Pope

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Aging of polyurethane foam insulation in simulated refrigerator panels -- Initial results with third-generation blowing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory data are presented on the effect of constant-temperature aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators and freezers. The foam specimens were blown with HCFC-141b and with three of its potential replacements -- HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane. Specimens were aged at constant temperatures of 90 F, 40 F, and {minus}10 F. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on two types of specimens: full-thickness simulated refrigerator panels containing foam enclosed between solid plastic sheets, and thin slices of core foam cut from similar panels. Results are presented for about 250 days of aging for the core-foam specimens and for the first six months of aging for the full-thickness panels.

Wilkes, K.E.; Gabbard, W.A.; Weaver, F.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Aging of Polyurethane Foam Insulation in Simulated Refrigerator Panels--One-Year Results with Third-Generation Blowing Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory data are presented on the effect of constant-temperature aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators and freezers. The foam specimens were blown with HCFC-141b and with three of its potential replacements--HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane. Specimens were aged at constant temperatures of 90 F, 40 F, and {minus}10 F. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on two types of specimens: full-thickness simulated refrigerator panels containing foam enclosed between solid plastic sheets, and thin slices of core foam cut from similar panels. Results are presented for the first year of a multi-year study for the full-thickness panels and for about 1-1/2 years of aging for the core-foam specimens.

Gabbard, W.A.; Weaver, F.J.; Wilkes, K.E.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

306

Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

LOST/STOLEN WALLET INVENTORY & EMERGENCY CHECKLIST Don't Lose These Names & Numbers: Fill out this personal guide & keep it in a safe place. If your wallet/purse is lost or stolen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOST/STOLEN WALLET INVENTORY & EMERGENCY CHECKLIST Don't Lose These Names & Numbers: Fill out-mail: Phone: Electric Company (24-hr # for emergency electrical supply problems) - Phone: Gas/Propane/Heating-Oil

Oklahoma, University of

308

Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

A QUASITHETA PRODUCT IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK BRUCE C. BERNDT 1 , HENG HUAT CHAN, AND ALEXANDRU ZAHARESCU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A QUASI­THETA PRODUCT IN RAMANUJAN'S LOST NOTEBOOK BRUCE C. BERNDT 1 , HENG HUAT CHANF27; Secondary, 33D10, 33C05. 1 #12; 2 BRUCE C. BERNDT, HENG HUAT CHAN, AND ALEXANDRU ZAHARESCU

Berndt, Bruce C.

313

A review of "Paradise Lost, 1668-1968: Three Centuries of Commentary." by Earl Miner senior ed.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEWS 41 particularly those interested in Restoration literature, women?s writing, and seventeenth-century history, culture, and society. Earl Miner, senior ed. Wiliam Moeck, co-ed. Steven Jablonski, corr. ed. Paradise Lost, 1668-1968: Three... Centuries of Commentary. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2004. 510 pp. + 25 illus. $85.00. Review by JOHN MULRYAN, ST. BONAVENTURE UNIVERSITY. This massive scholia of Milton?s Paradise Lost is a fitting tribute to Earl Miner, the senior...

John Mulryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a drive fluid for ASP flooding. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability produced by surfactant injection.

George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

2006-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL’s WTP gas retention and release modeling.

Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Metallicity of Galaxy Disks: Infall versus Outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Both gas accretion (infall) and winds (outflow) change a galaxy's metallicity and gas fraction, lowering the effective yield. Low effective yields in galaxies with rotation speeds 15% of baryons have been lost by galaxies of any mass. SN feedback is therefore unlikely to be effective for removing large amounts of gas from low mass disk galaxies. In addition, the dependence between metal-loss and galaxy mass is sufficiently weak that massive galaxies dominate metal enrichment of the IGM. The calculations in this paper provide limiting cases for any arbitrary chemical evolution history, as proven in an Appendix.

J. J. Dalcanton

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

Boris, G.

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Two-dimensional flows of foam: drag exerted on circular obstacles and dissipation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Stokes experiment for foams is proposed. It consists in a two-dimensional flow of a foam, confined between a water subphase and a top plate, around a fixed circular obstacle. We present systematic measurements of the drag exerted by the flowing foam on the obstacle, \\emph{versus} various separately controlled parameters: flow rate, bubble volume, solution viscosity, obstacle size and boundary conditions. We separate the drag into two contributions, an elastic one (yield drag) at vanishing flow rate, and a fluid one (viscous coefficient) increasing with flow rate. We quantify the influence of each control parameter on the drag. The results exhibit in particular a power-law dependence of the drag as a function of the solution viscosity and the flow rate with two different exponents. Moreover, we show that the drag decreases with bubble size, increases with obstacle size, and that the effect of boundary conditions is small. Measurements of the streamwise pressure gradient, associated to the dissipation along the flow of foam, are also presented: they show no dependence on the presence of an obstacle, and pressure gradient depends on flow rate, bubble volume and solution viscosity with three independent power laws.

Benjamin Dollet; Florence Elias; Catherine Quilliet; Arnaud Huillier; Miguel Aubouy; Francois Graner

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

Design and development of a multi-shot foam projectile toy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this research was to design and develop a working prototype of a new toy for Hasbro®'s Nerfe line of foam projectile toys. Several years ago, Hasbro approached the MIT CADlab about developing a new method for ...

Skaggs, Alan M. (Alan Michael)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Detailed energy distributions in laser-produced plasmas of solid gold and foam gold planar targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Foam gold was proposed to increase the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency due to its important applications. To understand the mechanism of x-ray enhancement, the detailed energy distributions and plasma profiles for laser-irradiated solid gold and foam gold targets were studied comparatively by hydrodynamic simulations using the code Multi-1D. It is confirmed that the radiation heat wave is subsonic for the normal solid gold target, while supersonic for the foam gold target. The shock wave, which is behind the supersonic radiation heat wave for the foam gold target, generates a plasma temperature gradient with high temperature near the shock wave front to produce an additional net outward radiation for enhancement of the x-ray emission. Much larger inward plasma velocity is also driven by the shock wave as an initial plasma velocity for the laser deposition and electron thermal conduct zone, which decreases the expanding plasma kinetic energy loss and helps to increase the x-ray radiation.

Dong, Yunsong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China) [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Lu; Yang, Jiamin; Shang, Wanli [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Squeezing particle-stabilized emulsions into biliquid foams equation of state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porous materials,14 and for shelf life.20 Here, we measure the equation of state of water-in-oil (w/o) PR emulsions via centrifugal compression and we interpret our results using a quantitative model adapted fromSqueezing particle-stabilized emulsions into biliquid foams ­ equation of state Louison Maurice

Schofield, Andrew

322

Reduced fibre breakage in a glass-fibre reinforced thermoplastic through foaming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced fibre breakage in a glass-fibre reinforced thermoplastic through foaming G. Zhang, M The processing of a glass fibre-reinforced polypropylene in the presence of a chemical blowing agent was found,3], and the fibre orientation [4­6]; all factors determining the surface area available for transmission of stresses

Thompson, Michael

323

Aging of polyurethane insulation foamed with second- and third-generation blowing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented on two studies of the effect of aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators. Both studies are cooperative projects between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Appliance Research Consortium. The first study has been ongoing for four years and involves evaluation of second generation blowing agents: HCFC-141b and HCFC-142/22 blend with CFC-11 for comparison. The second study has recently started and involves third generation blowing agents: HFC-134a, HFC-245fa. and cyclopentane with HCFC-141b for comparison. Both studies consist of periodic thermal measurements on panels made with solid steel and/or plastic skins and a core of foam to simulate refrigerator walls, and measurements on thin slices with cut faces to characterize the core foam. Laboratory data are presented on four years of aging of panels containing second generation blowing agents. Preliminary data are presented for the third generation blowing agents. The data on panels are compared with predictions of computer models of foam aging.

Wilkes, K.E.; Gabbard, W.A.; Weaver, F.J.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Extended LargeQ Potts Model Simulation of Foam Drainage Yi Jiang and James A. Glazier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as brewing, lubrication, oil recovery, and fire­ fighting. Characterizing their structure and evolution in an unstable in­ terface or in viscous fingering. Instead, the mean­field theory predicts a flat interface­ illary effects and gravity balance. For pulsed drainage, as liquid drains from the top of the foam

Kurien, Susan

325

Society of Petroleum Engineers Simulation of Foam Transport in Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society of Petroleum Engineers SPE 26402 Simulation of Foam Transport in Porous Media A.R. Kovscek, T.W. Patzek, and C.J. Radke, U. of California SPE Members Copyright 1993, Society of Petroleum and Exhibition of the Society of Petroleum Engineers held in Houston, Texas, 3-6 October 1993. This paper

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

326

Carbon Foam for Fuel Cell Humidification R. D. Ott, P. Kadolkar, J. W. Klett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/min) Air in 0.17 kg/min Air out Water in Heater block (32 W/cm2) #12;Current Status of Research Previous air with water · With increased water flow rate into the foam Decreased simulated electronics temperature (heater block) Decreased outlet temperature Increased RH of outlet air 0 50 100 150 200 0 5 10 15

327

Analysis of Principal Gas Products During Combustion of Polyether Polyurethane Foam at Different Irradiance Levels   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies the release of the principal gas species produced during the combustion of a non-flame-retarded Polyether Polyurethane Foam (PPUF) of density of 20.9 kg/m^3 in the cone calorimeter. Five irradiance levels are studied: 10, 20, 30...

Bustamante Valencia, Lucas; Rogaume, Thomas; Guillaume, Eric; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

INTERFACIAL AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN CLOSED-CELL FOAMS Submitted to the Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERFACIAL AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA IN CLOSED-CELL FOAMS A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty Sylvania, Techneglas, and Owens Corning provided the glass samples as well as help- ful criticisms the Purdue Glass Laboratory for sharing his expertise on glass and for letting me use his laboratory

Pilon, Laurent

329

Microfabrication-Compatible Nanoporous Gold Foams as Biomaterials for Drug Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfabrication-Compatible Nanoporous Gold Foams as Biomaterials for Drug Delivery Erkin Seker different samples: (i) 12 mm-diameter circular plain glass cover slips; (ii) 5 mm-diameter gold spots patterned on the glass cover slips; (iii) 5 mm-diameter np-Au spots patterned on the glass cover slips

Seker, Erkin

330

Flow in linearly sheared two dimensional foams: from bubble to bulk scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We probe the flow of two dimensional foams, consisting of a monolayer of bubbles sandwiched between a liquid bath and glass plate, as a function of driving rate, packing fraction and degree of disorder. First, we find that bidisperse, disordered foams exhibit strongly rate dependent and inhomogeneous (shear banded) velocity profiles, while monodisperse, ordered foams are also shear banded, but essentially rate independent. Second, we introduce a simple model based on balancing the averaged drag forces between the bubbles and the top plate and the averaged bubble-bubble drag forces. This model captures the observed rate dependent flows, and the rate independent flows. Third, we perform independent rheological measurements, both for ordered and disordered systems, and find these to be fully consistent with the scaling forms of the drag forces assumed in the simple model, and we see that disorder modifies the scaling. Fourth, we vary the packing fraction $\\phi$ of the foam over a substantial range, and find that the flow profiles become increasingly shear banded when the foam is made wetter. Surprisingly, our model describes flow profiles and rate dependence over the whole range of packing fractions with the same power law exponents -- only a dimensionless number $k$ which measures the ratio of the pre-factors of the viscous drag laws is seen to vary with packing fraction. We find that $k \\sim (\\phi-\\phi_c)^{-1}$, where $\\phi_c \\approx 0.84$, corresponding to the 2d jamming density, and suggest that this scaling follows from the geometry of the deformed facets between bubbles in contact. Overall, our work suggests a route to rationalize aspects of the ubiquitous Herschel-Bulkley (power law) rheology observed in a wide range of disordered materials.

Gijs Katgert; Andrzej Latka; Matthias E. Möbius; Martin van Hecke

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and laminar flow conditions at an average detention time of six hours. Both the polyurethane foams and the foam regenerate solution are re-used. The treatment is a cost-effective process for waste-waters which are not treatable, or are not cost-effectively treatable, by conventional process series.

Tiernan, Joan E. (Novato, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A preliminary study of acoustic propagation in thick foam tissue scaffolds composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exclusive ability of acoustic waves to probe the structural, mechanical and fluidic properties of foams may offer novel approaches to characterise the porous scaffolds employed in tissue engineering. Motivated by this we conduct a preliminary investigation into the acoustic properties of a typical biopolymer and the feasibility of acoustic propagation within a foam scaffold thereof. Focussing on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), we use a pulse-echo method to determine the longitudinal speed of sound, whose temperature-dependence reveals the glass transition of the polymer. Finally, we demonstrate the first topographic and tomographic acoustic images of polymer foam tissue scaffolds.

Parker, N G; Morgan, S P; Povey, M J W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A preliminary study of acoustic propagation in thick foam tissue scaffolds composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exclusive ability of acoustic waves to probe the structural, mechanical and fluidic properties of foams may offer novel approaches to characterise the porous scaffolds employed in tissue engineering. Motivated by this we conduct a preliminary investigation into the acoustic properties of a typical biopolymer and the feasibility of acoustic propagation within a foam scaffold thereof. Focussing on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), we use a pulse-echo method to determine the longitudinal speed of sound, whose temperature-dependence reveals the glass transition of the polymer. Finally, we demonstrate the first topographic and tomographic acoustic images of polymer foam tissue scaffolds.

N. G. Parker; M. L. Mather; S. P. Morgan; M. J. W. Povey

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

The lost and unaccounted-for gas: Chasing the ``Silver Bullet``  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the competitive and financial stakes increase in today`s natural gas market, pipeline companies are focusing increased attention on lost and unaccounted for gas (L and U) both as a significant element in bottom-line financial gains and losses, and as a major factor in interstate pipeline companies` rates to customers. However, many companies are finding that the Silver Bullet approach to L and U of the pre-deregulation past--locating a single, large problem or station error and correcting it--is at worst a misfire and at best only a short-term, partial solution. The paper discusses the scope of L and U losses, measurement errors, how companies are addressing losses, what a Silver Bullet is, alternative approaches, and costs.

Feldman, R. [Arthur Andersen, Houston, TX (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Modeling the dynamic response of low-density, reticulated, elastomeric foam impregnated with Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering cellular solids, such as honeycombs and foams, are widely used in applications ranging from thermal insulation to energy absorption. Natural cellular materials, such as wood, have been used in structures for ...

Dawson, Matthew A. (Matthew Aaron), 1983-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Brazing open cell reticulated copper foam to stainless steel tubing with vacuum furnace brazed gold/indium alloy plating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating a heat exchanger includes brush electroplating plated layers for a brazing alloy onto a stainless steel tube in thin layers, over a nickel strike having a 1.3 .mu.m thickness. The resultant Au-18 In composition may be applied as a first layer of indium, 1.47 .mu.m thick, and a second layer of gold, 2.54 .mu.m thick. The order of plating helps control brazing erosion. Excessive amounts of brazing material are avoided by controlling the electroplating process. The reticulated copper foam rings are interference fit to the stainless steel tube, and in contact with the plated layers. The copper foam rings, the plated layers for brazing alloy, and the stainless steel tube are heated and cooled in a vacuum furnace at controlled rates, forming a bond of the copper foam rings to the stainless steel tube that improves heat transfer between the tube and the copper foam.

Howard, Stanley R. (Windsor, SC); Korinko, Paul S. (Aiken, SC)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Aging of Polyurethane Foam Insulation in Simulated Refrigerator Panels--Three-Year Results with Third-Generation Blowing Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory data are presented on the effect of constant-temperature aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators and freezers. The foam specimens were blown with HCFC-141b and with three of its potential replacements--HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane. Specimens were aged at constant temperatures of 90 F, 40 F, and -10 F. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on two types of specimens: full-thickness simulated refrigerator panels containing foam enclosed between solid plastic sheets, and thin slices of core foam cut from similar panels. Results are presented for the first three years of a multi-year aging study. Preliminary comparisons of measured data with predictions of a mathematical aging model are presented.

Wilkes, K.E.

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

338

Aging of Polyurethane Foam Insulation in Simulated Refrigerator Panels--Two-Year Results with Third-Generation Blowing Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory data are presented on the effect of constant-temperature aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators and freezers. The foam specimens were blown with HCFC-141b and with three of its potential replacements--HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane. Specimens were aged at constant temperatures of 90 F, 40 F, and {minus}10 F. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on two types of specimens: full-thickness simulated refrigerator panels containing foam enclosed between solid plastic sheets, and thin slices of core foam cut from similar panels. Results are presented for the first two years of a multi-year aging study. Preliminary comparisons of measured data with predictions of a mathematical aging model are presented.

Wilkes, K.E.

2001-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Dynamic Compressive Response of an Open-Cell Foam Impregnated With a Non-Newtonian Fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The response of a reticulated, elastomeric foam filled with colloidal silica under dynamic compression is studied. Under compression beyond local strain rates on the order of 1 s[superscript ?1], the non-Newtonian, colloidal ...

Dawson, Matthew A.

340

Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the two-dimensional flow of foams around a circular obstacle within a long channel. In experiments, we confine the foam between liquid and glass surfaces. In simulations, we use a deterministic software, the Surface Evolver, for bubble details and a stochastic one, the extended Potts model, for statistics. We adopt a coherent definition of liquid fraction for all studied systems. We vary it in both experiments and simulations, and determine the yield drag of the foam, that is, the force exerted on the obstacle by the foam flowing at very low velocity. We find that the yield drag is linear over a large range of the ratio of obstacle to bubble size, and is independent of the channel width over a large range. Decreasing the liquid fraction, however, strongly increases the yield drag; we discuss and interpret this dependence.

Christophe Raufaste; B. Dollet; Simon Cox; Yi Jiang; François Graner

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Combustion Synthesis Of Ultralow-density Nanoporous Gold Foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new synthetic pathway for producing nanoporous gold monoliths through combustion synthesis from Au bistetrazoJeamine complexes has been demonstrated. Applications of interest for Au nanofoams include new substrates for nanoparticle-mediated catalysis, embedded antennas, and spectroscopy. Integrated support-and-catalystin-one nanocomposites prepared through combustion synthesis of mixed AuBTA/metal oxide pellets would also be an interesting technology approach for low-cost in-line catalytic conversion media. Furthermore, we envision preparation of ultrahigh surface area gold electrodes for application in electrochemical devices through this method.

Tappan, Bruce C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steiner, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Final Report - "Foaming and Antifoaming and Gas Entrainment in Radioactive Waste Pretreatment and Immobilization Processes"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford site are in the process of stabilizing millions of gallons of radioactive waste slurries remaining from production of nuclear materials for the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS is currently vitrifying the waste in borosilicate glass, while the facilities at the Hanford site are in the construction phase. Both processes utilize slurry-fed joule-heated melters to vitrify the waste slurries. The DWPF has experienced difficulty during operations. The cause of the operational problems has been attributed to foaming, gas entrainment and the rheological properties of the process slurries. The rheological properties of the waste slurries limit the total solids content that can be processed by the remote equipment during the pretreatment and meter feed processes. Highly viscous material can lead to air entrainment during agitation and difficulties with pump operations. Excessive foaming in waste evaporators can cause carryover of radionuclides and non-radioactive waste to the condensate system. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the surface phenomena, suspension rheology and bubble generation of interactions that lead to foaming and air entrainment problems in the DOE High Level and Low Activity Radioactive Waste separation and immobilization processes were pursued under this project. The first major task accomplished in the grant proposal involved development of a theoretical model of the phenomenon of foaming in a three-phase gas-liquid-solid slurry system. This work was presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis (9). The second major task involved the investigation of the inter-particle interaction and microstructure formation in a model slurry by the batch sedimentation method. Both experiments and modeling studies were carried out. The results were presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis. The third task involved the use of laser confocal microscopy to study the effectiveness of three slurry rheology modifiers. An effective modifier was identified which resulted in lowering the yield stress of the waste simulant. Therefore, the results of this research have led to the basic understanding of the foaming/antifoaming mechanism in waste slurries as well as identification of a rheology modifier, which enhances the processing throughput, and accelerates the DOE mission. The objectives of this research effort were to develop a fundamental understanding of the physico-chemical mechanisms that produced foaming and air entrainment in the DOE High Level (HLW) and Low Activity (LAW) radioactive waste separation and immobilization processes, and to develop and test advanced antifoam/defoaming/rheology modifier agents. Antifoams/rheology modifiers developed from this research ere tested using non-radioactive simulants of the radioactive wastes obtained from Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Wasan, Darsh T.

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Galaxy gas flows inferred from a detailed, spatially resolved metal budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the most extensive integral field spectroscopic map of a local galaxy, NGC 628, combined with gas and stellar mass surface density maps, to study the distribution of metals in this galaxy out to 3 effective radii ($\\rm R_e$). At each galactocentric distance, we compute the metal budget and thus constrain the mass of metals lost. We find that in the disc about half of the metals have been lost throughout the lifetime of the galaxy. The fraction of metals lost is higher in the bulge ($\\sim$70%) and decreases towards the outer disc ($\\rm \\sim 3 \\ R_e$). In contrast to studies based on the gas kinematics, which are only sensitive to ongoing outflow events, our metal budget analysis enables us to infer the average outflow rate during the galaxy lifetime. By using simple physically motivated models of chemical evolution we can fit the observed metal budget at most radii with an average outflow loading factor of order unity, thus clearly demonstrating the importance of outflows in the evolution of disc galaxi...

Belfiore, F; Bothwell, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A review of "Satan's Poetry: Fallenness and the Poetic Tradition in Paradise Lost" by Danielle A. St. Hilaire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that prompted them. Danielle A. St. Hilaire. Satan?s Poetry: Fallenness and the Poetic Tradition in Paradise Lost. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2012. x + 246 pp. $58.00. #25;#31;#27;#22;#31;#18; #26; #28;#8;#28;#7; #21;#18;#28;#29;#29;, #23...;#29;#22;#27;#31;#25;#21;#22;#20;#26; #24;#19; #6;#30;#28;#21;#6;#24;#18;. It is becoming increasingly challenging to #15;nd things unattempted yet in Paradise Lost criticism, and nowhere is this truer than in studies of Satan and the fallen state. St. Hilaire is under no illusions...

Swann, Adam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Three-dimensional foam flow resolved by fast X-ray tomographic microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thanks to ultra fast and high resolution X-ray tomography, we managed to capture the evolution of the local structure of the bubble network of a 3D foam flowing around a sphere. As for the 2D foam flow around a circular obstacle, we observed an axisymmetric velocity field with a recirculation zone, and indications of a negative wake downstream the obstacle. The bubble deformations, quantified by a shape tensor, are smaller than in 2D, due to a purely 3D feature: the azimuthal bubble shape variation. Moreover, we were able to detect plastic rearrangements, characterized by the neighbor-swapping of four bubbles. Their spatial structure suggest that rearrangements are triggered when films faces get smaller than a characteristic area.

Raufaste, Christophe; Mader, Kevin; Santucci, Stéphane; Mokso, Rajmund

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Three-dimensional foam flow resolved by fast X-ray tomographic microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thanks to ultra fast and high resolution X-ray tomography, we managed to capture the evolution of the local structure of the bubble network of a 3D foam flowing around a sphere. As for the 2D foam flow around a circular obstacle, we observed an axisymmetric velocity field with a recirculation zone, and indications of a negative wake downstream the obstacle. The bubble deformations, quantified by a shape tensor, are smaller than in 2D, due to a purely 3D feature: the azimuthal bubble shape variation. Moreover, we were able to detect plastic rearrangements, characterized by the neighbor-swapping of four bubbles. Their spatial structure suggest that rearrangements are triggered when films faces get smaller than a characteristic area.

Christophe Raufaste; Benjamin Dollet; Kevin Mader; Stéphane Santucci; Rajmund Mokso

2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Carbon dioxide foam with surfactants used below their critical micelle concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory results demonstrate that adsorption on sandstones is minimized and foam performance improved by reducing the ethoxylate chain length in alcohol ethoxy sulfonates and blending unethoxylated and ethoxylated sulfonates to optimize desirable properties. These properties include increased mobility reduction, more gas-oil foam formation, and enhanced surfactant transport in the oil and water, which all appear to be negatively affected by the presence of long ethoxylate chains in a surfactant. A series of experiments are used to show that laboratory adsorption measurements can only be extrapolated to reservoirs by (1) replicating the anaerobic conditions of reservoirs, (2) matching the reservoir pH in a CO{sub 2} flood and (3) differentiating authogenic minerals from drilling mud found in reservoir cores.

Kuhlman, M.I.; Lau, H.C.; Falls, A.H.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Metals 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Dendritic metal nanostructures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Two-dimensional flow of foam around an obstacle: force measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Stokes experiment for foams is proposed. It consists in a two-dimensional flow of a foam, confined between a water subphase and a top plate, around a fixed circular obstacle. We present systematic measurements of the drag exerted by the flowing foam on the obstacle, \\emph{versus} various separately controlled parameters: flow rate, bubble volume, bulk viscosity, obstacle size, shape and boundary conditions. We separate the drag into two contributions, an elastic one (yield drag) at vanishing flow rate, and a fluid one (viscous coefficient) increasing with flow rate. We quantify the influence of each control parameter on the drag. The results exhibit in particular a power-law dependence of the drag as a function of the bulk viscosity and the flow rate with two different exponents. Moreover, we show that the drag decreases with bubble size, and increases proportionally to the obstacle size. We quantify the effect of shape through a dimensioned drag coefficient, and we show that the effect of boundary conditions is small.

Benjamin Dollet; Florence Elias; Catherine Quilliet; Christophe Raufaste; Miguel Aubouy; Francois Graner

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Bubble statistics and coarsening dynamics for quasi-two dimensional foams with increasing liquid content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the statistics of bubble size, topology, and shape and on their role in the coarsening dynamics for foams consisting of bubbles compressed between two parallel plates. The design of the sample cell permits control of the liquid content, through a constant pressure condition set by the height of the foam above a liquid reservoir. We find that in the scaling state, all bubble distributions are independent not only of time but also of liquid content. For coarsening, the average rate decreases with liquid content due to the blocking of gas diffusion by Plateau borders inflated with liquid. By observing the growth rate of individual bubbles, we find that von Neumann's law becomes progressively violated with increasing wetness and with decreasing bubble size. We successfully model this behavior by explicitly incorporating the border blocking effect into the von Neumann argument. Two dimensionless bubble shape parameters naturally arise, one of which is primarily responsible for the violation of von Neumann's law for foams that are not perfectly dry.

A. E. Roth; C. D. Jones; D. J. Durian

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Federal manufactured home construction and safety standards -- implications for foam panel construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development construction code for (HUD-code) manufactured homes, Part 3280: Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (the HUD Code), to identify sections that might be relevant in determining if insulated foam core panels (or structural insulated panels, SIPs) meet the requirements of Part 3280 for use in manufactured home construction. The U.S. Department of Energy and other parties are interested in the use of SIPs in residential construction, including HUD-Code manufactured homes, because the foam panels can have a higher effective insulation value than standard stud-framed construction and use less dimensional lumber. Although SIPs have not been used in manufactured housing, they may be well suited to the factory production process used to manufacture HUD-Code homes and the fact that they require less virgin timber may reduce the effect of volatile and increasing timber prices. Part 3280 requirements for fire resistance, wind resistance, structural load strength, ventilation, transportation shock, and thermal protection are reviewed. A brief comparison is made between the HUD Code requirements and data collected from foam panel manufacturers. 8 refs.

Lee, A.D.; Schrock, D.W.; Flintoft, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Evaluation of Foaming and Antifoam Effectiveness During the WTP Oxidative Leaching Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using a Hanford waste simulant subjected to air sparging during oxidative leaching. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated by SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming studies and in small scale air sparger studies. The commercial antifoam, Dow Corning Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators and in vessel equipped with pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels (HLP-VSL-00027A/B), the Ultrafiltration Vessels (UFP-VSL-00002A&B), and the HLW Feed Blend Vessel (HLPVSL-00028) to assist the performance of the Pulse Jet Mixers (PJM). The previous air sparger antifoam studies conducted by SRNL researchers did not evaluate the hydrogen generation rate expected from antifoam additions or the effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching or oxidative leaching. The fate of the various antifoam components and breakdown products in the WTP process under prototypic process conditions (temperature & radiation) was also not investigated. The effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching, expected hydrogen generation rate associated with antifoam addition, and the fate of various antifoam components are being conducted under separate SRNL research tasks.

Burket, P. R.; Jones, T. M.; White, T. L.; Crawford, C. L.; Calloway, T. B

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) technology for Countermine (Sea) Program -- Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase 1 report documents the results of one of the subtasks that was initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of a foam that can neutralize mines and barriers and allow the safe passage of amphibious landing craft and vehicles was the objective of this subtask of the Sea Mine Countermeasures Technology program. This phase of the program concentrated on laboratory characterization of foam properties and field experiments with prefabricated foam blocks to determine the capability of RPF to adequately carry military traffic. It also established the flammability characteristics of the material under simulated operational conditions, extended the understanding of explosive cavity formation in RPF to include surface explosions, established the tolerance to typical military fluids, and the response to bullet impact. Many of the basic analyses required to establish the operational concept are reported. The initial field experiments were conducted at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM in November 1995 through February 1996.

Woodfin, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Exploratory Sensors and Munitions Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Exploratory Sensors and Munitions Dept.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Fairness lost in immigration reform; Never before have sweeping changes to policies been undertaken with so little public debate or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fairness lost in immigration reform; Never before have sweeping changes to policies been undertaken reform is unique neither in terms of its controversial substance nor in its lack of meaningful democratic processes. In the past, major immigration reform has typically been the result of parliamentary deliberation

Handy, Todd C.

357

How is open solar magnetic flux lost over the solar cycle? M. J. Owens,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How is open solar magnetic flux lost over the solar cycle? M. J. Owens,1,2 N. U. Crooker,3 and M 2011. [1] The Sun's open magnetic field, magnetic flux dragged out into the heliosphere by the solar wind, varies by approximately a factor of 2 over the solar cycle. We consider the evolution of open

Lockwood, Mike

358

The Price of Matching Selfish Vertices or: How much love is lost because our governments do not arrange marriages?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Price of Matching Selfish Vertices or: How much love is lost because our governments do of minimum-cost perfect matchings with selfish vertices through the price of anarchy (PoA) and price the cost of her own matching edge. Keywords: minimum-cost perfect matching, stable matching, price

359

In-situ and thin-specimen aging of experimental polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports apparent thermal conductivity (k) values from field and laboratory aging tests on a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as alternatives to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). The PIR boards were blown with five gases: CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-14lb. The k-values were determined from 0 to 50{degree}C (30 to 120{degree}F) using techniques that meet ASTM C 114 (Thin Heater Apparatus) and ASTM C 518 (Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). Results on laminate boards with facers provide an independent laboratory check on the increase in k observed for field exposure in the ORNL Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). The observed laboratory increase in k was between 8% and 11% for a 240 day field exposure in the RTRA. A thin-specimen aging procedure established the long-term thermal resistance of gas-filled foams. Thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 24 and 65{degree}C (75{degree}F and 150{degree}F) for up to 300 days. An exponential dependency of k with the quantity (diffusion coefficient X time){sup {1/2}}/ thickness, provide effective diffusion coefficients for air components into the foams and blowing agent out of the foams. The foams blown with alternative blowing agents exhibited k-values 3 to 16% (average 9.4%) above CFC-11 foams under similar conditions. Field exposures were conducted on specimens under single ply EPDM membranes in the RTRA for over 400 days. Hourly averages of panel temperature and heat flux were analyzed to obtain K as a function of mean temperature on a week by week basis. The relative performance of test specimens of HCFC-14B under a black and under a white membrane is reported. 29 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Graves, R.S.; Linkous, R.L.; McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Yarbrough, D.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The City Recycled: The Afterlives of Demolished Buildings in Postwar Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal, plastic, glass, insulation foam board, and rubber.metals, plastic, glass, cloth, paper, foam board, or wood.plastic, glass, rubber, and insulation foam boards. The

Kao, Shih-yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Phase and foam behavior study of CO{sub 2}-based foams at reservoir temperature and pressure. Final report, August 20, 1990--July 15, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major objective of the Enhanced Oil Recovery Program at Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to develop technologies based on CO{sub 2}, foams, emulsions, or other fluid dispersions that will alleviate viscous fingering and mobility control problems that severely limit the production of oil by miscible CO{sub 2}, flooding. In this project, data on the phase behavior of a model surfactant/water system were generated both to help in modeling work for phase behavior and dispersion morphologies and to provide an efficient experimental methodology for determination of these data from flow calorimetric measurements. The project consists of two separate but compatible subtasks, the results of which are described in detail in the two parts of the main body of this report.

Whiting, W.B.; Lim, K.H.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

363

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

365

Application and Continued Development of Thin Faraday Collectors as a Lost Ion Diagnostic for Tokamak Fusion Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishment of sixteen years of work toward the development of thin foil Faraday collectors as a lost energetic ion diagnostic for high temperature magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Following initial, proof of principle accelerator based studies, devices have been tested on TFTR, NSTX, ALCATOR, DIII-D, and JET (KA-1 and KA-2). The reference numbers refer to the attached list of publications. The JET diagnostic KA-2 continues in operation and hopefully will provide valuable diagnostic information during a possible d-t campaign on JET in the coming years. A thin Faraday foil spectrometer, by virtue of its radiation hardness, may likewise provide a solution to the very challenging problem of lost alpha particle measurements on ITER and other future burning plasma machines.

F. Ed Cecil

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 2012, IN PRESS DOI: 10.1007/S10853-012-6927-8 Viscoelastic properties of hollow glass particle filled vinyl ester matrix syntactic foams: effect of temperature and loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of hollow glass particle filled vinyl ester matrix syntactic foams: effect of temperature compositions of syntactic foams. Storage modulus, loss modulus, and glass transition temperature (Tg@poly.edu Abstract Viscoelastic properties of hollow particle reinforced composites called syntactic foams

Gupta, Nikhil

367

Materials Science and Engineering A, 2006. 427(1-2): p. 331-342 331 Comparison of Compressive Properties of Layered Syntactic Foams having Gradient in Microballoon Volume Fraction and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. The microstructure of syntactic foams is shown in Figure 1, where glass microballoons are dispersed in an epoxy resin foam. Glass microballoons are embedded in an epoxy resin matrix. Figure 2. Compressive stress Properties of Layered Syntactic Foams having Gradient in Microballoon Volume Fraction and Wall Thickness

Gupta, Nikhil

368

4. FUSION-PRODUCTLOSSESTO FIRST WALL The fraction of particles lost to the wall from a given birth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The trapping fraction can be calculated as an immediate consequence of (4.1). For a birth point having zero by (3.3)-s (3.5). Whena birth point has a non-zero loss region, the overlap between X. (4.3b). #12;31 The net loss fraction is: F = total fu~i~n ~roducts lost from plasma~ = I f~ nln2

Hively, Lee M.

369

SPRAY FOAM IN ACCESSIBLE SPACES:BEST PRACTICES AND CASE STUDIES FOR RETROFIT IN MIXED-HUMID CLIMATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heating and cooling the house is one of the homeowners major expenses. Reducing these costs, saving energy, and creating a healthier, more comfortable indoor environment are good reasons to consider improving the building thermal envelope. Improvements usually consider increasing the amount of insulation, reducing the infiltration of outside air, and controlling moisture in existing buildings. This report describes the use of spray foam materials to insulate, seal, and control moisture. This discussion is limited to treating areas that are accessible. What is accessible, however, can vary depending on the type of renovation. If the building has been gutted or exterior surfaces removed, there are more options. This report will look at areas to consider for spray foam application and discuss the types of spray foams available and their uses. A number of case studies are presented to show the effectiveness of this retrofit in existing houses based on performance data.

Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gant, Kathy [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their suitability. Seven foam generators were evaluated: two were packed columns of honeycomb, two were static mixers with different mixing media, one was a tube containing a concentric fritted air pipe, and two were low- and high-pressure venturi mi xers.... The air and solution have a common inlet to the packed column and static mixer type foamers. The air for the venturi foamers is added to the turbulent solution after the venturi throat. The mixing in the tube foamer is achieved by blowing air through...

Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

371

Metal Hydrides  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies |Charles Page -toMetabolic PathwaysMetal

372

PRODUCTION OF FOAMS, FIBERS AND PITCHES USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed processes for converting coal feedstocks to carbon products, including coal-derived pitch, coke foams and fibers based on solvent extraction processes. A key technology is the use of hydrogenation accomplished at elevated temperatures and pressures to obtain a synthetic coal pitch. Hydrogenation, or partial direct liquefaction of coal, is used to modify the properties of raw coal such that a molten synthetic pitch can be obtained. The amount of hydrogen required to produce a synthetic pitch is about an order of magnitude less than the amount required to produce synthetic crude oil. Hence the conditions for synthetic pitch production consume very little hydrogen and can be accomplished at substantially lower pressure. In the molten state, hot filtration or centrifugation can be used to separate dissolved coal chemicals from mineral matter and insolubles (inertinite), resulting in the production of a purified hydrocarbon pitch. Alternatively, if hydrogenation is not used, aromatic hydrocarbon liquids appropriate for use as precursors to carbon products can obtained by dissolving coal in a solvent. As in the case for partial direct liquefaction pitches, undissolved coal is removed via hot filtration or centrifugation. Excess solvent is boiled off and recovered. The resultant solid material, referred to as Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore or SECO, has been used successfully to produce artificial graphite and carbon foam.

Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Pete G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Microstructural characterization of low-density foams. [Silica, resorcinol/formaldehyde, cellulose/acetate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-density foams (of the order 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/) synthesized from silica aerogel, resorcinol/formaldehyde, and cellulose acetate have fine, delicate microstructures that are extremely difficult to characterize. Improved low-voltage resolution of an SEM equipped with a field-emission gun (FESEM) does permit these materials to be examined directly without coating and at sufficient magnification to reveal the microstructures. Light coatings applied by ion-beam deposition can stabilize the specimens to some extent and reduce electron charging without seriously altering the microstructure, but coatings applied by conventional techniques usually obliterate these microstructures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is required to provide unambiguous microstructural interpretations. However, TEM examinations of these materials can be severely restricted by specimen preparation difficulties and electron-beam damage, and considerable care must be taken to ensure that reasonably accurate TEM results have been obtained. This work demonstrates that low-voltage FESEM analyses can be used to characterize microstructures in these foams, but TEM analyses are required to confirm the FESEM analyses and perform quantitative measurements. 19 refs., 11 figs.

Price, C.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

HPC realization of a controlled turbulent round jet using OpenFOAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper investigates high performance computing abilities of OpenFOAM for a low Reynolds number ($Re_D=2000$) axisymmetric jet subject to multiple zero net mass flux (ZNMF) actuators. First, parallel performance of OpenFOAM is tested by performing a scaling study up to $2048$ processors on a supercomputer of Flemish Supercomputer Center(VSC). Then, a method to improve the parallel efficiency is proposed. The method is based on developing a hybrid concept to calculate the statistical moments. This new concept combines ensemble and time averaging in order to allow data sampling in parallel. The motivation is obtaining a reduction in the walltime to collect turbulent statistics which is observed to be the dominating part in the ZNMF controlled jet flow. Employing this parallel statistical averaging approach in combination with regular grid partitioning parallelism, allowed us conducting DNS cases on $P=624$ processors with an overall speed-up of $S_e=540.56$ and a parallel efficiency of $E_e=0.87$. The...

Önder, Asim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

An approach to model validation and model-based prediction -- polyurethane foam case study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced software methodology and improved computing hardware have advanced the state of simulation technology to a point where large physics-based codes can be a major contributor in many systems analyses. This shift toward the use of computational methods has brought with it new research challenges in a number of areas including characterization of uncertainty, model validation, and the analysis of computer output. It is these challenges that have motivated the work described in this report. Approaches to and methods for model validation and (model-based) prediction have been developed recently in the engineering, mathematics and statistical literatures. In this report we have provided a fairly detailed account of one approach to model validation and prediction applied to an analysis investigating thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. A model simulates the evolution of the foam in a high temperature environment as it transforms from a solid to a gas phase. The available modeling and experimental results serve as data for a case study focusing our model validation and prediction developmental efforts on this specific thermal application. We discuss several elements of the ''philosophy'' behind the validation and prediction approach: (1) We view the validation process as an activity applying to the use of a specific computational model for a specific application. We do acknowledge, however, that an important part of the overall development of a computational simulation initiative is the feedback provided to model developers and analysts associated with the application. (2) We utilize information obtained for the calibration of model parameters to estimate the parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimates. We rely, however, on validation data (or data from similar analyses) to measure the variability that contributes to the uncertainty in predictions for specific systems or units (unit-to-unit variability). (3) We perform statistical analyses and hypothesis tests as a part of the validation step to provide feedback to analysts and modelers. Decisions on how to proceed in making model-based predictions are made based on these analyses together with the application requirements. Updating modifying and understanding the boundaries associated with the model are also assisted through this feedback. (4) We include a ''model supplement term'' when model problems are indicated. This term provides a (bias) correction to the model so that it will better match the experimental results and more accurately account for uncertainty. Presumably, as the models continue to develop and are used for future applications, the causes for these apparent biases will be identified and the need for this supplementary modeling will diminish. (5) We use a response-modeling approach for our predictions that allows for general types of prediction and for assessment of prediction uncertainty. This approach is demonstrated through a case study supporting the assessment of a weapons response when subjected to a hydrocarbon fuel fire. The foam decomposition model provides an important element of the response of a weapon system in this abnormal thermal environment. Rigid foam is used to encapsulate critical components in the weapon system providing the needed mechanical support as well as thermal isolation. Because the foam begins to decompose at temperatures above 250 C, modeling the decomposition is critical to assessing a weapons response. In the validation analysis it is indicated that the model tends to ''exaggerate'' the effect of temperature changes when compared to the experimental results. The data, however, are too few and to restricted in terms of experimental design to make confident statements regarding modeling problems. For illustration, we assume these indications are correct and compensate for this apparent bias by constructing a model supplement term for use in the model-based predictions. Several hypothetical prediction problems are created and addressed. Hypothetical problems are used because no guidance was provided concern

Dowding, Kevin J.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

OmniBrace: A Fast Acting Expanding Foam Splint for Orthopedic Injuries Anisha Bapna, Margaret Lees, William Littlefield, Harrison Rose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utilizes expanding polyurethane foam technology to provide immediate temporary immobilization to orthopedic professionals · Emergency responders · Sports medics · Military field medics There are 225,000 registered EMS personnel in the US alone, as well as nearly 20,000 sports medics, all requiring immobilization equipment

McGaughey, Alan

379

DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A RECTANGULAR HE-COOLED REFRACTORY FOAM HX-CHANNEL FOR DIVERTOR APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a thin (~ 2mm) layer of open-cell refractory foam bonded underneath the heated surface to enhance heat the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) was considered by Malang et al. in 2001, but not pursued due to uncertainties in predicting the heat transfer coefficient and due to geometric considerations [2]. Recently, we

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

380

DESIGN OF FOAM COVERING FOR ROBOTIC ARMS TO ENSURE HUMAN SAFETY Lingqi Zeng and Gary M. Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and experimental peak impact force results is 8%. 1. INTRODUCTION Whether in industrial applications such as teach programming, or service applications such as rescue robots, robotic manipulators are operating closer and maintain, which limits their applicability. Using foam to cover the robot arm surface is a simple

Bone, Gary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............... 131 Figure 85. Un-mitigated continuous spill - hydrocarbon camera snapshots .................. 133 Figure 86. Foamglas hydrocarbon camera snapshots ..................................................... 134 Figure 87. Methane cloud characteristics... - no suppression and with expansion foam .. 134 Figure 88. Methane concentration profile in the 65m 2 pit during Foamglas?PFS application .................................................................................................... 136 Figure 89. Methane...

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Long-Term Stabilization of Foams and Emulsions with In-Situ Formed Microparticles from Hydrophobic Cellulose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ethanol/ water mixtures. As these HP stock solutions were sheared in aqueous media, micron sized cellulose Cellulose Hartmut A. Wege, Sejong Kim, Vesselin N. Paunov, Qixin Zhong,*,§ and Orlin D. Velev*, Department a simple method to produce foams and emulsions of extraordinary stability by using hydrophobic cellulose

Velev, Orlin D.

383

Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 7 2002 228 234 Slow dynamics in glasses, gels and foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 7 2002 228 234 Slow dynamics in glasses, gels and foams Luca CipellettiU , Laurence Ramos Groupe de Dynamique des Phases Condensees, Uni. Keywords: Aging; Lightscattering; Glass; Gel; Colloids; Rheolgy 1. Introduction Disordered, out

Weeks, Eric R.

384

Numerical and experimental investigations on the interaction of light wire-array Z-pinches with embedded heavy foam converters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of a light tungsten wire-array Z-pinch with an embedded heavy foam converter, whose mass ratio is typically less than 0.16, is numerically analyzed and experimentally investigated on the 1.3 MA “QiangGuang I” facility. Computational results show that this implosion process can be divided into three stages: acceleration of the tungsten wire-array plasma, collision, and stagnation. The tungsten plasma is accelerated to a high speed by the J?×?B force and interacts weakly with the foam plasma in the first stage. Strong energy conversions take place in the second collision stage. When the high speed tungsten plasma impacts on the foam converter, the plasma is thermalized and a radial radiation peak is produced. Meanwhile, a shock wave is generated due to the collision. After the shock rebounds from the axis and meets the W/Foam boundary, the plasma stagnates and the second radial radiation peak appears. The collision and stagnation processes were observed and the two-peak radial radiation pulse was produced in experiments. Increasing the wire-array radius from 4?mm to 6?mm, the kinetic energy of the tungsten plasma is increased, causing a stronger thermalization and generating a higher first radiation peak. Experimental results also showed a higher ratio of the first peak to the second peak in the case of larger wire-array radius. If we add a thin CH film cover onto the surface of the embedded foam converter, the first radiation peak will be hardly changed, because the acceleration of the tungsten plasma is not evidently affected by the film cover. However, the second radiation peak decreases remarkably due to the large load mass and the corresponding weak compression.

Xiao, Delong; Ding, Ning; Sun, Shunkai [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Ye, Fan; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Chen, Faxin; Qin, Yi; Xu, Rongkun; Li, Zhenghong [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A review of 'Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books': An Authoritative Text of the 1667 First Edition" edited by John T. Shawcross and Michael Lieb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: An Authoritative Text of the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xvi + 456 pp. bibl. $68. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. Michael Lieb and John T. Shawcross..., eds. ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: Essays on the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xii + 288 pp. index. append. $60. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. 40 seventeenth-century news...

Sanchez, Reuben

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A review of 'Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books': Essays on the 1667 First Edition" edited by John T. Shawcross and Michael Lieb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: An Authoritative Text of the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xvi + 456 pp. bibl. $68. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. Michael Lieb and John T. Shawcross..., eds. ?Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books?: Essays on the 1667 First Edition. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2007. xii + 288 pp. index. append. $60. Review by reuben sanchez, texas a&m university. 40 seventeenth-century news...

Sanchez, Reuben

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Failure of a gas well to respond to a foam hydraulic fracturing treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well No. 1 (not the real name of the well) is not producing gas at maximum capacity following a foam hydraulic fracturing treatment performed upon completion of the well in 1987. The failure of the stimulation treatment, which has affected other wells throughout the field, was due to a combination of three factors: (1) downward fracture growth and proppant settling during injection (2) embedment due to a high pressure drawdown in the wellbore during flowback procedures, and (3) poor cleanup of the fracture fluid due to high capillary pressures. The following are recommendations to help improve future fracturing treatments throughout the field: (1) Fracture at lower treating pressures; (2) Improve perforating techniques; (3) Change flowback procedures; and (4) Evaluate using N{sub 2} as a fracture fluid.

Rauscher, B.D.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Measurement of emission diameter as a function of time on foam z- pinch plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a streaked imaging capability to make time-resolved measurements of the emission size for low density foam z-pinches. By lens coupling visible emission from the z-pinch target to an array of fiber optics we obtained the emission profile in the visible as a function of time with radial resolution of 300 {mu}m. To measure the emission at temperatures greater than {approx}40 eV the source was slit-imaged or pin-hole imaged onto an x-ray filtered scintillator. Non-uniformities in both visible and x-ray emission were observed. We describe the diagnostics, the image unfold process, and results from the instrument for both visible and x-ray measurements.

Lazier, S.E.; Barber, T.L. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Derzon, M.S.; Kellogg, J.W.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

An elastic, plastic, viscous model for slow shear of a liquid foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a scalar model for deformation and flow of an amorphous material such as a foam or an emulsion. To describe elastic, plastic and viscous behaviours, we use three scalar variables: elastic deformation, plastic deformation rate and total deformation rate; and three material specific parameters: shear modulus, yield deformation and viscosity. We obtain equations valid for different types of deformations and flows slower than the relaxation rate towards mechanical equilibrium. In particular, they are valid both in transient or steady flow regimes, even at large elastic deformation. We discuss why viscosity can be relevant even in this slow shear (often called "quasi-static") limit. Predictions of the storage and loss moduli agree with the experimental literature, and explain with simple arguments the non-linear large amplitude trends.

Philippe Marmottant; François Graner

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evaluation of Experimental Parameters in the Accelerated Aging of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C1303 standard test method led to the ruggedness test described here. This test program included the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods of five years for direct comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. The test protocol has been completed and this report provides a detailed evaluation of the impact of the test parameters on the accuracy of the 5-year thermal conductivity prediction.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Vanderlan, Michael [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Metal-phosphate binders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton GIT 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Air (oxygen), vacuum, inert gas (argon) · Heating ­ External - electric, gas, oil ­ Internal Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 11 Processes · Sand · Shell · Plaster · Ceramic · Investment · Lost foam Metals processed by casting · Sand casting ­ 60% · Investment casting ­ 7% · Die casting ­ 9% · Permanent

Colton, Jonathan S.

396

International Journal of Crashworthiness, 2012, 17(3): p. 327-336 Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanisms of Closed-Cell PVC Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

guidelines. Keywords: Foam; cellular polymer; mechanical properties; impact; automotive material. 1 into increased fuel economy and reduced pollution in transportation applications. In addition, high compressive with uniform cell structure and improved mechanical properties can be chemically synthesized through

Gupta, Nikhil

397

Metal Hydrides - Science Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with traditions in metal hydride research Metal and Ceramic Sciences Condensed Matter Physics Materials Chemistry Chemical and Biological Sciences Located on campus of Tier...

398

Investigation of Kelvin-like solid foams for potential engineering applications: An attractive set of geometrical and thermo-hydraulic properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open cell foams have diverse industrial applications e.g. heat exchangers, structured reactors, filtration due to their unique properties such as high porosity and high specific surface area. In order to theoretically determine the geometric specific surface area and relationships between geometrical parameters of isotropic open cell foams, a generalized mathematical correlation was developed. For this purpose the tetrakaidecahedron geometry was used and different shapes of strut cross-sections of foam structures were taken explicitly into account. The derived correlation to predict geometrical properties can be easily extended to different strut shapes. 3-D numerical simulations at pore scale were performed to study the pressure drop characteristics and effective thermal conductivity. Fluid flow through open cell foam was performed in three different regimes: Darcy regime, transition regime and inertia regime. Importance of geometrical properties on fluid flow characteristics and their inclusion in the proposed correlations for predicting pressure drop is discussed. Can Ergun parameters have constant numerical values or not is also extensively discussed. Three different correlations were derived to predict the effective thermal conductivity for both, isotropic and anisotropic open cell foams. Geometrical parameters of foam matrix were introduced in the correlations to predict effective thermal conductivity.

Prashant Kumar

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

399

Heavy metal biosensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and l BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

Tiernan, Joan E. (38 Clay Ct., Novato, CA 94947)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparison of the bubble size distribution in silicate foams using 2-dimensional images and 3-dimensional x-ray microtomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three silicate glasses were hydrated at high pressure and then heated at atmospheric pressure to exsolve the water into bubbles and create foams. The bubble size distribution in these foams was measured by x-ray microtomography on the GSECARS BM-13 beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The bubble area distributions were measured in two dimensions using the image slices produced from the microtomography and the software ImageJ. The bubble volume distributions were measured from the three-dimensional tomographic images with the BLOB3D software. We found that careful analysis of the microtomography data in both two and three dimensions was necessary to avoid the physically unrealistic, experimental artifact of identifying and counting many small bubbles whose surfaces were not defined by a septum of glass. When this artifact was avoided the foams demonstrated power-law distributions of bubble sizes in both two and three dimensions. Conversion of the power-law exponents for bubble areas measured in two dimensions to exponents for bubble volumes usually agreed with the measured three dimensional volume exponents. Furthermore, the power-law distributions for bubble volumes typically agree with multiple theories of bubble growth, all of which yield an exponent of 1 for the cumulative bubble volume distribution. The measured bubble volume distributions with exponents near 0.3 can be explained by diffusive growth as proposed by other authors, but distributions with exponents near 1.4 remain to be explained and are the subject of continuing research on the effects of water concentration and melt viscosity on foaming behavior.

Robert, G.; Baker, D.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Allard, E.; Larocque, J. (McGill); (UC)

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Design considerations for a steam-injection pilot with in-situ foaming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the necessary aspects of the planning, operation, evaluation, environmental impact and cost to implement a field pilot of steam injection with in-situ foaming. The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI) is planning to implement such a pilot in Kern County, California. The cost of the pilot will be shared by the US Department of Energy and an oil company. Some important aspects of drilling and completion programs and their specifications, permits from regulatory bodies, and downhole tools to improve steam stimulation are discussed. The essential surface facilities which include water treatment plant, steam generator, demulsifier and dehydrator are considered. The necessary laboratory research in support of the pilot has been recommended. The formation evaluation and reservoir engineering effort for the pilot has been divided into three phases: reservoir definition, reservoir monitoring and post-pilot study. Appropriate techniques applicable to each phase of the test have been discussed. The environmental impact regulations as related to the steam injection process have been considered. In particular, the environmental problems associated with the burning of crude oil and desulfurization of flue gas have been discussed. Other environmental considerations such as solid and liquid waste disposal, health and safety are also discussed. An estimate of the cost of this field test is presented. Three scenarii (for pilots with high, medium, and low investment potentials, respectively) are presented. Since this report was prepared, a specific site for the supri pilot has been chosen. Appendices G and H present the details on this site.

Siddiqui, M.H.; Sanyal, S.K.; Horn, A.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Structural insulated panels produced from recycled Expanded-Polystrene (EPS) foam scrap. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a research project undertaken to assess the feasibility of using scrap reground expanded polystyrene (EPS) in the manufacture of structural insulated panels (SIPs) in order to save material costs and reduce the amount of EPS waste products to be disposed. The project team, managed by Steven Winter Associates, Inc., a Norwalk, Connecticut-based building systems research and consulting firm included: Thermal Foams, Inc., a Buffalo-based manufacturer of EPS products; BASF Corp., the world`s largest producer of EPS beads; Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which performed thermal tests (ASTM C-518); RADCO, Inc. which performed material properties tests: density (ASTM C-303), flexural strength (ASTM C-203), tensile strength (ASTM D-1623), and transverse load test of SIPs panels (ASTM E-72). The report documents the manufacturing and testing process and concludes that there was relatively little difference in the thermal and structural characteristics under normal loading conditions of the panels tested with varying amount of regrind (from 10% - 25%) and those made with 100% virgin beads. The report recommends that additional tests be undertaken, but suggests that, based on the test results, reground EPS can be successfully used in the cores of SIPs in amounts up to 25%.

Grinnell, A.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Interlaboratory comparison of four heat flow meter apparatuses on planed polyisocyanurate boards foamed with CFC-11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an interlaboratory comparison of apparent thermal conductivity (k) results on planed polyisocyanurate (PIR) boards foamed with chlorofluorocarbon-11 (CFC-11). Sequential tests were conducted at 75{degrees}F (24{degrees}C) at four facilities on two rigid (PIR) boards, individually and as a pair, using four comparative heat flow meter apparatuses. The specimens were shipped from lab to lab, and testing yielded 15 k-values that have two standard deviation (2 {alpha}) value of 2.2% when described by: k(Btu{center dot}in./h{center dot}ft{sup 2}{center dot}F) = 0/1365 + 1.15 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} t k(W/m{center dot}K) = 0.0197 + 1.66 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} t, where t is the elapsed time in days after planing of the boards. An increased 2 {sigma} value for board 2 may be associated with a larger variation in thickness. The 15 thermal conductance (C) values have a 2 {sigma} value of 3.2% when described by: C(Btu/H{center dot}h{center dot}{sup 2}{center dot}{degrees}F) = 0.1069 + 1.20 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} t. Thus, the 2 {sigma} (k-values) of the interlaboratory comparison is not reduced by comparing C values. 5 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Graves, R.S.; McElroy, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Miller, R.G. (Walter (Jim) Research Corp., St. Petersburg, FL (USA)); Yarbrough, D.W. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (USA)); Zarr, R.R. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Tucker, Mark David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kaiser, Julia N. (Global Product Management, Hilden, Germany); Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and may be more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads. U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS worked with National Housing Quality Award winner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes, Inc., to assess the performance of this feature in a single-family detached ranch house with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms constructed on a slab-on-grade foundation in Fresno, California. One challenge during installation of the system was the attachment of the butyl flashing to the open framing. To solve this constructability issue, the team added a nailer to the base of the wall to properly attach and lap the flashing. In this strategy, R-7.5, 1.5-in.-thick extruded polystyrene was installed on the exterior of the slab for a modeled savings of 4,500 Btu/h on the heating load.

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thermal characterization and model free kinetics of aged epoxies and foams using TGA and DSC methods.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two classes of materials, poly(methylene diphenyl diisocyanate) or PMDI foam, and cross-linked epoxy resins, were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to help understand the effects of aging and %E2%80%9Cbake-out%E2%80%9D. The materials were evaluated for mass loss and the onset of decomposition. In some experiments, volatile materials released during heating were analyzed via mass spectroscopy. In all, over twenty materials were evaluated to compare the mass loss and onset temperature for decomposition. Model free kinetic (MFK) measurements, acquired using variable heating rate TGA experiments, were used to calculate the apparent activation energy of thermal decomposition. From these compiled data the effects of aging, bake-out, and sample history on the thermal stability of materials were compared. No significant differences between aged and unaged materials were detected. Bake-out did slightly affect the onset temperature of decomposition but only at the highest bake-out temperatures. Finally, some recommendations for future handling are made.

Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Nissen, April

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Metal-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Conferences Lost Password  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Session topic:large-scale land cover initiatives The effective reduction of global carbon emissions from biofuel production is highly dependent on the direct and indirect land use & land cover (LULC) change

Hammerton, James

410

NF-kB activity-dependent P-selectin involved in ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation in U937 cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} Ox-LDL induced foam cell formation in the human U937 promonocytic cell line in a dose- and time-dependent manner. {yields} Ox-LDL induced expression of P-selectin through degradation of IkBa and augment of NF-kB activity and protein level during macrophage-derived foam cell formation. {yields} P-selectin and NF-kB may be identified as pivotal regulators of ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation. {yields} Therapy based on the inhibition of P-selectin and NF-kB may complement conventional treatments to prevent atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) plays a critical role in regulation of atherosclerosis. However, little is known about the role of Nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activity-dependent P-selectin in ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation during atherosclerosis. In this study, we first investigated ox-LDL induced foam cell formation in the human U937 promonocytic cell line in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of U937 cells with ox-LDL increased lipid accumulation as well as intracellular cholesterol content. Next, a comparative analysis of gene expression profiling using cDNA microarray and Real-time-PCR indicated that ox-LDL exposure induced, in three treated groups, an extremely marked increase in the mRNA level of P-selectin. Protein levels of P-selectin and its upstream regulators IkBa and NF-kB showed that NF-kB pathway is involved in the ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation. Finally, overexpression of NF-kB significantly accelerated, whereas, inhibition of NF-kB with siRNA remarkably attenuated ox-LDL-induced macrophage-derived foam cell formation. It was concluded that the activity of NF-kB is augmented during macrophage-derived foam cell formation. Activation of NF-kB increased, whereas, inhibition of NF-kB decreased ox-LDL-induced P-selectin expression and lipid accumulation in macrophages, suggesting ox-LDL induced expression of P-selectin through degradation of IkBa and activation of NF-kB in the regulation of foam cell formation.

Wang, Yi, E-mail: wangyi2004a@126.com [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080 (China)] [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080 (China); Wang, Xiang; Sun, Minghui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Cao, Heng; Chen, Xiaoqing [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080 (China)] [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200080 (China)

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fracturing alliance allows massive diatomite oil reserves to be economically produced at Lost Hills, California: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As North American oilfield operations mature, there is a perceptible loosening of the autocratic ties between oil companies and contractors. They are being replaced by alliances or partnerships designed to minimize cost while improving profitability of the companies involved. Many papers have been written concerning alliance theory, but little documentation exists detailing actual performance. This paper evaluates a mature alliance, its implementation, structure and results. In Lost Hills, California, the diatomite formation requires hydraulic fracturing to allow oil recovery at profitable production rates. Because hydraulic fracturing is approximately two-thirds of the total well cost, it is imperative that fracturing investments be optimized to allow field development to proceed at optimum levels. Therefore, in 1990, a fracturing alliance (the first of its kind) was initiated between Chevron and Schlumberger Dowell. Over 1 billion lbm of sand has been successfully placed during approximately 2,000 fracture stimulation jobs. Through this prototype fracturing alliance, many major accomplishments are being achieved. The most notable are the hydraulic fracturing costs that have been reduced by 40% while improving the profitability of both companies. This paper illustrates the benefits of an alliance and justifies the change in management style from a low-bid operating strategy to a win-win customer/supplier attitude.

Klins, M.A.; Stewart, D.W.; Pferdehirt, D.J.; Stewart, M.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

X-ray micro-tomography investigation of the foaming process in the system of waste glass–silica mud–MnO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In case of foamed lightweight aggregates (LWAs), porosity is introduced by the addition of a foaming agent to the glassy matrix, which degasses at an elevated temperature, so that the resulting gases remain trapped inside the glassy structure. The efficiency of action of MnO{sub 2} as a foaming agent in waste glass and waste glass/silica mud systems was studied. Samples were fired at different temperatures and with different dwelling times at a certain temperature, and the development of porosity was investigated by means of X-ray micro-tomography. It was found that, with the prolongation in dwelling times, the number of pores decreased, while, on the other hand, the volume of these pores increased, and that the addition of silica mud increases the foaming temperature and slows down the foaming process. - Highlights: • Preparation of lightweight aggregate from waste glass, silica sludge, and MnO{sub 2} • DTA/TG investigation of MnO{sub 2} • Characterization of pore-forming process by means of X-ray micro-tomography (?cT)

Ducman, V., E-mail: vilma.ducman@zag.si [ZAG Ljubljana, Dimi?eva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Korat, L.; Legat, A. [ZAG Ljubljana, Dimi?eva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mirti?, B. [NTF, Ašker?eva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

FUEL DEVICE REPLACEMENT Use this application to request a replacement fuel access device for a device that has been lost or stolen. Use and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUEL DEVICE REPLACEMENT Use this application to request a replacement fuel access device as those explained in the original Fuel Device Application and for your convenience provided on this form Information Lost Stolen Unknown Date of last known use Certification of Use I certify that fuel access device

Kirschner, Denise

414

STRUCTURE ORIGIN OF THE ENHANCED THERMOELECTRIC POWER Today approximately 60% of the energy consumption in the US is lost, mostly through waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption in the US is lost, mostly through waste heat. Development on thermoelectric technologySTRUCTURE ORIGIN OF THE ENHANCED THERMOELECTRIC POWER Today approximately 60% of the energy to significant energy savings. Many recent advances in thermoelectric materials are attributed to nanoscale

Homes, Christopher C.

415

Diploma Replacement Request Form Students who have misplaced or lost their original diplomas may order a replacement diploma. The cost for each  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diploma Replacement Request Form Students who have misplaced or lost their original diplomas may order a replacement diploma. The cost for each replacement diploma is $25.00 ($35.00 for D.M.D, J.D., LL.M., and M.D). Please fill out the applicable information and mail it to the address below. Replacement

Guenther, Frank

416

Collaborative Research: Barotropic Radiation Experiment (BARX) The question of how energy flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flows through the oceans, especially how energy is lost from the currents comprising the general and vorticity. Intellectual Merit. A fundamental process by which ocean currents lose the energy acquired from Variability in the Central North Atlantic Ocean 1. Motivations and Objectives The paths along which energy

Dushaw, Brian

417

Liquid Metal Transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part IV. Relevance of materials standards to problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam insulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The insulation industry is essentially self-regulated; therefore, the question arises as to whether or not increased public regulation would be effective in controlling problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam as residential insulation. The relevancy of public regulation to controlling problems such as off-gassing of formaldehyde associated with the use of the products through the introduction of materials standards and quality assurance of manufacture and installation is discussed. The use of urea-formaldehyde insulation may be divided into three phases-manufacture, installation, and behavioral phases. The relevance of materials standards and quality assurance for each phase is discussed.

Long, K.R.; Schutte, W.C.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

VOLUME 87, NUMBER 17 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 22 OCTOBER 2001 Deformation and Flow of a Two-Dimensional Foam under Continuous Shear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­3]. For such sys- tems, thermal energies are orders of magnitude lower than the typical energy required to relax. But the resulting flow field may still differ a lot from what would be expected for a molecular liquid. Dry sand. In this Letter, we report the formation of shear bands in aqueous foams. We believe that foams may shed light

Debrégeas, Georges

423

Numerical and Experimental Investigations of Polyurethane Foam for Use as Cask Impact Limiter in Accidental Drop Scenarios - 12099  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foams are frequently used as cask impact limiters in nuclear materials and hazardous waste transport due to their high energy-absorption potential. When assessing the cask integrity in accidental scenarios based on numerical simulations, a description of the foam damping properties is required for different strain rates and for a wide temperature range with respect to waste heat generation in conjunction with critical operating and environmental conditions. Implementation and adaption of a respective finite element material model strongly relies on an appropriate experimental data base. Even though extensive impact experiments were conducted e.g. in Sandia National Laboratories, Savannah River National Laboratory and by Rolls Royce plc, not all relevant factors were taken into account. Hence, BAM who is in charge of the mechanical evaluation of such packages within the approval procedure in Germany, incorporated systematic test series into a comprehensive research project aimed to develop numerical methods for a couple of damping materials. In a first step, displacement driven compression tests have been performed on confined, cubic specimens at five loading rates ranging from 0.02 mm/s to 3 m/s at temperatures between +90 deg. C and -40 deg. C. Materials include two different polyurethane foam types called FR3718 and FR3730 having densities of 280 kg/m{sup 3} and 488 kg/m{sup 3} from the product line-up of General Plastics Manufacturing Company. Their data was used to adapt an advanced plasticity model allowing for reliably simulating cellular materials under multi-axial compression states. Therefore, an automated parameter identification procedure had been established by combining an artificial neural network with local optimization techniques. Currently, the selected numerical material input values are validated and optimized by means of more complex loading configurations with the prospect of establishing methods applicable to impact limiters under severe accidental conditions. The reference data base is provided by experiments, where weights between 212 kg and 1200 kg have been dropped from heights between 1.25 m and 7 m on confined 10 cm cubic foam specimens. By presenting the deviations between experimental values and the corresponding output of finite element simulations, the potentials and restrictions of the resulting models are highlighted. Systematic compression tests on polyurethane foams had been performed at BAM test site within the framework of a research project on impact limiters for handling casks for radioactive waste. The experimental results had been used to adapt numerical models for simulating the behaviour of different foam types at different temperatures. The loading speed, however, turned out to have a major influence on their flow curves that can not be captured by simple strain-rate dependent multipliers. Especially for guided drop tests that come close to real accidental scenarios there is a significant gap between experimental and numerical results even when applying such advanced material models. Hence, the extensive data base is currently deployed for expanding the standard algorithms to include adequate dynamic hardening factors. (authors)

Kasparek, Eva M.; Voelzke, Holger; Scheidemann, Robert; Zencker, Uwe [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 12200 Berlin (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The impact of low-Z impurities on x-ray conversion efficiency from laser-produced plasmas of low-density gold foam targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is an important approach to improve the x-ray conversion efficiency of laser-ablated high-Z plasmas by using low initial density materials for various applications. However, unavoidable low-Z impurities in the manufacture process of low-density high-Z foam targets will depress this effect. A general easy-to-use analytical model based on simulations was developed to evaluate the quantitative impact of impurities within the gold foam target on laser to x-ray conversion efficiency. In addition, the x-ray conversion efficiencies of 1 g/cm{sup 3} gold foams with two different initial contents of impurities were experimentally investigated. Good agreements have been achieved between the model results and experiments.

Dong, Yunsong [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China) [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shang, Wanli; Yang, Jiamin; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Zhan, Xiayu; Du, Huabing; Deng, Bo [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Pu, Yikang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Two-dimensional heterogeneous model for a reticulated-foam photocatalytic reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2-D heterogeneous convection reaction model for a gas-solid lamp-in-tube annular photocatalytic reactor is presented. The catalyst (TiO{sub 2}) is supported on a reticulated-foam monolithic structure placed in the annular space between the UV lamp and the reactor wall. Mass balances for individual species are coupled through the reaction-rate expression that appears in the boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface in heterogeneous catalytic reactor models. The heterogeneous reaction rate is modeled using semiempirical Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW) kinetics with adsorption constants for various species. The local volumetric rate of energy absorption (LVREA) term in the rate expression was computed using a 3-D polychromatic radiation-field model. The overall system of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved using a combination of the Crank-Nicolson method and the globally convergent Newton-Raphson method. The apparent, average quantum yield in the LHHW kinetic rate form is the single adjustable parameter in the model. Isopropanol (IPA) was chosen as the test contaminant to conduct experimental performance measurements for model validation. Model-predicted radial and axial profiles for bulk and surface concentration reveal that the extent to which mass transport influences the operation of a photocatalytic reactor is determined largely by the local magnitude of the LVREA. Similitude in the scale-up of an annular lamp-in-tube heterogeneous photocatalytic reactor is achieved only when the dimensionless radial radiation profile, as well as corresponding magnitudes of a geometric number, the Peclet number, the Stanton number, and the photocatalytic analog of the Damkoehler number, are identical.

Changrani, R.G.; Raupp, G.B.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Liquid Metal Transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Joint Industry/Government Research Project: Comparison of thermal aging for roof exposures and thin-specimens of experimental polyisocyanurate insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports apparent thermal conductivity (k) values from field exposures and laboratory aging of a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as alternative to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The k-values were determined from 0 to 50{degree}C using techniques that meet ASTM C 1114 (Thin Heater Apparatus) and ASTM C 518 (Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The increase in k observed for field exposure in the ORNL Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA) was confirmed by independent laboratory tests. The observed laboratory increase in k was about the same, between 17 and 22%, for all three blowing agent foams for a 450 day field exposure in the RTRA. Thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 24 and 65{degree}C for up to 460 days. The foams blown with alternative blowing agents exhibited long-term k-values 7 to 15% above those for CFC foams under similar conditions. Field exposures were conducted on specimens under single ply EPDM membranes in the RTRA for over 680 days. Hourly averages of panel temperature and heat flux were analyzed to obtain k as a function of mean insulation temperature on a week-by-week basis. The k-values derived from the field data provided effective diffusion coefficients for air in the foam, which were within 7% of those obtained from the thin-specimen aging procedure at 24%C except for one sample. The relative performance of test specimens of HCFC-141b under a black and under a white membrane is reported, and data suggest that differences are relatively small. 26 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Graves, R.S.; Christian, J.E.; McElroy, D.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories of the California Institute of Technology--of course we all know this as GALCIT--is celebrating 75 astonishing years on November 14 and 15th.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of "bubbloy," an amorphous, homogeneous foam of bulk metallic glass (BMG) Pd43Ni10Cu27P20. The foaming, invented a method to foam bulk metallic glass. Since the amount of energy that can be absorbed scales of metals is a challenge since foam is an unstable structure. However, metallic foams are known to have many

430

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density solid: 1 mg/cm3 Aerogels hold 15 different records for material properties, including best insulator 2.38 g piece of aerogel supports a 2.5 kg brick. #12;#12;#12;l = m Ă? n unit vector in orbital space

Fominov, Yakov

433

Materials Science and Engineering A, 2011, 528(1-2): p. 7596 7605 High strain rate compressive response ofsyntactic foams: trends in mechanical properties and failure mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comprising hollow particles dispersed in a matrix material. Available studies on high strain rate compressive with respect to the material composition. Syntactic foams reinforced with micro- and nano-sized fibers are a class of porous materials in which thin-walled hollow particles are dispersed in a matrix material

Gupta, Nikhil

434

Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sharma, Ashwani K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sharma, Ashwani K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Type of phytoremediation Cost effective form of environmental remediation (Glass 1999) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al -using hyperaccumulator plant biomass to produce a bio-ore for commercial use -Li et al. look at using Ni

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

437

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Transition Metal Switchable Mirror  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

444

Transition Metal Switchable Mirror  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

Functional Metal Phosphonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functional groups. In some cases, these ligands undergo reactions during the solvothermal syntheses which can impart new chemical reactivity. Another method used to introduce functionality was to partially or completely substitute metal atoms within...

Perry, Houston Phillipp

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

447

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Metallic glass composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Molten metal reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thermally tolerant multilayer metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of a Group IVB or Group VB metal sandwiched between two layers of a Group VIIIB metal selected from the group consisting of palladium, platinum, nickel, rhodium, iridium, cobalt, and alloys thereof, and a non-continuous layer of a metal chalcogenide upon one layer of the Group VIIIB metal is disclosed together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture using such a composite membrane and a process for forming such a composite metal membrane.

Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Method for forming metal contacts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

Post-processing of polymer foam tissue scaffolds with high power ultrasound: a route to increased pore interconnectivity, pore size and fluid transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We expose thick polymer foam tissue scaffolds to high power ultrasound and study its effect on the openness of the pore architecture and fluid transport through the scaffold. Our analysis is supported by measurements of fluid uptake during insonification and imaging of the scaffold microstructure via x-ray computed tomography, scanning electron microscopy and acoustic microscopy. The ultrasonic treatment is found to increase the mean pore size by over 10%. More striking is the improvement in fluid uptake: for scaffolds with only 40% water uptake via standard immersion techniques, we can routinely achieve full saturation of the scaffold over approximately one hour of exposure. These desirable modifications occur with no loss of scaffold integrity and negligible mass loss, and are optimized when the ultrasound treatment is coupled to a pre-wetting stage with ethanol. Our findings suggest that high power ultrasound is a highly targetted and efficient means to promote pore interconnectivity and fluid transport in thick foam tissue scaffolds.

N J Watson; R K Johal; Y Reinwald; L J White; A M Ghaemmaghami; S P Morgan; F R A J Rose; M J W Povey; N G Parker

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

456

Risks generated by the treatment of aerosol in the recycling of metals: How to secure the process?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the hazardous properties of most common flammable solvents [1] to [3] Iso-pentane Ethanol Methanol Iso". The composition threshold is 1 %. Heat of combustion. Tests results: foam flammability test for a foam producing

Boyer, Edmond

457

High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed Metal/Metal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference...

458

Solvothermal synthesis of NiAl double hydroxide microspheres on a nickel foam-graphene as an electrode material for pseudo-capacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate excellent pseudo-capacitance behavior of nickel-aluminum double hydroxide microspheres (NiAl DHM) synthesized by a facile solvothermal technique using tertbutanol as a structure-directing agent on nickel foam-graphene (NF-G) current collector as compared to use of nickel foam current collector alone. The structure and surface morphology were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopies respectively. NF-G current collector was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition followed by an ex situ coating method of NiAl DHM active material which forms a composite electrode. The pseudocapacitive performance of the composite electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, constant charge–discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The composite electrode with the NF-G current collector exhibits an enhanced electrochemical performance due to the presence of the conductive graphene layer on the nickel foam and gives a specific capacitance of 1252 F g{sup ?1} at a current density of 1 A g{sup ?1} and a capacitive retention of about 97% after 1000 charge–discharge cycles. This shows that these composites are promising electrode materials for energy storage devices.

Momodu, Damilola; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Barzeger, Farshad; Taghizadeh, Fatimeh; Fabiane, Mopeli; Manyala, Ncholu, E-mail: ncholu.manyala@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028, South Africa. (South Africa); Johnson, A. T. Charlie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450 C and 600 C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 hours. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A general methodology for inverse estimation of the elastic and anelastic properties of anisotropic open-cell porous materials—with application to a melamine foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes an inverse estimation method for the characterisation of the elastic and anelastic properties of the frame of anisotropic open-cell foams used for sound absorption. A model of viscoelasticity based on a fractional differential constitutive equation is used, leading to an augmented Hooke's law in the frequency domain, where the elastic and anelastic phenomena appear as distinctive terms in the stiffness matrix. The parameters of the model are nine orthotropic elastic moduli, three angles of orientation of the material principal directions and three parameters governing the anelastic frequency dependence. The inverse estimation consists in numerically fitting the model on a set of transfer functions extracted from a sample of material. The setup uses a seismic-mass measurement repeated in the three directions of space and is placed in a vacuum chamber in order to remove the air from the pores of the sample. The method allows to reconstruct the full frequency-dependent complex stiffness matrix of the frame of an anisotropic open-cell foam and in particular it provides the frequency of maximum energy dissipation by viscoelastic effects. The characterisation of a melamine foam sample is performed and the relation between the fractional-derivative model and other types of parameterisations of the augmented Hooke's law is discussed.

Cuenca, Jacques, E-mail: jcuenca@kth.se; Van der Kelen, Christophe; Göransson, Peter [Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory for Sound and Vibration Research, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 8, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Method for locating metallic nitride inclusions in metallic alloy ingots  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of determining the location and history of metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions in metallic melts. The method includes the steps of labeling metallic nitride and/or oxynitride inclusions by making a coreduced metallic-hafnium sponge from a mixture of hafnium chloride and the chloride of a metal, reducing the mixed chlorides with magnesium, nitriding the hafnium-labeled metallic-hafnium sponge, and seeding the sponge to be melted with hafnium-labeled nitride inclusions. The ingots are neutron activated and the hafnium is located by radiometric means. Hafnium possesses exactly the proper metallurgical and radiochemical properties for this use.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Schmitt, Roman A. (Corvallis, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and hot returning to the evaporator section. Eventually sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

Secary, J. (Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)); Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Establishing low-power operating limits for liquid metal heat pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point for long durations may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and hot returning to the evaporator section. Eventually sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort between the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate the phenomena. Experiments include both high temperature liquid metal and low temperature organic heat pipes. To date, a low temperature working fluid has been selected and its performance in a heat pipe validated. Additionally, a low-temperature heat pipe has been fabricated and is presently being tested.

Secary, J. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Non Metallic Materials List The LEAM Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 799, 901, 919, 921, 936, 937, 981, 985, 998 #12;Description Foams & Sponge Silicone Urethane, Polyester Urethane, Polyester Lubricants Bonded Film, Inorganic Molding Plastics Polycarbonate, 40o/o Glass Polyamide (Nylon) Plastic Laminates Epoxy-Glass, Sheet Epoxy-Glass, CU Clad Epoxy-Glass Rod Epoxy-Glass

Rathbun, Julie A.

465

Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Vitek, John Michael [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Rakowski, Jim [Allegheny Ludlum; Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hard metal composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

Sheinberg, H.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hard metal composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Metal alloy identifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Metallic coating of microspheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

Meyer, S.F.

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Metal Mechanisms | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat Cornell Batteries & Fuel Cells In ThisMetal Mechanisms Metal

471

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kV Transmission Line Reroute Project, Montrose County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to reroute a section of the Curecanti-Lost Canyon 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, in Montrose County, Colorado. A portion of the transmission line, situated 11 miles southeast of Montrose, Colorado, crosses Waterdog Peak, an area of significant geologic surface activity, which is causing the transmission line's lattice steel towers to shift. This increases stress to structure hardware and conductors, and poses a threat to the integrity of the transmission system. Western proposes to relocate the lattice steel towers and line to a more geologically stable area. The existing section of transmission line and the proposed relocation route cross Bureau of Land Management and private land holdings.

N /A

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

Serpentine metal gasket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic seal or gasket for use in the joining of cryogenic fluid conduits, the seal or gasket having a generally planar and serpentine periphery defining a central aperture. According to a preferred embodiment, the periphery has at least two opposing elongated serpentine sides and two opposing arcuate ends joining the opposing elongated serpentine sides and is of a hexagonal cross-section.

Rothgeb, Timothy Moore (Norfolk, VA); Reece, Charles Edwin (Yorktown, VA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ductile transplutonium metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

Conner, W.V.

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

475

Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Speed of Sound in metal Speed of Sound in metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the metal rod and metal bar. 2. Acquire a metal bar or rod and measure its mass. Use the meter stick and measure and record the length in meters. Use the vernier calipers and measure the other dimensionBar Select the Smart Tool. Position the Smart tool so that the vertical line bisects the pulse. The (x

Yu, Jaehoon

477

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

478

Upgrading platform using alkali metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

Gordon, John Howard

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

479

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, L.J.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lost foam metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Electroless metal plating of plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Methods of recovering alkali metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

483

Metals processing control by counting molten metal droplets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for controlling metals processing (e.g., ESR) by melting a metal ingot and counting molten metal droplets during melting. An approximate amount of metal in each droplet is determined, and a melt rate is computed therefrom. Impedance of the melting circuit is monitored, such as by calculating by root mean square a voltage and current of the circuit and dividing the calculated current into the calculated voltage. Analysis of the impedance signal is performed to look for a trace characteristic of formation of a molten metal droplet, such as by examining skew rate, curvature, or a higher moment.

Schlienger, Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Robertson, Joanna M. (Safford, AZ); Melgaard, David (Albuquerque, NM); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM); Van Den Avyle, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Fabrication of metallic glass structures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

Cline, C.F.

1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

487

Integrated decontamination process for metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

Friesen, Cody

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

489

FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

Friesen, Cody

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

490

Spray casting of metallic preforms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result 7 ' 30 u 31 in metal carbide cluster chemistry willin metal chemistry. Oxidation of the iron carbide cluster

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal c