Sample records for loop range test

  1. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: molten salt test loop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molten salt test loop Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy...

  3. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind.

  4. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  5. Wide tracking range, auto ranging, low jitter phase lock loop for swept and fixed frequency systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerner, Thomas M. (Manorville, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a wide tracking range phase locked loop (PLL) circuit that achieves minimal jitter in a recovered clock signal, regardless of the source of the jitter (i.e. whether it is in the source or the transmission media). The present invention PLL has automatic harmonic lockout detection circuitry via a novel lock and seek control logic in electrical communication with a programmable frequency discriminator and a code balance detector. (The frequency discriminator enables preset of a frequency window of upper and lower frequency limits to derive a programmable range within which signal acquisition is effected. The discriminator works in combination with the code balance detector circuit to minimize the sensitivity of the PLL circuit to random data in the data stream). In addition, the combination of a differential loop integrator with the lock and seek control logic obviates a code preamble and guarantees signal acquisition without harmonic lockup. An adaptive cable equalizer is desirably used in combination with the present invention PLL to recover encoded transmissions containing a clock and/or data. The equalizer automatically adapts to equalize short haul cable lengths of coaxial and twisted pair cables or wires and provides superior jitter performance itself. The combination of the equalizer with the present invention PLL is desirable in that such combination permits the use of short haul wires without significant jitter.

  6. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  7. Modern testing meets wide range of objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing sequences in two very different wells illustrate the wide range of objectives that are met with modern testing procedures. The first example is a drill stem test in an exploration well. The second test is in an established producing well. The exploration well test incorporated tubing-conveyed perforating, fluid sampling, production logging, and matrix stimulation to evaluate and properly treat near-well bore damage, as well as to investigate reservoir volume and characterize boundaries. The test on the established producer evaluated whether a workover could remedy lower than expected productivity. Production logging was combined with stationary transient measurements.

  8. Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  9. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Brown, Nicholas [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Fuller, Robert; Nichols, Kenneth [Barber Nichols 6325 W 55th Ave., Arvada, Colorado 80002 (United States)

    2005-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

  10. Operational results of a Closed Brayton Cycle test-loop.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Robert (Barber Nichols, Arvada, Colorado); Wright, Steven Alan; Nichols, Kenneth Graham. (Barber Nichols, Arvada, Colorado); Brown, Nicholas; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kW{sub th} with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

  11. Tonopah Test Range 2030 Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Closed, Closed in Place, or Closure in Progress. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized. CASs and CAUs where contaminants and/or waste have been closed in place are summarized. There is also a table that summarizes the contaminant that has been closed at each site, if land-use restrictions are present, and if post-closure inspections are required.

  12. Results from tests of TFL Hydragard sampling loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is operational, processed radioactive sludge will be transferred in batches to the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), where glass frit will be added and the contents concentrated by boiling. Batches of the slurry mixture are transferred from the SME to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). Hydragard{reg_sign} sampling systems are used on the SME and the MFT for collecting slurry samples in vials for chemical analysis. An accurate replica of the Hydragard sampling system was built and tested in the thermal Fluids Laboratory (TFL) to determine the hydragard accuracy. It was determined that the original Hydragard valve frequently drew a non-representative sample stream through the sample vial that ranged from frit enriched to frit depleted. The Hydragard valve was modified by moving the plunger and its seat backwards so that the outer surface of the plunger was flush with the inside diameter of the transfer line when the valve was open. The slurry flowing through the vial accurately represented the composition of the slurry in the reservoir for two types of slurries, different dilution factors, a range of transfer flows and a range of vial flows. It was then found that the 15 ml of slurry left in the vial when the Hydragard valve was closed, which is what will be analyzed at DWPF, had a lower ratio of frit to sludge as characterized by the lithium to iron ratio than the slurry flowing through it. The reason for these differences is not understood at this time but it is recommended that additional experimentation be performed with the TFL Hydragard loop to determine the cause.

  13. Abnormal operating procedures for ATR (Advanced Test Reactor's) experiment loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auflick, J.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the background from the TMI accident which resulted in the definition and development of function-oriented procedures. It also explains how function-oriented procedures were applied in a task for the Advanced Test Reactor's (ATR) NR experiment loops. Human performance design discrepancies were identified for existing procedures, and were corrected by upgrading them according to current NRC and DOE standards. Finally, specific recommendations are made with respect to future ATR control room and loop improvements, as they relate to the revision of operating procedures within INEL's power reactor program. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

  15. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

  16. Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

  17. Testing Loop Quantum Gravity and Electromagnetic Dark Energy in Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clovis Jacinto de Matos

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 Cabrera and Tate reported an anomalous excess of mass of the Cooper pairs in rotating thin Niobium rings. So far, this experimental result never received a proper theoretical explanation in the context of superconductor's physics. In the present work we argue that what Cabrera and Tate interpreted as an anomalous excess of mass can also be associated with a deviation from the classical gravitomagnetic Larmor theorem due to the presence of dark energy in the superconductor, as well as with the discrete structure of the area of the superconducting Niobium ring as predicted by Loop Quantum Gravity. From Cabrera and Tate measurements we deduce that the quantization of spacetime in superconducting circular rings occurs at the Planck-Einstein scale $l_{PE} = (\\hbar G/c^3 \\Lambda)^{1/4}\\sim 3.77\\times 10 ^{-5} m$, instead of the Planck scale $l_{P} =(\\hbar G / c^3)^{1/2}=1.61 \\times 10 ^{-35} m$, with an Immirzi parameter which depends on the specific critical temperature of the superconducting material and on the area of the ring. The stephan-Boltzmann law for quantized areas delimited by superconducting rings is predicted, and an experimental concept based on the electromagnetic black-body radiation emitted by this surfaces, is proposed to test loop quantum gravity and electromagnetic dark energy in superconductors.

  18. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  19. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites Pre-activity survey report to clear areas to be cleaned up. No sensitive species were...

  20. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  2. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  3. Customer interface document for the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettit, Kathleen; Kolb, William J.; Gill, David Dennis; Briggs, Ronald D.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate 'solar salt' and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 600psi, temperature to 585 C, and flow rate of 400-600GPM depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

  4. Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1 Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range Wednesday, December 15, 2010 Melissa due to renewable energy infrastructure development at the Nevada Test and Training Range. Nevada has have ever-increasing renewable energy goals. However, proposals for the development of 116 renewable

  5. Assessment of High-Temperature Measurements for Use in the Gas Test Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Curt Wilkins; Robert P. Evans

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature transducers capable of control and test measurements in the 1400-1800¢ªC range in the fast neutron irradiation environment of the Gas Test Loop are evaluated. Among the instruments discussed are high-temperature thermocouples, resistance temperature detectors, ultrasonic thermometers, noise thermometers, and optical temperature sensors. High-temperature capability, behavior under irradiation, technical maturity, cost, and availability are among the key factors considered in assessing the relative merits of each measurement method. In the near term, the doped molybdenum versus niobium-zirconium alloy thermocouple is deemed to be best suited to the in-pile test and control requirements. Additional characterization of this thermocouple combination is needed to ensure confidence in its performance. Use of tungsten-rhenium alloy thermocouples, with specific disadvantages noted, constitutes the recommended back-up position.

  6. Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop Valentina Tcharnotskaia, Curtt Ammerman, Timothy Darling, Joe King,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop Valentina Tcharnotskaia, Curtt Ammerman, Timothy Darling 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract We designed and built the Liquid Lead-Bismuth Materials Test Loop (MTL) to study the materials behavior in a flow of molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper we

  7. Design of a Gas Test Loop Facility for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wemple

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Nuclear Energy within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-NE) has identified the need for irradiation testing of nuclear fuels and materials, primarily in support of the Generation IV (Gen-IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. These fuel development programs require a unique environment to test and qualify potential reactor fuel forms. This environment should combine a high fast neutron flux with a hard neutron spectrum and high irradiation temperature. An effort is presently underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to modify a large flux trap in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to accommodate such a test facility [1,2]. The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project Conceptual Design was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Such a capability will be needed if programs such as the AFCI, Gen-IV, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), and space nuclear propulsion are to meet development objectives and schedules. These programs are beginning some irradiations now, but many call for fast flux testing within this decade.

  8. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will be performed to develop probability of confidence in what is measured in the test loop. Overall, the testing loop will allow development of needed heat transfer related thermophysical parameters for all the salts, validate existing correlations, validate measuring instruments under harsh environment, and have extensive corrosion testing of materials of construction.

  9. ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: ICFT- An Initial...

  10. Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of the Equivalence Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale Boggs

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiment provides precise observations of the lunar orbit that contribute to a wide range of science investigations. In particular, time series of highly accurate measurements of the distance between the Earth and Moon provide unique information that determine whether, in accordance with the Equivalence Principle (EP), both of these celestial bodies are falling towards the Sun at the same rate, despite their different masses, compositions, and gravitational self-energies. Analyses of precise laser ranges to the Moon continue to provide increasingly stringent limits on any violation of the EP. Current LLR solutions give (-0.8 +/- 1.3) x 10^{-13} for any possible inequality in the ratios of the gravitational and inertial masses for the Earth and Moon, (m_G/m_I)_E - (m_G/m_I)_M. Such an accurate result allows other tests of gravitational theories. Focusing on the tests of the EP, we discuss the existing data and data analysis techniques. The robustness of the LLR solutions is demonstrated with several different approaches to solutions. Additional high accuracy ranges and improvements in the LLR data analysis model will further advance the research of relativistic gravity in the solar system, and will continue to provide highly accurate tests of the Equivalence Principle.

  11. Summary of TRUEX Radiolysis Testing Using the INL Radiolysis Test Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Rocklan G. McDowell; Gracy Elias; Jack D. Law

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL radiolysis and hydrolysis test loop has been used to evaluate the effects of hydrolytic and radiolytic degradation upon the efficacy of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. Repeated irradiation and subsequent re-conditioning cycles did result in a significant decrease in the concentration of the TBP and CMPO extractants in the TRUEX solvent and a corresponding decrease in americium and europium extraction distributions. However, the build-up of solvent degradation products upon {gamma}-irradiation, had little impact upon the efficiency of the stripping section of the TRUEX flowsheet. Operation of the TRUEX flowsheet would require careful monitoring to ensure extraction distributions are maintained at acceptable levels.

  12. Tonopah Test Range EGS graphics tracking display system: HP370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.H.; Bauhs, K.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the HP370 component of the Enhanced Graphics System (EGS) used at Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Selected Radar data is fed into the computer systems and the resulting tracking symbols are displayed on high-resolution video monitors in real time. These tracking symbols overlay background maps and are used for monitoring/controlling various flight vehicles. This report discusses both the operational aspects and the internal configuration of the HP370 Workstation portion of the EGS system.

  13. FY 1993 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G. [and others

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 MG/m{sup 2}-s. In a parallel fuel plate configuration as in the ANSR, the flow is subject to a potential excursive static-flow instability that can very rapidly lead to flow starvation and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) in the ``hot channel``. The current correlations and experimental data bases for flow excursion (FE) and critical heat flux (CHF) seldom evaluate the specific combination of ANSR operating parameters. The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 17 MW/m{sup 2}, a mass flux range of 8 to 28 Mg/m{sup 2}-s, an exit pressure range of 1.4 to 2.1 MPa, and an inlet temperature range of 40 to 50 C. FE experiments were also conducted using as ``soft`` a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomena (actual secondary burnout). True DNB experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. To the author`s knowledge, no other FE data have been reported in the literature to date that dover such a combination of conditions of high mass flux, high heat flux, and moderately high pressure.

  14. Johnson(-like)-Noise-Kirchhoff-Loop Based Secure Classical Communicator Characteristics, for Ranges of Two to Two Thousand Kilometers, via Model-Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Mingesz; Zoltan Gingl; Laszlo B. Kish

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of Kirchhoff-Loop-Johnson(-like)-Noise communicators, which is able to work over variable ranges, was designed and built. Tests have been carried out on a model-line performance characteristics were obtained for ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance of the exchanged raw key bits. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation and sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for corresponding copper wire diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity). The raw-bit security of this practical system significantly outperforms raw-bit quantum security. Current injection breaking tests show zero bit eavesdropping ability without triggering the alarm signal, therefore no multiple measurements are needed to build an error statistics to detect the eavesdropping as in quantum communication. Wire resistance based breaking tests of Bergou-Scheuer-Yariv type give an upper limit of eavesdropped raw bit ratio of 0.19 % and this limit is inversely proportional to the sixth power of cable diameter. Hao's breaking method yields zero (below measurement resolution) eavesdropping information.

  15. Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, JR.G.L.

    2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

  16. Numerical simulation of the electromagnetic fields excited by loop antennas in plasma in the whistler frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koldanov, V. A.; Korobkov, S. V.; Gushchin, M. E.; Kostrov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic fields excited by circular loop antennas in a magnetized plasma in the whistler frequency range are simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method. The spatial structure of quasi-monochromatic fields excited in the near- and far-field zones by an antenna with a harmonic current, as well as the dynamics of the electromagnetic field excited by an antenna with a current in the form of a single video pulse, is studied. Simulations performed for a uniform plasma and uniform ambient magnetic field agree well with the results of theoretical analysis and model laboratory experiments performed on large-scale plasma devices.

  17. Observational Tests of Damping by Resonant Absorption in Coronal Loop Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus J. Aschwanden; Richard W. Nightingale; Jesse Andries; Marcel Goossens; Tom Van Doorsselaere

    2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the proposed damping mechanisms of coronal (transverse) loop oscillations in the kink-mode is resonant absorption as a result of the Alfven speed variation at the outer boundary of coronal loops. Analytical expressions for the period and damping time exist for loop models with thin non-uniform boundaries. Here we measure the thickness of the non-uniform layer in oscillating loops for 11 events, by forward-fitting of the cross-sectional density profile and line-of-sight integration to the cross-sectional fluxes observed with TRACE 171 A. This way we model the internal and external electron density of the coronal plasma in oscillating loops. This allows us to test the theoretically predicted damping rates for thin boundaries as function of the density ratio. We find that the density ratio predicted by the damping time is higher than the density ratio estimated from the background fluxes. The lower densities modeled from the background fluxes are likely to be a consequence of the neglected hotter plasma that is not detected with the TRACE 171 A filter. Taking these correction into account, resonant absorption predicts damping times of kink-mode oscillations that are commensurable with the observed ones and provides a new diagnostic of the density contrast of oscillating loops.

  18. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. This annual report (calendar year 1998) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management cleanup of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In compliance with DOE orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance at TTR extends only to those areas where SNL activities are carried out. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990a).

  19. Adaptive Internal Model Control for Mid-Ranging of Closed-Loop Systems with Internal Saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    saturations. The problem originates from previous work in machining with industrial robots, where an external and tested in milling scenarios [1], [2]. The setup consists of a conventional industrial robot

  20. Hydrogen loops in existing reactors for testing fuel elements for nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.; Welland, H.; Abraschoff, J. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho Inc., P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)); Thoms, K. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8087 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has revitalized interest in adapting nuclear energy for power and propulsion. Prior to the selection of a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system, extensive testing of the various proposed concepts will be required. In today's environmental, safety and health culture, full size rocket engine tests as were done under the Rover/NERVA program will be extremely difficult and expensive to perform and meet NASA's schedules. A different test strategy uses a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor to test a wide variety of single elements or clusters of elements for fuel qualification. This approach is expected to reduce operating and capital costs and expedite the testing schedule. This paper examines the potential of performing subscale tests in a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The HFIR is expected to achieve power densities comparable to those achieved in ATR because of the 85 MWt power level and the high thermal and fast flux levels. The available length and diameter of the test region of FHIR are 60 cm and 10 cm whereas the available length and diameter of the test region of ATR are 120 cm and 12 cm respectively.

  1. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  2. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. Closed-loop control in ambulatory diabetic swine A closed-loop blood-glucose control system is tested in vivo in an ambulatory diabetic swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is tested in vivo in an ambulatory diabetic swine model. · Blood-glucose (BG) regulation is achieved for pre-loop control provides blood-glucose regulation using dual subcutaneous insulin and glucagon infusion ACQUISITION DELIVERY MEASUREMENT DIABETIC PIG MODEL Insulin Glucagon Bluetooth wireless control SIGNAL CONTROL

  4. Analysis of the October 5, 1979 lithium spill and fire in the Lithium Processing Test Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maroni, V.A.; Beatty, R.A.; Brown, H.L.; Coleman, L.F.; Foose, R.M.; McPheeters, C.C.; Slawecki, M.; Smith, D.L.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Weston, J.R.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 5, 1979, the Lithium Processing Test Loop (LPTL) developed a lithium leak in the electromagnetic (EM) pump channel, which damaged the pump, its surrounding support structure, and the underlying floor pan. A thorough analysis of the causes and consequences of the pump failure was conducted by personnel from CEN and several other ANL divisions. Metallurgical analyses of the elliptical pump channel and adjacent piping revealed that there was a significant buildup of iron-rich crystallites and other solid material in the region of the current-carrying bus bars (region of high magnetic field), which may have resulted in a flow restriction that contributed to the deterioration of the channel walls. The location of the failure was in a region of high residual stress (due to cold work produced during channel fabrication); this failure is typical of other cold work/stress-related failures encountered in components operated in forced-circulation lithium loops. Another important result was the isolation of crystals of a compound characterized as Li/sub x/CrN/sub y/. Compounds of this type are believed to be responsible for much of the Fe, Cr, and Ni mass transfer encountered in lithium loops constructed of stainless steel. The importance of nitrogen in the mass-transfer mechanism has long been suspected, but the existence of stable ternary Li-M-N compounds (M = Fe, Cr, Ni) had not previously been verified.

  5. Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) Testing Facility for Distributed Energy Storage (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer.J.; Lundstrom, B.; Simpson, M.; Pratt, A.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing deployment of distributed, variable generation and evolving end-user load profiles presents a unique set of challenges to grid operators responsible for providing reliable and high quality electrical service. Mass deployment of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) has the potential to solve many of the associated integration issues while offering reliability and energy security benefits other solutions cannot. However, tools to develop, optimize, and validate DESS control strategies and hardware are in short supply. To fill this gap, NREL has constructed a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) test facility that connects DESS, grid simulator, and load bank hardware to a distribution feeder simulation.

  6. Test Report on ISR Double-Loop, Spray-Cooled Inverter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, John S [ORNL; Coomer, Chester [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Wiles, Randy H [ORNL; Lowe, Kirk T [ORNL; McFee, Marshall T [ORNL

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Isothermal Systems Research, Inc. (ISR) double-loop, two-phase spray cooling system was designed to use 85 C transmission oil to cool a heat exchanger via a second cooling loop. The heat exchanger condenses the working fluid vapor back to liquid inside a sealed enclosure to allow for continuous spray cooling of electronics. In the ORNL tests, 85 C water/ethylene/glycol (WEG), which has better thermal properties than transmission oil, was substituted for the transmission oil. Because the ISR spray-cooling system requires a second cooling loop, the final inverter might be inherently larger than inverters that do not require a second-loop cooling system. The ISR test setup did not include a dc bus capacitor. Because the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) conduction test indicated that the ISR test setup could not be properly loaded thermally, no switching tests were conducted. Therefore it was not necessary to attach external capacitors outside the test setup. During load situations not exceeding 400A, the WEG inlet temperature was higher than the WEG outlet temperature. This meant that the 85 C WEG heat exchanger was not cooling the inverter and became a thermal load to the inverter. Only when the load was higher than 400A with a higher coolant temperature and the release valve actuated did the WEG heat exchanger start to cool the 2-phase coolant. The inverter relied strongly on the cooling of the huge aluminum enclosure located inside the ventilation chamber. In a hybrid vehicle, the inverter is situated under the hood, where the dependency on cooling provided by the enclosure may become a problem. The IGBT power dissipation with both sides being spray cooled was around 34 W/cm{sup 2} at 403A, with 995W total IGBT loss at 113.5 C projected junction temperature before the release valve was actuated. The current loading could rise higher than 403 A before reaching the 125 C junction temperature limit if the pressure buildup inside the enclosure could be prevented by improving the secondary cooling loop. This 34 w/cm{sup 2} was an average across all dies. There is no doubt that the cooling capability of the ISR spray-cooling test setup can be improved by (1) lowering the WEG inlet temperature from 85 C to say 70 C, this would condense the vapor better and lower the container pressure, (2) modification of the vapor condenser inside the container to cool both the vapor and the liquid of the 2-phase coolant, in the present setup only the vapor is cooled by the condenser inside the container, and (3) lower the liquid temperature through (1) and (2) to avoid the vaporization that causes cavitations in the pump for ensuring the pump's life expectance.

  7. Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas: EnergyFallon GeothermalTest

  8. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  9. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  10. Neonatal Hearing Screening Test Consistent with loss in one or both ears within frequency range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Neonatal Hearing Screening Test Consistent with loss in one or both ears within frequency range: Gene specific mutation screening If familial and nonsyndromal is suspected, consider: GJB2 testing GJB6 testing CMV testing Environmental etiologies Gene specific screening may be warranted If nonsyndromal

  11. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  12. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535%C2%B0C. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535%C2%B0C and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice won't be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  13. (VDL)² : a jitter measurement built-in self-test circuit for phase locked loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam, Brandon Ray

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the development of a new type of BIST circuit, the (VDL)2, with the purpose of measuring jitter in IBM's phase locked loops. The (VDL)2, which stands for Variable Vernier Digital Delay Locked Line, ...

  14. Test of the string loop oscillation model using kHz quasiperiodic oscillations in a neutron star binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuchlík, Zden?k

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The model of current-carrying string loop oscillations is tested to explain the special set of frequencies related to the high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed recently in the low-mass X-ray binary XTE J1701-407 containing a neutron star. The external geometry of the neutron star is approximated by the Kerr geometry, introducing errors not exceeding $10~\\%$ for slowly rotating massive neutron stars. The frequencies of the radial and vertical string loop oscillations are then governed by the mass $M$ and dimensionless spin $a$ of the neutron star, and by the dimensionless parameter $\\omega$ describing combined effects of the string loop tension and its angular momentum. It is explicitly demonstrated that the string-loop oscillation model can explain the observed kHz frequencies for the neutron star parameters restricted to the intervals ${0.2

  15. A Low-Voltage and Wide-Range Phase-Locked Loop for Standard Mobile Imaging Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo-Young

    conditions. Even in the PVT (Process, Voltage, Temperature) worst conditions, the locking range of the PLL Block diagram #12;2.2 Charge Pump Mismatch CP NMOS PMOS sinking/sourcing mismatch,8,9 VCC , PVT worst 3.3V 10Mhz~1.18Ghz, 2.8V 100Mhz~850Mhz, 2.4V 180Mhz~820Mhz . (0.4V

  16. Additive and multiplicative renormalization of topological charge with improved gluon/fermion actions: A test case for 3-loop vacuum calculations, using overlap or clover fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Skouroupathis; H. Panagopoulos

    2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate perturbative renormalization properties of the topological charge, using the standard lattice discretization given by a product of twisted plaquettes. We use the overlap and clover action for fermions, and the Symanzik improved gluon action for 4- and 6-link loops. We compute the multiplicative renormalization of the topological charge density to one loop; this involves only the gluon part of the action. The power divergent additive renormalization of the topological susceptibility is calculated to 3 loops. Our work serves also as a test case of the techniques and limitations of lattice perturbation theory, it being the first 3-loop computation in the literature involving overlap fermions.

  17. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Research and Technology Applications Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  18. AN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for themselves. The third home is even more aggressively revamped to target zero net energy use. The first home ... that this is worth looking at and then worth investing in," he said. Putting buildings on energy diets ProjectAN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades

  19. Katech (Lithium Polymer) 4-Passenger NEV - Range and Battery Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) received a Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) from the Korea Automotive Technology Institute (KATECH) for vehicle and battery characterization testing. The KATECH NEV (called the Invita) was equipped with a lithium polymer battery pack from Kokam Engineering. The Invita was to be baseline performance tested by AVTA’s testing partner, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA), at ETA’s contract testing facilities and test track in Phoenix, Arizona, to AVTA’s NEVAmerica testing specifications and procedures. Before and during initial constant speed range testing, the Invita battery pack experienced cell failures, and the onboard charger failed. A Kokamsupplied off-board charger was used in place of the onboard charger to successfully perform a constant speed range test on the Invita. The Invita traveled a total of 47.9 miles in 1 hour 47 minutes, consuming 91.3 amp-hours and 6.19 kilowatt-hours. The Kokam Engineering lithium polymer battery was also scheduled for battery pack characterization testing, including the C/3 energy capacity, dynamic stress, and peak power tests. Testing was stopped during the initial C/3 energy capacity test, however, because the battery pack failed to withstand cycling without cell failures. After the third discharge/charge sequence was completed, it was discovered that Cell 6 had failed, with a voltage reading of 0.5 volts. Cell 6 was replaced, and the testing sequence was restarted. After the second discharge/charge sequence was complete, it was discovered that Cell 1 had failed, with its voltage reading 0.2 volts. At this point it was decided to stop all battery pack testing. During the discharge cycles, the battery pack supplied 102.21, 94.34, and 96.05 amp-hours consecutively before Cell 6 failed. After replacing Cell 6, the battery pack supplied 98.34 and 98.11 amp-hours before Cell 1 failed. The Idaho National Laboratory managed these testing activities for the AVTA, as part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  20. Advanced Photovoltaic Inverter Functionality using 500 kW Power Hardware-in-Loop Complete System Laboratory Testing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, B. A.; Kromer, M. A.; Casey, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing penetration of distribution connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, more and more PV developers and utilities are interested in easing future PV interconnection concerns by mitigating some of the impacts of PV integration using advanced PV inverter controls and functions. This paper describes the testing of a 500 kW PV inverter using Power Hardware-in-Loop (PHIL) testing techniques. The test setup is described and the results from testing the inverter in advanced functionality modes, not commonly used in currently interconnected PV systems, are presented. PV inverter operation under PHIL evaluation that emulated both the DC PV array connection and the AC distribution level grid connection are shown for constant power factor (PF) and constant reactive power (VAr) control modes. The evaluation of these modes was completed under varying degrees of modeled PV variability.

  1. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, William T.; Daniels, Jeffrey; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Giles, Ken; Karr, Lynn; Kluesner, Tammy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  2. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  3. Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of the Equivalence Principle with the Earth and Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale H. Boggs

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary objective of the Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiment is to provide precise observations of the lunar orbit that contribute to a wide range of science investigations. Time series of the highly accurate measurements of the distance between the Earth and Moon provide unique information used to determine whether, in accordance with the Equivalence Principle (EP), both of these celestial bodies are falling towards the Sun at the same rate, despite their different masses, compositions, and gravitational self-energies. Current LLR solutions give $(-1.0 \\pm 1.4) \\times 10^{-13}$ for any possible inequality in the ratios of the gravitational and inertial masses for the Earth and Moon, $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)$. This result, in combination with laboratory experiments on the weak equivalence principle, yields a strong equivalence principle (SEP) test of $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)_{\\tt SEP} = (-2.0 \\pm 2.0) \\times 10^{-13}$. Such an accurate result allows other tests of gravitational theories. The result of the SEP test translates into a value for the corresponding SEP violation parameter $\\eta$ of $(4.4 \\pm 4.5)\\times10^{-4}$, where $\\eta = 4\\beta -\\gamma -3$ and both $\\gamma$ and $\\beta$ are parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters. The PPN parameter $\\beta$ is determined to be $\\beta - 1 = (1.2 \\pm 1.1) \\times 10^{-4}$. Focusing on the tests of the EP, we discuss the existing data, and characterize the modeling and data analysis techniques. The robustness of the LLR solutions is demonstrated with several different approaches that are presented in the text. We emphasize that near-term improvements in the LLR ranging accuracy will further advance the research of relativistic gravity in the solar system, and, most notably, will continue to provide highly accurate tests of the Equivalence Principle.

  4. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  5. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Landfill Complex, CAU No. 424, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. The CAU 424 is comprised of eight individual landfill sites that are located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound. Due to the unregulated disposal activities commonly associated with early landfill operations, an investigation will be conducted at each CAS to complete the following tasks: identify the presence and nature of possible contaminant migration from the landfills; determine the vertical and lateral extent of possible contaminant migration; ascertain the potential impact to human health and the environment; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action strategies for each CAS.

  6. The northern boundary of the desert tortoise range on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; Brown, G.A.; Goodwin, R.G.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted in 1993 to more accurately define the northern boundary of the range of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Eighty-six transects totaling 338.2 km were walked along this boundary and 53 tortoise signs were recorded. Tortoise signs were found all along the northern edge of Jackass and Frenchman flats. Signs were found north of those valleys only in the Calico Hills at the south end of Topopah Valley and in the CP Hills at the extreme southern end of Yucca Flat. A revised map of the range of desert tortoises on NTS is presented. This information can be used by the US Department of Energy to determine whether activities conducted along or near this boundary will affect desert tortoises.

  7. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  8. The Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement and the Wide Range Achievement Test: convergent and discriminant validity for blacks and whites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenson, Glenn Martin

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE WOODCOCK-JOHNSON TESTS OF ACHIEVEMENT AND THE WIDE RANGE ACHIEVEMENT TEST: CONVERGENT AND DISCRIMINANT VALIDITY FOR BLACKS AND WHITES A Thesis by GLENN MARTIN JENSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Educational Psychology THE WOODCOCK-JOHNSON TESTS OF ACHIEVEMENT AND THE WIDE RANGE ACHIEVEMENT TEST: CONVERGENT AND DISCRIMINANT VALIDITY FOR BLACKS...

  9. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (US), NNSA; Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (US)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  10. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  11. Testing of a loop heat pipe experimental apparatus under varied acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurwitz, Richard Cable

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    correlation's and models may be used to predict steady state and some transient performance of the LHP. The model is adapted from the LHP working cycle found in the patent and other literature describing the device. The predictions closely match test data...

  12. Studies of the steam generator degraded tubes behavior on BRUTUS test loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chedeau, C.; Rassineux, B. [EDF/DER/MTC, Moret Sur Loing (France); Flesch, B. [EDF/EPN/DMAINT, Paris (France)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies for the evaluation of steam generator tube bundle cracks in PWR power plants are described. Global tests of crack leak rates and numerical calculations of crack opening area are discussed in some detail. A brief overview of thermohydraulic studies and the development of a mechanical probabilistic design code is also given. The COMPROMIS computer code was used in the studies to quantify the influence of in-service inspections and maintenance work on the risk of a steam generator tube rupture.

  13. Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

  14. Practical Experiences from the USE of a Method for Active Functional Tests and Optimization of Coil Energy Recovery Loop Systems in AHUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksson, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRACTICAL EXPERIENCES FROM THE USE OF A METHOD FOR ACTIVE FUNCTIONAL TESTS AND OPTIMIZATION OF COIL ENERGY RECOVERY LOOP SYSTEMS IN AHUS. J?rgen Eriksson* * ?F-Installation AB, Box 1551 SE 401 51 G?teborg, Sweden. Summary A method...-commissioning, ventilation, energy, efficiency, EES INTRODUCTION The reason to study coil energy recovery loop systems is that they are very common in Sweden and mainly used in cases with high air flow rates such as in hospitals and pharmaceutical industries. The heat...

  15. APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 Tests of Gravity with Lunar Laser Ranging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 Tests of Gravity with Lunar Laser Ranging;APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 LLR Outline · What LLR measures · What LLR tests · LLR and the equivalence principle #12;APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 Lunar

  16. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2011 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (3) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (4) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (5) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C, field notes are included in Appendix D, and photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 3 and 4, 2011. Maintenance was performed at CAU 424, CAU 453, and CAU 487. At CAU 424, two surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 could not be located during the inspection. The two monuments were located and marked with lava rock on July 13, 2011. At CAU 453, there was evidence of animal burrowing. Animal burrows were backfilled on July 13, 2011. At CAU 487, one use restriction warning sign was missing, and wording was faded on the remaining signs. A large animal burrow was also present. The signs were replaced, and the animal burrow was backfilled on July 12, 2011. As a best management practice, the use restriction warning signs at CAU 407 were replaced with standard Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order signs on July 13, 2011. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2011, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  17. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2013 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: • CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) • CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) • CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) • CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) • CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Field notes are included in Appendix D. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 14, 2013. Maintenance was performed at CAU 400, CAU 424, and CAU 453. At CAU 400, animal burrows were backfilled. At CAU 424, erosion repairs were completed at Landfill Cell A3-3, subsidence was repaired at Landfill Cell A3-4, and additional lava rock was placed in high-traffic areas to mark the locations of the surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 and Landfill Cell A3-8. At CAU 453, two areas of subsidence were repaired and animal burrows were backfilled. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2013. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  18. Loop Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bruegmann

    1993-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The loop representation plays an important role in canonical quantum gravity because loop variables allow a natural treatment of the constraints. In these lectures we give an elementary introduction to (i) the relevant history of loops in knot theory and gauge theory, (ii) the loop representation of Maxwell theory, and (iii) the loop representation of canonical quantum gravity. (Based on lectures given at the 117. Heraeus Seminar, Bad Honnef, Sept. 1993)

  19. Current Short-Range Tests of the Gravitational Inverse Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua C. Long; John C. Price

    2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated in large part by the possibility of observing signatures of compact extra dimensions, experimental searches for deviations from Newtonian gravity at short distances have improved in sensitivity by many orders of magnitude in the past five years. We review the essential features of the experiments responsible for the current limits on new effects in the range from a few microns to a few centimeters, and discuss prospects for the near future.

  20. Radiochemical data collected on events from which radioactivity escaped beyond the borders of the Nevada test range complex. [NONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, H.G.

    1981-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies all nuclear events in Nevada that are known to have sent radioactivity beyond the borders of the test range complex. There have been 177 such tests, representing seven different types: nuclear detonations in the atmosphere, nuclear excavation events, nuclear safety events, underground nuclear events that inadvertently seeped or vented to the atmosphere, dispersion of plutonium and/or uranium by chemical high explosives, nuclear rocket engine tests, and nuclear ramjet engine tests. The source term for each of these events is given, together with the data base from which it was derived (except where the data are classified). The computer programs used for organizing and processing the data base and calculating radionuclide production are described and included, together with the input and output data and details of the calculations. This is the basic formation needed to make computer modeling studies of the fallout from any of these 177 events.

  1. Multiprotein DNA looping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose M. G. Vilar; Leonor Saiz

    2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switch-like transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 386 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 425 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 consisted of a large pile of concrete rubble from the original Hard Target and construction debris associated with the Tornado Rocket Sled Tests. CAU 425 was closed in accordance with the FFACO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2002). CAU 425 was closed by implementing the following corrective actions: The approved corrective action for this unit was clean closure. Closure activities included: (1) Removal of all the debris from the site. (2) Weighing each load of debris leaving the job site. (3) Transporting the debris to the U.S. Air Force Construction Landfill for disposal. (4) Placing the radioactive material in a U.S. Department of Transportation approved container for proper transport and disposal. (5) Transporting the radioactive material to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. (6) Regrading the job site to its approximate original contours/elevation.

  3. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)]. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  4. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499, Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR). This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996). CAU 499 is located on the TTR and consists of the following single Corrective Action Site (CAS) (Figure 1): CAS RG-25-001-RD24 - Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been cased by numerous small historical over fillings, spills and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of 36 years. The tank was located on the north side of Building 24-50 on the TTR approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of the Avenue 24.

  5. Testing the attitude determination and control of a CubeSat with hardware-in-the-loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quadrino, Meghan Kathleen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a methodology for testing the attitude determination and control of a CubeSat within a constrained environment. This approach first evaluates the concept of operations of the satellite mission, then ...

  6. Corrective action decision document second gas station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403). Revision No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes}. The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-03 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (3 5 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service.

  7. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  8. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  9. Application of a Virtual Reactivity Feedback Control Loop in Non-Nuclear Testing of a Fast Spectrum Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Al, 35812 (United States); Forsbacka, Matthew [NASA Headquarters, 300 E St. S, Washington, DC 20465 (United States)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a compact, fast-spectrum reactor, reactivity feedback is dominated by core deformation at elevated temperature. Given the use of accurate deformation measurement techniques, it is possible to simulate nuclear feedback in non-nuclear electrically heated reactor tests. Implementation of simulated reactivity feedback in response to measured deflection is being tested at the Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). During tests of the SAFE-100 reactor prototype, core deflection was monitored using a high resolution camera. 'Virtual' reactivity feedback was accomplished by applying the results of Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to core deflection measurements; the computational analysis was used to establish the reactivity worth of various core deformations. The power delivered to the SAFE-100 prototype was then adjusted accordingly via kinetics calculations. The work presented in this paper will demonstrate virtual reactivity feedback as core power was increased from 1 kWt to 10 kWt, held approximately constant at 10 kWt, and then allowed to decrease based on the negative thermal reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  10. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  11. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408: Bomblet Target Area (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. This CAS includes the following seven target areas: • Mid Target • Flightline Bomblet Location • Strategic Air Command (SAC) Target Location 1 • SAC Target Location 2 • South Antelope Lake • Tomahawk Location 1 • Tomahawk Location 2 The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for the CAS within CAU 408 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 408 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From July 2009 through August 2010, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Identify and remove munitions of explosive concern (MEC) associated with DOE activities. • Investigate potential disposal pit locations. • Remove depleted uranium-contaminated fragments and soil. • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 408. Assessment of the data indicated COCs are not present at CAS TA-55-002-TAB2; therefore, no corrective action is necessary. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities. The MEC was successfully removed and dispositioned as planned using current best available technologies. As MEC guidance and general MEC standards acknowledge that MEC response actions cannot determine with 100 percent certainty that all MEC and unexploded ordnance (UXO) are removed, the clean closure of CAU 408 will implement a best management practice of posting UXO hazard warning signs near the seven target areas. The signs will warn future land users of the potential for encountering residual UXO hazards. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 408. • Corrective Action Unit 408 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  12. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 423, Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend a preferred corrective action for the single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 03-02-002-0308, within CAU 423. Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles[mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The UDP is approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest of the northwest corner of Building 03-60, the Auto Maintenance Shop. Corrective Action Unit 423 is comprised of the UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60. The UDP received waste oil products from the Auto Maintenance Shop, a light-duty fleet maintenance shop in the Area 3 compound, from 1965 to 1989 or 1990 (DOE/NV, 1997).

  14. High-Speed Real-Time Digital Emulation for Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing of Power Electronics: A New Paradigm in the Field of Electronic Design Automation (EDA) for Power Electronics Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsy, Michel A.

    This paper details the design and application of a new ultra-high speed real-time simulation for Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) testing and design of high-power power electronics systems. Our real-time hardware emulation for ...

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at undisturbed locations near the area of the disposal pits; field screening samples for radiological constituents; analysis for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters of samples beneath the disposal pits; and bioassessment samples, if VOC or TPH contamination concentrations exceed field-screening levels. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  16. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  17. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR THE AREA 3 LANDFILL COMPLEX, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, CAU 424, REVISION 0, MARCH 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for the Area 3 Landfill Complex (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 424) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Corrective Action Unit 424 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs), each an individual landfill located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Landfill A3-1 is CAS No. 03-08-001-A301. (2) Landfill A3-2 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A302. (3) Landfill A3-3 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A303. (4) Landfill A3-4 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A304. (5) Landfill A3-5 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A305. (6) Landfill A3-6 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A306. (7) Landfill A3-7 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A307. (8) Landfill A3-8 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A308. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (6) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. In June and July 1997, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated four groupings of site characteristics as shown in Table ES-1. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for CAU No. 424: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing waste. (2) Remediate the site per applicable state and federal regulations (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the TTR, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Landfill Complex CAU: Alternative 1 - No Action; Alternative 2 - Administrative Closure; Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Backfill, and Recontouring The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy-selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, preferred alternatives were selected for each CAS as indicated in Table ES-2. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on their technical merits, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. These alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contents of the landfills. During corrective action implementation, these alternatives will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  18. Closed loop cooling operation with MICON. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro, G.E.

    1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Document provides instructions for testing the closed loop cooling operation with the MICON Computer System at PFP.

  19. Loop-deformed Poincaré algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakub Mielczarek

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this essay we present evidence suggesting that loop quantum gravity leads to deformation of the local Poincar\\'e algebra within the limit of high energies. This deformation is a consequence of quantum modification of effective off-shell hypersurface deformation algebra. Surprisingly, the form of deformation suggests that the signature of space-time changes from Lorentzian to Euclidean at large curvatures. We construct particular realization of the loop-deformed Poincar\\'e algebra and find that it can be related to curved momentum space, which indicates the relationship with recently introduced notion of relative locality. The presented findings open a new way of testing loop quantum gravity effects.

  20. 1McNEILL: JITTER IN PHASE-LOCKED LOOPS Jitter in Phase-Locked Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeill, John A.

    1McNEILL: JITTER IN PHASE-LOCKED LOOPS Jitter in Phase-Locked Loops John McNeill Worcester Polytechnic Institute #12;2McNEILL: JITTER IN PHASE-LOCKED LOOPS Course Overview · Basic Theory · Applications · Measurement Techniques · Test Issues · Design Measurement Techniques Design Tools #12;3McNEILL: JITTER

  1. Abstract--Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components were tested over the Martian temperature range for their use in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, William B.

    supplies and multi meter using IEEE GPIB- 488 standard for data acquisition. Measurements were then taken TESTING Cryogenic cooling is a process of bringing down the temperature of the DUT (Device under Test to vapor state and thus the idea behind cryogenic cooling is to make a liquid vaporize and thus cool

  2. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  3. Fracture toughness testing of Linde 1092 reactor vessel welds in the transition range using Charpy-sized specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavinich, W.A. [Framatome Technologies Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Yoon, K.K. [Framatome Technologies Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Hour, K.Y. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States). Research and Development Div.; Hoffman, C.L. [ABB-CE, Windsor, CT (United States)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present reference toughness method for predicting the change in fracture toughness can provide over estimates of these values because of uncertainties in initial RT{sub NDT} and shift correlations. It would be preferable to directly measure fracture toughness. However, until recently, no standard method was available to characterize fracture toughness in the transition range. ASTM E08 has developed a draft standard that shows promise for providing lower bound transition range fracture toughness using the master curve approach. This method has been successfully implemented using 1T compact fracture specimens. Combustion Engineering reactor vessel surveillance programs do not have compact fracture specimens. Therefore, the CE Owners Group developed a program to validate the master curve method for Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens for future application on irradiated specimens. This method was validated for Linde 1092 welds using unirradiated Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens by comparison of results with those from compact fracture specimens.

  4. Search for Lorentz invariance violation through tests of the gravitational inverse square law at short-ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Cheng-Gang; Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Luo, Jun; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for sidereal variations in the non-Newtonian force between two tungsten plates separated at millimeter ranges sets experimental limits on Lorentz invariance violation involving quadratic couplings of Riemann curvature. We show that the Lorentz invariance violation force between two finite flat plates is dominated by the edge effects, which includes a suppression effect leading to lower limits than previous rough estimates. From this search, we determine the current best constraints of the Lorentz invariance violating coefficients at a level of $10^{-8}$ m$^{2}$.

  5. Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

  6. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  7. The performance of a multiple-disk centrifugal pump as an artificial ventricle over a wide range of operating parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidhu, Amrita Singh

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a multiple-disk centrifugal pump based on the Tesla Turbine design is tested over a wide range of operating conditions. 'This pump is tested on a mock circulatory loop (with a blood analog) approved by the NIH. This valveless...

  8. Quantum loop programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mingsheng Ying; Yuan Feng

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop is a powerful program construct in classical computation, but its power is still not exploited fully in quantum computation. The exploitation of such power definitely requires a deep understanding of the mechanism of quantum loop programs. In this paper, we introduce a general scheme of quantum loops and describe its computational process. The notions of termination and almost termination are proposed for quantum loops, and the function computed by a quantum loop is defined. To show their expressive power, quantum loops are applied in describing quantum walks. Necessary and sufficient conditions for termination and almost termination of a general quantum loop on any mixed input state are presented. A quantum loop is said to be (almost) terminating if it (almost) terminates on any input state. We show that a quantum loop is almost terminating if and only if it is uniformly almost terminating. It is observed that a small disturbance either on the unitary transformation in the loop body or on the measurement in the loop guard can make any quantum loop (almost) terminating. Moreover, a representation of the function computed by a quantum loop is given in terms of finite summations of matrices. To illustrate the notions and results obtained in this paper, two simplest classes of quantum loop programs, one qubit quantum loops, and two qubit quantum loops defined by controlled gates, are carefully examined.

  9. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  10. Fast flux locked loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  11. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit Number 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU Number 423 is comprised of only one Corrective Action Site (CAS) which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a point approximately 73 meters (240 feet) northwest. The UDP was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to dispose of waste fluids from the Building 03-60 automotive maintenance shop. It is likely that soils surrounding the UDP have been impacted by oil, grease, cleaning supplies and solvents as well as waste motor oil and other automotive fluids released from the UDP.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site • 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 541 will be evaluated based on information collected from field investigations. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  13. CIS 1068: Practice Problems 11 Some practice with basic loop algorithms: step-by-step loops, sentinel loops, accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Alexander

    , sentinel loops, accumulation loops, and nested loops. 1. Basic Step-by-Step Loops A basic step-by-step loop. Accumulation loops Accumulation loops keep track of and update information each time through the loop. Usually an accumulation loop. Accumulation loops are add-ons to either step-by-step or sentinel loops. You need to start

  14. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally occurring radionuclides. The radionuclides cesium-134 and -137 were identified in only two samples at each station collected in the weeks following the destruction of the nuclear power reactor in Fukushima, Japan, on March 11, 2011. Observed gamma energy values never exceeded the local background by more than 4 ?R/h. The higher observed gamma values were coincident with wind from any of the cardinal directions, which suggests that there is no significant transport from the Clean Slate contamination areas. Annual average daily gamma values at the TTR stations are higher than at the surrounding CEMP stations, but they are equivalent to or just slightly higher than the background estimates made at locations at equivalent elevations, such as Denver, Colorado. Winds in excess of approximately 15 mph begin to resuspend soil particles and create dust, but dust generation is also affected by soil temperature, relative humidity, and soil water content. Power curves provide good predictive equations for dust concentration as a function of wind speed. However, winds in the highest wind speed category occur infrequently. iii

  15. Dynamic PID loop control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, L; Theilacker, J; Soyars, W; Martinez, A; Bossert, R; DeGraff, B; Darve, C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters' oscillation.

  16. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  17. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 423: BUILDING 03-60 UNDERGROUND DISCHARGE POINT, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (Corrective Action Unit 423) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is comprised of Corrective Action Site 03-02-002-0308. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 423. The scope of this Correction Action Decision Document consists of the following: ? Develop corrective action objectives. ? Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. ? Develop corrective action alternatives. ? Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. ? Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit. In January 1998, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). A hydrocarbon plume was found to emanate from near the bottom of the Underground Discharge Point to the west. The plume encompasses approximately 65 square meters (700 square feet). The highest total petroleum hydrocarbon level detected was 2,400 milligrams per kilogram. No other contaminants were detected above preliminary action levels. Details of the investigation can be found in Appendix A of this document. Based on the potential exposure pathways identified during the Data Quality Objectives process, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for Corrective Action Unit 423: ? Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soil containing contaminants of concern. ? Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use assumption, and current operations at the Tonopah Test Range, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point: ? Alternative 1 - No Action ? Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls ? Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Disposal, and Administrative Controls ? Alternative 4 - In Situ Bioremediation The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for Corrective Action Unit 423 is Alternative 2, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. The preferred corrective action alternative was evaluated on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternative also meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted uranium, beryllium, total petroleum hydrocarbons; and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals. Field activities will consist of geophysical and radiological surveys, and collecting soil samples at biased locations by appropriate methods. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) define the nature of contamination at each CAS location by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); and, (2) determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  19. Optimizing Nested Loops with Loop Distribution and Loop Fusion Department of Computer Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sha, Edwin

    nodes so that the loop nodes inside one partition can be fused directly without transformation. Maximum and the power consumption [1, 5, 7, 8]. Direct loop fusion is to find the legal fusion partition of the loop of the fused loops is minimized. Loop distribution separates independent statements inside a single loop (or

  20. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

  1. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area (TTR). Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 408 comprises Corrective Action Site TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. Clean closure of CAU 408 will be accomplished by removal of munitions and explosives of concern within seven target areas and potential disposal pits. The target areas were used to perform submunitions related tests for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of CAU 408 is limited to submunitions released from DOE activities. However, it is recognized that the presence of other types of unexploded ordnance and munitions may be present within the target areas due to the activities of other government organizations. The CAU 408 closure activities consist of: • Clearing bomblet target areas within the study area. • Identifying and remediating disposal pits. • Collecting verification samples. • Performing radiological screening of soil. • Removing soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include unexploded submunitions, explosives, Resource Conservation Recovery Act metals, and depleted uranium. Contaminants are not expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, REVISION 0, march 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428, Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 428 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03- 05- 002- SW01 and 03- 05- 002- SW05, respectively known as Area 3 Septic Waste System 1 and Septic Waste System 5. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada , Rev. 1 (DOE/ NV, 1998c). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 428. A system of leachfields and associated collection systems was used for wastewater disposal at Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range until a consolidated sewer system was installed in 1990 to replace the discrete septic waste systems. Operations within various buildings at Area 3 generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with contaminants of potential concern and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Corrective Action Unit 428 is composed of two leachfield systems in the northern portion of Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include oil/ diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. A limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from four of the septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform video surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (2) Collect samples of material in the septic tanks. (3) Conduct exploratory trenching to locate and inspect subsurface components. (4) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tanks and outfall end of distribution boxes. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes via trenching. (6) Collect surface and near- surface samples near potential locations of the Acid Sewer Outfall if Septic Waste System 5 Leachfield cannot be located. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/ diesel range organics). Limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from particular septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (10) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/ hydrologic parameters. (11) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at the discretion of the Site Supervisor if total petroleum hydrocarbons exceed field- screening levels.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, June 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located near Area 3 on the TTR approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, CAU 409 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site; CAS TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1); CAS TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2). This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's (NNSA/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 409. The CADD/CR have been combined into one report based on sample data collected during the field investigation performed in November 2000. Analysis of the data generated from these investigation activities indicates preliminary action levels were not exceeded for total volatile organic compounds, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, TCLP semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (except arsenic), TCLP RCRA metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, isotopic uranium, and gamma-emitting radionuclides (except thorium-234) for any of the soil samples collected. Concentrations of arsenic were detected above the preliminary action level in all samples; however, the concentrations are considered representative of ambient conditions at the site. Thorium-234 was tentatively identified in one sample; however, the concentration is considered no greater than background. The NNSA/NV's final determination is that CAU 409 shows no evidence of soil contamination at any of the associated CASs; therefore, the recommendation for no corrective action is justified.

  4. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerel G. Nelson

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan provides the closure methods for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems (SWS) 2 and 6, located at the Tonopah Test Range. SWS 2 consists of Septic Tanks 33-4, 33-5, 33-6, and two associated leachfields. SWS 6 consists of one associated leachfield. The Area 3 SWS 2 and 6 are also known as Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 03-05-002-SW02 and 03-05-002-SW06 respectively. Site investigation activities were completed in February 1998 and are documented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). The site characterization found septage in Septic Tank 33-5. Septic Tank 33-4 is closed. Septic Tank 33-6 is still active and in line with the Sandia National Laboratories consolidated system. This site was investigated for volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, RCRA metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Characterizations of the three leachfields associated with these septic tanks were characterized and not detected above the Preliminary Action Levels. During the characterization, it was determined that Septic Tank 33-5 had not been closed. Therefore, closure activities will consist of removal of the residual septage and closure-in-place. Septic Tank 33-5 will be closed by filling of the emptied tank with clean inert material (sand) and sealing the top with a concrete cap.

  5. COMBINING PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND CORONAL HEATING VIA DATA-CONSTRAINED CALCULATIONS OF NANOFLARES IN CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gontikakis, C.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Georgoulis, M. K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efessiou 4, 11528 Athens (Greece); Patsourakos, S. [Section of Astro-Geophysics, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Anastasiadis, A., E-mail: cgontik@academyofathens.gr [National Observatory of Athens, Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, GR-15236, Palaia Penteli (Greece)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We model nanoflare heating of extrapolated active-region coronal loops via the acceleration of electrons and protons in Harris-type current sheets. The kinetic energy of the accelerated particles is estimated using semi-analytical and test-particle-tracing approaches. Vector magnetograms and photospheric Doppler velocity maps of NOAA active region 09114, recorded by the Imaging Vector Magnetograph, were used for this analysis. A current-free field extrapolation of the active-region corona was first constructed. The corresponding Poynting fluxes at the footpoints of 5000 extrapolated coronal loops were then calculated. Assuming that reconnecting current sheets develop along these loops, we utilized previous results to estimate the kinetic energy gain of the accelerated particles. We related this energy to nanoflare heating and macroscopic loop characteristics. Kinetic energies of 0.1-8 keV (for electrons) and 0.3-470 keV (for protons) were found to cause heating rates ranging from 10{sup -6} to 1 erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -3}. Hydrodynamic simulations show that such heating rates can sustain plasma in coronal conditions inside the loops and generate plasma thermal distributions that are consistent with active-region observations. We concluded the analysis by computing the form of X-ray spectra generated by the accelerated electrons using the thick-target approach. These spectra were found to be in agreement with observed X-ray spectra, thus supporting the plausibility of our nanoflare-heating scenario.

  6. Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks beneath the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

  7. Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, K.T.

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

  8. A loop quantum multiverse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Bojowald

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhomogeneous space-times in loop quantum cosmology have come under better control with recent advances in effective methods. Even highly inhomogeneous situations, for which multiverse scenarios provide extreme examples, can now be considered at least qualitatively.

  9. A loop quantum multiverse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojowald, Martin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inhomogeneous space-times in loop quantum cosmology have come under better control with recent advances in effective methods. Even highly inhomogeneous situations, for which multiverse scenarios provide extreme examples, can now be considered at least qualitatively.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  11. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 407) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 407, Roller Coaster RadSafe Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOEN-694, October 2001. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on April 24,2001. No issues with the post-closure monitoring plan, Section 5 .O, were raised. However, other concerns raised by stakeholders required that the CR be revised. Revision 1 of CR was issued in December of 2001 and was approved by NDEP on January 7,2002. Section 5.2 of the NDEP-approved CR calls for site inspections to be conducted within the first six months following completion of cover construction. Following the first six months, site inspection are to be conducted twice yearly for the next two years. This report provides the results of the six month post-construction site inspection. As stated in Section 5.2 of the CR, Post-closure site inspections at CAU 407 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover and plant development. (2) Verification that the site is secure and condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. To meet the fiscal year 2002 post-closure inspection schedule, the first post-closure site inspection was conducted on November 6,2001. The site inspection was conducted after completion of the revegetation activities (October 24,2000) and submittal of revision 0 of the CR (October 31,2001). All site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection requirements stated in revision 0 of the CR. This report includes copies of inspection checklist, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklist is found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment By and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  12. Short-range tests of the equivalence principle G. L. Smith, C. D. Hoyle, J. H. Gundlach, E. G. Adelberger, B. R. Heckel, and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    galaxy 4 . This paper describes our exploration of the short-range regime, where we compared the accelerations of Cu and Pb toward a rotating 3 ton uranium attractor. The experimental results are based on two

  13. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the modification of the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons. This UR was established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and was based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This reevaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC to an administrative UR. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). This Administrative UR was based on a “Remote Work Sites” future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  14. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons • CAS TA-21-001-TARC Roller Coaster N. Disposal Trench These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify these URs to administrative URs. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). These Administrative URs were based on a “Remote Work Sites” future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  15. Torsional oscillations of longitudinally inhomogeneous coronal loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Zaqarashvili; K Murawski

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effect of an inhomogeneous mass density field on frequencies and wave profiles of torsional Alfven oscillations in solar coronal loops. Dispersion relations for torsional oscillations are derived analytically in limits of weak and strong inhomogeneities. These analytical results are verified by numerical solutions, which are valid for a wide range of inhomogeneity strength. It is shown that the inhomogeneous mass density field leads to the reduction of a wave frequency of torsional oscillations, in comparison to that of estimated from mass density at the loop apex. This frequency reduction results from the decrease of an average Alfven speed as far as the inhomogeneous loop is denser at its footpoints. The derived dispersion relations and wave profiles are important for potential observations of torsional oscillations which result in periodic variations of spectral line widths. Torsional oscillations offer an additional powerful tool for a development of coronal seismology.

  16. A keyboard control method for loop measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Z.W. [Universita Degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a keyboard control mode based on the DEC VAX computer. The VAX Keyboard code can be found under running of a program was developed. During the loop measurement or multitask operation, it ables to be distinguished from a keyboard code to stop current operation or transfer to another operation while previous information can be held. The combining of this mode, the author successfully used one key control loop measurement for test Dual Input Memory module which is used in a rearrange Energy Trigger system for LEP 8 Bunch operation.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Molten Salt Test Loop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Biofuels Publications Biochemical Conversion Program Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae Thermochemical Conversion Sign up for our E-Newsletter Required.gif?3.21 Email...

  18. Sandia Energy - Molten Salt Test Loop Commissioning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757Kelley Ruehl HomeCommissioning Home Renewable Energy

  19. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2} separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

  20. OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF THE EMERGING EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN AS SEEN WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitta, L. P.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kariyappa, R.; Hasan, S. S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Hanslmeier, A. [Institut fuer Physik, IGAM, Universitaet Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to study coronal loops at small scales, emerging in the quiet Sun. With HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, we derive the integrated and unsigned photospheric magnetic flux at the loop footpoints in the photosphere. These loops are bright in the EUV channels of AIA. Using the six AIA EUV filters, we construct the differential emission measure (DEM) in the temperature range 5.7-6.5 in log T (K) for several hours of observations. The observed DEMs have a peak distribution around log T Almost-Equal-To 6.3, falling rapidly at higher temperatures. For log T < 6.3, DEMs are comparable to their peak values within an order of magnitude. The emission-weighted temperature is calculated, and its time variations are compared with those of magnetic flux. We present two possibilities for explaining the observed DEMs and temperatures variations. (1) Assuming that the observed loops are composed of a hundred thin strands with certain radius and length, we tested three time-dependent heating models and compared the resulting DEMs and temperatures with the observed quantities. This modeling used enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL), a zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic code. The comparisons suggest that a medium-frequency heating model with a population of different heating amplitudes can roughly reproduce the observations. (2) We also consider a loop model with steady heating and non-uniform cross-section of the loop along its length, and find that this model can also reproduce the observed DEMs, provided the loop expansion factor {gamma} {approx} 5-10. More observational constraints are required to better understand the nature of coronal heating in the short emerging loops on the quiet Sun.

  1. Strategic Need for Multi-Purpose Thermal Hydraulic Loop for Support of Advanced Reactor Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; Su-Jong Yoon; Gregory K. Housley

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a conceptual design for a new high-temperature multi fluid, multi loop test facility for the INL to support thermal hydraulic, materials, and thermal energy storage research for nuclear and nuclear-hybrid applications. In its initial configuration, the facility will include a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed with this facility include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions, flow and heat transfer issues related to core thermal hydraulics in advanced helium-cooled and salt-cooled reactors, and evaluation of corrosion behavior of new cladding materials and accident-tolerant fuels for LWRs at prototypical conditions. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) facility. Research performed in this facility will advance the state of the art and technology readiness level of high temperature intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) for nuclear applications while establishing the INL as a center of excellence for the development and certification of this technology. The thermal energy storage capability will support research and demonstration activities related to process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will assist in development of reliable predictive models for thermal hydraulic design and safety codes over the range of expected advanced reactor operating conditions. Proposed/existing IHX heat transfer and friction correlations and criteria will be assessed with information on materials compatibility and instrumentation needs. The experimental database will guide development of appropriate predictive methods and be available for code verification and validation (V&V) related to these systems.

  2. Worm-like Polymer Loops and Fourier Knots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rappaport; Y. Rabin; A. Yu. Grosberg

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Every smooth closed curve can be represented by a suitable Fourier sum. We show that the ensemble of curves generated by randomly chosen Fourier coefficients with amplitudes inversely proportional to spatial frequency (with a smooth exponential cutoff), can be accurately mapped on the physical ensemble of worm-like polymer loops. We find that measures of correlation on the scale of the entire loop yield a larger persistence length than that calculated from the tangent-tangent correlation function at small length scales. The conjecture that physical loops exhibit additional rigidity on scales comparable to the entire loop due to the contribution of twist rigidity, can be tested experimentally by determining the persistence length from the local curvature and comparing it with that obtained by measuring the radius of gyration of dsDNA plasmids. The topological properties of the ensemble randomly generated worm-like loops are shown to be similar to that of other polymer models.

  3. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarkisian, Paul H. (Watertown, MA); Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Biermann, Wendell J. (Fayetteville, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  4. The Human is the Loop: New Directions for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endert, Alexander; Hossain, Shahriar H.; Ramakrishnan, Naren; North, Chris; Fiaux, Patrick; Andrews, Christopher

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual analytics is the science of marrying interactive visualizations and analytic algorithms to support exploratory knowledge discovery in large datasets. We argue for a shift from a ‘human in the loop’ philosophy for visual analytics to a ‘human is the loop’ viewpoint, where the focus is on recognizing analysts’ work processes, and seamlessly fitting analytics into that existing interactive process. We survey a range of projects that provide visual analytic support contextually in the sensemaking loop, and outline a research agenda along with future challenges.

  5. High temperature storage loop : final design report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650%C2%B0C) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOE's SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  6. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugh, J. P.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

  7. Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency Hybrid Vehicles Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency...

  8. Relativistic calculation of the pion loop correlation energy in nuclear matter in a theory including confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Relativistic calculation of the pion loop correlation energy in nuclear matter in a theory of nuclear matter which contains the correlation energy. Pion loops are incorporated on top of a relativistic for the correlation energy is the Landau-Migdal parameter g governing the short-range part of the spin- isospin

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF PLASMA UPFLOW IN A WARM LOOP WITH HINODE/EIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Mason, Helen E.; Del Zanna, Giulio [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, Steven [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete understanding of Doppler shift in active region loops can help probe the basic physical mechanism involved into the heating of those loops. Here, we present observations of upflows in coronal loops detected in a range of temperatures (log T = 5.8-6.2). The loop was not discernible above these temperatures. The speed of upflow was strongest at the footpoint and decreased with height. The upflow speed at the footpoint was about 20 km s{sup -1} in Fe VIII, which decreased with temperature, being about 13 km s{sup -1} in Fe X, about 8 km s{sup -1} in Fe XII, and about 4 km s{sup -1} in Fe XIII. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation providing evidence of upflow of plasma in coronal loop structures at these temperatures. We interpret these observations as evidence of chromospheric evaporation in quasi-static coronal loops.

  10. Discrete-time, cyclostationary phase-locked loop model for jitter analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vamvakos, Socrates D.

    Timing jitter is one of the most significant phase-locked loop characteristics, with high impact on performance in a range of applications. It is, therefore, important to develop the tools necessary to study and predict ...

  11. String Loop Corrections to Stable Non-BPS Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the string loop corrections to the tachyon potential for stable non-BPS Dp-branes on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. We find a non-trivial phase structure and we show that, after tachyon condensation, the non-BPS Dp-branes are attracted to each other for p=0,1,2. We then identify the corresponding closed string boundary states together with the massless long range fields they excite. For p=3,4 the string loop correction diverge. We identify the massless closed string fields responsible for these divergencies and regularise the partition function using a Fischler-Susskind mechanism.

  12. A Novel Strange Attractor with a Stretched Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safieddine Bouali

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper introduces a new 3D strange attractor topologically different from any other known chaotic attractors. The intentionally constructed model of three autonomous first-order differential equations derives from the coupling-induced complexity of the well-known Lotka-Volterra oscillator. The chaotic attractor exhibiting a double scroll bridged by a loop mutates to a single scroll with a very stretched loop by the variation of one parameter. Analysis of the global behavior of the new low dimensional dissipative dynamical model and its range of periodic and a-periodic oscillations are presented.

  13. MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF VERTICAL GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGERS FOR GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By CENK SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved: ___________________________________________ Thesis Adviser scale test data. The short-term behavior of ground-coupled heat pump systems is important for the design

  14. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  15. Hamiltonian traffic dynamics in microfluidic-loop networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphaël Jeanneret; Julien Piera-Vest; Denis Bartolo

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent microfluidic experiments revealed that large particles advected in a fluidic loop display long-range hydrodynamic interactions. However, the consequences of such couplings on the traffic dynamics in more complex networks remain poorly understood. In this letter, we focus on the transport of a finite number of particles in one-dimensional loop networks. By combining numerical, theoretical, and experimental efforts, we evidence that this collective process offers a unique example of Hamiltonian dynamics for hydrodynamically interacting particles. In addition, we show that the asymptotic trajectories are necessarily reciprocal despite the microscopic traffic rules explicitly break the time reversal symmetry. We exploit these two remarkable properties to account for the salient features of the effective three-particle interaction induced by the exploration of fluidic loops.

  16. SU-E-J-85: Leave-One-Out Perturbation (LOOP) Fitting Algorithm for Absolute Dose Film Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, A; Ahmad, M; Chen, Z; Nath, R [Yale New Haven Hospital/School of Medicine Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Feng, W [New York Presbyterian Hospital, Tenafly, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To introduce an outliers-recognition fitting routine for film dosimetry. It cannot only be flexible with any linear and non-linear regression but also can provide information for the minimal number of sampling points, critical sampling distributions and evaluating analytical functions for absolute film-dose calibration. Methods: The technique, leave-one-out (LOO) cross validation, is often used for statistical analyses on model performance. We used LOO analyses with perturbed bootstrap fitting called leave-one-out perturbation (LOOP) for film-dose calibration . Given a threshold, the LOO process detects unfit points (“outliers”) compared to other cohorts, and a bootstrap fitting process follows to seek any possibilities of using perturbations for further improvement. After that outliers were reconfirmed by a traditional t-test statistics and eliminated, then another LOOP feedback resulted in the final. An over-sampled film-dose- calibration dataset was collected as a reference (dose range: 0-800cGy), and various simulated conditions for outliers and sampling distributions were derived from the reference. Comparisons over the various conditions were made, and the performance of fitting functions, polynomial and rational functions, were evaluated. Results: (1) LOOP can prove its sensitive outlier-recognition by its statistical correlation to an exceptional better goodness-of-fit as outliers being left-out. (2) With sufficient statistical information, the LOOP can correct outliers under some low-sampling conditions that other “robust fits”, e.g. Least Absolute Residuals, cannot. (3) Complete cross-validated analyses of LOOP indicate that the function of rational type demonstrates a much superior performance compared to the polynomial. Even with 5 data points including one outlier, using LOOP with rational function can restore more than a 95% value back to its reference values, while the polynomial fitting completely failed under the same conditions. Conclusion: LOOP can cooperate with any fitting routine functioning as a “robust fit”. In addition, it can be set as a benchmark for film-dose calibration fitting performance.

  17. Thermodynamics in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Fang Li; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is very powerful to deal with the behavior of early universe. And the effective loop quantum cosmology gives a successful description of the universe in the semiclassical region. We consider the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe as a thermodynamical system and investigate the thermodynamics of LQC in the semiclassical region. The effective density and effective pressure in the modified Friedmann equation from LQC not only determine the evolution of the universe in LQC scenario but are actually also found to be the thermodynamic quantities. This result comes from the energy definition in cosmology (the Misner-Sharp gravitational energy) and is consistent with thermodynamic laws. We prove that within the framework of loop quantum cosmology, the elementary equation of equilibrium thermodynamics is still valid.

  18. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  19. Loop-induced Neutrino Masses: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the cocktail model in which the Majorana neutrino masses are generated by the so-called "cocktail" three-loop diagrams with the dark matter particle running in the loops. In particular, we give the correct analytic expressions of the neutrino masses in the model by the detailed calculation of the cocktail diagrams. Based on the reliable numerical calculation of the loop integrals, we explore the parameter space which can give the correct orders of neutrino masses while satisfying other experimental constraints, such as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay, low-energy lepton flavor violation processes, electroweak precision tests, and collider searches. As a result, the large couplings and the large mass difference between the two singly-charged (neutral) scalars are required.

  20. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  1. Handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Allen, G.C.

    1992-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  2. Phenylnaphthalene Derivatives as Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrating Solar Power: Loop Experiments and Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Bell, Jason R [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Joseph III, Robert Anthony [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Weaver, Samuel P [ORNL

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL and subcontractor Cool Energy completed an investigation of higher-temperature, organic thermal fluids for solar thermal applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 C showed that the material isomerized at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. So, as experienced in loop operation, eventually the internal channels of cooler components such as the waste heat rejection exchanger may become coated or clogged and loop performance will decrease. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades) to be used in a loop at the increased temperatures of interest. Hence a decision was made not to test the ORNL fluid in the loop at Cool Energy Inc. Instead, Cool Energy tested and modeled power conversion from a moderate-temperature solar loop using coupled Stirling engines. Cool Energy analyzed data collected on third and fourth generation SolarHeart Stirling engines operating on a rooftop solar field with a lower temperature (Marlotherm) heat transfer fluid. The operating efficiencies of the Stirling engines were determined at multiple, typical solar conditions, based on data from actual cycle operation. Results highlighted the advantages of inherent thermal energy storage in the power conversion system.

  3. A new scheme for the running coupling constant in gauge theories using Wilson loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erek Bilgici; Antonino Flachi; Etsuko Itou; Masafumi Kurachi; C. -J David Lin; Hideo Matsufuru; Hiroshi Ohki; Tetsuya Onogi; Takeshi Yamazaki

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new renormalization scheme of the running coupling constant in general gauge theories using the Wilson loops. The renormalized coupling constant is obtained from the Creutz ratio in lattice simulations and the corresponding perturbative coefficient at the leading order. The latter can be calculated by adopting the zeta-function resummation techniques. We perform a benchmark test of our scheme in quenched QCD with the plaquette gauge action. The running of the coupling constant is determined by applying the step-scaling procedure. Using several methods to improve the statistical accuracy, we show that the running coupling constant can be determined in a wide range of energy scales with relatively small number of gauge configurations.

  4. Theory of the hysteresis loop in ferromagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuksyutov, Igor F.; Nattermann, T.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~see Refs. 7?9! PRB 590163-1829/99/59~6!/4260~13!/$15.00 loop in ferromagnets v* , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 n a?t zu Ko?ln, 50937, Ko?ln, Germany , 24 rue Lhomond 75231, Paris Cedex 05, France y , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 l... strength in a compli- cated way.18 The random fields h @ r5(x,Z) # generated by imperfec- PRB 59 THEORY OF THE HYSTERESI tions is assumed to be Gaussian distributed and short-range correlated with h(r)50 and h ~ r!h~r 8 !5h 2lD11d l~r2r8!. ~2...

  5. Detecting and escaping infinite loops using Bolt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kling, Michael (Michael W.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we present Bolt, a novel system for escaping infinite loops. If a user suspects that an executing program is stuck in an infinite loop, the user can use the Bolt user interface, which attaches to the running ...

  6. Video looping of human cyclic motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hye Mee

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, a system called Video Looping is developed to analyze human cyclic motions. Video Looping allows users to extract human cyclic motion from a given video sequence. This system analyzes similarities from a large amount of live footage...

  7. Closing the Loop over Wireless Networks:Closing the Loop over Wireless Networks: Fundamentals and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    4/9/2008 1 Closing the Loop over Wireless Networks:Closing the Loop over Wireless Networks Johansson, Pan Gun Park, Emmanuel Witrant Closing the Loop over Wireless Networks:Closing the Loop over Wireless Networks: Fundamentals and Applications Karl H. Johansson Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute

  8. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility was successfully concluded in September 1979. In 13,000 hours of operation over a three and one half year period, the nominal 10 megawatt electrical equivalent GLEF provided the opportunity to identify problems in working with highly saline geothermal fluids and to develop solutions that could be applied to a commercial geothermal power plant producing electricity. A seven and one half year period beginning in April 1972, with early well flow testing and ending in September 1979, with the completion of extensive facility and reservoir operations is covered. During this period, the facility was designed, constructed and operated in several configurations. A comprehensive reference document, addressing or referencing documentation of all the key areas investigated is presented.

  9. Effects of Sequence Disorder on DNA Looping and Cyclization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri O. Popov; Alexei V. Tkachenko

    2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of sequence disorder on looping and cyclization of the double-stranded DNA are studied theoretically. Both random intrinsic curvature and inhomogeneous bending rigidity are found to result in a remarkably wide distribution of cyclization probabilities. For short DNA segments, the range of the distribution reaches several orders of magnitude for even completely random sequences. The ensemble averaged values of the cyclization probability are also calculated, and the connection to the recent experiments is discussed.

  10. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF COOLING PLASMA IN QUIESCENT ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E. [Artep, Inc. at Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. S.W., 20375-5320, Washington DC (United States); Miralles, M. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-50, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Curdt, W. [Max Planck Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max Planck Strasse 2, Katlenburg-Lindau 37191 (Germany); Hara, H. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, we use SOHO/SUMER, SOHO/UVCS, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO/EUVI, and Hinode/EIS coordinated observations of an active region (AR 10989) at the west limb taken on 2008 April 8 to study the cooling of coronal loops. The cooling plasma is identified using the intensities of SUMER spectral lines emitted at temperatures in the 4.15 {<=} log T {<=} 5.45 range. EIS and SUMER spectral observations are used to measure the physical properties of the loops. We found that before cooling took place these loops were filled with coronal hole-like plasma, with temperatures in the 5.6 {<=} log T {<=} 5.9 range. SUMER spectra also allowed us to determine the plasma temperature, density, emission measure, element abundances, and dynamic status during the cooling process. The ability of EUVI to observe the emitting region from a different direction allowed us to measure the volume of the emitting region and estimate its emission measure. Comparison with values measured from line intensities provided us with an estimate of the filling factor. UVCS observations of the coronal emission above the active region showed no streamer structure associated with AR 10989 at position angles between 242{sup 0}and 253.{sup 0} EIT, LASCO, and EUVI-A narrowband images and UVCS spectral observations were used to discriminate between different scenarios and monitor the behavior of the active region in time. The present study provides the first detailed measurements of the physical properties of cooling loops, a very important benchmark for theoretical models of loop cooling and condensation.

  11. Thermal and non-thermal emission from reconnecting twisted coronal loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto, R; Browning, P K; Vilmer, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twisted magnetic fields should be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The magnetic energy contained in such twisted fields can be released during solar flares and other explosive phenomena. Reconnection in helical magnetic coronal loops results in plasma heating and particle acceleration distributed within a large volume, including the lower coronal and chromospheric sections of the loops, and can be a viable alternative to the standard flare model, where particles are accelerated only in a small volume located in the upper corona. The goal of this study is to investigate the observational signatures of plasma heating and particle acceleration in kink-unstable twisted coronal loops using combination of MHD simulations and test-particle methods. The simulations describe the development of kink instability and magnetic reconnection in twisted coronal loops using resistive compressible MHD, and incorporate atmospheric stratification and large-scale loop curvature. The resulting distributions of hot plasma let us est...

  12. Development of the ANL plant dynamics code and control strategies for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle and code validation with data from the Sandia small-scale supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle test loop.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in the ongoing development of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code (PDC), the ongoing investigation and development of control strategies, and the analysis of system transient behavior for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles. Several code modifications have been introduced during FY2011 to extend the range of applicability of the PDC and to improve its calculational stability and speed. A new and innovative approach was developed to couple the Plant Dynamics Code for S-CO{sub 2} cycle calculations with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System calculations for the transient system level behavior on the reactor side of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) or Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The new code system allows use of the full capabilities of both codes such that whole-plant transients can now be simulated without additional user interaction. Several other code modifications, including the introduction of compressor surge control, a new approach for determining the solution time step for efficient computational speed, an updated treatment of S-CO{sub 2} cycle flow mergers and splits, a modified enthalpy equation to improve the treatment of negative flow, and a revised solution of the reactor heat exchanger (RHX) equations coupling the S-CO{sub 2} cycle to the reactor, were introduced to the PDC in FY2011. All of these modifications have improved the code computational stability and computational speed, while not significantly affecting the results of transient calculations. The improved PDC was used to continue the investigation of S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and transient behavior. The coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code capability was used to study the dynamic characteristics of a S-CO{sub 2} cycle coupled to a SFR plant. Cycle control was investigated in terms of the ability of the cycle to respond to a linear reduction in the electrical grid demand from 100% to 0% at a rate of 5%/minute. It was determined that utilization of turbine throttling control below 50% load improves the cycle efficiency significantly. Consequently, the cycle control strategy has been updated to include turbine throttle valve control. The new control strategy still relies on inventory control in the 50%-90% load range and turbine bypass for fine and fast generator output adjustments, but it now also includes turbine throttling control in the 0%-50% load range. In an attempt to investigate the feasibility of using the S-CO{sub 2} cycle for normal decay heat removal from the reactor, the cycle control study was extended beyond the investigation of normal load following. It was shown that such operation is possible with the extension of the inventory and the turbine throttling controls. However, the cycle operation in this range is calculated to be so inefficient that energy would need to be supplied from the electrical grid assuming that the generator could be capable of being operated in a motoring mode with an input electrical energy from the grid having a magnitude of about 20% of the nominal plant output electrical power level in order to maintain circulation of the CO{sub 2} in the cycle. The work on investigation of cycle operation at low power level will be continued in the future. In addition to the cycle control study, the coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code system was also used to simulate thermal transients in the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger. Several possible conditions with the potential to introduce significant changes to the heat exchanger temperatures were identified and simulated. The conditions range from reactor scram and primary sodium pump failure or intermediate sodium pump failure on the reactor side to pipe breaks and valve malfunctions on the S-CO{sub 2} side. It was found that the maximum possible rate of the heat exchanger wall temperature change for the particular heat exchanger design assumed is limited to {+-}7 C/s for less than 10 seconds. Modeling in the Plant Dynamics Code has been compared with available data from the Sandia Natio

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 405: Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada(April 2001, Rev. 0) with Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    2001-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 405, Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 405 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW03, 03-05-002-SW04, and 03-05-002-SW07 (also collectively known as: Septic Waste Systems [SWSs] 3, 4, and 7). Located in Area 3 in the northwest section of the TTR, approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, this location was historically (between 1960 and 1990) used as a research facility with the mission to perform defense-related projects, and whose operations generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with COPCs and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Though Septic Waste Systems 3, 4, and 7 were origin ally constructed to receive sanitary sewage, they may have inadvertently received effluent containing potentially hazardous and radiological constituents containing acetone, benzene, ethylbenzene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, toluene, xylenes, volatile organic compound constituents, phenols, arsenic, barium, lead, mercury, hydrocarbons of oil and grease, and uranium-234, -235, and -238. The Area 3 septic systems were documented in a DOE/NV 1996 report as being included in the septic tank abandonment program conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in 1993; however, this program was not completed and the possibility exists that some of the Area 3 septic tanks may not have been abandoned. Even though all of the SWSs addressed in this CAIP are inactive, geophysical surveys conducted in 1993 were generally inconclusive and did not provide useful data for the purposes of this investigation. The scope of this current investigation, therefore, will be to determine the existence of the identified CO PCs and excavation will be the primary investigation method employed for these leachfield systems, but this effort may be limited by existing facilities and utilities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the subsequent corrective action decision document.

  14. GRACE at ONE-LOOP: Automatic calculation of 1-loop diagrams in the electroweak theory with gauge parameter independence checks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Belanger; F. Boudjema; J. Fujimoto; T. Ishikawa; T. Kaneko; K. Kato; Y. Shimizu

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the main building blocks of a generic automated package for the calculation of Feynman diagrams. These blocks include the generation and creation of a model file, the graph generation, the symbolic calculation at an intermediate level of the Dirac and tensor algebra, implementation of the loop integrals, the generation of the matrix elements or helicity amplitudes, methods for the phase space integrations and eventually the event generation. The report focuses on the fully automated systems for the calculation of physical processes based on the experience in developing GRACE-loop. As such, a detailed description of the renormalisation procedure in the Standard Model is given emphasizing the central role played by the non-linear gauge fixing conditions for the construction of such automated codes. The need for such gauges is better appreciated when it comes to devising efficient and powerful algorithms for the reduction of the tensorial structures of the loop integrals. A new technique for these reduction algorithms is described. Explicit formulae for all two-point functions in a generalised non-linear gauge are given, together with the complete set of counterterms. We also show how infrared divergences are dealt with in the system. We give a comprehensive presentation of some systematic test-runs which have been performed at the one-loop level for a wide variety of two-to-two processes to show the validity of the gauge check. These cover fermion-fermion scattering, gauge boson scattering into fermions, gauge bosons and Higgs bosons scattering processes. Comparisons with existing results on some one-loop computation in the Standard Model show excellent agreement. We also briefly recount some recent development concerning the calculation of mutli-leg one-loop corrections.

  15. Chemical Looping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric SurveyChelan County, Washington:Looping Jump to: navigation,

  16. DEEPER BY THE DOZEN: UNDERSTANDING THE CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Jenkins, B. S.; Worley, B. T., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic analysis of coronal loops has revealed a variety of cross-field temperature distributions. Some loops appear to be isothermal while others require multithermal plasma. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode has the spatial resolution and temperature coverage required for differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of coronal loops. Our results also use data from the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode as a high-temperature constraint. Of our 12 loops, two were post-flare loops with broad temperature distributions, two were narrow but not quite isothermal, and the remaining eight were in the mid range. We consider our DEM methods to be a significant advance over previous work, and it is also reassuring to learn that our findings are consistent with results available in the literature. For the quiescent loops analyzed here, 10 MK plasma, a signature of nanoflares, appears to be absent at a level of approximately two orders of magnitude down from the DEM peak. We find some evidence that warmer loops require broader DEMs. The cross-field temperatures obtained here cannot be modeled as single flux tubes. Rather, the observed loop must be composed of several or many unresolved strands. The plasma contained in each of these strands could be cooling at different rates, contributing to the multithermal nature of the observed loop pixels. An important implication of our DEM results involves observations from future instruments. Once solar telescopes can truly resolve X-ray and EUV coronal structures, these images would have to reveal the loop substructure implied by our multithermal results.

  17. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN BARNARD'S LOOP, COMPONENTS OF THE ORION-ERIDANUS BUBBLE, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM COMPONENT OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dell, C. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Porter, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia at Athens, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Van Hoof, P. A. M. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have supplemented existing spectra of Barnard's Loop with high accuracy spectrophotometry of one new position. Cloudy photoionization models were calculated for a variety of ionization parameters and stellar temperatures and compared with the observations. After testing the procedure with recent observations of M43, we establish that Barnard's Loop is photoionized by four candidate ionizing stars, but agreement between the models and observations is only possible if Barnard's Loop is enhanced in heavy elements by about a factor of 1.4. Barnard's Loop is very similar in properties to the brightest components of the Orion-Eridanus Bubble and the warm ionized medium (WIM). We are able to establish models that bound the range populated in low-ionization color-color diagrams (I([S II])/I(H{alpha}) versus I([N II])/I(H{alpha})) using only a limited range of ionization parameters and stellar temperatures. Previously established variations in the relative abundance of heavy elements render uncertain the most common method of determining electron temperatures for components of the Orion-Eridanus Bubble and the WIM based only on the I([N II])/I(H{alpha}) ratio, although we confirm that the lowest surface brightness components of the WIM are on average of higher electron temperature. The electron temperatures for a few high surface brightness WIM components determined by direct methods are comparable to those of classical bright H II regions. In contrast, the low surface brightness H II regions studied by the Wisconsin H{alpha} Mapper are of lower temperatures than the classical bright H II regions.

  18. Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

  19. Performance of a Thermally Stable Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon in a Simulated Concentrating Solar Power Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL] [ORNL; Bell, Jason R [ORNL] [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Joseph III, Robert Anthony [ORNL] [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL] [ORNL; Weaver, Samuel P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbon thermal fluids showing thermally stability to 600 C have been tested for solar thermal-power applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 C indicated that the fluid isomerized and degraded at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. So, as experienced in loop operation, eventually the internal channels of cooler components in trough solar electric generating systems, such as the waste heat rejection exchanger, may become coated or clogged affecting loop performance. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene, without addition of stabilizers, does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades) to be used in a loop at the temperatures greater than 500 C. The performance of a concentrating solar loop using high temperature fluids was modeled based on the National Renewable Laboratory Solar Advisory Model. It was determined that a solar-to-electricity efficiency of up to 30% and a capacity factor of near 60% could be achieved using a high efficiency collector and 12 h thermal energy storage.

  20. Hardware In The Loop Simulator in UAV Rapid Development Life Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field trial is very critical and high risk in autonomous UAV development life cycle. Hardware in the loop (HIL) simulation is a computer simulation that has the ability to simulate UAV flight characteristic, sensor modeling and actuator modeling while communicating in real time with the UAV autopilot hardware. HIL simulation can be used to test the UAV autopilot hardware reliability, test the closed loop performance of the overall system and tuning the control parameter. By rigorous testing in the HIL simulator, the risk in the field trial can be minimized.

  1. Hard-thermal-loop QED thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nan Su; Jens O. Andersen; Michael Strickland

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The weak-coupling expansion for thermodynamic quantities in thermal field theories is poorly convergent unless the coupling constant is tiny. We discuss the calculation of the free energy for a hot gas of electrons and photons to three-loop order using hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt). We show that the hard-thermal-loop perturbation reorganization improves the convergence of the successive approximations to the QED free energy at large coupling, e ~ 2. The reorganization is gauge invariant by construction, and due to the cancellations among various contributions, we obtain a completely analytic result for the resummed thermodynamic potential at three loops.

  2. Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  3. Sensitivity of the blue loops of intermediate-mass stars to nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib [American University of Beirut, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of a modification of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate, as suggested by recent evaluations, on the formation and extension of the blue loops encountered during the evolution of the stars in the mass range 5M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} to 12M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }. We show that the blue loops of stars in the mass range 5M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} to 8M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }, that is the range of super ABG stars, are severely affected by a modification of the important {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate. We also show that the blue loops can be restored if envelope overshooting is included, which is necessary to explain the observations of the Cepheid stars.

  4. Direct numerical integration for multi-loop integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Becker; Stefan Weinzierl

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to construct a suitable contour deformation in loop momentum space for multi-loop integrals. This contour deformation can be used to perform the integration for multi-loop integrals numerically. The integration can be performed directly in loop momentum space without the introduction of Feynman or Schwinger parameters. The method can be applied to finite multi-loop integrals and to divergent multi-loop integrals with suitable subtraction terms. The algorithm extends techniques from the one-loop case to the multi-loop case. Examples at two and three loops are discussed explicitly.

  5. Closed-loop guided directional drilling: Fundamentals, concepts and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heisig, G.; Oppelt, J. [Baker Hughes INTEQ GmbH, Celle (Germany); Neubert, M. [Technical Univ. Braunschweig (Germany); Donati, F. [Agip S.p.A., Milan (Italy)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the fundamentals of directional drilling with a closed-loop control. In the discussion of different signal flow concepts a surface controlled system is identified as the original approach to automatic directional drilling. The success of the directional drilling operation depends on the proper layout of the controller in the control loop. A control method is introduced which anticipates direction changes on the planned path. The algorithm is tested by applying computer simulation techniques. The simulator is based on a mathematical model of a directional drilling system with an adjustable stabilizer. Coupling this model with a rock/bit interaction model yields a non-linear differential equation system for the drilling trajectory. The equations can be solved numerically. The simulation results prove the importance of anticipation in the control algorithm.

  6. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, J; Kim, W K; Metzler, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two dimensional system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that larger activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer's centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our...

  7. MODEL FOR ALFVEN WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS: HEATING RATE PROFILES AND TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgari-Targhi, M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that the solar corona may be heated by dissipation of Alfven waves that propagate up from the solar photosphere. According to this theory, counterpropagating Alfven waves are subject to nonlinear interactions that lead to turbulent decay of the waves and heating of the chromospheric and coronal plasma. To test this theory, better models for the dynamics of Alfven waves in coronal loops are required. In this paper, we consider wave heating in an active region observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 2010 May. First a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic model of the region is constructed, and ten magnetic field lines that match observed coronal loops are selected. For each loop we construct a 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the Alfven waves near the selected field line. The waves are assumed to be generated by footpoint motions inside the kilogauss magnetic flux elements at the two ends of the loop. Based on such models, we predict the spatial and temporal profiles of the heating along the selected loops. We also estimate the temperature fluctuations resulting from such heating. We find that the Alfven wave turbulence model can reproduce the observed characteristics of the hotter loops in the active region core, but the loops at the periphery of the region have large expansion factors and are predicted to be thermally unstable.

  8. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spiridon, Alex (Palo Alto, CA); Benzel, Dave (Livermore, CA); Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Nekoogar, Faranak (San Ramon, CA); Rosenbury, Erwin T. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  9. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  10. Initiate test loop irradiations of ALSEP process solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Rocklan G. McDowell

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the initial results of the study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the ALSEP process and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-14IN030202. Initial irradiations, up to 100 kGy absorbed dose, of the extraction section of the ALSEP process have been completed. The organic solvent used for these experiments contained 0.05 M TODGA and 0.75 M HEH[EHP] dissolved in n-dodecane. The ALSEP solvent was irradiated while in contact with 3 M nitric acid and the solutions were sparged with compressed air in order to maintain aerated conditions. The irradiated phases were used for the determination of americium and europium distribution ratios as a function of absorbed dose for the extraction and stripping conditions. Analysis of the irradiated phases in order to determine solvent composition as a function of absorbed dose is ongoing. Unfortunately, the failure of analytical equipment necessary for the analysis of the irradiated samples has made the consistent interpretation of the analytical results difficult. Continuing work will include study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the extraction of actinides and lanthanides by the ALSEP solvent and the stripping of the extracted metals from the loaded solvent. The irradiated aqueous and organic phases will be analyzed in order to determine the variation in concentration of solvent components with absorbed gamma dose. Where possible, radiolysis degradation product will be identified.

  11. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

  12. Sandia Energy - Molten Salt Test Loop Melted Salt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757Kelley Ruehl HomeCommissioning Home Renewable

  13. Sandia Energy - Molten Salt Test Loop Pump Installed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757Kelley Ruehl HomeCommissioning Home RenewablePump

  14. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  15. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  16. Ground Loops for Heat Pumps and Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, H. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground loops are used for water source heat pumps. Refrigeration can be put on a ground loop. Water-cooled condensing units are more efficient than air-cooled, and they can be put indoors. Indoor location makes piping for desuperheater hot water...

  17. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  18. Closed-loop control of an experimental mixing layer using machine learning control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parezanovi?, Vladimir; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R; Delville, Joël; Bonnet, Jean-Paul; Segond, Marc; Abel, Markus; Brunton, Steven L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel framework for closed-loop control of turbulent flows is tested in an experimental mixing layer flow. This framework, called Machine Learning Control (MLC), provides a model-free method of searching for the best function, to be used as a control law in closed-loop flow control. MLC is based on genetic programming, a function optimization method of machine learning. In this article, MLC is benchmarked against classical open-loop actuation of the mixing layer. Results show that this method is capable of producing sensor-based control laws which can rival or surpass the best open-loop forcing, and be robust to changing flow conditions. Additionally, MLC can detect non-linear mechanisms present in the controlled plant, and exploit them to find a better type of actuation than the best periodic forcing.

  19. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  20. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  1. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  2. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO{sub 2} capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (5.1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (5.2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification; (5.3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratoryscale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability; and (5.4) the identification of kinetic data for copper-based oxygen carriers as well as the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material. Subtask 5.1 focused on the development of kinetic expressions for the Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU) process and validating them with reported literature data. The kinetic expressions were incorporated into a process model for determination of reactor size and oxygen carrier circulation for the CLOU process using ASPEN PLUS. An ASPEN PLUS process model was also developed using literature data for the CLC process employing an iron-based oxygen carrier, and the results of the process model have been utilized to perform a relative economic comparison. In Subtask 5.2, the investigators studied the trade-off between modeling approaches and available simulations tools. They quantified uncertainty in the high-performance computing (HPC) simulation tools for CLC bed applications. Furthermore, they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

  3. Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Poster presented at...

  4. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  5. DNA looping: the consequences and its control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonor Saiz; Jose M. G. Vilar

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of DNA loops by proteins and protein complexes is ubiquitous to many fundamental cellular processes, including transcription, recombination, and replication. Here we review recent advances in understanding the properties of DNA looping in its natural context and how they propagate to the cellular behavior through gene regulation. The results of connecting the molecular properties with cellular physiology indicate that looping of DNA in vivo is much more complex and easier than predicted from current models and reveals a wealth of previously unappreciated details.

  6. A new loop-reducing routing algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sung-Woo

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coming-up VI. Three Links Failed Page 51 51 52 52 53 53 . 54 54 55 Figure 5. 6. 7. 8. LIST OF FIGURES Bellman-Ford Algorithm Update Tables of Distributed Bellman-Ford Algorithm Two Types of a. Loop Two-Node Loop Multi-Node Loop... distances for all pairs of nodes in the subnet, and distributes updated routing information to all the nodes. The centralized algorithm, however, is vulnerable to a. single node failure ? if the NRC fails, all nodes in the network must stop their rout...

  7. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  8. Modulation of DNA loop lifetimes by the free energy of loop formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi-Ju; Mulligan, Peter; Spakowitz, Andrew J; Phillips, Rob

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage and retrieval of the genetic information in cells is a dynamic process that requires the DNA to undergo dramatic structural rearrangements. DNA looping is a prominent example of such a structural rearrangement that is essential for transcriptional regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and the speed of such regulations affects the fitness of individuals. Here, we examine the in vitro looping dynamics of the classic Lac repressor gene-regulatory motif. We show that both loop association and loop dissociation at the DNA-repressor junctions depend on the elastic deformation of the DNA and protein, and that both looping and unlooping rates approximately scale with the looping J factor, which reflects the system's deformation free energy. We explain this observation by transition state theory and model the DNA-protein complex as an effective worm-like chain with twist. We introduce a finite protein-DNA binding interaction length, in competition with the characteristic DNA deformation length scale, ...

  9. Off-shell two loop QCD vertices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Gracey

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the triple gluon, ghost-gluon and quark-gluon vertex functions at two loops in the MSbar scheme in the chiral limit for an arbitrary linear covariant gauge when the external legs are all off-shell.

  10. Speed estimation using single loop detector outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Zhirui

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    -in Motion (WIM) Video Image Processor (VIP) Microwave Radar Infrared Sensors Ultrasonic Sensors Non-intrusive Passive Acoustic Array Sensors In the following sections, three types of detectors adopting the inductive loop technology are reviewed...

  11. Speed estimation using single loop detector outputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Zhirui

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -in Motion (WIM) Video Image Processor (VIP) Microwave Radar Infrared Sensors Ultrasonic Sensors Non-intrusive Passive Acoustic Array Sensors In the following sections, three types of detectors adopting the inductive loop technology are reviewed...

  12. The Three-Loop Lattice Free Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alles; M. Campostrini; A. Feo; H. Panagopoulos

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the free energy of SU(N) gauge theories on the lattice, to three loops. Our result, combined with Monte Carlo data for the average plaquette, gives a more precise estimate of the gluonic condensate.

  13. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the Northern Cascade Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hook, Robert D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the NorthernUSA Fred Beckey. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of thewill find that Range of Glaciers is a must read. The book

  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  15. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  16. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  17. Wide-range voltage modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

  18. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured.

  19. Simulations of magnetic hysteresis loops at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J. [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada); Ek, J. van [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, California 94588 (United States); Mercer, J. I. [Department of Computer Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm as well as standard micromagnetics are used to simulate MH loops of high anisotropy magnetic recording media at both short and long time scales over a wide range of temperatures relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Microscopic parameters, common to both methods, were determined by fitting to experimental data on single-layer FePt-based media that uses the Magneto-Optic Kerr effect with a slow sweep rate of 700 Oe/s. Saturation moment, uniaxial anisotropy, and exchange constants are given an intrinsic temperature dependence based on published atomistic simulations of FePt grains with an effective Curie temperature of 680 K. Our results show good agreement between micromagnetics and kinetic Monte Carlo results over a wide range of sweep rates. Loops at the slow experimental sweep rates are found to become more square-shaped, with an increasing slope, as temperature increases from 300 K. These effects also occur at higher sweep rates, typical of recording speeds, but are much less pronounced. These results demonstrate the need for accurate determination of intrinsic thermal properties of future recording media as input to micromagnetic models as well as the sensitivity of the switching behavior of thin magnetic films to applied field sweep rates at higher temperatures.

  20. Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

  1. Analysis of heat transfer in unlooped and looped pulsating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    , Tubing Abstract An advanced heat transfer model for both unlooped and looped Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs

  2. www.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and missile launch, tracking, and recovery · Nuclear effects testing · High-speed sled track · Directed energy weapons testing · Climatic and dynamic environments testing · Atmospheric research · Electronicwww.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES SUMMARY White Sands Test Facility (WSTF

  3. On Smarandache Bryant Schneider group of a Smarandache loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temitope Gbolahan Jaiyeola

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of Smarandache Bryant Schneider Group of a Smarandache loop is introduced. Relationship(s) between the Bryant Schneider Group and the Smarandache Bryant Schneider Group of an S-loop are discovered and the later is found to be useful in finding Smarandache isotopy-isomorphy condition(s) in S-loops just like the formal is useful in finding isotopy-isomorphy condition(s) in loops. Some properties of the Bryant Schneider Group of a loop are shown to be true for the Smarandache Bryant Schneider Group of a Smarandache loop. Some interesting and useful cardinality formulas are also established for a type of finite Smarandache loop.

  4. Induction loop detector systems crosstalk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhagat, Victor

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Tests were also conducted to measure the potential of crosstalk within a controller cabinet and in twisted and untwisted lead wires. As a part of this ongoing research, attention was also given to determine the distance of no spillover at detector unit...

  5. Numerical multi-loop calculations with the program SecDec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophia Borowka; Gudrun Heinrich

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    SecDec is a program which can be used for the evaluation of parametric integrals, in particular multi-loop integrals. For a given set of propagators defining the graph, the program constructs the graph polynomials, factorizes the endpoint singularities, and finally produces a Laurent series in the dimensional regularization parameter, whose coefficients are evaluated numerically. In this talk we discuss various features of the program, which extend the range of applicability. We also present a recent phenomenological example of an application entering the momentum dependent two-loop corrections to neutral Higgs boson masses in the MSSM.

  6. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  7. Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood.2 million cubic meters) of lumber treated with CCA are produced annually in the United States (Micklewright 1998). ·In 1997, for example, some 581.4 million cu. ft. was treated with waterborne preservatives

  8. Parameterizing loop fusion for automated empirical tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y; Yi, Q; Kennedy, K; Quinlan, D; Vuduc, R

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional compilers are limited in their ability to optimize applications for different architectures because statically modeling the effect of specific optimizations on different hardware implementations is difficult. Recent research has been addressing this issue through the use of empirical tuning, which uses trial executions to determine the optimization parameters that are most effective on a particular hardware platform. In this paper, we investigate empirical tuning of loop fusion, an important transformation for optimizing a significant class of real-world applications. In spite of its usefulness, fusion has attracted little attention from previous empirical tuning research, partially because it is much harder to configure than transformations like loop blocking and unrolling. This paper presents novel compiler techniques that extend conventional fusion algorithms to parameterize their output when optimizing a computation, thus allowing the compiler to formulate the entire configuration space for loop fusion using a sequence of integer parameters. The compiler can then employ an external empirical search engine to find the optimal operating point within the space of legal fusion configurations and generate the final optimized code using a simple code transformation system. We have implemented our approach within our compiler infrastructure and conducted preliminary experiments using a simple empirical search strategy. Our results convey new insights on the interaction of loop fusion with limited hardware resources, such as available registers, while confirming conventional wisdom about the effectiveness of loop fusion in improving application performance.

  9. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9 PNWD-SA-7032 / 9 What are the Steps in Using the VSP Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 10 PNWD-SA-7032 / 10 Hypotheses Being TestedHypotheses Being Tested is false., i.e., on showing that the segment does not need to be bumped out. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP

  10. SOLAR CORONA LOOP STUDIES WITH THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY. I. CROSS-SECTIONAL TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, Paul, E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a first systematic study on the cross-sectional temperature structure of coronal loops using the six coronal temperature filters of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We analyze a sample of 100 loop snapshots measured at 10 different locations and 10 different times in active region NOAA 11089 on 2010 July 24, 21:00-22:00 UT. The cross-sectional flux profiles are measured and a cospatial background is subtracted in six filters in a temperature range of T {approx} 0.5-16 MK, and four different parameterizations of differential emission measure (DEM) distributions are fitted. We find that the reconstructed DEMs consist predominantly of narrowband peak temperature components with a thermal width of {sigma}{sub log(T)} {<=} 0.11 {+-} 0.02, close to the temperature resolution limit of the instrument, consistent with earlier triple-filter analysis from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer by Aschwanden and Nightingale and from EIS/Hinode by Warren et al. or Tripathi et al. We find that 66% of the loops could be fitted with a narrowband single-Gaussian DEM model, and 19% with a DEM consisting of two narrowband Gaussians (which mostly result from pairs of intersecting loops along the same line of sight). The mostly isothermal loop DEMs allow us also to derive an improved empirical response function of the AIA 94 A filter, which needs to be boosted by a factor of q{sub 94} = 6.7 {+-} 1.7 for temperatures at log (T) {approx}< 6.3. The main result of near-isothermal loop cross-sections is not consistent with the predictions of standard nanoflare scenarios, but can be explained by flare-like heating mechanisms that drive chromospheric evaporation and upflows of heated plasma coherently over loop cross-sections of w {approx} 2-4 Mm.

  11. Inflationary universe in loop quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Zhang; Yi Ling

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop quantum cosmology provides a nice solution of avoiding the big bang singularity through a big bounce mechanism in the high energy region. In loop quantum cosmology an inflationary universe is emergent after the big bounce, no matter what matter component is filled in the universe. A super-inflation phase without phantom matter will appear in a certain way in the initial stage after the bounce; then the universe will undergo a normal inflation stage. We discuss the condition of inflation in detail in this framework. Also, for slow-roll inflation, we expect the imprint from the effects of the loop quantum cosmology should be left in the primordial perturbation power spectrum. However, we show that this imprint is too weak to be observed.

  12. Scaling Laws and Temperature Profiles for Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops with Non-uniform Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. H. Martens

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulk of solar coronal radiative loss consists of soft X-ray emission from quasi-static loops at the cores of Active Regions. In order to develop diagnostics for determining the heating mechanism of these loops from observations by coronal imaging instruments, I have developed analytical solutions for the temperature structure and scaling laws of loop strands for a wide range of heating functions, including footpoint heating, uniform heating, and heating concentrated at the loop apex. Key results are that the temperature profile depends only weakly on the heating distribution -- not sufficiently to be of significant diagnostic value -- and that the scaling laws survive for this wide range of heating distributions, but with the constant of proportionality in the RTV scaling law ($P_{0}L \\thicksim T_{max}^3$) depending on the specific heating function. Furthermore, quasi-static analytical solutions do not exist for an excessive concentration of heating near the loop footpoints, a result in agreement with recent numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that a generalization of the solutions to the case of a strand with a variable diameter leads to only relatively small correction factors in the scaling laws and temperature profiles for constant diameter loop strands. A quintet of leading theoretical coronal heating mechanisms is shown to be captured by the formalism of this paper, and the differences in thermal structure between them may be verified through observations. Preliminary results from full numerical simulations demonstrate that, despite the simplifying assumptions, the analytical solutions from this paper are stable and accurate.

  13. Low temperature irradiation tests on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Sample cool down by He gas loop 10K ­ 20K Fast neutron flux Measured by Ni activation in 2010 1.4xK #12;reactor Cryogenics #12;Al-Cu-Mg He gas temperature near sample 12K Resistance changesLow temperature irradiation tests on stabilizer materials using reactor neutrons at KUR Makoto

  14. Automation of one-loop QCD corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin Hirschi; Rikkert Frederix; Stefano Frixione; Maria Vittoria Garzelli; Fabio Maltoni; Roberto Pittau

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the complete automation of the computation of one-loop QCD corrections, including UV renormalization, to an arbitrary scattering process in the Standard Model. This is achieved by embedding the OPP integrand reduction technique, as implemented in CutTools, into the MadGraph framework. By interfacing the tool so constructed, which we dub MadLoop, with MadFKS, the fully automatic computation of any infrared-safe observable at the next-to-leading order in QCD is attained. We demonstrate the flexibility and the reach of our method by calculating the production rates for a variety of processes at the 7 TeV LHC.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

  16. A loop is the only control-flow construct that lets you go back to an earlier point in the code. Loops are designed to allow us to iterate--to execute the same piece of code over and over again.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    A loop is the only control-flow construct that lets you go back to an earlier point in the code. After the body is executed, we go back and test the loop continuation condition again As soon. Note that the first example (temperature conversion) is basically a variation on this theme. Event

  17. Lunar Laser Ranging Test of the Invariance of c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Y. Gezari

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The speed of laser light pulses launched from Earth and returned by a retro-reflector on the Moon was calculated from precision round-trip time-of-flight measurements and modeled distances. The measured speed of light (c) in the moving observers rest frame was found to exceed the canonical value c = 299,792,458 m/s by 200+/-10 m/s, just the speed of the observatory along the line-of-sight due to the rotation of the Earth during the measurements. This is a first-order violation of local Lorentz invariance; the speed of light seems to depend on the motion of the observer after all, as in classical wave theory, and implies that a preferred reference frame exists for the propagation of light. However, the present experiment cannot identify the physical system to which such a reference frame might be tied.

  18. aeronautical test range: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16. This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space-2199 NASACR-1999-209827 ICASE Report No. 99-50 Efficient Symbolic State-space Construction for...

  19. Landmark : towards and alternative testing range, Vieques, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allora, Jennifer, 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How does land differentiate itself from other land by the way that it is marked? What implicit power relations are evidenced in these land marking processes? Whose interests are served in the designation of certain places ...

  20. EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM Recovery Act PressEMTackles Cleanup at

  1. DOE completes environmental assessment on INL National Security Test Range

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOE SolarPrinter-friendly icon

  2. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind PowerNevada State ClearinghouseNevada

  3. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAirWork (WaterStormwater General

  4. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) | Open Energy Information(Blewitt,

  5. Evaluation of multi-loop multi-scale integrals and phenomenological two-loop applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophia Borowka

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, major developments in the publicly available program SecDec are presented, extending the numerical evaluation of multi-loop multi-scale integrals from Euclidean to physical kinematics. The power of this new feature is shown in two phenomenological applications. In the first, numerical results for several massive two-loop four-point functions are shown. In its second application within this thesis, the leading momentum-dependent two-loop corrections to the neutral $\\mathcal{CP}$-even MSSM Higgs-boson masses are calculated. The results are included in the code FeynHiggs.

  6. A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deitrich, L. W.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop.

  7. Loop realizations of quantum affine algebras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cautis, Sabin [Department of Mathematics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, 90089 (United States); Licata, Anthony [Department of Mathematics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a simplified description of quantum affine algebras in their loop presentation. This description is related to Drinfeld's new realization via halves of vertex operators. We also define an idempotent version of the quantum affine algebra which is suitable for categorification.

  8. The HTGR Closed - Loop Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeth, G. G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes some of the studies performed during the past several years on the application of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to the U.S. industrial energy market. The specific concept utilizes a closed-loop thermo chemical...

  9. Loop expansion in Yang-Mills thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralf Hofmann

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that a selfconsistent spatial coarse-graining, which involves interacting (anti)calorons of unit topological charge modulus, implies that real-time loop expansions of thermodynamical quantities in the deconfining phase of SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills thermodynamics are, modulo 1PI resummations, determined by a finite number of connected bubble diagrams.

  10. Warm inflationary model in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Ramon [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A warm inflationary universe model in loop quantum cosmology is studied. In general we discuss the condition of inflation in this framework. By using a chaotic potential, V({phi}){proportional_to}{phi}{sup 2}, we develop a model where the dissipation coefficient {Gamma}={Gamma}{sub 0}=constant. We use recent astronomical observations for constraining the parameters appearing in our model.

  11. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  12. Dry dilution refrigerator with 4He-1K-loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlig, Kurt

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we summarize experimental work on cryogen-free 3He/4He dilution refrigerators which, in addition to the dilution refrigeration circuit, are equipped with a 4He-1K-stage. This type of DR becomes worth considering when high cooling capacities are needed at T ~ 1 K to cool cold amplifiers and heat sink cables. In our application, the motivation for the construction of this type of cryostat was to do experiments on superconducting quantum circuits for quantum information technology and quantum simulations. In other work, DRs with 1K-stage were proposed for astro-physical cryostats. For neutron scattering research, a top-loading cryogen-free DR with 1K-stage was built which was equipped with a standard commercial dilution refrigeration insert. Cooling powers of up to 100 mW have been reached with our 1K-stage, but higher refrigeration powers were achieved with more powerful pulse tube cryocoolers and higher 4He circulation rates in the 1K-loop. Several different versions of a 1K-loop have been test...

  13. Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling and Sustainability Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling and Sustainability May 21, 2014 6:30PM to 7:30PM PDT...

  14. USING A DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS IN AN ACTIVE REGION CORE TO TEST A STEADY HEATING MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Schmelz, Joan T. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Saar, Steve H.; Kashyap, Vinay L., E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The frequency of heating events in the corona is an important constraint on the coronal heating mechanisms. Observations indicate that the intensities and velocities measured in active region cores are effectively steady, suggesting that heating events occur rapidly enough to keep high-temperature active region loops close to equilibrium. In this paper, we couple observations of active region (AR) 10955 made with the X-Ray Telescope and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode to test a simple steady heating model. First we calculate the differential emission measure (DEM) of the apex region of the loops in the active region core. We find the DEM to be broad and peaked around 3 MK. We then determine the densities in the corresponding footpoint regions. Using potential field extrapolations to approximate the loop lengths and the density-sensitive line ratios to infer the magnitude of the heating, we build a steady heating model for the active region core and find that we can match the general properties of the observed DEM for the temperature range of 6.3 < log T < 6.7. This model, for the first time, accounts for the base pressure, loop length, and distribution of apex temperatures of the core loops. We find that the density-sensitive spectral line intensities and the bulk of the hot emission in the active region core are consistent with steady heating. We also find, however, that the steady heating model cannot address the emission observed at lower temperatures. This emission may be due to foreground or background structures, or may indicate that the heating in the core is more complicated. Different heating scenarios must be tested to determine if they have the same level of agreement.

  15. Six-loop divergences in the supersymmetric Kahler sigma model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Jack; D. R. T. Jones; J. Panvel

    1993-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-dimensional supersymmetric $\\s$-model on a K\\"ahler manifold has a non-vanishing $\\b$-function at four loops, but the $\\b$-function at five loops can be made to vanish by a specific choice of renormalisation scheme. We investigate whether this phenomenon persists at six loops, and conclude that it does not; there is a non-vanishing six-loop $\\b$-function irrespective of renormalisation scheme ambiguities.

  16. Gravitational field of a stationary circular cosmic string loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A; A. Sen; N. Banerjee

    1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational field of a stationary circular cosmic string loop has been studied in the context of full nonlinear Einstein's theory of gravity. It has been assumed that the radial and tangential stresses of the loop are equal to the energy density of the string loop. An exact solution for the system has been presented which has a singularity at a finite distance from the axis,but is regular for any other distances from the axis of the loop.

  17. Validation of SSC using the FFTF natural-circulation tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.; Kennett, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Super System Code (SSC) validation program, the 100% power FFTF natural circulation test has been simulated using SSC. A detailed 19 channel, 2 loop model was used in SSC. Comparisons showed SSC calculations to be in good agreement with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), test data. Simulation of the test was obtained in real time.

  18. On Termination of Integer Linear Loops Joel Ouaknine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouaknine, Joël

    On Termination of Integer Linear Loops Jo¨el Ouaknine Department of Computer Science Oxford con- cerns the termination of simple linear loops of the form: x u ; while Bx c do x Ax + a , where initial integer vectors u, such a loop terminates. The correctness of our algorithm relies

  19. Renormalization of a two-loop neutrino mass model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, K. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States); Julio, J. [Fisika LIPI, Kompleks Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15310, Indonesia and Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova Cesta 39, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the renormalization group structure of a radiative neutrino mass model consisting of a singly charged and a doubly charged scalar fields. Small Majorana neutrino masses are generated by the exchange of these scalars via two-loop diagrams. We derive boundedness conditions for the Higgs potential and show how they can be satisfied to energies up to the Planck scale. Combining boundedness and perturbativity constraints with neutrino oscillation phenomenology, new limits on the masses and couplings of the charged scalars are derived. These in turn lead to lower limits on the branching ratios for certain lepton flavor violating (LFV) processes such as ??e?, ??3e and ? – e conversion in nuclei. Improved LFV measurements could test the model, especially in the case of inverted neutrino mass hierarchy where these are more prominent.

  20. SecDec-3.0: numerical evaluation of multi-scale integrals beyond one loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Borowka; G. Heinrich; S. P. Jones; M. Kerner; J. Schlenk; T. Zirke

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    SecDec is a program which can be used for the factorization of dimensionally regulated poles from parametric integrals, in particular multi-loop integrals, and the subsequent numerical evaluation of the finite coefficients. Here we present version 3.0 of the program, which has major improvements compared to version 2: it is faster, contains new decomposition strategies, an improved user interface and various other new features which extend the range of applicability.

  1. A new vacuum for Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca Dittrich; Marc Geiller

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a new vacuum for loop quantum gravity, which is dual to the Ashtekar-Lewandowski vacuum. Because it is based on BF theory, this new vacuum is physical for $(2+1)$-dimensional gravity, and much closer to the spirit of spin foam quantization in general. To construct this new vacuum and the associated representation of quantum observables, we introduce a modified holonomy-flux algebra which is cylindrically consistent with respect to the notion of refinement by time evolution suggested in [1]. This supports the proposal for a construction of a physical vacuum made in [1,2], also for $(3+1)$-dimensional gravity. We expect that the vacuum introduced here will facilitate the extraction of large scale physics and cosmological predictions from loop quantum gravity.

  2. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  3. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  4. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S. (Knoxville, TN); Todd, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage system. This will be the first CSP integration with Sandia Labs' Molten-Salt Test Loop System ... Dr. David Danielson Visit to NSTTF On September 10, 2012, in...

  6. MAGNETIC LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Borrero, J. M.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pillet, V. MartInez; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de Astronomia y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: wiegelmann@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the fine structure of magnetic fields in the atmosphere of the quiet Sun. We use photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX with unprecedented spatial resolution to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field into higher layers of the solar atmosphere with the help of potential and force-free extrapolation techniques. We find that most magnetic loops that reach into the chromosphere or higher have one footpoint in relatively strong magnetic field regions in the photosphere. Ninety-one percent of the magnetic energy in the mid-chromosphere (at a height of 1 Mm) is in field lines, whose stronger footpoint has a strength of more than 300 G, i.e., above the equipartition field strength with convection. The loops reaching into the chromosphere and corona are also found to be asymmetric in the sense that the weaker footpoint has a strength B < 300 G and is located in the internetwork (IN). Such loops are expected to be strongly dynamic and have short lifetimes, as dictated by the properties of the IN fields.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Under ground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Underground Discharge Points (UDPs) included in both CAU 406 and CAU 429. The CAUs are located in Area 3 and Area 9 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  8. Novel Magnetically Fluidized Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Renwei; Hahn, David; Klausner, James; Petrasch, Jorg; Mehdizadeh, Ayyoub; Allen, Kyle; Rahmatian, Nima; Stehle, Richard; Bobek, Mike; Al-Raqom, Fotouh; Greek, Ben; Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Singh, Abhishek; Takagi, Midori; Barde, Amey; Nili, Saman

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The coal to hydrogen project utilizes the iron/iron oxide looping process to produce high purity hydrogen. The input energy for the process is provided by syngas coming from gasification process of coal. The reaction pathways for this process have been studied and favorable conditions for energy efficient operation have been identified. The Magnetically Stabilized Porous Structure (MSPS) is invented. It is fabricated from iron and silica particles and its repeatable high performance has been demonstrated through many experiments under various conditions in thermogravimetric analyzer, a lab-scale reactor, and a large scale reactor. The chemical reaction kinetics for both oxidation and reduction steps has been investigated thoroughly inside MSPS as well as on the surface of very smooth iron rod. Hydrogen, CO, and syngas have been tested individually as the reducing agent in reduction step and their performance is compared. Syngas is found to be the most pragmatic reducing agent for the two-step water splitting process. The transport properties of MSPS including porosity, permeability, and effective thermal conductivity are determined based on high resolution 3D CT x-ray images obtained at Argonne National Laboratory and pore-level simulations using a lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE)-based mesoscopic model developed during this investigation. The results of those measurements and simulations provide necessary inputs to the development of a reliable volume-averaging-based continuum model that is used to simulate the dynamics of the redox process in MSPS. Extensive efforts have been devoted to simulate the redox process in MSPS by developing a continuum model consist of various modules for conductive and radiative heat transfer, fluid flow, species transport, and reaction kinetics. Both the Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches for species transport of chemically reacting flow in porous media have been investigated and verified numerically. Both approaches lead to correct prediction of hydrogen production rates over a large range of experimental conditions in the laboratory scale reactor and the bench-scale reactor. In the economic analysis, a comparison of the hydrogen production plants using iron/iron oxide looping cycle and the conventional process has been presented. Plant configurations are developed for the iron/iron oxide looping cycle. The study suggests a higher electric power generation but a lower hydrogen production efficiency comparing with the conventional process. Additionally, it was shown that the price of H{sub 2} obtained from our reactor can be as low as $1.7/kg, which is 22% lower than the current price of the H{sub 2} obtained from reforming plants.

  9. Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  10. A single-chip real-Time range finder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sicheng

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    for their temporal bandwidth and detection performance. The mathematical and optical models of the system are built and carefully verified. A prototype based on this technique has been fabricated and tested. The experimental results prove that the range finder can...

  11. Statistical Evidence for the Existence of Alfv\\'enic Turbulence in Solar Coronal Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiajia; De Moortel, Ineke; Threlfall, James; Bethge, Christian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have demonstrated that waves which are capable of carrying large amounts of energy are ubiquitous throughout the solar corona. However, the question of how this wave energy is dissipated (on which time and length scales) and released into the plasma remains largely unanswered. Both analytic and numerical models have previously shown that Alfv\\'enic turbulence may play a key role not only in the generation of the fast solar wind, but in the heating of coronal loops. In an effort to bridge the gap between theory and observations, we expand on a recent study [De Moortel et al., ApJL, 782:L34, 2014] by analyzing thirty-seven clearly isolated coronal loops using data from the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) instrument. We observe Alfv\\'enic perturbations with phase speeds which range from 250-750 km/s and periods from 140-270 s for the chosen loops. While excesses of high frequency wave-power are observed near the apex of some loops (tentatively supporting the onset of Alfv\\'enic turbu...

  12. Hydrogen-bond driven loop-closure kinetics in unfolded polypeptide chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daidone, Isabella [University of Heidelberg; Neuweiler, H [University of Heidelberg; Doose, S [University of Heidelberg; Sauer, M [University of Heidelberg; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the length dependence of end-to-end loop-closure kinetics in unfolded polypeptide chains provides an understanding of early steps in protein folding. Here, loop-closure in poly-glycine-serine peptides is investigated by combining single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy with molecular dynamics simulation. For chains containing more than 10 peptide bonds loop-closing rate constants on the 20-100 nanosecond time range exhibit a power-law length dependence. However, this scaling breaks down for shorter peptides, which exhibit slower kinetics arising from a perturbation induced by the dye reporter system used in the experimental setup. The loop-closure kinetics in the longer peptides is found to be determined by the formation of intra-peptide hydrogen bonds and transient beta-sheet structure, that accelerate the search for contacts among residues distant in sequence relative to the case of a polypeptide chain in which hydrogen bonds cannot form. Hydrogen-bond-driven polypeptide-chain collapse in unfolded peptides under physiological conditions found here is not only consistent with hierarchical models of protein folding, that highlights the importance of secondary structure formation early in the folding process, but is also shown to speed up the search for productive folding events.

  13. The Higgs mass range from Standard Model false vacuum Inflation in scalar-tensor gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella Masina; Alessio Notari

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    If the Standard Model is valid up to very high energies it is known that the Higgs potential can develop a local minimum at field values around $10^{15}-10^{17}$ GeV, for a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs masses. We show that in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity such Higgs false vacuum can give rise to viable inflation if the potential barrier is very shallow, allowing for tunneling and relaxation into the electroweak scale true vacuum. The amplitude of cosmological density perturbations from inflation is directly linked to the value of the Higgs potential at the false minimum. Requiring the top quark mass, the amplitude and spectral index of density perturbations to be compatible with observations, selects a narrow range of values for the Higgs mass, $m_H=126.0\\pm 3.5$ GeV, where the error is mostly due to the theoretical uncertainty of the 2-loop RGE. This prediction could be soon tested at the Large Hadron Collider. Our inflationary scenario could also be further checked by better constraining the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  14. Cosmological Analysis of Pilgrim Dark Energy in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawad, Abdul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposal of pilgrim dark energy is based on speculation that phantom-like dark energy (with strong enough resistive force) can prevent black hole formation in the universe. We explore this phenomenon in loop quantum cosmology framework by taking Hubble horizon as an infra-red cutoff in pilgrim dark energy. We evaluate the cosmological parameters such as Hubble, equation of state parameter, squared speed of sound and also cosmological planes like $\\omega_{\\vartheta}-\\omega'_{\\vartheta}$ and $r-s$ on the basis of pilgrim dark energy parameter ($u$) and interacting parameter ($d^2$). It is found that values of Hubble parameter lies in the range $74^{+0.005}_{-0.005}$. It is mentioned here that equation state parameter lies within the ranges $-1\\mp0.00005$ for $u=2, 1$ and $(-1.12,-1), (-5,-1)$ for $u=-1,-2$, respectively. Also, $\\omega_{\\vartheta}-\\omega'_{\\vartheta}$ planes provide $\\Lambda$CDM limit, freezing and thawing regions for all cases of $u$. It is also interesting to mention here that $\\omega_{\\va...

  15. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  16. A Hardware in the Loop module in an IEC61850 Co-Simulation Platform for advanced substation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Hardware in the Loop module in an IEC61850 Co- Simulation Platform for advanced substation aspects, related to the IEC61850 requirements, should be tested and checked in order to validate architecture. The first aspect consists in validating the conformity of the IEC61850 implementation inside

  17. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGIC ENGINEERING / MARCH/APRIL 2001 / 119 MODELING LOOPED RATINGS IN MUSKINGUM-CUNGE ROUTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    ). The conventional Muskingum-Cunge model is based on kinematic wave theory; thus, it uses the equilibrium or bottom four-point model to use the local water surface slope and the Vedernikov number in the expression of kinematic/diffusive unsteady flow conditions. Numerical experiments were used to test the looped

  18. Water-loop heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eley, C.; Hydeman, M. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-loop heat pump (WLHP) systems are reliable, versatile, energy-efficient alternatives to conventional systems such as packaged rooftop or central chiller systems. These systems offer low installed costs, unparalleled design flexibility, and an inherent ability to recover heat in a variety of commercial and multifamily residential buildings for both new construction and retrofit markets. Southern California Edison Co. (SCE) teamed with EPRI to develop a comprehensive design guide for WLHP systems that incorporated recent research by EPRI, SCE, and others. The project team reviewed current literature, equipment data, and design guidelines from equipment manufacturers. They next discussed design and application practices with consulting engineers as well as design and building contractors. The team also ran extensive computer simulations on commercial and multifamily residential building models for Southern California, both to determine the sensitivity of energy use to WLHP system design parameters and to establish optimal design parameters. This information culminated in a comprehensive engineering guide. Volume 1 of this report, provides step-by-step technical design data for selection, application, and specification of WLHP systems. This guide emphasizes energy-efficient design principles and incorporates the findings of the computer simulations and research. For example, it recommends lowering the loop temperature in buildings dominated by internal loads. Reducing the loop temperature from 90 to 80[degrees]F provides a 7--10% savings in the total system energy in Southern California climate areas. Other recommendations include (1) installing a cooling tower with a propeller fan, which uses one fourth to one third of the energy of a cooling tower with a centrifugal fan; and (2) incorporating variable-speed pumps in conjunction with two-position valves in the heat pumps to reduce the system pump energy use by up to 50%.

  19. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  20. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bel,; Lon E. (Altadena, CA); Crane, Douglas Todd (Pasadena, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  1. Fractal Structure of Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo Modesto

    2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have calculated the spectral dimension of loop quantum gravity (LQG) using simple arguments coming from the area spectrum at different length scales. We have obtained that the spectral dimension of the spatial section runs from 2 to 3, across a 1.5 phase, when the energy of a probe scalar field decrees from high to low energy. We have calculated the spectral dimension of the space-time also using results from spin-foam models, obtaining a 2-dimensional effective manifold at hight energy. Our result is consistent with other two approach to non perturbative quantum gravity: causal dynamical triangulation and asymptotic safety quantum gravity.

  2. High Energy Evolution with Pomeron Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Lublinsky

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy/density QCD has been widely used for DIS phenomenology with a projectile particle considered as perturbative and dilute. We review some recent attempts to derive a high energy evolution kernel which treats targets and projectiles in a symmetric manner. From theoretical point of view the problem is tightly related to inclusion of Pomeron loops in the evolution. The ultimate goal is to consider high energy scatterings with both projectile and target being dense, the situation faced at RHIC and the LHC.

  3. Loop Quantum Gravity: An Inside View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Thiemann

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a (relatively) non -- technical summary of the status of the quantum dynamics in Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG). We explain in detail the historical evolution of the subject and why the results obtained so far are non -- trivial. The present text can be viewed in part as a response to an article by Nicolai, Peeters and Zamaklar [hep-th/0501114]. We also explain why certain no go conclusions drawn from a mathematically correct calculation in a recent paper by Helling et al [hep-th/0409182] are physically incorrect.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (AVTA) Data and Results The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies...

  5. Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Range condition, or a rangeland's "state of health," is an ecological measurement of the current condition of a range. Range condition is evaluated by the plant species composition. This leaflet explains the importance of range condition, how range...

  6. Grafting Polymer Loops onto Functionalized Nanotubes: Monitoring Grafting and Loop Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashcraft, Earl C [ORNL; Ji, Haining [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polystyrene functionalized at both ends (telechelic polymer) with epoxide groups (epoxy PS epoxy) was reacted with carboxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes (COOH MWNT) in solution in order to graft polymer chains at both ends onto the MWNT surface, forming loops. FT-IR spectroscopy was employed to monitor the formation of aromatic esters and to quantify the amount of telechelic grafted to the nanotube surface as a function of reaction time. When the samples were further annealed in the melt, an increase in the aromatic ester peak was observed, indicating that the unreacted chain ends further grafted to MWNT surfaces to form loops. By reacting the grafted nanotube samples further with monocarboxy terminated poly(4-methylstyrene) (COOH P4MS), the amount of epoxy PS epoxy that had only reacted at one end was determined. Reaction rate analysis indicates that that the grafting of epoxy PS epoxy to the nanotube surface is reaction controlled, as the FT-IR spectroscopy signal grows as a function of approximately t0.3. These studies exemplify how FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a novel technique to quantify the amount of grafted polymer, grafting rate, and percent of difunctional polymers that form loops, and provide a method to create loop covered nanoparticles.

  7. VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS FOR A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION FAN LOOP FROM HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); O'Dwyer, B.; Mason, H. E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The velocity pattern of a fan loop structure within a solar active region over the temperature range 0.15-1.5 MK is derived using data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. The loop is aligned toward the observer's line of sight and shows downflows (redshifts) of around 15 km s{sup -1} up to a temperature of 0.8 MK, but for temperatures of 1.0 MK and above the measured velocity shifts are consistent with no net flow. This velocity result applies over a projected spatial distance of 9 Mm and demonstrates that the cooler, redshifted plasma is physically disconnected from the hotter, stationary plasma. A scenario in which the fan loops consist of at least two groups of 'strands'-one cooler and downflowing, the other hotter and stationary-is suggested. The cooler strands may represent a later evolutionary stage of the hotter strands. A density diagnostic of Mg VII was used to show that the electron density at around 0.8 MK falls from 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} at the loop base, to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} at a projected height of 15 Mm. A filling factor of 0.2 is found at temperatures close to the formation temperature of Mg VII (0.8 MK), confirming that the cooler, downflowing plasma occupies only a fraction of the apparent loop volume. The fan loop is rooted within a so-called outflow region that displays low intensity and blueshifts of up to 25 km s{sup -1} in Fe XII {lambda}195.12 (formed at 1.5 MK), in contrast to the loop's redshifts of 15 km s{sup -1} at 0.8 MK. A new technique for obtaining an absolute wavelength calibration for the EIS instrument is presented and an instrumental effect, possibly related to a distorted point-spread function, that affects velocity measurements is identified.

  8. Two-loop additive mass renormalization with clover fermions and Symanzik improved gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Skouroupathis; M. Constantinou; H. Panagopoulos

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the critical value of the hopping parameter, $\\kappa_c$, in Lattice QCD, up to two loops in perturbation theory. We employ the Sheikholeslami-Wohlert (clover) improved action for fermions and the Symanzik improved gluon action with 4- and 6-link loops. The quantity which we study is a typical case of a vacuum expectation value resulting in an additive renormalization; as such, it is characterized by a power (linear) divergence in the lattice spacing, and its calculation lies at the limits of applicability of perturbation theory. Our results are polynomial in $c_{SW}$ (clover parameter) and cover a wide range of values for the Symanzik coefficients $c_i$. The dependence on the number of colors N and the number of fermion flavors $N_f$ is shown explicitly. In order to compare our results to non perturbative evaluations of $\\kappa_c$ coming from Monte Carlo simulations, we employ an improved perturbation theory method for improved actions.

  9. Spontaneous helicity of a polymer with side-loops confined to a cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Debasish

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by recent experiments on the spatial organization of bacterial chromosomes, we consider a type of "bottle brush" polymer consisting of a flexible backbone chain, to which flexible side loops are connected. We show that such a model with an open linear backbone spontaneously adopts a helical structure with a well-defined pitch when confined to small cylindrical volume. This helicity persists over a range of sizes and aspect-ratios of the cylinder, provided the packing fraction of the chain is suitably large. We analyze this results in terms of the interplay between the effective stiffness and actual intra-chain packing effects caused by the side-loops in response to the confinement. For the case of a circular backbone, mimicking e.g. the E. coli chromosome, the polymer adopts a linearized configuration of two parallel helices connected at the cylinder poles.

  10. Evolution equation for 3-quark Wilson loop operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Gerasimov; A. V. Grabovsky

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution equation for the 3 quark Wilson loop operator has been derived in the leading logarithm approximation within Balitsky high energy operator expansion.

  11. ORC Closed Loop Control Systems for Transient and Steady State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    models using iterative concept analysis are being used on a closed loop controlled, waste heat recovery system running automatically over various drive cycles....

  12. Robotic Roommates Making Pancakes -Look Into Perception-Manipulation Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Robotic Roommates Making Pancakes - Look Into Perception-Manipulation Loop Michael Beetz, Ulrich Klank, Alexis Maldonado, Dejan Pangercic, Thomas R¨uhr {beetz, klank, maldonad, pangercic, ruehr

  13. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . MCKETTA is an economist with the College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range Sciences, University of Idaho has been developed for determining the cost of Fire Management Inputs (FMls)-the direct frreline costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES

  14. SHOCK SPEED, COSMIC RAY PRESSURE, AND GAS TEMPERATURE IN THE CYGNUS LOOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvesen, Greg; Raymond, John C.; Edgar, Richard J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: salvesen@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: edgar@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: salvesen@umich.edu

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper limits on the shock speeds in supernova remnants can be combined with post-shock temperatures to obtain upper limits on the ratio of cosmic ray to gas pressure (P {sub CR}/P{sub G} ) behind the shocks. We constrain shock speeds from proper motions and distance estimates, and we derive temperatures from X-ray spectra. The shock waves are observed as faint H{alpha} filaments stretching around the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant in two epochs of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) separated by 39.1 years. We measured proper motions of 18 nonradiative filaments and derived shock velocity limits based on a limit to the Cygnus Loop distance of 576 {+-} 61 pc given by Blair et al. for a background star. The Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) instrument on-board ROSAT observed the X-ray emission of the post-shock gas along the perimeter of the Cygnus Loop, and we measure post-shock electron temperature from spectral fits. Proper motions range from 2.''7 to 5.''4 over the POSS epochs and post-shock temperatures range from kT {approx} 100-200 eV. Our analysis suggests a cosmic ray to post-shock gas pressure consistent with zero, and in some positions P {sub CR} is formally smaller than zero. We conclude that the distance to the Cygnus Loop is close to the upper limit given by the distance to the background star and that either the electron temperatures are lower than those measured from ROSAT PSPC X-ray spectral fits or an additional heat input for the electrons, possibly due to thermal conduction, is required.

  15. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  16. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  17. Dual-range linearized transimpedance amplifier system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A transimpedance amplifier system is disclosed which simultaneously generates a low-gain output signal and a high-gain output signal from an input current signal using a single transimpedance amplifier having two different feedback loops with different amplification factors to generate two different output voltage signals. One of the feedback loops includes a resistor, and the other feedback loop includes another resistor in series with one or more diodes. The transimpedance amplifier system includes a signal linearizer to linearize one or both of the low- and high-gain output signals by scaling and adding the two output voltage signals from the transimpedance amplifier. The signal linearizer can be formed either as an analog device using one or two summing amplifiers, or alternately can be formed as a digital device using two analog-to-digital converters and a digital signal processor (e.g. a microprocessor or a computer).

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  19. Open-loop heat-recovery dryer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward Evan

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A drying apparatus is disclosed that includes a drum and an open-loop airflow pathway originating at an ambient air inlet, passing through the drum, and terminating at an exhaust outlet. A passive heat exchanger is included for passively transferring heat from air flowing from the drum toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the ambient air inlet toward the drum. A heat pump is also included for actively transferring heat from air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the drum. A heating element is also included for further heating air flowing from the heat pump toward the drum.

  20. Pair Correlation Function of Wilson Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Chaudhuri; Y. Chen; E. Novak

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a path integral prescription for the pair correlation function of Wilson loops lying in the worldvolume of Dbranes in the bosonic open and closed string theory. The results can be applied both in ordinary flat spacetime in the critical dimension d or in the presence of a generic background for the Liouville field. We compute the potential between heavy nonrelativistic sources in an abelian gauge theory in relative collinear motion with velocity v = tanh(u), probing length scales down to r_min^2 = 2 \\pi \\alpha' u. We predict a universal -(d-2)/r static interaction at short distances. We show that the velocity dependent corrections to the short distance potential in the bosonic string take the form of an infinite power series in the dimensionless variables z = r_min^2/r^2, uz/\\pi, and u^2.

  1. Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass packing density inside the porous wall were 1 to 5 kg/m{sup 3}; and percolation factors were 0.81 to 0.97. Average particulate layer permeability was 1.95 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}. Solid particulate layer packing density values were between 11 and 128 kg/m{sup 3}. These values were in good agreement with the Peclet number correlation theory reported in the literature. NO{sub 2}-assisted oxidation of PM in the DPF showed experimentally that a significant reduction of the pressure drop can be achieved (<8 kPa) when sufficient NO{sub 2} (>120 ppm) is available and high exhaust gas temperatures ({approx}360-460 C) can be maintained, even at high PM loadings (low NO{sub 2}/solid PM ratios). The CRT{trademark} (DOC-DPF system) showed limited advantages when used with high PM rates (low NOx/PM ratios) in combination with a low pressure loop EGR strategy for a continuous operation of an engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. The 8.1-liter engine was not designed for low-pressure loop EGR and when the EGR was added the NOx emissions were reduced but the PM emissions increased. This corresponds to the well known NOx to PM relationship in which if the NOx is reduced the PM emissions increase. In order for this technology to be successful on this engine family, the engine out PM emissions must be reduced. These results led to Task II. Task II objective was to meet the interim Tier 4 standards using the CCRT{trademark} technology applied to an advanced 6.8 liter John Deere engine. The advanced engine incorporated a 4 valve head, required additional EGR, an advanced high pressure common rail fuel system and a better matched turbocharger. The EGR system was optimized and the goal of less than 2 g/kWh NOx and less than 0.02 g/kWh PM were achieved over the 8 mode test. Again, experimental data was provided to Michigan Tech to study the passive regeneration of the CCRT{trademark} technology. Two computer models, i.e., the MTU 1-D DOC model and the MTU 1-D 2-layer CPF model were developed as part of this research and calibrated using the data obtained from experiments. The 1-D D

  2. Loop-voltage tomography in tokamaks using transient synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.; Hunter Coll., New York, NY (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The loop voltage in tokamaks is particularly difficult to measure anywhere but at the plasma periphery. A brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons, however, produces a transient radiation response that is sensitive to this voltage. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose the loop voltage. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Supply Regulation Techniques for Phase-Locked Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    Supply Regulation Techniques for Phase-Locked Loops Vivekananth Gurumoorthy and Samuel Palermo-- Phase-locked loops (PLLs) which employ voltage regulators for low supply-noise sensitivity often rely. This paper compares various supply regulation techniques on the basis of their ability to reject noise from

  4. Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferris, Michael C.

    on a transmission network from net generation nodes to net consumption nodes is governed by the Kirchoff Laws [45Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO Xinmin Hu Daniel Ralph to model markets for delivery of electrical power on looped transmission networks. It analyzes

  5. IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS #12;ii IMPLEMENTING GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP AND GROUND LOOP HEAT EXCHANGER MODELS IN THE ENERGYPLUS............................................................... 2 1.3. Overview of the Parameter Estimation Water-to-Water Heat Pump Model ........... 5 1

  6. Singlet Free Energies and Renormalized Polyakov Loop in full QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Petrov

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the free energy of a static quark anti-quark pair and the renormalized Polyakov loop in 2+1- and 3- flavor QCD using $16^3 \\times 4$ and $16^3 \\times 6$ lattices and improved staggered p4 action. We also compare the renormalized Polyakov loop with the results of our earlier studies.

  7. Flow Loop Experiments Using Polyalphaolefin Nanofluids Ian C. Nelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    Flow Loop Experiments Using Polyalphaolefin Nanofluids Ian C. Nelson and Debjyoti Banerjee Texas A a flow-loop apparatus to explore the performance of nanofluids in cooling applications. The experiments/heater), and a reservoir. Experiments were conducted using nanofluid and polyalphaolefin for two different fin strip

  8. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  9. Vortex loops: Are they always doomed to die

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Ya'acov, U. (International Solvay Institutes for Physics and Chemistry, Campus Plaine-CP231, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium))

    1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective equations of motion of relativistic strings in material media are derived and applied to moving rings with a time-dependent radius. The equations contain the Magnus force, due to the motion of the ring relative to the medium, whose eventual effect is the possible stabilization of the ring against shrinking. A constant solution is identified, and small fluctuations around it are bound, demonstrating the stability of the solution. If the string loops created in the cosmological cosmic string scenario interact via this mechanism with a formed-up Higgs particle condensate, then the stabilizing velocities are [similar to][delta][sub loop]/[ital R][sub loop], and the overall effect of this phenomenon is to stabilize large loops and reduce the general disappearance rate of the string loops.

  10. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  11. Range Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to:Radiant ElectricRamkyRange Fuels

  12. Closed-loop control of anesthesia in children 1 Robust closed-loop control of induction and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : During closed-loop control, a drug infusion is continually adjusted according to a measure of clinical. Remifentanil was administered as a bolus (0.5 g/kg), followed by continuous infusion (0.03 g/kg/min). The propofol infusion was closed-loop controlled throughout induction and maintenance of anesthesia, using

  13. Two Loop Unification of Non-SUSY SO(10) GUT with TeV Scalars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, T Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine gauge coupling unification at the two loop level in the the non-SUSY SO(10) grand unified theory proposed by Babu and Mohapatra \\cite{BM}. This GUT, which breaks down to the standard model in a single step, has the distinguishing feature of containing non-standard model scalars at the TeV scale. This leads to a plethora of interesting effects in the TeV range, most prominently predicting the possibility of discovering new particles at the LHC in run 2. This model also gives rise to measurable proton decay, neutron-antineutron oscillations, provides a mechanism for baryogenesis, and contains potential dark matter candidates. In this paper, we compute the two loop beta function and show that this model unifies to two loop order around $10^{15}$ GeV. We then compute the proton lifetime and argue that threshold effects place it comfortably above the Super Kamiokande limit. In this paper, we demonstrate that this model passes the baseline for physical plausibility and therefore is worth st...

  14. Two Loop Unification of Non-SUSY SO(10) GUT with TeV Scalars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Daniel Brennan

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine gauge coupling unification at the two loop level in the the non-SUSY SO(10) grand unified theory proposed by Babu and Mohapatra \\cite{BM}. This GUT, which breaks down to the standard model in a single step, has the distinguishing feature of containing non-standard model scalars at the TeV scale. This leads to a plethora of interesting effects in the TeV range, most prominently predicting the possibility of discovering new particles at the LHC in run 2. This model also gives rise to measurable proton decay, neutron-antineutron oscillations, provides a mechanism for baryogenesis, and contains potential dark matter candidates. In this paper, we compute the two loop beta function and show that this model unifies to two loop order around $10^{15}$ GeV. We then compute the proton lifetime and argue that threshold effects place it comfortably above the Super Kamiokande limit. In this paper, we demonstrate that this model passes the baseline for physical plausibility and therefore is worth studying due to its interesting low energy phenomenology.

  15. A Voltage Controlled Oscillator for a Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer in a Silicon-on-Sapphire Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Sean

    2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers from a government-owned engineering and manufacturing facility were contracted by government-owned research laboratory to design and build an S-band telemetry transmitter using Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit (RFIC) technology packaged in a Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) Multi-Chip Module. The integrated circuit technology chosen for the Phase-Locked Loop Frequency Synthesizer portion of the telemetry transmitter was a 0.25 um CMOS process that utilizes a sapphire substrate and is fabricated by Peregrine Semiconductor corporation. This thesis work details the design of the Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) portion of the PLL frequency synthesizer and constitutes an fully integrated VCO core circuit and a high-isolation buffer amplifier. The high-isolation buffer amplifier was designed to provide 16 dB of gain for 2200-3495 MHz as well as 60 dB of isolation for the oscillator core to provide immunity to frequency pulling due to RF load mismatch. Actual measurements of the amplifier gain and isolation showed the gain was approximately 5 dB lower than the simulated gain when all bond-wire and test substrate parasitics were taken into account. The isolation measurements were shown to be 28 dB at the high end of the frequency band but the measurement was more than likely compromised due to the aforementioned bond-wire and test substrate parasitics. The S-band oscillator discussed in this work was designed to operate over a frequency range of 2200 to 2300 MHz with a minimum output power of 0 dBm with a phase-noise of -92 dBc/Hz at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier. The tuning range was measured to be from 2215 MHz to 2330 MHz with a minimum output power of -7 dBm over the measured frequency range. A phase-noise of -90 dBc was measured at a 100 kHz offset from the carrier.

  16. Automated one-loop calculations with GoSam 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. van Deurzen; N. Greiner; G. Heinrich; G. Luisoni; P. Mastrolia; E. Mirabella; G. Ossola; T. Peraro; J. Schlenk; J. F. von Soden-Fraunhofen; F. Tramontano

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the version 2.0 of the program GoSam, which is a public program package to compute one-loop corrections to multi-particle processes. The extended version of the "Binoth-Les-Houches-Accord" interface to Monte Carlo programs is also implemented. This allows a large flexibility regarding the combination of the code with various Monte Carlo programs to produce fully differential NLO results, including the possibility of parton showering and hadronisation. We describe the new features of the code and illustrate the wide range of applicability for multi-particle processes at NLO, both within and beyond the Standard Model.

  17. Annealing kinetics of ^311 defects and dislocation loops in the end-of-range damage region of ion implanted silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 L. M. Rubin and J. Jackson Eaton Corporation, Beverly was implanted using an Eaton NV-GSD 200E. The wafer was amorphized using a Si implantation, with an energy of 20

  18. Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO{sub 2} Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, Herbert; Chiu, John; Edberg, Carl; Thibeault, Paul; Turek, David

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Alstom’s Limestone Chemical Looping (LCL™) process has the potential to capture CO{sub 2} from new and existing coal-fired power plants while maintaining high plant power generation efficiency. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion- gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology. This process could also be potentially configured as a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas or hydrogen for various applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. The targets set for this technology is to capture over 90% of the total carbon in the coal at cost of electricity which is less than 20% greater than Conventional PC or CFB units. Previous work with bench scale test and a 65 kWt Process Development Unit Development (PDU) has validated the chemistry required for the chemical looping process and provided for the investigation of the solids transport mechanisms and design requirements. The objective of this project is to continue development of the combustion option of chemical looping (LCL-C™) by designing, building and testing a 3 MWt prototype facility. The prototype includes all of the equipment that is required to operate the chemical looping plant in a fully integrated manner with all major systems in service. Data from the design, construction, and testing will be used to characterize environmental performance, identify and address technical risks, reassess commercial plant economics, and develop design information for a demonstration plant planned to follow the proposed Prototype. A cold flow model of the prototype will be used to predict operating conditions for the prototype and help in operator training. Operation of the prototype will provide operator experience with this new technology and performance data of the LCL-C™ process, which will be applied to the commercial design and economics and plan for a future demonstration plant.

  19. Diesel Combustion Control with Closed-Loop Control of the Injection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Control with Closed-Loop Control of the Injection Strategy Diesel Combustion Control with Closed-Loop Control of the Injection Strategy New control strategies are...

  20. Folding of a DNA Hairpin Loop Structure in Explicit SolventUsingRepli...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a DNA Hairpin Loop Structure in Explicit Solvent UsingReplica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Folding of a DNA Hairpin Loop Structure in Explicit Solvent...

  1. Program permits fast solution to pipeline loop requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, G.D.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A program developed for the HP-41CV hand-held calculator can provide pipeline engineers with a quick and easy means for determining loop requirements on existing gas-transmission pipelines. Adding pipe in parallel to an existing pipeline, referred to as looping, is necessary to insure that with a given flow rate, the gas will arrive at a certain point on the pipeline with a pressure equal to or greater than the minimum required pressure. The automatic loop program calculates loop by first determining the total number of segments which require looping within the section of pipeline being evaluated. A section of pipe is usually the pipeline between compressor stations and is divided into segments by either receipt or delivery points along the pipeline. The number of segments which require looping is found by adding loop to individual segments until the final pressure (i.e., the pressure at the point of interest downstream on the pipeline) is equal to or greater than the specified design pressure.

  2. THE COOLING OF CORONAL PLASMAS. IV. CATASTROPHIC COOLING OF LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargill, P. J. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, S. J., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the radiative cooling of coronal loops and demonstrate that the recently identified catastrophic cooling is due to the inability of a loop to sustain radiative/enthalpy cooling below a critical temperature, which can be >1 MK in flares, 0.5-1 MK in active regions, and 0.1 MK in long tenuous loops. Catastrophic cooling is characterized by a rapid fall in coronal temperature, while the coronal density changes by a small amount. Analytic expressions for the critical temperature are derived and show good agreement with numerical results. This effect considerably limits the lifetime of coronal plasmas below the critical temperature.

  3. Two-loop calculation of the scaling behavior of two-dimensional forced Navier-Stokes equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Honkonen; Yu. S. Kabrits; M. V. Kompaniets

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Asymptotic properties of the solution of two-dimensional randomly forced Navier-Stokes equation with long-range correlations of the driving force are analyzed in the two-loop order of perturbation theory with the use of renormalization group. Kolmogorov constant of the energy spectrum is calculated for both the inverse energy cascade and the direct enstrophy cascade in the second order of the $\\epsilon$ expansion.

  4. POSSIBLE PHASE LOOP FOR THE GLOBAL DECOUPLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; CAMERON, P.; DELLA PENNA, A.; JONES, R.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The two eigentunes Q{sub I} and Q{sub II}, two eigenmode amplitude ratios R{sub I} and R{sub II}, and two eignmode phase differences {Delta}{phi}{sub I} and {Delta}{phi}{sub II}, are defined as the coupling observables for the linear weak difference betatron coupling. Simulations were carried out to investigate their behaviors in global decoupling scans. It was found that the amplitude ratios R{sub I,II} are more sensitive than the tune split when the decoupling scan is approaching the global uncoupled point, and that the phase differences {Delta}{phi}{sub I,II} tell the right global decoupling direction, the right strength combination of the skew quadrupoles or families. The analytical solution to these six coupling observables is calculated through both the strict matrix approach and the perturbation Hamiltonian approach. The constant phase differences in the right decoupling direction hint a possible global decoupling phase loop. Dedicated beam experiments were carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The preliminary results from the beam experiments are presented. These six parameters can be used for the global decoupling in feed-back mode, especially on the non-stop energy ramp.

  5. TS LOOP NON-POTABLE PUMP EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Goodin

    1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis evaluates the existing subsurface non-potable water system from the portal pump to the end of the water line in the South Ramp and determines if the pump size and spacing meets the system pressure and flow requirements for construction operations and incipient fire fighting capability as established in the Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1998b). This analysis does not address the non potable water system in the Cross Drift which is covered under a previous design analysis (CRWMS-M&O 1998a). The Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis references sections of OSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart L for requirements applicable to the incipient fire fighting hose stations used underground. This analysis does not address mechanical system valves, fittings, risers and other components of the system piping. This system is not designed or intended to meet all National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) codes for a fire fighting system but is only considered a backup system to fire extinguishers that are installed throughout the Topopah Springs (TS) Loop and may be used to fight small incipient stage fires.

  6. THE EFFECT OF THE {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O REACTION ON THE BLUE LOOPS IN INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib F. [Department of Physics, American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); Champagne, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present stellar evolutionary sequences of stars in the mass range 5-12 M{sub Sun }, having solar-like initial composition. The stellar models are obtained using updated input physics, including recent rates of thermonuclear reactions. We investigate the effects of a modification of the {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate, as suggested by recent evaluations, on the formation and extension of the blue loops encountered during the evolution of the stars in the above mass range. We find that a reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate, as described in the text, has a striking impact on the physical conditions of burning and mixing during shell hydrogen burning when the blue loops are formed. In particular, we find that the efficiency of shell hydrogen burning is crucial for the formation of an extended blue loop. We show that a significantly reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate affects severely the extension of the blue loops and the time spent by the star in the blue part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in the mass range 5-7 M{sub Sun} if the treatment of convection is based on the Schwarzschild criterion only. In this case, envelope overshooting helps to restore well-extended blue loops as supported by the observations of the Cepheid stars. If core overshooting is included during the core hydrogen and core helium burning phases, the loop formation and its properties depend on how this overshooting is treated for a given stellar mass range, as well as on its efficiency.

  7. Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

  8. Experimental characterization and chemical kinetics study of chemical looping combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tianjiao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the most promising technologies to achieve carbon capture in fossil fuel power generation plants. A novel rotary-bed reactor concept was proposed by Zhao et. al. [1] in 2013. It ...

  9. Investigations of tetraspanin functions using large extracellular loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Christopher C

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes our characterization of a specific tetraspanin domain: the large extracellular loop (LEL). Tetraspanins are involved in cellular migration, adhesion, and metastasis, sperm-egg fusion, and viral ...

  10. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  11. active region loop: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loops J.-Y. Lee1,2 , Graham that seems to be associated with separators with a smaller free energy. Subject headings: Sun: corona -- Sun: magnetic topology -- Sun: UV radiation...

  12. active region loops: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loops J.-Y. Lee1,2 , Graham that seems to be associated with separators with a smaller free energy. Subject headings: Sun: corona -- Sun: magnetic topology -- Sun: UV radiation...

  13. RMOTC - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sale of Equipment and Materials DOE to Sell NPR-3 Testing Tomorrow's Technology Today RMOTC - Testing - From Lab to Industry, Moving Your Ideas Forward RMOTC provides a neutral,...

  14. N >= 4 Supergravity Amplitudes from Gauge Theory at One Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Boucher-Veronneau, C.; /SLAC; Johansson, H.; /Saclay

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We expose simple and practical relations between the integrated four- and five-point one-loop amplitudes of N {ge} 4 supergravity and the corresponding (super-)Yang-Mills amplitudes. The link between the amplitudes is simply understood using the recently uncovered duality between color and kinematics that leads to a double-copy structure for gravity. These examples provide additional direct confirmations of the duality and double-copy properties at loop level for a sample of different theories.

  15. Entropy and Area of Black Holes in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple arguments related to the entropy of black holes strongly constrain the spectrum of the area operator for a Schwarzschild black hole in loop quantum gravity. In particular, this spectrum is fixed completely by the assumption that the black hole entropy is maximum. Within the approach discussed, one arrives in loop quantum gravity at a quantization rule with integer quantum numbers $n$ for the entropy and area of a black hole.

  16. MICROPHONICS TESTING OF THE CEBAF UPGRADE 7-CELL CAVITY* , J. Delayen, M. Drury, T. Hiatt, C. Hovater, T. Powers, J. Preble,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    changes in cavity dimensions. When the cavity is locked on-resonance via a phase locked loop (PLL), the RF Generator SRFCavity Horizontal Test Bed Transmitted Power Signal Klystron VCO LPF Phase Locked Loop FFT to excitation from background vibration, swept sinusoids, high-power RF pulses, and mechanical impulses. Test

  17. Observation of reversed hysteresis loops and negative coercivity in granular GaAs{endash}Fe hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fumagalli, P.; Sommer, G.; Lippitz, H.; Haneda, S.; Munekata, H.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied GaAs{endash}Fe granular magnetic-semiconductor hybrid structures by magneto-optic spectroscopy in a photon-energy range from 0.7 to 5 eV at temperatures from 7 to 300 K in magnetic fields up to 1.8 T. The structures have been grown by alternative molecular-beam deposition of GaAs and Fe. At the chosen substrate temperature of T{sub s}=580{degree}C the Fe precipitates into clusters of nanometer to submicron size which are in part ferromagnetically ordered at 300 K. The polar Kerr spectra at 300 and 7 K show for the hybrid structures with high Fe content a broad negative peak with a Kerr rotation of {minus}0.2{degree} at a photon energy of 0.9 eV. The spectral dependence is very similar to pure Fe. Looking at the polar Kerr hysteresis loops at 300 K, a striking behavior is found. The hysteresis loops are reversed, i.e., the magneto-optic hysteresis curves decrease faster when decreasing the fields than the situation is when closing the hysteresis loop on the way back. This peculiar behavior is discussed in the context of local exchange-bias like coupling between ferromagnetic Fe clusters and an antiferromagnetic FeAs surrounding. An alternative model of two superimposed Kerr hysteresis loops is proposed as well. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Estimation of Radioactivities in the IFMIF Liquid Lithium Loop Due to the Erosion and Corrosion of Target Back-Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamauchi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Takemura, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Nakamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Fischer, U. [Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit (Germany); Ida, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Mori, S. [KHI (Japan); Sato, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Simakov, T. [Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit (Germany); Sugimoto, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large amount of radioactive erosion and corrosion products are produced in the IFMIF lithium loop in addition to the deuteron-lithium reaction remnant {sup 7}Be. An analysis was conducted to estimate the radioactive corrosion products with a design code ACT-4 developed in JAERI, the activation cross sections based on the FENDL library and the IEAF-2001 library, the latest version of nuclear activation data in the intermediate energy range up to 150 MeV. The result says the concentration of the corrosion in lithium is not very large compared with that of {sup 7}Be. However, the behavior of the nuclides such as accumulation and detachment on material has not been clarified yet. When the dose rate around the lithium loop was estimated under the condition of 100% plate-out, the value was beyond the acceptable level for the hands-on maintenance near the loop soon after the operation stop. It means that a very efficient cold trap is required so that the 90% activity in the lithium loop is removed.

  19. Design, Construction, and Visualization of Transparent Full Scale High Pressure Test Facility for Electronic Submersible Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Joseph Michael

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain these proper testing conditions. To reasonably pump these large amounts of fluids without wasting the domestic water supply, and the compressor capacity at the Turbomachinery Laboratory, a closed loop 22 system was developed. A P&ID diagram...

  20. Triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The triple loop heat exchanger comprises portions of a strong solution line for conducting relatively hot, strong solution from a generator to a solution heat exchanger of the absorption refrigeration system, conduit means for conducting relatively cool, weak solution from the solution heat exchanger to the generator, and a bypass system for conducting strong solution from the generator around the strong solution line and around the solution heat exchanger to an absorber of the refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator to an undesirable level. The strong solution line and the conduit means are in heat exchange relationship with each other in the triple loop heat exchanger so that, during normal operation of the refrigeration system, heat is exchanged between the relatively hot, strong solution flowing through the strong solution line and the relatively cool, weak solution flowing through the conduit means. Also, the strong solution line and the bypass system are in heat exchange relationship in the triple loop heat exchanger so that if the normal flow path of relatively hot, strong solution flowing from the generator to an absorber is blocked, then this relatively, hot strong solution which will then be flowing through the bypass system in the triple loop heat exchanger, is brought into heat exchange relationship with any strong solution which may have solidified in the strong solution line in the triple loop heat exchanger to thereby aid in desolidifying any such solidified strong solution.

  1. Nonlinear Effects in Pulse Propagation through Doppler-Broadened Closed-Loop Atomic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Fleischhaker; Jörg Evers

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear effects in pulse propagation through a medium consisting of four-level double-$\\Lambda$-type systems are studied theoretically. We apply three continous-wave driving fields and a pulsed probe field such that they form a closed interaction loop. Due to the closed loop and the finite frequency width of the probe pulses the multiphoton resonance condition cannot be fulfilled, such that a time-dependent analysis is required. By identifying the different underlying physical processes we determine the parts of the solution relevant to calculate the linear and nonlinear response of the system. We find that the system can exhibit a strong intensity dependent refractive index with small absorption over a range of several natural linewidths. For a realistic example we include Doppler and pressure broadening and calculate the nonlinear selfphase modulation in a gas cell with Sodium vapor and Argon buffer gas. We find that a selfphase modulation of $\\pi$ is achieved after a propagation of few centimeters through the medium while the absorption in the corresponding spectral range is small.

  2. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  3. A Superconducting transformer system for high current cable testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Dietderich, D. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Prestemon, S. O.; Miller, G.; Weijers, H. W.

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the development of a direct-current (dc) superconducting transformer system for the high current test of superconducting cables. The transformer consists of a core-free 10 464 turn primary solenoid which is enclosed by a 6.5 turn secondary. The transformer is designed to deliver a 50 kA dc secondary current at a dc primary current of about 50 A. The secondary current is measured inductively using two toroidal-wound Rogowski coils. The Rogowski coil signal is digitally integrated, resulting in a voltage signal that is proportional to the secondary current. This voltage signal is used to control the secondary current using a feedback loop which automatically compensates for resistive losses in the splices to the superconducting cable samples that are connected to the secondary. The system has been commissioned up to 28 kA secondary current. The reproducibility in the secondary current measurement is better than 0.05% for the relevant current range up to 25 kA. The drift in the secondary current, which results from drift in the digital integrator, is estimated to be below 0.5 A/min. The system's performance is further demonstrated through a voltage-current measurement on a superconducting cable sample at 11 T background magnetic field. The superconducting transformer system enables fast, high resolution, economic, and safe tests of the critical current of superconducting cable samples.

  4. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  5. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  6. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, J. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  7. Profiles of heating in turbulent coronal magnetic loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Buchlin; P. J. Cargill; S. J. Bradshaw; M. Velli

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: The location of coronal heating in magnetic loops has been the subject of a long-lasting controversy: does it occur mostly at the loop footpoints, at the top, is it random, or is the average profile uniform? Aims: We try to address this question in model loops with MHD turbulence and a profile of density and/or magnetic field along the loop. Methods: We use the ShellAtm MHD turbulent heating model described in Buchlin & Velli (2006), with a static mass density stratification obtained by the HydRad model (Bradshaw & Mason 2003). This assumes the absence of any flow or heat conduction subsequent to the dynamic heating. Results: The average profile of heating is quasi-uniform, unless there is an expansion of the flux tube (non-uniform axial magnetic field) or the variation of the kinetic and magnetic diffusion coefficients with temperature is taken into account: in the first case the heating is enhanced at footpoints, whereas in the second case it is enhanced where the dominant diffusion coefficient is enhanced. Conclusions: These simulations shed light on the consequences on heating profiles of the complex interactions between physical effects involved in a non-uniform turbulent coronal loop.

  8. Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

  9. Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

  10. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  11. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  12. GoSam-2.0: a tool for automated one-loop calculations within the Standard Model and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cullen; H. van Deurzen; N. Greiner; G. Heinrich; G. Luisoni; P. Mastrolia; E. Mirabella; G. Ossola; T. Peraro; J. Schlenk; J. F. von Soden-Fraunhofen; F. Tramontano

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the version 2.0 of the program package GoSam for the automated calculation of one-loop amplitudes. GoSam is devised to compute one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to multi-particle processes within and beyond the Standard Model. The new code contains improvements in the generation and in the reduction of the amplitudes, performs better in computing time and numerical accuracy, and has an extended range of applicability. The extended version of the "Binoth-Les-Houches-Accord" interface to Monte Carlo programs is also implemented. We give a detailed description of installation and usage of the code, and illustrate the new features in dedicated examples.

  13. Comparison of primordial tensor power spectra from the deformed algebra and dressed metric approaches in loop quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolliet, B; Stahl, C; Linsefors, L; Barrau, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loop quantum cosmology tries to capture the main ideas of loop quantum gravity and to apply them to the Universe as a whole. Two main approaches within this framework have been considered to date for the study of cosmological perturbations: the dressed metric approach and the deformed algebra approach. They both have advantages and drawbacks. In this article, we accurately compare their predictions. In particular, we compute the associated primordial tensor power spectra. We show -- numerically and analytically -- that the large scale behavior is similar for both approaches and compatible with the usual prediction of general relativity. The small scale behavior is, the other way round, drastically different. Most importantly, we show that in a range of wavenumbers explicitly calculated, both approaches do agree on predictions that, in addition, differ from standard general relativity and do not depend on unknown parameters. These features of the power spectrum at intermediate scales might constitute a univers...

  14. Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  15. American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

  17. Impulse gage development for the 100-200 ktap range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.C.; Naumann, W.J. (General Research Corp., Santa Barbara, CA (USA). Advanced Technologies Div.)

    1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Special effects underground test (UGT) material response and source diagnostics data require impulse gages that can be used in the 50--150 ktap range and have equilibrated from electrical and mechanical noise sources within 0.001 s. Such gages were designed, analyzed, and tested under this program. One- and two-dimensional stress propagation calculations were performed and predictions were developed for deformation of the gage specimen cup. These predictions were conservative when compared to gas gun test results. The response of the gage will equilibrate within 5% to its final value within 300 {mu}sec. The impulse delivered to the gages for these tests exceeded 250 ktap. The code and experimental results provides a basis for confidence in the operability of the gage in an actual UGT environment.

  18. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  19. Closed loop drilling systems can eliminate reserve pit costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astrella, L.; Wiemers, R. [Environmental Equipment Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed loop systems have become more dependable and efficient, making drilling without a mud pit an economically attractive alternative in many drilling programs. A closed loop system is defined simply as a mechanical and chemical system which will allow an operator to drill a well without using a reserve pit. A closed loop system includes some solids control equipment (such as the shaker, desander, desilter, and proper centrifuge), which may already be on the rig, and a polymer flocculation unit, which is not part of a conventional rig`s solids control system. This paper reviews the various methods of flocculation and the performance of the different units. It then goes on to describe costs and regulations associated with both methods of handling drilling wastes.

  20. Forward Modelling of Standing Slow Modes in Flaring Coronal Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, D; Banerjee, D; Antolin, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing slow mode waves in hot flaring loops are exclusively observed in spectrometers and are used to diagnose the magnetic field strength and temperature of the loop structure. Due to the lack of spatial information, the longitudinal mode cannot be effectively identified. In this study, we simulate standing slow mode waves in flaring loops and compare the synthesized line emission properties with SUMER spectrographic and SDO/AIA imaging observations. We find that the emission intensity and line width oscillations are a quarter period out of phase with Doppler shift velocity both in time and spatial domain, which can be used to identify a standing slow mode wave from spectroscopic observations. However, the longitudinal overtones could be only measured with the assistance of imagers. We find emission intensity asymmetry in the positive and negative modulations, this is because the contribution function pertaining to the atomic emission process responds differently to positive and negative temperature variat...

  1. From Loops to Trees By-passing Feynman's Theorem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catani, Stefano; Gleisberg, Tanju; Krauss, Frank; Rodrigo, German; Winter, Jan-Christopher

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a duality relation between one-loop integrals and phase-space integrals emerging from them through single cuts. The duality relation is realized by a modification of the customary + i0 prescription of the Feynman propagators. The new prescription regularizing the propagators, which we write in a Lorentz covariant form, compensates for the absence of multiple cut contributions that appear in the Feynman Tree Theorem. The duality relation can be applied to generic one-loop quantities in any relativistic, local and unitary field theories. It is suitable for applications to the analytical calculation of one-loop scattering amplitudes, and to the numerical evaluation of cross-sections at next-to-leading order.

  2. Test of luminosity levelling with separated collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Jacquet, D; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Ponce, L; Schaumann, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this test we demonstrated that in the absence of strong long range interactions a levelling of the luminosity can be achieved by a small transverse offset.

  3. Results from CTF3 The Counting Test Facility (CTF) started its third data-taking phase in May 2001. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water extraction, nitrogen stripping and impurity removal on a silicagel adsorption bed. Table 8-28 2002 water extraction test 2123-2130 continuous loop mode April 26 2002 14C test 2153 May 9-23 2002 water extraction test 2162-2173 stop-and-go mode, acidic water June 3 2002 14C test 2180 June 9-20 2002

  4. Estimating two-loop radiative effects in the MOLLER experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksejevs, A. G., E-mail: aaleksejevs@swgc.mun.ca [Grenfell Campus Memorial University (Canada); Barkanova, S. G., E-mail: svetlana.barkanova@acadiau.ca [Acadia University (Canada); Zykunov, V. A., E-mail: vladimir.zykunov@cern.ch [Belarussian State University of Transport (Belarus); Kuraev, E. A., E-mail: kuraev@theor.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the on-shell renormalization scheme, two-loop electroweak corrections to the parityviolating polarization asymmetry in the reaction e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}({gamma}, {gamma}{gamma}) were estimated for the MOLLER experiment at JLab. The infrared divergence and the imaginary part of the amplitude were taken completely under control. Relevant compact expressions obtained by using asymptotic methods are free from unphysical parameters and are convenient for analysis and for numerical estimations. A numerical analysis revealed a significant scale of two-loop effects and the need for taking them into account in the MOLLER experiment.

  5. Suppression and enhancement of transcriptional noise by DNA looping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose M. G. Vilar; Leonor Saiz

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA looping has been observed to enhance and suppress transcriptional noise but it is uncertain which of these two opposite effects is to be expected for given conditions. Here, we derive analytical expressions for the main quantifiers of transcriptional noise in terms of the molecular parameters and elucidate the role of DNA looping. Our results rationalize paradoxical experimental observations and provide the first quantitative explanation of landmark individual-cell measurements at the single molecule level on the classical lac operon genetic system [Choi et al., Science 322, 442-446 (2008)].

  6. 2-loop additive mass renormalization with clover fermions and Symanzik improved gluons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Skouroupathis; M. Constantinou; H. Panagopoulos

    2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the critical value of the hopping parameter, kappa_c, in Lattice QCD, up to two loops in perturbation theory. We employ the Sheikholeslami-Wohlert (clover) improved action for Wilson fermions and the Symanzik improved gluon action for 4- and 6-link loops. The quantity which we study is a typical case of a vacuum expectation value resulting in an additive renormalization; as such, it is characterized by a power (linear) divergence in the lattice spacing, and its calculation lies at the limits of applicability of perturbation theory. Our results are polynomial in c_{SW} (clover parameter) and cover a wide range of values for the Symanzik coefficients c_i. Furthermore, the dependence on the number of colors N and the number of fermionic flavors N_f is shown explicitly. In order to compare our results to non perturbative evaluations of kappa_c coming from Monte Carlo simulations, we employ an improved perturbation theory method applied to improved actions.

  7. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlop, Mary; Keasling, Jay; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cells use feedback to implement a diverse range of regulatory functions. Building synthetic feedback control systems may yield insight into the roles that feedback can play in regulation since it can be introduced independently of native regulation, and alternative control architectures can be compared. We propose a model for microbial biofuel production where a synthetic control system is used to increase cell viability and biofuel yields. Although microbes can be engineered to produce biofuels, the fuels are often toxic to cell growth, creating a negative feedback loop that limits biofuel production. These toxic effects may be mitigated by expressing efflux pumps that export biofuel from the cell. We developed a model for cell growth and biofuel production and used it to compare several genetic control strategies for their ability to improve biofuel yields. We show that controlling efflux pump expression directly with a biofuel-responsive promoter is a straight forward way of improving biofuel production. In addition, a feed forward loop controller is shown to be versatile at dealing with uncertainty in biofuel production rates.

  8. LOCA with consequential or delayed LOOP accidents: Unique issues, plant vulnerability, and CDF contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) can cause a loss-of-offsite power (LOOP) wherein the LOOP is usually delayed by few seconds or longer. Such an accident is called LOCA with consequential LOOP, or LOCA with delayed LOOP (here, abbreviated as LOCA/LOOP). This paper analyzes the unique conditions that are associated with a LOCA/LOOP, presents a model, and quantifies its contribution to core damage frequency (CDF). The results show that the CDF contribution can be a dominant contributor to risk for certain plant designs, although boiling water reactors (BWRs) are less vulnerable than pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

  9. Kinks, loops, and protein folding, with protein A as an example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krokhotin, Andrey, E-mail: Andrei.Krokhotine@cern.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Liwo, Adam, E-mail: adam@chem.univ.gda.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)] [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Maisuradze, Gia G., E-mail: gm56@cornell.edu; Scheraga, Harold A., E-mail: has5@cornell.edu [Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (United States); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fédération Denis Poisson, Université de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours, France and Department of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics and energetics of formation of loops in the 46-residue N-terminal fragment of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A has been studied. Numerical simulations have been performed using coarse-grained molecular dynamics with the united-residue (UNRES) force field. The results have been analyzed in terms of a kink (heteroclinic standing wave solution) of a generalized discrete nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation. In the case of proteins, the DNLS equation arises from a C{sup ?}-trace-based energy function. Three individual kink profiles were identified in the experimental three-?-helix structure of protein A, in the range of the Glu16-Asn29, Leu20-Asn29, and Gln33-Asn44 residues, respectively; these correspond to two loops in the native structure. UNRES simulations were started from the full right-handed ?-helix to obtain a clear picture of kink formation, which would otherwise be blurred by helix formation. All three kinks emerged during coarse-grained simulations. It was found that the formation of each is accompanied by a local free energy increase; this is expressed as the change of UNRES energy which has the physical sense of the potential of mean force of a polypeptide chain. The increase is about 7 kcal/mol. This value can thus be considered as the free energy barrier to kink formation in full ?-helical segments of polypeptide chains. During the simulations, the kinks emerge, disappear, propagate, and annihilate each other many times. It was found that the formation of a kink is initiated by an abrupt change in the orientation of a pair of consecutive side chains in the loop region. This resembles the formation of a Bloch wall along a spin chain, where the C{sup ?} backbone corresponds to the chain, and the amino acid side chains are interpreted as the spin variables. This observation suggests that nearest-neighbor side chain–side chain interactions are responsible for initiation of loop formation. It was also found that the individual kinks are reflected as clear peaks in the principal modes of the analyzed trajectory of protein A, the shapes of which resemble the directional derivatives of the kinks along the chain. These observations suggest that the kinks of the DNLS equation determine the functionally important motions of proteins.

  10. Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

  11. Automation of Multi-leg One-loop virtual Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Maitre

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years, much progress has been made in the computation of one-loop virtual matrix elements for processes involving many external particles. In this contribution the methods that have enabled this recent progress are briefly reviewed with a focus on their computing and automation aspects.

  12. The long wavelength limit of hard thermal loop effective actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F T Brandt; J Frenkel; J C Taylor

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a closed form expression for the long wavelength limit of the effective action for hard thermal loops in an external gravitational field. It is a function of the metric, independent of time derivatives. It is compared and contrasted with the static limit, and with the corresponding limits in an external Yang-Mills field.

  13. Combined Loop Transformation and Hierarchy Allocation for Data Reuse Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

    transformation framework was established based on parametric integer linear programming [6-8]. Data dependenceCombined Loop Transformation and Hierarchy Allocation for Data Reuse Optimization Jason Cong, Peng Zhang, Yi Zou Computer Science Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095

  14. 5-loop Konishi from linearized TBA and the XXX magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janos Balog; Arpad Hegedus

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the linearized TBA equations recently obtained in [arXiv:1002.1711] we show analytically that the 5-loop anomalous dimension of the Konishi operator agrees with the result obtained previously from the generalized Luscher formulae. The proof is based on the relation between this linear system and the XXX model TBA equations.

  15. An evaluation of inductance loop detectors for speed measurement accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Brian Patrick

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The lag time from the presence of a vehicle at an inductance loop to the actual detection of a vehicle varies. As the lag time varies so does the accuracy of speed measurement. Vehicle size, vehicle speed, detector type, detector sensitivity...

  16. A Radiation Tolerant Phase Locked Loop Design for Digital Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    significantly to the chip level Soft Error Rate (SER). The on-chip Phase Locked Loop (PLL) is particularly vulnerable to radiation strikes. In this thesis, we present a radiation hardened PLL design. Each of the components of this design-the voltage controlled...

  17. Closed-Loop Energy Management Control of Large Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, R. L.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    providing steam to the process. A Sell Advisor calculates Make-Buy decisions based on real-time electrical prices, fuel prices and boiler loads. Condensing turbines are coordinated with closed-loop control to provide the lowest energy cost to the plant. When...

  18. Closed-Loop Energy Management Control of Large Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, R. L.

    A case study is presented of a closed-loop control system installed and running at a Pulp and Paper facility in the southeast. A fuzzy logic, ruled-based control system optimally loads multiple steam turbines for maximum electrical generation, while...

  19. Sagnac Interference in Carbon Nanotube Loops Gil Refael,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockrath, Marc

    loops. The conductance as a function of the applied voltage is shown to oscillate due to interference. The period of these oscillations with respect to the gate voltage, as well as the temperatures required calculate interaction effects on the period of the oscillations, and show that even though interactions

  20. A Loop Material Flow System Design for Automated Guided Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    A Loop Material Flow System Design for Automated Guided Vehicles Ardavan Asef-Vaziri 1 Maged load automated guided vehicles. The model simultaneously determines both the design are attributed to material handling (Tompkins et al., 1996). Automated guided vehicles (AGVs) are among

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Comparative genomics-guided loop-mediated isothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang, Tom

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Comparative genomics-guided loop-mediated isothermal amplification sequencing and analytical techniques, genomic sequence data of prok- aryotes are accumulating at a very rapid pace. As of October 2008, there are 873 complete and pub- lished genome sequences, as well as 2025

  2. Optimization of Industrial Applications with Hardware in the Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of industrial robots integrated in complex robot cells. Trajectory optimizers are usually based on models and with changes of the robot task. Index Terms Industrial robotics, Trajectory optimization, Derivative free with Hardware in the Loop I. INTRODUCTION To reduce production costs, industrial robots must work as fast

  3. Conformal Behavior at Four Loops and Scheme (In)Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas A. Ryttov

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for infrared zeros of the beta function and evaluate the anomalous dimension of the mass at the associated fixed point for asymptotically free vector-like fermionic gauge theories with gauge group SU(N). The fixed points of the beta function are studied at the two, three and four loop level in two different explicit schemes. These are the modified regularization invariant, RI', scheme and the minimal momentum subtraction, mMOM, scheme. The search is performed in Landau gauge where the beta function of the gauge parameter vanishes. We then compare our findings to earlier identical investigations performed in the modified minimal subtraction, $\\bar{\\text{MS}}$, scheme. It is found that the value of the anomalous dimension of the mass is smaller at three and four loops than at two loops. This seems to be a generic pattern that is observed in all three different schemes. We then estimate the value of the anomalous dimension to be $\\gamma \\sim 0.225-0.375$ for twelve fundamental flavors and three colors, $\\gamma \\sim 0.500 - 0.593$ for two adjoint flavors and two colors and finally $\\gamma \\sim 1.12-1.70$ for two two-indexed flavors and three colors with the lower and upper bound set by the minimum and maximum value respectively over all three schemes and at three and four loops. Our analysis suggests that the former two theories lie in the conformal window while the latter belongs to the chirally broken phase.

  4. On the q-quantum gravity loop algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth Major

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of deformations of the q-quantum gravity loop algebra is shown to be incompatible with the combinatorics of Temperley-Lieb recoupling theory with deformation parameter at a root of unity. This incompatibility appears to extend to more general deformation parameters.

  5. A new closed loop control method for HVDC transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlecik-Maier, F. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)] [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents a new closed loop control method which uses information locally available at each converter station and combines and coordinates control possibilities with the objective of improving the dynamic behavior during fault recoveries and disturbances around the operating points.

  6. Three-loop free energy for pure gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P.; Zhai, C. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the free energy density for pure non-Abelian gauge theory at high temperature and zero chemical potential. The three-loop result to [ital O]([ital g][sup 4]) is [ital F]=[ital d][sub [ital A

  7. Waste Heat Recovery Using a Circulating Heat Medium Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, E., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a circulating heat medium loop where waste heat is recovered for useful purposes. The heat medium chosen is turbine fuel. It is pumped around the refinery to pick up heat at the crude distilling unit, the hydrocracker, the catalytic cracker...

  8. Closed-loop real-time control on distributed networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambike, Ajit Dilip

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an e?ort to develop closed-loop control strategies on computer networks and study their stability in the presence of network delays and packet losses. An algorithm using predictors was designed to ensure the system stability...

  9. Recovery Act: Novel Oxygen Carriers for Coal-fueled Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Cao, Yan

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) could totally negate the necessity of pure oxygen by using oxygen carriers for purification of CO{sub 2} stream during combustion. It splits the single fuel combustion reaction into two linked reactions using oxygen carriers. The two linked reactions are the oxidation of oxygen carriers in the air reactor using air, and the reduction of oxygen carriers in the fuel reactor using fuels (i.e. coal). Generally metal/metal oxides are used as oxygen carriers and operated in a cyclic mode. Chemical looping combustion significantly improves the energy conversion efficiency, in terms of the electricity generation, because it improves the reversibility of the fuel combustion process through two linked parallel processes, compared to the conventional combustion process, which is operated far away from its thermo-equilibrium. Under the current carbon-constraint environment, it has been a promising carbon capture technology in terms of fuel combustion for power generation. Its disadvantage is that it is less mature in terms of technological commercialization. In this DOE-funded project, accomplishment is made by developing a series of advanced copper-based oxygen carriers, with properties of the higher oxygen-transfer capability, a favorable thermodynamics to generate high purity of CO{sub 2}, the higher reactivity, the attrition-resistance, the thermal stability in red-ox cycles and the achievement of the auto-thermal heat balance. This will be achieved into three phases in three consecutive years. The selected oxygen carriers with final-determined formula were tested in a scaled-up 10kW coal-fueled chemical looping combustion facility. This scaled-up evaluation tests (2-day, 8-hour per day) indicated that, there was no tendency of agglomeration of copper-based oxygen carriers. Only trace-amount of coke or carbon deposits on the copper-based oxygen carriers in the fuel reactor. There was also no evidence to show the sulphidization of oxygen carriers in the system by using the high-sulfur-laden asphalt fuels. In all, the scaled-up test in 10 kW CLC facility demonstrated that the preparation method of copper-based oxygen carrier not only help to maintain its good reactivity, also largely minimize its agglomeration tendency.

  10. Viking Range: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Viking Range, LLC failed to certify cooking products as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  11. Chains with loops - synthetic magnetic fluxes and topological order in one-dimensional spin systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Grass; Christine Muschik; Alessio Celi; Ravindra Chhajlany; Maciej Lewenstein

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering topological quantum order has become a major field of physics. Many advances have been made by synthesizing gauge fields in cold atomic systems. Here, we carry over these developments to other platforms which are extremely well suited for quantum engineering, namely trapped ions and nano-trapped atoms. Since these systems are typically one-dimensional, the action of artificial magnetic fields has so far received little attention. However, exploiting the long-range nature of interactions, loops with non-vanishing magnetic fluxes become possible even in one-dimensional settings. This gives rise to intriguing phenomena, such as fractal energy spectra, flat bands with localized edge states, and topological many-body states. We elaborate on a simple scheme for generating the required artificial fluxes by periodically driving an XY spin chain. Concrete estimates demonstrating the experimental feasibility for trapped ions and atoms in waveguides are given.

  12. GoSam 2.0: a tool for automated one-loop calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johann Felix von Soden-Fraunhofen

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the version 2.0 of the program package GoSam, which is a public program package to compute one-loop QCD and/or electroweak corrections to multi-particle processes within and beyond the Standard Model. The extended version of the Binoth-Les-Houches-Accord interface to Monte Carlo programs is also implemented. This allows a large flexibility regarding the combination of the code with various Monte Carlo programs to produce fully differential NLO results, including the possibility of parton showering and hadronisation. We illustrate the wide range of applicability of the code by showing phenomenological results for multi-particle processes at NLO, both within and beyond the Standard Model.

  13. Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  14. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Edwards

    2003-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs.

  15. ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectProgramsAlterationAl.,GRCReservoir |

  16. Sandia Energy - Customer Interface Document for the Molten Salt Test Loop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatings Initiated at PNNL's SequimReactors To Receive UpinCumminsCurrentat

  17. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  18. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Possible Regulatory Role for the Histidine-Rich Loop in the Zinc Transport Protein, ZnuA. Abstract:...

  19. Geek-Up[08.27.10] -- Geothermal Stores, Graphene Loops, Nozzle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7.10 -- Geothermal Stores, Graphene Loops, Nozzle Technology and the 1918 El Nio Geek-Up08.27.10 -- Geothermal Stores, Graphene Loops, Nozzle Technology and the 1918 El Nio...

  20. High Performance Loop Filter Design for Continuous-time Sigma-delta ADC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Fan

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous-time (CT) sigma-delta (??) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are widely used in wireless transceiver. Loop filter becomes a critical component in the implementation of high resolution large bandwidth CT ?? ADC because it determines loop...

  1. Development of a Water Loop Simulation at the Texas A&M University Main Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, H.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer simulation model is an economic and convenient tool to perform analysis of chilled water loop. The primary objective of this paper is developing procedure for simulating and optimizing chilled water loop with computer simulation model. A...

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF RADIOACTIVITY IN THE REACTOR VESSEL OF THE HEAVY WATER COMPONENT TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, Dennis

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy Water Component Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility is a pressurized heavy water reactor that was used to test candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. The reactor operated at nominal power of 50 MW{sub th}. The reactor coolant loop operated at 1200 psig and 250 C. Two isolated test loop were designed into the reactor to provide special test conditions. Fig. 1 shows a cut-away view of the reactor. The two loops are contained in four inch diameter stainless steel piping. The HWCTR was operated for only a short duration, from March 1962 to December 1964 in order to test the viability of test fuel elements and other reactor components for use in a heavy water power reactor. The reactor achieved 13,882 MWd of total power while testing 36 different fuel assemblies. In the course of operation, HWCTR experienced the cladding failures of 10 separate test fuel assemblies. In each case, the cladding was breached with some release of fuel core material into the isolated test loop, causing fission product and actinide contamination in the main coolant loop and the liquid and boiling test loops. Despite the contribution of the contamination from the failed fuel, the primary source of radioactivity in the HWCTR vessel and internals is the activation products in the thermal shields, and to a lesser degree, activation products in the reactor vessel walls and liner. A detailed facility characterization report of the HWCTR facility was completed in 1996. Many of the inputs and assumptions in the 1996 characterization report were derived from the HWCTR decommissioning plan published in 1975. The current paper provides an updated assessment of the radioisotopic characteristics of the HWCTR vessel and internals to support decommissioning activities on the facility.

  3. A preliminary assessment of the effects of groundwater flow on closed-loop ground source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiasson, A.D.; Rees, S.J.; Spitler, J.D.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study has been made of the effects of groundwater flow on the heat transfer characteristics of vertical closed-loop heat exchangers and the ability of current design and in-situ thermal conductivity measurement techniques to deal with these effects. It is shown that an initial assessment of the significance of groundwater flow can be made by examining the Peclet number of the flow. A finite-element numerical groundwater flow and heat transfer model has been used to simulate the effects of groundwater flow on a single closed-loop heat exchanger in various geologic materials. These simulations show that advection of heat by groundwater flow significantly enhances heat transfer in geologic materials with high hydraulic conductivity, such as sands, gravels, and rocks exhibiting fractures and solution channels. Simulation data were also used to derive effective thermal conductivities with an in-situ thermal conductivity estimation procedure. These data were used to design borehole fields of different depths for a small commercial building. The performance of these borehole field designs was investigated by simulating each borehole field using the pre-calculated building loads over a ten-year period. Results of these simulations, in terms of the minimum and peak loop temperatures, were used to examine the ability of current design methods to produce workable and efficient designs under a range of groundwater flow conditions.

  4. Prediction of hydrodynamic properties of mixed-particle systems and theoretical analysis of loop pressure profile in a CFB unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, M.; Meikap, B.C.; Saha, R.K. [Indian Institute for Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamic behaviors of mixed system of particles were investigated in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) unit consisting of fast column (riser) with an inner diameter of 0.1016 m and a height of 5.62 m. Particle mixtures containing a Geldart group-A-like fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst with group-B-like sand and iron ore with coal were used to study the hydrodynamic features including static pressure, voidage, and loop pressure profile. The mixed system consisting of FCC catalyst and sand contained 20, 50, and 80 mass % sand, and the coal-iron ore mixture contained 80 mass % coal. The superficial air velocity ranged between 2.01 and 4.681 m/s, and the corresponding mass fluxes were 12.5-50 kg/(m{sup 2} s). A comparison of the available experimental values for static pressure profiles at different operating conditions for mixed-particle systems shows good agreement with those predicted from the single-particle systems. Using experimental data on the loop pressure balance, a simplified theoretical analysis was performed to predict the pressure profile in the CFB loop. The deviations between the two sets of values are within reasonable limits of accuracy.

  5. P a g e | 1 Why can wind delay the shedding of Loop Current eddies?1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a g e | 4 intrudes northward into the Gulf along the Campeche Bank's eastern shelfbreak, and loops44

  6. Running of $?_s$ in the MSSM with three-loop accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luminita Mihaila

    2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ from $M_Z$ to the GUT scale is presented, involving three-loop running and two-loop decoupling. Accordingly, the two-loop transition from the $\\bar{\\rm MS}$ to the $\\bar{\\rm DR}$ scheme is properly taken into account. We find that the three-loop effects are comparable to the experimental uncertainty for $\\alpha_s$.

  7. RELAP-7: Demonstrating the integration of two-phase flow components for an ideal BWR loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; David Andrs; John Peterson; Ray Berry; Richard Martineua

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is DOE Level 3 milestone report documenting RELAP-7's capability to simulate an ideal BWR loop.

  8. The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators: Convexity and Related Results Chi-Kwong Li Classification 47A12, 47A13, 47A55. Keywords Joint essential numerical range, self-adjoint operator, Hilbert the joint behavior of several operators A1, . . . , Am. One may see [1, 5, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 23, 28, 31

  9. Advanced Test Reactor Testing Experience: Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world’s premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner “lobes” to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 48" long and 5.0" diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of test sponsors -- US government, foreign governments, private researchers, and commercial companies needing neutron irradiation services. There are three basic types of test configurations in the ATR. The simplest configuration is the sealed static capsule, wherein the target material is placed in a capsule, or plate form, and the capsule is in direct contact with the primary coolant. The next level of complexity of an experiment is an instrumented lead experiment, which allows for active monitoring and control of experiment conditions during the irradiation. The highest level of complexity of experiment is the pressurized water loop experiment, in which the test sample can be subjected to the exact environment of a pressurized water reactor. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and future plans.

  10. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  11. WARM AND FUZZY: TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY ANALYSIS OF AN Fe XV EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER LOOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Rightmire, L. A.; Kimble, J. A.; Worley, B. T.; Pathak, S. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Saar, S. H., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) were designed in part to work together. They have the same spatial resolution and cover different but overlapping coronal temperature ranges. These properties make a combined data set ideal for multithermal analysis, where EIS provides the best information on the cooler corona (log T < 6.5) and XRT provides the best information on the hotter corona (log T > 6.5). Here, we analyze a warm non-flaring loop detected in images made in a strong EIS Fe XV emission line with a wavelength of 284.16 A and peak formation temperature of log T = 6.3. We perform differential emission measure (DEM) analysis in three pixels at different heights above the footpoint and find multithermal results with the bulk of the emission measure in the range 6.0 < log T < 6.6. Analysis with the EIS lines alone gave a DEM with huge amounts of emission measure at very high temperatures (log T >7.2); analysis with XRT data alone resulted in a DEM that was missing most of the cooler emission measure required to produce many of the EIS lines. Thus, both results were misleading and unphysical. It was only by combining the EIS and XRT data that we were able to produce a reasonable result, one without ad hoc assumptions on the shape and range of the DEM itself.

  12. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

  13. Closed-Loop Compensation Method for Oscillations Caused by Control Valve Stiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiandong

    Closed-Loop Compensation Method for Oscillations Caused by Control Valve Stiction Jiandong Wang-loop compensation method to remove oscillations caused by control valve stiction. With the control loop operating movements for the control valve to arrive at a desired position. A systematic way to design the parameters

  14. The Distribution of Loop Lengths in Graphical Models for Turbo Decoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Padhraic

    1 The Distribution of Loop Lengths in Graphical Models for Turbo Decoding Xianping Ge, David model for a K = 6, N = 12, rate 1=2 turbo code. Abstract| This paper analyzes the distribution of loop lengths in graphical models for turbo decoding. The prop- erties of such loops are of signi#12;cant

  15. Strain-controlled bulge test B. Erdem Alacaa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alaca, B. Erdem

    mechanical tests,6­8 creep and viscoelas- tic tests,9,10 and high-temperature testing11 were re- ported. All cover a wide spectrum ranging from 10-8 s-1 (creep testing) to 108 s-1 (hypervelocity impact testing).12Strain-controlled bulge test B. Erdem Alacaa) and K. Bugra Toga College of Engineering, Koc

  16. Noncontact atomic force microscopy simulator with phase-locked-loop controlled frequency detection and excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nony, L; Schaer, D; Pfeiffer, O; Wezel, A; Meyer, E; Nony, Laurent; Baratoff, Alexis Prof.; Schaer, Dominique; Pfeiffer, Oliver; Wezel, Adrian; Meyer, Ernst

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation of an atomic force microscope operating in the constant amplitude dynamic mode is described. The implementation mimics the electronics of a real setup including a digital phase-locked loop (PLL). The PLL is not only used as a very sensitive frequency detector, but also to generate the time-dependent phase shifted signal driving the cantilever. The optimum adjustments of individual functional blocks and their joint performance in typical experiments are determined in detail. Prior to testing the complete setup, the performances of the numerical PLL and of the amplitude controller were ascertained to be satisfactory compared to those of the real components. Attention is also focused on the issue of apparent dissipation, that is, of spurious variations in the driving amplitude caused by the nonlinear interaction occurring between the tip and the surface and by the finite response times of the various controllers. To do so, an estimate of the minimum dissipated energy that is detectable by the instru...

  17. System design and field results of closed loop guided directional drilling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calderoni, A.; Donati, F.; Ligrone, A. [AGIP S.p.A., Milan (Italy); Oppelt, J.; Ragnitz, D. [Baker Hughes INTEQ GmbH, Celle (Germany)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of automatic directional drilling tools has been introduced to the field. The development process started with an automated vertical drilling system, followed by a more generally applicable straight hole drilling device. Now a fully directional closed loop system has been established comprising a rotary steering device, a two-way communication link and an intelligent surface system. The downhole tool includes a modular electronic control and measurement system with directional and formation evaluation sensors and can operate at temperatures up to 185 C with full functionality. The paper presents system and tool design and reports about field results and experience in terms of performance, reliability, directional behavior etc. The vertical drilling system was a breakthrough in vertical drilling technology for the German deep drilling project, the straight hole drilling device has been successfully run in various oilfield applications in Europe. The fully directional system is looking forward for early field testing by the end of 1995.

  18. AVTA: 2014 Chevrolet Cruze Diesel Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  19. AVTA: 2012 Nissan Leaf All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  20. AVTA: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  1. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Data and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies through the Advanced Vehicle Testing...

  2. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  3. AVTA: 2013 Ford Focus All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  4. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

  5. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  6. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  7. Analysis of crack initiation and growth in the high level vibration test at Tadotsu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassir, M.K.; Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Shteyngart, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Level Vibration Test data are used to assess the accuracy and usefulness of current engineering methodologies for predicting crack initiation and growth in a cast stainless steel pipe elbow under complex, large amplitude loading. The data were obtained by testing at room temperature a large scale modified model of one loop of a PWR primary coolant system at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory in Japan. Fatigue crack initiation time is reasonably predicted by applying a modified local strain approach (Coffin-Mason-Goodman equation) in conjunction with Miner`s rule of cumulative damage. Three fracture mechanics methodologies are applied to investigate the crack growth behavior observed in the hot leg of the model. These are: the {Delta}K methodology (Paris law), {Delta}J concepts and a recently developed limit load stress-range criterion. The report includes a discussion on the pros and cons of the analysis involved in each of the methods, the role played by the key parameters influencing the formulation and a comparison of the results with the actual crack growth behavior observed in the vibration test program. Some conclusions and recommendations for improvement of the methodologies are also provided.

  8. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  9. On the Blue Loops of Intermediate-Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walmswell, J J; Eldridge, J J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the blue loops in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram that occur when intermediate-mass stars begin core helium burning. It has long been known that the excess of helium above the burning shell, the result of the contraction of the convective core during core hydrogen burning, has the effect of making such stars redder and larger than they would be otherwise. The outward motion of the burning shell in mass removes this excess and triggers the loop. Hitherto nobody has attempted to demonstrate why the excess helium has this effect. We consider the effect of the local opacity, which is reduced by excess helium, the shell fuel supply, which is also reduced, and the local mean molecular weight, which is increased. We demonstrate that the mean molecular weight is the decisive reddening factor. The opacity has a much smaller effect and a reduced fuel supply actually favours blueward motion.

  10. Long range transport of acid rain precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

  11. APS Long Range Schedule FY1996

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long Range Commissioning Schedule for FY1996 Date First Shift 0:00-8:00 Second Shift 8:00-16:00 Third Shift 16:00-24:00 31596 SR Studies 1-ID-A Shielding Verification SR Studies...

  12. Descriptions of Range and Pasture Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby; Welch, Tommy G.

    2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of common range and pasture plants are listed in this publication. The common and scientific name of each species are given, along with the species' value as a grazing plant for wildlife and livestock....

  13. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

    2009-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

  14. Systematic ranging and late warning asteroid impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnocchia, D; Micheli, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe systematic ranging, an orbit determination technique especially suitable to assess the near-term Earth impact hazard posed by newly discovered asteroids. For these late warning cases, the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps a few hours or even less, which leads to severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. The systematic ranging approach gets around these degeneracies by performing a raster scan in the poorly-constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane of sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, we obtain a probability distribution in the orbital space and then estimate the probability of an Earth impact. We show how this technique is effective for a number of examples, including 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, the only tw...

  15. COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehan, Anne F.

    COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado, seismic, seismicity, crust, fault, hazard ABSTRACT Construction of seismic hazard and risk maps depends upon carefully constrained input parameters including background seismicity, seismic attenuation

  16. Long range interactions in nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajter, Richard F.

    Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

  17. Programmable near-infrared ranging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

  18. Heliostat System with Wireless Closed-Loop Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet summarizes a SunShot Initiative project led by Thermata to develop and demonstrate the first practical heliostat to use closed-loop tracking that can optically sense and control the reflected sunlight beam at the target. The expected benefits of this system include the reduction in the total installed cost of the heliostat field in a power tower concentrating solar power project.

  19. Longitudinal magnetohydrodynamics oscillations in dissipative, cooling coronal loops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ghafri, K. S.; Ruderman, M. S.; Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R., E-mail: app08ksa@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: m.s.ruderman@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: app09aw@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the effect of cooling on standing slow magnetosonic waves in coronal magnetic loops. The damping mechanism taken into account is thermal conduction that is a viable candidate for dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves in coronal loops. In contrast to earlier studies, here we assume that the characteristic damping time due to thermal conduction is not small, but arbitrary, and can be of the order of the oscillation period, i.e., a temporally varying plasma is considered. The approximation of low-beta plasma enables us to neglect the magnetic field perturbation when studying longitudinal waves and consider, instead, a one-dimensional motion that allows a reliable first insight into the problem. The background plasma temperature is assumed to be decaying exponentially with time, with the characteristic cooling timescale much larger than the oscillation period. This assumption enables us to use the WKB method to study the evolution of the oscillation amplitude analytically. Using this method we obtain the equation governing the oscillation amplitude. The analytical expressions determining the wave properties are evaluated numerically to investigate the evolution of the oscillation frequency and amplitude with time. The results show that the oscillation period increases with time due to the effect of plasma cooling. The plasma cooling also amplifies the amplitude of oscillations in relatively cool coronal loops, whereas, for very hot coronal loop oscillations the damping rate is enhanced by the cooling. We find that the critical point for which the amplification becomes dominant over the damping is in the region of 4 MK. These theoretical results may serve as impetus for developing the tools of solar magneto-seismology in dynamic plasmas.

  20. "Closed-loop" analysis of a thermo-charged capacitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germano D'Abramo

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, an explicit application of conservation of energy and zero net work principle around a closed path ("closed-loop" analysis) is carried out on a thermo-charged capacitor at equilibrium with ambient heat at uniform temperature. This analysis corroborates the results of previous studies [Phys.Lett.A 374 (2010) 1801, Physica A 390 (2011) 481] that a potential drop $\\Delta V$ does actually occur at capacitor terminals.

  1. Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    North, William Edward (Winter Springs, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

  2. A Cluster Bootstrap for Two-Loop MHV Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Golden; Marcus Spradlin

    2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a bootstrap procedure to two-loop MHV amplitudes in planar N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory. We argue that the mathematically most complicated part (the $\\Lambda^2 B_2$ coproduct component) of the n-particle amplitude is uniquely determined by a simple cluster algebra property together with a few physical constraints (dihedral symmetry, analytic structure, supersymmetry, and well-defined collinear limits). We present a concise, closed-form expression which manifests these properties for all n.

  3. Effect of steam generator configuration in a loss of the RHR during mid-loop operation at PKL facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villanueva, J. F.; Carlos, S.; Martorell, S.; Sanchez, F. [Dpto. Ingenieria Quimica Y Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The loss of the residual heat removal system in mid-loop conditions may occur with a non-negligible contribution to the plant risk, so the analysis of the accidental sequences and the actions to mitigate the accident are of great interest in shutdown conditions. In order to plan the appropriate measures to mitigate the accident is necessary to understand the thermal-hydraulic processes following the loss of the residual heat removal system during shutdown. Thus, transients of this kind have been simulated using best-estimate codes in different integral test facilities and compared with experimental data obtained in different facilities. In PKL (Primaerkreislauf-Versuchsanlage, primary coolant loop test facility) test facility different series of experiments have been undertaken to analyze the plant response in shutdown. In this context, the E3 and F2 series consist of analyzing the loss of the residual heat removal system with a reduced inventory in the primary system. In particular, the experiments were developed to investigate the influence of the steam generators secondary side configuration on the plant response, what involves the consideration of different number of steam generators filled with water and ready for activation, on the heat transfer mechanisms inside the steam generators U-tubes. This work presents the results of such experiments calculated using, RELAP5/Mod 3.3. (authors)

  4. Visualisations of coherent centre domains in local Polyakov loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finn M. Stokes; Waseem Kamleh; Derek B. Leinweber

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Chromodynamics exhibits a hadronic confined phase at low to moderate temperatures and, at a critical temperature $T_C$, undergoes a transition to a deconfined phase known as the quark-gluon plasma. The nature of this deconfinement phase transition is probed through visualizations of the Polyakov loop, a gauge independent order parameter. We produce visualizations that provide novel insights into the structure and evolution of center clusters. Using the HMC algorithm the percolation during the deconfinement transition is observed. Using 3D rendering of the phase and magnitude of the Polyakov loop, the fractal structure and correlations are examined. The evolution of the center clusters as the gauge fields thermalize from below the critical temperature to above it are also exposed. We observe deconfinement proceeding through a competition for the dominance of a particular center phase. We use stout-link smearing to remove small-scale noise in order to observe the large-scale evolution of the center clusters. A correlation between the magnitude of the Polyakov loop and the proximity of its phase to one of the center phases of SU(3) is evident in the visualizations.

  5. Asymmetric Ejecta Distribution of the Cygnus Loop revealed with Suzaku

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Katsuda; H. Tsunemi; E. Miyata; K. Mori; M. Namiki; N. Nemes; E. D. Miller

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed a linearly sliced area of the Cygnus Loop from the north-east to the south-west with Suzaku in seven pointings. After dividing the entire fields of view (FOV) into 119 cells, we extracted spectra from all of the cells and performed spectral analysis for them. We then applied both one- and two-component non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) models for all of the spectra, finding that almost all were significantly better fitted by the two-component NEI model rather than the one-component NEI model. Judging from the abundances, the high-kT_e component must be the ejecta component, while the low-kT_e component comes from the swept-up matter. Therefore, the ejecta turn out to be distributed inside a large area (at least our FOV) of the Cygnus Loop. We divided the entire FOV into northern and southern parts, and found that the ejecta distributions were asymmetric to the geometric center: the ejecta of Si, S, and Fe seem to be distributed more in the south than in the north of the Cygnus Loop by a factor of about 2. The degree of ejecta-asymmetry is consistent with that expected by recent supernova explosion models.

  6. Asymmetric Ejecta Distribution of the Cygnus Loop revealed with Suzaku

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsuda, S; Miyata, E; Mori, K; Namiki, M; Nemes, N; Miller, E D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed a linearly sliced area of the Cygnus Loop from the north-east to the south-west with Suzaku in seven pointings. After dividing the entire fields of view (FOV) into 119 cells, we extracted spectra from all of the cells and performed spectral analysis for them. We then applied both one- and two-component non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) models for all of the spectra, finding that almost all were significantly better fitted by the two-component NEI model rather than the one-component NEI model. Judging from the abundances, the high-kT_e component must be the ejecta component, while the low-kT_e component comes from the swept-up matter. Therefore, the ejecta turn out to be distributed inside a large area (at least our FOV) of the Cygnus Loop. We divided the entire FOV into northern and southern parts, and found that the ejecta distributions were asymmetric to the geometric center: the ejecta of Si, S, and Fe seem to be distributed more in the south than in the north of the Cygnus Loop by a factor of a...

  7. Soft X-ray emission in flaring coronal loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto, R F; Brun, A S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy which can be released impulsively and account for the heating of the plasma in flares. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes using a series of MHD simulations. We deduce emission diagnostics and their temporal evolution and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to observations. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, compute the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) and deduce the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. During the initial phase of the instability plasma heating is mostly ...

  8. Heating and Dynamics of Two Flare Loop Systems Observed by AIA and EIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y; Ding, M D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate heating and evolution of flare loops in a C4.7 two-ribbon flare on 2011 February 13. From SDO/AIA imaging observations, we can identify two sets of loops. Hinode/EIS spectroscopic observations reveal blueshifts at the feet of both sets of loops. The evolution and dynamics of the two sets are quite different. The first set of loops exhibits blueshifts for about 25 minutes followed by redshifts, while the second set shows stronger blueshifts, which are maintained for about one hour. The UV 1600 observation by AIA also shows that the feet of the second set of loops brighten twice. These suggest that continuous heating may be present in the second set of loops. We use spatially resolved UV light curves to infer heating rates in the few tens of individual loops comprising the two loop systems. With these heating rates, we then compute plasma evolution in these loops with the "enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops" (EBTEL) model. The results show that, for the first set of loops, the synthetic EU...

  9. Status Update and Closed-Loop Performance of the Magellan Adaptive Optics VisAO Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopon, Derek; Males, Jared; Gasho, Victor; Morzinski, Katie; Follette, Katherine

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present laboratory results of the closed-loop performance of the Magellan Adaptive Optics (AO) Adaptive Secondary Mirror (ASM), pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS), and VisAO visible adaptive optics camera. The Magellan AO system is a 585-actuator low-emissivity high-throughput system scheduled for first light on the 6.5 meter Magellan Clay telescope in November 2012. Using a dichroic beamsplitter near the telescope focal plane, the AO system will be able to simultaneously perform visible (500-1000 nm) AO science with our VisAO camera and either 10 micron or 3-5 micron science using either the BLINC/MIRAC4 or CLIO cameras, respectively. The ASM, PWS, and VisAO camera have undergone final system tests in the solar test tower at the Arcetri Institute in Florence, Italy, reaching Strehls of 37% in i'-band with 400 modes and simulated turbulence of 14 cm ro at v-band. We present images and test results of the assembled VisAO system, which includes our prototype advanced Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector (ADC), prot...

  10. Automated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    carrying out a proof of operation. In large modern buildings, the energy management and control system to exercise systems while under closed-loop control. The test signals are in the form of setpoint changesAutomated Testing of HVAC Systems for Commissioning Tim Salsbury and Rick Diamond Lawrence Berkeley

  11. CST Melter Feed Characterization in Support of the 1999 and 2000 Thermal Fluids Lab Hydragard Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.C.

    2001-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Immobilization Technology Section measured properties of the melter feed simulants used in the 1999 and 2000 Hydragard sample loop tests. These tests used simulated Sludge Batch 1B (Macrobatch 2) melter feeds. The melter feeds were characterized for wt. percent total and insoluble solids, pH, composition, particle size distribution, and rheology.

  12. Range Con: a management evaluation system for assessing sucess of selected range improvement practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekblad, Steven Linn

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategic resource management plans. Individual management skills and managerial environment have not been considered when predicting biological and economic response of range management practices. Risk for individual managers adopting unsuited... APPENDIX Prototype Range Management Skills Survey. Range Management Skills Survey Survey Data Tables. Validation Figures. VITA 64 65 74 92 104 106 1X LIST OP FIGURES FIGURE Page 1. The Range Con expert system in relation to the Resource...

  13. Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

  14. Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

  15. Lunar Laser Ranging, Gravitomagnetism and Frame-Dragging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignazio Ciufolini

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past century Einstein's theory of General Relativity gave rise to an experimental triumph, however, there are still aspects of this theory to be measured or more accurately tested. One of the main challenges in experimental gravitation, together with the direct detection of gravitational waves, is today the accurate measurement of the gravitomagnetic field generated by the angular momentum of a body. Here, after a description of frame-dragging and gravitomagnetism and of the main experiments to detect these relativistic phenomena, we show that the fundamental tests of General Relativity performed by Lunar Laser Ranging do not, however, include a measurement of the intrinsic gravitomagnetic field generated by the angular momentum of a body.

  16. Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range the construction of the actual antenna circuit took place, a number of tests were performed to develop of various techniques. Following these tests, a prototype antenna circuit was constructed and measurements

  17. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  18. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  19. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Hu, Anzi; Wall, Michael L; Foss-Feig, Michael; Gorshkov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  20. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  1. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Suárez, O L Ramírez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  2. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  3. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe-Xuan Gong; Mohammad F. Maghrebi; Anzi Hu; Michael L. Wall; Michael Foss-Feig; Alexey V. Gorshkov

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  4. Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

  5. AVTA: 2010 Mercedes Benz HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Mercedes Benz hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  6. AVTA: 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  7. AVTA: 2011 Honda CRZ HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Honda CRZ hybrid electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  8. AVTA: 2011 Chevrolet Volt Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a Chevrolet Volt 2011. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  9. A two length scale polymer theory for RNA loop free energies and helix stacking Daniel P. Aalberts and Nagarajan Nandagopal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    A two length scale polymer theory for RNA loop free energies and helix stacking Daniel P. Aalberts). The reliability of RNA secondary structure predictions is subject to the accuracy of the underly- ing free energy formulation of loop free energies, particularly for multibranch loops. RNA loops contain single

  10. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Range Creek Calibrated Dates Beta-202190

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Range Creek Calibrated Dates 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Beta-202190 Beta-175753 Beta-175755 Beta-235067 Beta-202189 Beta-214831 Beta-202188 Beta-202191 Beta-203630 Beta-214832 Beta-175754 Beta a Carbon-14 calibrated date (95% CI) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. (Figure 5: Beta-235067). The calibrated

  12. 6, 1018310216, 2006 Long-range transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 10183­10216, 2006 Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin and air pollutants to Taiwan: observed evidence and model simulation C.-Y. Lin 1 , Z. Wang 2 , W.-N. Chen and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  13. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, H.; Valenzuela, J.A.; Nutt, W.E.

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof. 6 figures.

  14. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, Herbert (Norwich, VT); Valenzuela, Javier A. (Grantham, NH); Nutt, William E. (Enfield, NH)

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof.

  15. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna (10), so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive (24) and transmit cavities (22) by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling.

  16. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling. 25 figs.

  17. Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Machinery C T C T EET 365W Electrical Power & Machinery Laboratory C C, V V C C, V V EET 370T EnergyElectrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE Course Number and Name Fall 2010 Spr 2011 Sum 2011 Fall 2011 Spr 2012 Sum 2012 Fall 2012 Spr 2013 Sum 2013 Fall 2013 Spr 2014 Sum 2014 EET

  18. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  19. Gluon Fusion Processes at One-loop within the Standard Model and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambresh Shivaji

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we have studied certain gluon fusion processes which proceed via quark loop diagrams at the leading order. The fact that these gluon-gluon channel processes are independent processes, their contributions towards the total/differential hadronic cross sections can be calculated separately. We have considered the production of a pair of electroweak vector bosons in association with a jet via gluon fusion within the standard model. These processes were not accessible at earlier hadron colliders such as the Tevatron. Therefore, observation of these rare processes at the LHC will be a test of the standard model itself. Like the di-vector boson production via gluon fusion processes, these processes are also important backgrounds for many new physics signals, and the standard model Higgs boson signal at the LHC. These leading order gluon fusion processes contribute to the corresponding hadronic processes at the next-to-next-to-leading order in {\\alpha}_s. We have taken a model of extra-dimensions, the ADD (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali) model, as the possible candidate of new physics at the LHC. This model tries to solve the hierarchy problem of the standard model by proposing large extra space dimensions which may be accessible at TeV scale. We have considered the direct production of KK-gravitons (GKK) in association with an electroweak boson (H/{\\gamma}/Z) via gluon fusion. These processes contribute to the corresponding hadronic processes at the next-to-leading order in {\\alpha}_s. Many interesting issues related to the fermion loop amplitudes have also been discussed.

  20. Integrated testing of the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cooler and the iris LCCE electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Rodriguez, Jose I.; Carroll, Brian A. [The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bustamante, John G. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Kirkconnell, Carl S.; Luong, Thomas T.; Murphy, J. B.; Haley, Michael F. [Iris Technology, Irvine, CA 92616 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has identified the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cryocooler as a candidate low cost cryocooler to provide active cooling on future cost-capped scientific missions. The commercially available cooler can provide refrigeration in excess of 2 W at 100K for 60W of power. JPL purchased the LPT9510 cooler for thermal and dynamic performance characterization, and has initiated the flight qualification of the existing cooler design to satisfy near-term JPL needs for this cooler. The LPT9510 has been thermally tested over the heat reject temperature range of 0C to +40C during characterization testing. The cooler was placed on a force dynamometer to measure the selfgenerated vibration of the cooler. Iris Technology has provided JPL with a brass board version of the Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics (LCCE) to drive the Thales cooler during characterization testing. The LCCE provides precision closed-loop temperature control and embodies extensive protection circuitry for handling and operational robustness; other features such as exported vibration mitigation and low frequency input current filtering are envisioned as options that future flight versions may or may not include based upon the mission requirements. JPL has also chosen to partner with Iris Technology for the development of electronics suitable for future flight applications. Iris Technology is building a set of radiation-hard, flight-design electronics to deliver to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Test results of the thermal, dynamic and EMC testing of the integrated Thales LPT9510 cooler and Iris LCCE electronics is presented here.

  1. Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. First quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available,

    1980-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is Phase I of a multi-phased program for the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Phase I comprises the conceptual design and associated cost estimates of a stationary Stirling engine capable of being fueled by a variety of heat sources, with emphasis on coal firing, followed by the preparation of a plan for implementing the design, fabrication and testing of a demonstration engine by 1985. The main effort in Phase I is the generation of state-of-the-art conceptual designs having greatest potential for prototype testing in 1985. The conceptual designs include a heat transport system for integrating the engine heater head with such energy sources as conventional oil/gas combustors, fluidized bed and other coal combustors, and combustors using coal-derived liquid fuels, and low/medium BTU gases. The heat transport systems being investigated include forced convection with gases or liquids, heat pipes, and direct firing. Currently, the leading choice for the solid fuel combustion system is the atmospheric fluidized bed, with low BTU gasification still a viable alternative. Both systems will continue to be evaluated further, but with greater emphasis on FBC. To date, there appears no clear choice among the heat pipe, forced convection gas loop, or direct firing as the prime candidate for the heat transport sub-system. Conceptual design and analysis will continue on all three sub-systems. Scale-up of United Stirling's P-75 engine to serve as the conceptual design of the 500 HP engine module is continuing. (LCL)

  2. Optical bistability in nonlinear system with two loops of feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George P. Miroshnichenko; Alexander I. Trifanov

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of nonlinear optical system surrounded by two loops of feedback is investigated. The cell with the vapor of rubidium - type atoms is taken in the capacity of nonlinear element. Two modes of near-resonant electromagnetic field interacting with the cell are involved in the feedback. Two-dimensional optical bistability domain in location of input field intensities is obtained and dependence of its form and magnitude from the system parameters (photon detunings, feedback factor etc.) is investigated. "Input - output" relations corresponding to different trajectories in the bistability domain are obtained. Cross-hysteresis is studied.

  3. "Closed-loop" analysis of a thermo-charged capacitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germano D'Abramo

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, an explicit application of conservation of energy and zero net work principle around a closed path ("closed-loop" analysis) is carried out on a thermo-charged capacitor at equilibrium with ambient heat at uniform temperature. This analysis corroborates the results of previous studies [Phys.Lett.A 374 (2010) 1801, Physica A 390 (2011) 481] that a potential drop $\\Delta V$ does actually occur at capacitor terminals. Finally, a conventional photoelectric emission experiment is proposed to indirectly text thermo-charged capacitor functioning.

  4. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, D.J.; Briesch, M.S.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts. 1 fig.

  5. Numerical investigation of closed-loop control for Hall accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barral, S.; Miedzik, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 01497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low frequency discharge current oscillations in Hall accelerators are conventionally damped with external inductor-capacitor (LC) or resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) networks. The role of such network in the stabilization of the plasma discharge is investigated with a numerical model and the potential advantages of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) closed-loop control over RLC networks are subsequently assessed using either discharge voltage or magnetic field modulation. Simulations confirm the reduction of current oscillations in the presence of a RLC network, but suggest that PID control could ensure nearly oscillation-free operation with little sensitivity toward the PID settings.

  6. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, David John (North Canton, OH); Briesch, Michael Scot (Orlando, FL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts.

  7. Loop Quantum Theory Applied to Biology and Nonlinear Whole Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The loop quantum theory, which constitutes a very small discontinuous space, as new method is applied to biology. The model of protein folding and lungs is proposed. In the model, some known results are used, and four approximate conclusions are obtained: their structures are quantized, their space regions are finite, various singularities correspond to folding and crossed points, and different types of catastrophe exist. Further, based on the inseparability and correlativity of the biological systems, the nonlinear whole biology is proposed, and four basic hypotheses are formed. It may unify reductionism and holism, structuralism and functionalism. Finally, the medical meaning of the theory is discussed briefly.

  8. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Blue Springs, MO)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  9. Study of a third order phase-lock loop 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jack Masters

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'aboratory sys- tem. 43 18 Final diagram of loop filter used in the laboratory system. 43 Vi Figure No. Page B ? 1 Ana1og computer response to step change in frequency of 0. 5 radians/second. 55 Nonlinear system response to a step change in input... phase of 1. 0 radians. 0 ? 2 Nonlinear system response to a step change in input phase of 0. 5 radians. 58 LIST OF TABLES Table Number I NUMERICAL COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR SYSTEM RESPONSE TO A STEP CHANGE IN INPUT PHASE OF 1. 0 RADIANS...

  10. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, P., E-mail: Pavel.Evtushenko@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  11. Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Larry Young

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

  12. Soil Remediation Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

  13. Spectral indices of Galactic radio loops between 1420, 820 and 408 MHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Borka

    2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the average brightness temperatures and surface brightnesses at 1420, 820 and 408 MHz of the six main Galactic radio-continuum loops are derived, as are their radio spectral indices. The temperatures and surface brightnesses of the radio loops are computed using data taken from radio continuum surveys at 1420, 820 and 408 MHz. We have demonstrated the reality of Loops V and VI and present diagrams of their spectra for the first time. We derived the radio spectral indices of Galactic radio loops from radio surveys at three frequencies (1420, 820 and 408 MHz) and confirm them to be non-thermal sources. Diameters and distances of Loops I-VI were also calculated. The results obtained are in good agreement with current theories of supernova remnant (SNR) evolution and suggest that radio loops may have a SNR origin.

  14. Fusion rules and macroscopic loops from discretized approach to two-dimensional gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Anazawa

    1997-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the multi-loop correlators and the multi-point functions for all of the scaling operators in unitary minimal conformal models coupled to two-dimensional gravity from the two-matrix model. We show that simple fusion rules for these scaling operators exist, and these are summarized in a compact form as fusion rules for loops. We clarify the role of the boundary operators and discuss its connection to how loops touch each other. We derive a general formula for the n-resolvent correlators, and point out the structure similar to the crossing symmetry of underlying conformal field theory. We discuss the connection of the boundary conditions of the loop correlators to the touching of loops for the case of the four-loop correlators.

  15. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  16. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as 12C(e,e'p)11B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to directly observe these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3 < xB < 0.7 deep inelastic scattering ratios.

  17. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23601 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as {sup 12}C(e,e'p){sup 11}B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to isolate the signal from these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3

  18. Intermediate Range Order and Transport Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    Simulation Study February 7, 2005 Patrick Pfleiderer ICP, University of Stuttgart in Collaboration: 2 2 21 ),...,,( dt d mV i iNii r rrrF =-= t m ttt ttt t m t ttttt i ii ii i i iii 2 )()( )()( 2-range and responsible for covalent character · obtained from ab initio calculations · time step: 1.6fs 6 2 r C eA r eqq

  19. What Range Herbivores Eat -- and Why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Forbes, T. D. A.; Machen, Richard V.

    1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    systems that have the chemicals need- ed to digest it. Cellulose is digested by fermenta- tion. Fermentation requires time and a con- ducive environment in the digestive system *Assistant Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor... fermentation can take place. Some monogastrics (like horses, rabbits) have either an enlarged stomach or areas in the large intestine and/or cecum where fermentation can take place. Monogastrics with an enlarged stomach (like the hippopotamus) are called...

  20. Causality and the effective range expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -W. Hammer; Dean Lee

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the generalization of Wigner's causality bounds and Bethe's integral formula for the effective range parameter to arbitrary dimension and arbitrary angular momentum. We also discuss the impact of these constraints on the separation of low- and high-momentum scales and universality in low-energy scattering. Some of our results were summarized earlier in a letter publication. In this work, we present full derivations and several detailed examples.