Sample records for look-ahead driver feedback

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Look-Ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Eaton at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about look-ahead driver feedback and...

  2. Look-Ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  3. Look-ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001Long-Term Storage of Cesium and

  4. The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology A Look Ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    The Navy's Program in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology ­ A Look Ahead Robert Kavetsky Office of Naval anticipated in the early 1980s the possible opportunities nanoscience and nanotechnology might bring leadership in the arenas of nanoscience and nanotechnology through its coordination and collaboration

  5. Use of look-ahead modeling in pipeline operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, B.; O`Leary, C.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Amoco Canada Petroleum Company, Ltd. operates the Cochin pipeline system. Cochin pumps batched liquid ethane, propane, ethylene, butane, and NGL. Operating and scheduling this pipeline is very complex. There are safety considerations, especially for ethylene, which cannot be allowed to drop below vapor pressure. Amoco Canada needs to know where batches are in the line, what pressure profiles will look like into the future, and when batches arrive at various locations along the line. In addition to traditional instrumentation and SCADA, Amoco Canada uses modeling software to help monitor and operate the Cochin pipeline. Two important components of the modeling system are the Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) and Predictive Model (PM) modules. These modules perform look ahead modeling to assist in operating the Cochin pipeline. The modeling software was first installed for the Cochin system in February of 1994, and was commissioned on August 1, 1994. This paper will discuss how the look ahead modules are used for the Cochin pipeline.

  6. Hello, everyone. Looking ahead to Exam 2, I wanted to provide the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devilyna L Nichols

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hello, everyone. Looking ahead to Exam 2, I wanted to provide the following information and clarifications. EXAM INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS: Exam 2 ...

  7. Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  8. Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems with Variable Resources Electric Energy System #12;#12;Quantifying Benefits of Demand Response and Look-ahead Dispatch in Systems benefits correspond to a real-world power system, as we use actual data on demand-response and wind

  9. (Smart) Look-Ahead Arc Consistency and the Pursuit of CSP Tractability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalmau, Victor

    (Smart) Look-Ahead Arc Consistency and the Pursuit of CSP Tractability Hubie Chen 1 and V#19. The constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) can be formu- lated as the problem of deciding, given a pair (A; B) of relational struc- tures, whether or not there is a homomorphism from A to B. Although the CSP is in general

  10. Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities through Intelligent Driver Feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driving style changes, e.g., improving driver efficiency and motivating driver behavior changes, could deliver significant petroleum savings. This project examines eliminating stop-and-go driving and unnecessary idling, and also adjusting acceleration rates and cruising speeds to ideal levels to quantify fuel savings. Such extreme adjustments can result in dramatic fuel savings of over 30%, but would in reality only be achievable through automated control of vehicles and traffic flow. In real-world driving, efficient driving behaviors could reduce fuel use by 20% on aggressively driven cycles and by 5-10% on more moderately driven trips. A literature survey was conducted of driver behavior influences, and pertinent factors from on-road experiments with different driving styles were observed. This effort highlighted important driver influences such as surrounding vehicle behavior, anxiety over trying to get somewhere quickly, and the power/torque available from the vehicle. Existing feedback approaches often deliver efficiency information and instruction. Three recommendations for maximizing fuel savings from potential drive cycle improvement are: (1) leveraging applications with enhanced incentives, (2) using an approach that is easy and widely deployable to motivate drivers, and (3) utilizing connected vehicle and automation technologies to achieve large and widespread efficiency improvements.

  11. Final Report on the Fuel Saving Effectiveness of Various Driver Feedback Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report quantifies the fuel-savings opportunities from specific driving behavior changes, identifies factors that influence drivers' receptiveness to adopting fuel-saving behaviors, and assesses various driver feedback approaches.

  12. Fermilab | Tevatron | Looking Ahead

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000Technology |TheoryTufteTake Five

  13. MAGNET DIVISION: A LOOK AHEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ;SAFETY: 1279 DAYS = 3.5 YEARS WITHOUT A LOST TIME ACCIDENT CONGRATULATIONS KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK #12; went well. 4 #12;Nuclear Physics Addition of $50M to DOE Nuclear Physics budget Year-long process to develop a Long Range Plan for Nuclear Physics has recently started C-AD's development of an affordable

  14. Help us to manage Welsh Assembly Government Woodlands Feedback form for horse riders/carriage drivers to report problems on designated routes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /carriage drivers to report problems on designated routes, purpose built car parks or facilities in Welsh Assembly

  15. Better Plants Look Ahead Webinar: Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Plants Program hosted a webinar on January 22, 2015 to review accomplishments to date and detail new initiatives to save partners energy and water. Question and answer session is included. Download presentation slides.

  16. Better Plants 2015 Look Ahead Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergy BetterApril|DepartmentHomes,

  17. A Look Ahead at Demand Response in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Robert B.; Henderson, Michael I.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the demand response programs developed and in operation in New England, and the revised designs for participation in the forward capacity market. This description will include how energy efficiency, demand-side resources, and distributed generation are eligible to participate in this new forward capacity market. The paper will also discuss various methods that can be used to configure and communicate with demand response resources and important concerns in specifying interfaces that accommodate multiple technologies and allow technology choice and evolution.

  18. Letter Report: Looking Ahead at Nuclear Fuel Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Stephen Herring

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of nuclear energy and its ability to fulfill part of the world’s energy needs for centuries to come depend on a reliable input of nuclear fuel, either thorium or uranium. Obviously, the present nuclear fuel cycle is completely dependent on uranium. Future thorium cycles will also depend on 235U or fissile isotopes separated from used fuel to breed 232Th into fissile 233U. This letter report discusses several emerging areas of scientific understanding and technology development that will clarify and enable assured supplies of uranium and thorium well into the future. At the most fundamental level, the nuclear energy community needs to appreciate the origins of uranium and thorium and the processes of planetary accretion by which those materials have coalesced to form the earth and other planets. Secondly, the studies of geophysics and geochemistry are increasing understanding of the processes by which uranium and thorium are concentrated in various locations in the earth’s crust. Thirdly, the study of neutrinos and particularly geoneutrinos (neutrinos emitted by radioactive materials within the earth) has given an indication of the overall global inventories of uranium and thorium, though little indication for those materials’ locations. Crustal temperature measurements have also given hints of the vertical distribution of radioactive heat sources, primarily 238U and 232Th, within the continental crust. Finally, the evolving technologies for laser isotope separation are indicating methods for reducing the energy input to uranium enrichment but also for tailoring the isotopic vectors of fuels, burnable poisons and structural materials, thereby adding another tool for dealing with long-term waste management.

  19. Better Buildings, Better Plants Look Ahead - January 22, 2015 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergy BetterApril|Department ofBetterof

  20. Better Plants Look Ahead Webinar: Presentation Slides | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsBSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfBetter Buildings ResidentialBetterEnergy

  1. Better Buildings, Better Plants Overview and Look Ahead | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment1, 2011

  2. Driver eye height measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Anthony Daniel

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRIVER EYF HEIGHT MFASHRFMENT A Thesis by ANTHONY DANIEL ABRAHAMSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Hniversity in partial fulfillment oi the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subje"t: Civil... Engineering DRIVER EYE HEIGHT MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ANTHONY DANIEL ABRAHAMSON Approved as to style and content by: I (C irman of Committee) (Member) (Memb er ) Head of Department) December 1978 ABSTRACT Driver. Eye Height Neasurement. (December...

  3. driver.asm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Disassembly of file :DRIVER.COM ; ; Define common ASCII control codes. ; HT EQU 9 LF EQU 10 FF EQU 12 CR EQU 13 EOF EQU 26 ; ; Define ...

  4. Vehicle Management Driver Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Vehicle Management and Driver Safety Program Manual Facilities & Operations / Finance & Administration Version 2 April 2012 #12;© 2012 University of Alberta. #12;The Vehicle Management and Driver of employment. Driver Acknowledgement I have received the University of Alberta, Vehicle Management and Driver

  5. DRIVER RECORD CHECK REQUEST FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    DRIVER RECORD CHECK REQUEST FORM This form must be submitted to the Sport Clubs Office at least TWO weeks prior to your club's departure and serves as a request for permission to become an approved driver, please email us at sportclb@umn.edu or call 612-625-6017. Driver Information *Enter the following

  6. Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data - Cleansed data freely available for download - Controlled access to detailed spatial data * User application process * Software tools available through secure web...

  7. Analyzing Fuel Saving Opportunities through Driver Feedback Mechanisms |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis ofDepartment of Energy

  8. Buffer insertion in large circuits using look-ahead and back-off techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waghmode, Mandar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Buffer insertion is an essential technique for reducing interconnect delay in submicron circuits. Though it is a well researched area, there is a need for robust and effective algorithms to perform buffer insertion at the circuit level. This thesis...

  9. Workgroup #1 Measuring What Matters --Looking ahead, what data must we have to succeed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are needed to forecast future energy demand, which in turn drives the need for new resources, one of which, the region may miss market trends that drive new load growth. Without accurate data, the promise of energy issues that are unique to their business. · Energy Data versus Electric Energy Data. Given the multi

  10. Looking Ahead - Biofuels, H2, & Vehicles: 21st Industry Growth Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation on the future of biofuels, hydrogen, and hybrid vehicles was presented at NREL's 21st Industry Growth Forum in Denver, Colorado, on October 28, 2008.

  11. 2003 Water Year Wrap2003 Water Year Wrap--UpUp and Look Aheadand Look Ahead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doesken Colorado Climate CenterColorado Climate Center Prepared byPrepared by OdieOdie BlissBliss http Departurefromaverage,degreeF Eastern Plains Foothills Mountains Western Valleys #12;Fort Collins Summer Temperatures (JuneFort Collins Summer Temperatures (June ­­ August)August) Fort Collins Summer Average Temperature

  12. Materials from 2014 SunShot Summit Breakout Session: Looking Ahead: PV

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 Master EM Project Definition RatingHCCI EnginesSOFT COSTS

  13. ENERGETIC SYSTEMS AND NANOTECHNOLOGY -A LOOK AHEAD Robert Kavetsky*, Davinder Anand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    the development time for new systems, including those with energetic materials, to be deployed into the fleet. 1-looking vision for the application of new and advanced energetic materials for Naval applications. The Navy has. In the 1990s, 12 new energetic materials developed by the Navy were transitioned into 43 weapons systems

  14. Energy Education: A Glance Back and a Look Ahead | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombined Heat & PowerEnergy Blog Energy BlogDeployment |Education

  15. Breakout Session: A Look Ahead: PV Manufacturing in 10 Years | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchTheMarketing,Energy andNews and updatesStudy | DepartmentBradysExistingof

  16. BPA Turns 75: A Look Back and a Look Ahead | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t iBudget2/4/139/4/2012BPABPA Turns 75: A

  17. Approaches to enhance driver situational assessment aids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collision warning systems encounter a fundamental trade-off between providing the driver more time in which to respond and alerting the driver unnecessarily. The probability that a driver successfully avoids a hazard ...

  18. Corrective Feedback and Teacher Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Rod

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types of corrective feedback on ESL student writing. Journaland implicit negative feedback: An empirical study of theof written corrective feedback types. English Language

  19. Visualization Drivers for Geant4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andy Beretvas

    2008-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is on Geant4 visualization tools (drivers), evaluating pros and cons of each option, including recommendations on which tools to support at Fermilab for different applications{\\cite{Daniel}}. Four visualization drivers are evaluated. They are OpenGL, HepRep, DAWN and VRML. They all have good features, OpenGL provides graphic output with out an intermediate file! HepRep provides menus to assist the user. DAWN provides high quality plots and even for large files produces output quickly. VRML uses the smallest disk space for intermediate files. Large experiments at Fermilab will want to write their own display. They should proceed to make this display graphics independent. Medium experiment will probably want to use HepRep because of it's menu support. Smaller scale experiments will want to use OpenGL in the spirit of having immediate response, good quality output and keeping things simple.

  20. Visualization drivers for Geant4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beretvas, Andy; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is on Geant4 visualization tools (drivers), evaluating pros and cons of each option, including recommendations on which tools to support at Fermilab for different applications. Four visualization drivers are evaluated. They are OpenGL, HepRep, DAWN and VRML. They all have good features, OpenGL provides graphic output without an intermediate file. HepRep provides menus to assist the user. DAWN provides high quality plots and even for large files produces output quickly. VRML uses the smallest disk space for intermediate files. Large experiments at Fermilab will want to write their own display. They should proceed to make this display graphics independent. Medium experiment will probably want to use HepRep because of it's menu support. Smaller scale experiments will want to use OpenGL in the spirit of having immediate response, good quality output and keeping things simple.

  1. Linear Quantum Feedback Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gough; R. Gohm; M. Yanagisawa

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical theory of quantum feedback networks has recently been developed for general open quantum dynamical systems interacting with bosonic input fields. In this article we show, for the special case of linear dynamical systems Markovian systems with instantaneous feedback connections, that the transfer functions can be deduced and agree with the algebraic rules obtained in the nonlinear case. Using these rules, we derive the the transfer functions for linear quantum systems in series, in cascade, and in feedback arrangements mediated by beam splitter devices.

  2. Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

  3. Efficient Driver for Dimmable White LED Lighting.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Wen-ching

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A high efficiency driver circuit is proposed for Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps with dimming feature. The current regulation is accomplished by processing partial power… (more)

  4. Physics at a Fermilab Proton Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. G. Albrow; S. Antusch; K. S. Babu; T. Barnes; A. O. Bazarko; R. H. Bernstein; T. J. Bowles; S. J. Brice; A. Ceccucci; F. Cei; H. W. KCheung; D. C. Christian; J. I. Collar; J. Cooper; P. S. Cooper; A. Curioni; A. deGouvea; F. DeJongh; P. F. Derwent; M. V. Diwan; B. A. Dobrescu; G. J. Feldman; D. A. Finley; B. T. Fleming; S. Geer; G. L. Greene; Y. Grossman; D. A. Harris; C. J. Horowitz; D. W. Hertzog; P. Huber; J. Imazato; A. Jansson; K. P. Jungmann; P. A. Kasper; J. Kersten; S. H. Kettell; Y. Kuno; M. Lindner; M. Mandelkern; W. J. Marciano; W. Melnitchouk; O. Mena; D. G. Michael; J. P. Miller; G. B. Mills; J. G. Morfin; H. Nguyen

    2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the physics case for building a 2 MW, 8 GeV superconducting linac proton driver at Fermilab.

  5. Selected Texas Driver Education Instructors’ Feelings About A Driver Education Cultural Awareness Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saint, Nina Jo

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2011 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction SELECTED TEXAS DRIVER EDUCATION INSTRUCTORS? FEELINGS ABOUT A DRIVER EDUCATION CULTURAL AWARENESS SURVEY A Thesis by NINA JO.... Davis Maurice E. Dennis Head of Department, Dennie L. Smith May 2011 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction iii ABSTRACT Selected Texas Driver Education Instructors? Feelings About A Driver Education Cultural Awareness Survey. (May...

  6. Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

  7. Construction of a driver-vehicle model and identification of the driver model parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Jemeng

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by , JEMENG SU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requiremr nt for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by JEMENG SU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe ) / I...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - active gate driver Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shadow driver works... Device Drivers Active mode: When drivers fail shadow driver works in active mode. Communication... notification ... Source: Pulfrey, David L. -...

  9. Newport Power Meter Drivers CD Installation Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Newport Power Meter Drivers CD Installation Software Version 2.3.1 Revision Date: October 16, 2008 IMPORTANT NOTES: The USB drivers on your CD must be installed before the Newport Power Meter is connected to your PC (via USB cable). Manual: The latest manuals for the Newport Power Meters can be found

  10. xDSL line driver design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    xDSL line driver is a very important element in xDSL systems. This thesis proposes a three stage xDSL line driver solution based on a multipath feedforward compensation principle. TSMC 0.8 micro meter high voltage BiCMOS technology is used as a...

  11. Physics at an Upgraded Fermilab Proton Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Geer

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  12. 9, 1443714473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd if available. Causes of variation in soil carbon predictions from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison #12;BGD 9, 14437­14473, 2012 Soil carbon drivers and benchmarks in Earth system models K. E. O. Todd

  13. DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT MSU DRIVERS SIGNATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT MSU DRIVERS SIGNATURE Signature 2-9-108, MCA (Statutory Coverage, in lieu-90-(4-20). CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE X Weather Conditions: ACCIDENT INFORMATION Location: Date: - - 20 Time: : .M. Driver and Risk Management ~ 1160 Research Drive Bozeman, MT 59718 ~ (406) 994-2711 Accident Form #12;OTHER

  14. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. An Unlucky Feeling: Overconfidence and Noisy Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Zachary; Owens, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    way that vague or ambiguous feedback may exacerbate overcon?fact that external task-feedback situations may be much lessIncorporating Performance Feedback,” Discussion paper, work-

  16. Feedback and Interference Alignment in Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Changho

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Feedback in the Gaussian Interference Channel 2.1Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Feedback Capacity2.6 Role of Feedback . . . . . . . .

  17. Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drivers and Barriers in the Current Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Market (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Drivers and Barriers in the Current...

  18. Coherent feedback that beats all measurement-based feedback protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Kurt

    We show that when the speed of control is bounded, there is a widely applicable minimal-time control problem for which a coherent feedback protocol is optimal, and is faster than all measurement-based feedback protocols, ...

  19. A Framework of Incorporating Spatio-temporal Forecast in Look-ahead Grid Dispatch with Photovoltaic Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Chen

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing penetration of stochastic photovoltaic (PV) generation into the electric power system poses significant challenges to system operators. In the thesis, we evaluate the spatial and temporal correlations of stochastic PV generation...

  20. Educational hardware for feedback systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dancy, Isaac

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores a variety of educational feedback systems with an emphasis on developing them for in-class demonstrations and in-depth student projects. The nature of feedback systems means there is never a shortage ...

  1. Beam bunch feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambertson, G.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the electromagnetic fields that are excited by the passage of a bundle of charged particles persist to act upon bunches that follow, then the motions of the bunches are coupled. This action between bunches circulating on a closed orbit can generate growing patterns of bunch excursions. Such growth can often be suppressed by feedback systems that detect the excursion and apply corrective forces to the bunches. To be addressed herein is feedback that acts on motions of the bunch body centers. In addition to being useful for suppressing the spontaneous growth of coupled-bunch motions, such feedback can be used to damp transients in bunches injected into an accelerator or storage ring; for hadrons which lack strong radiation damping, feedback is needed to avoid emittance growth through decoherence. Motions excited by noise in magnetic fields or accelerating rf can also be reduced by using this feedback. Whether the action is on motions that are transverse to the closed orbit or longitudinal, the arrangement is the same. Bunch position is detected by a pickup and that signal is processed and directed to a kicker that may act upon the same bunch or some other portion of the collective beam pattern. Transverse motion is an oscillation with angular frequency {nu}{perpendicular}{omega}{sub o} where {omega}{sub o} is the orbital frequency 2{pi}{line_integral}o. Longitudinal synchrotron oscillation occurs at frequency {omega} {sub s} = {nu}{sub s}{omega}{sub o}. The former is much more rapid, {nu}{perpendicular} being on the order of 10 while {nu}{sub s} is typically about 10{sup minus 1} to 10 {sup minus 2}.

  2. 100MHz Current Feedback Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    O PPLICATI s Video Amplifiers s Buffers s IF and RF Amplification s Cable Drivers s 8-, 10-, 12-Bit products. The LT1223 is manufactured on Linear Technology's proprietary complementary bipolar process. Video Cable Driver Voltage Gain vs Frequency U A O PPLICATITYPICAL INV OUTV RG 1k RF 1k 75 75 CABLE 75

  3. Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development 2012 DOE...

  4. Physics at a New Fermilab Proton Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Geer

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ``Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future U.S. neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ``A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing CP violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  5. Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  6. A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic UV light exposure. We developed a permutation-based ...

  7. Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn UpdatedUpdatedUpdatedUpdated Literature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature ReviewLiterature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , such as unexpected fluctuations in energy demand, energy prices (e.g., oil, gas, coal) and weather conditions1 Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers:Carbon Price Drivers: AAAAnnnn the factors that shape the price of carbon, where one European Union Allowance is equal to one ton of CO2

  8. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  9. Detection of Driver Fatigue Caused by Sleep Deprivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Joseph F.

    This paper aims to provide reliable indications of driver drowsiness based on the characteristics of driver-vehicle interaction. A test bed was built under a simulated driving environment, and a total of 12 subjects ...

  10. Effects of Single versus Multiple Warnings on Driver Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, M. L.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: To explore how a single master alarm system affects drivers’ responses when compared to multiple, distinct warnings. Background: Advanced driver warning systems are intended to improve safety, yet inappropriate ...

  11. Feedback-optimized parallel tempering Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katzgraber, H G; Trebst, S; Huse, D A; Troyer, M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    brie?y discuss possible feedback schemes for systems that1742-5468/06/P03018+22$30.00 Feedback-optimized parallel5468/2006/03/P03018 Feedback-optimized parallel tempering

  12. Feedback in the Emergency Medicine Clerkships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Aaron W; Kman, Nicholas E; Khandelwal, Sorabh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4. Branch WT, Paranjape A. Feedback and reflection: teachingDA, Choo EK. Providing feedback in the emergency department.26. Richardson BK. Feedback. Acad Emerg Med. 2004;11:1283e1–

  13. Solar Supply Chain and Market Driver Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Nicholas 1990-

    2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to explore the evolution of the photovoltaic supply chain in the United States and the drivers which foster growth of the solar market. The study will gather knowledge on the growth of the solar market and roles of different firms...

  14. MOTOR VEHICLE USE PROGRAM DRIVER SAFETY TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOTOR VEHICLE USE PROGRAM DRIVER SAFETY TIPS Observe Speed Limits and Traffic Laws ­ Allow - Employees who drive Institute or privately owned vehicles on Institute business must possess and carry person. Insurance - Employees who operate their privately owned vehicles on Institute business shall

  15. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software project Westronics Driver acceptance test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasscock, J.A.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The acceptance test for the Westronics driver. This driver connects the Westronics Smart Multiplexer with the TMACS monitoring system.

  16. Coherent feedback that beats all measurement-based feedback protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs; Xiaoting Wang; Howard M. Wiseman

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that when the speed of control is bounded, there is a widely applicable minimal-time control problem for which a coherent feedback protocol is optimal, and is faster than all measurement-based feedback protocols, where the latter are defined in a strict sense. The superiority of the coherent protocol is due to the fact that it can exploit a geodesic path in Hilbert space, a path that measurement-based protocols cannot follow.

  17. Feedback control of spin systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Altafini

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The feedback stabilization problem for ensembles of coupled spin 1/2 systems is discussed from a control theoretic perspective. The noninvasive nature of the bulk measurement allows for a fully unitary and deterministic closed loop. The Lyapunov-based feedback design presented does not require spins that are selectively addressable. With this method, it is possible to obtain control inputs also for difficult tasks, like suppressing undesired couplings in identical spin systems.

  18. Drivers of Commercial Building Operator Skills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 Drivers of Commercial Building Operator Skills C&W OVERVIEW C&W SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES GROUP WHAT?S DRIVING THE NEED FOR TRAINING? NECESSARY SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE C&W DEVELOPMENT & TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES International Conference... ? Managerial skills ? Market knowledge ? Building certifications ? Energy Star, LEED ? Industry resources 9 C&W TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES ? C&W Training and Support programs ? C&W Green Practice Policies ? LEED Green Associate and AP...

  19. Alternative Fuel Driver Training Companion Manual

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DiggFederalNationalandElectric-driveMobile*Drivers

  20. Feedback, power control, and beamforming : methods for situational aware wireless networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yichao

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imperfect Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.4.1 Imperfect Feedback Model . . . . . . . . . . .4.3 Full Feedback Analysis . . . . . . .

  1. Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, Lee; Szilagyi, Bela [Theoretical Astrophysics 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new gauge driver is introduced for the generalized harmonic (GH) representation of Einstein's equation. This new driver allows a rather general class of gauge conditions to be implemented in a way that maintains the hyperbolicity of the combined evolution system. This driver is more stable and effective and, unlike previous drivers, allows stable evolutions using the dual-frame evolution technique. Appropriate boundary conditions for this new gauge driver are constructed, and a new boundary condition for the 'gauge' components of the spacetime metric in the GH Einstein system is introduced. The stability and effectiveness of this new gauge driver are demonstrated through numerical tests, which impose a new damped-wave gauge condition on the evolutions of single black-hole spacetimes.

  2. An Improved Gauge Driver for the Generalized Harmonic Einstein System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Lindblom; Bela Szilagyi

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new gauge driver is introduced for the generalized harmonic (GH) representation of Einstein's equation. This new driver allows a rather general class of gauge conditions to be implemented in a way that maintains the hyperbolicity of the combined evolution system. This driver is more stable and effective, and unlike previous drivers, allows stable evolutions using the dual-frame evolution technique. Appropriate boundary conditions for this new gauge driver are constructed, and a new boundary condition for the ``gauge'' components of the spacetime metric in the GH Einstein system is introduced. The stability and effectiveness of this new gauge driver are demonstrated through numerical tests, which impose a new damped-wave gauge condition on the evolutions of single black-hole spacetimes.

  3. Fieldbus Device Drivers for Accelerator Control at DESY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. G. Wu

    2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to interface the DESY fieldbus adapter, SEDAC (SErial Data Acquisition and Control system), a full duplex device driver was developed for the Windows NT, Linux, VxWorks, and Solaris operating systems. Detailed driver development issues as well as a common user interface will be presented, along with a comparison of the device drivers among the different operating systems. In particular, we shall present benchmark results concerning general performance as well as ease of development.

  4. Market Drivers for Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA: CommentsEnergy 13,Combined Heat &Market Drivers

  5. Driver Circuit for White LED Lamps with TRIAC Dimming Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Szu-Jung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??An efficient Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamp driver circuit is proposed for retrofitting the conventionally used incandescent lamps with existing TRIAC dimmer. The dimming feature… (more)

  6. High Temperature, High Voltage Fully Integrated Gate Driver Circuit

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    driver circuit, 5-V on- chip voltage regulator, short-circuit protection, undervoltage lockout, bootstrap capacitor, dead time controller and temperature sensor * 0.8-micron,...

  7. Neutrino oscillation physics with a FNAL proton driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Winter

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the need of a proton driver for the Fermilab neutrino oscillation program, as well as its role in the global context.

  8. Quasar Structure and Cosmological Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Elvis

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from quasars and AGNs is being invoked frequently in several cosmological settings. Currently, order of magnitude, or more, uncertainties in the structure of both the wind and the 'obscuring torus' make predictions highly uncertain. To make testable models of this 'cosmological feedback' it is essential to understand the detailed structure of AGNs sufficiently well to predict their properties for the whole quasar population, at all redshifts. Progress in both areas is rapid, and I describe the near-term prospects for reducing these uncertainties for 'slow' (non-relativistic) AGN winds and the obscuring torus.

  9. Feedback-assisted ponderomotive squeezing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Vitali; Paolo Tombesi

    2010-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze how the radiation pressure interaction between a mechanical element and an intensely driven optical cavity mode can be exploited for generating squeezed light. We study in particular how the performance of the optomechanical device can be improved when a homodyne-based feedback loop is added to control the motion of the mechanical element of the system. We show that, when driving the cavity at resonance, an appropriate proportional feedback control is able to improve the generation of ponderomotive squeezing, which should be detectable with state-of-the-art apparatuses.

  10. Negative feedback confers mutational robustness in yeast transcription factor regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denby, Charles

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is! possible! that! feedback! does! not! reduce! expression!positive! and! negative! feedback. ! An! alternative!reporter! to! test! for! feedback. ! The! general! approach!

  11. Carrier and Timing Synchronization of BPSK via LDPC Code Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valles, Esteban

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using code constraint feedback,” IEEE CommunicationsQPSK using soft decision feedback,” Proc. IEEE 44th Allertonof BPSK via LDPC Code Feedback Esteban L. Vall´ s, Richard

  12. Transmit beamforming for multiple antenna systems with imperfect feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isukapalli, Yogananda R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.3 A General Framework for Feedback Imperfections . . . . .FDD with Finite Rate Feedback (FDDQ) System . 2.3.3 TDDModeling of Imperfect Feedback and Error Probability

  13. Evaluation and Feedback of Medical Students Rotating in Emergency Medicine: A Model for Comprehensive Evaluation and Swift Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banh, Kenny; Weichenthal, Lori; Snowden, Brandy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    importance of Evaluation and Feedback of Medical StudentsEvaluation and Swift Feedback Kenny Banh, MD; Loriand providing quality feedback to medical students who

  14. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  15. UWM CIO Office Feedback on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Accounts Receivable General Accounting Svcs. Cashier's Office Purchasing Office Travel Office Total Receivable 0 0 2 7 3 4 General Accounting Svcs. 0 1 2 8 5 0 Cashiers Office 0 0 3 3 2 8 Purchasing Office 2 6UWM CIO Office Feedback on The Department of Business & Financial Services Presentation of Results

  16. The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks #12;Three Pillars Behind Climate Change! #12;1. Global. Greenhouse Gases have been on the increase. #12;3. The Greenhouse effect is a powerful theory that explains! natural greenhouse effect! · an empirical introduction #12;Moral of the story: The doubling of CO2 causes

  17. Material feedback in digital design tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanton, Christian J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How do design tools feedback material behavior to the designer? Digital design tools in use by designers today provide a rich environment for design of form but offer little feedback of the material that ultimately realize ...

  18. CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    CLAIMANT AUTO ACCIDENT REPORT For Completion by Driver D E P A R T M E N T O F A D M I N I S T R Address City State Zip For what purpose was car being used at time of accident? Has damage been repaired signals did you give? Other Driver? Who investigated? Who Cited and Why? Describe Accident CONTINUE

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - averaging ic drivers Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ic drivers Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: averaging ic drivers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Simultaneous Driver and Wire Sizing for...

  20. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adelmann; J. Alonso; W. A. Barletta; J. M. Conrad; M. H. Shaevitz; J. Spitz; M. Toups; L. A. Winslow

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well-defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross section knowledge is high. Very few sources of neutrinos can meet these requirements. However, pion/muon and isotope decay-at-rest sources qualify. The ideal drivers for decay-at-rest sources are cyclotron accelerators, which are compact and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes a scheme to produce decay-at-rest sources driven by such cyclotrons, developed within the DAEdALUS program. Examples of the value of the high precision beams for pursuing Beyond Standard Model interactions are reviewed. New results on a combined DAEdALUS--Hyper-K search for CP-violation that achieve errors on the mixing matrix parameter of 4 degrees to 12 degrees are presented.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies driver Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: analysis identifies driver Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Improving the Reliability of Commodity Operating Summary: 12;Summary I identified properties of drivers...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced driver assistance Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: advanced driver assistance Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Recovering Device Drivers MICHAEL M. SWIFT, MUTHUKARUPPAN ANNAMALAI, BRIAN N. BERSHAD, Summary: Recovering...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced driver information systems Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: advanced driver information systems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Recovering Device Drivers MICHAEL M. SWIFT, MUTHUKARUPPAN ANNAMALAI, BRIAN N. BERSHAD, Summary: systems,...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - active-load laser driver Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alternative Alternative Summary: ConceptsOther IFE Driver Concepts 9 HOW INERTIAL FUSION WORKS DIODE-PUMPED SOLID-STATE LASER DRIVER Using... National Laboratory. KRYPTON-FLUORIDE...

  5. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  6. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  7. Science Drivers for Con-XScience Drivers for Con-X Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Michael

    and their effect on galaxy formation Dark Matter and Dark Energy Use clusters of galaxies to trace the locations of Dark Matter and as independent probes to constrain the amount and evolution of Dark Energy Search for the missing baryonic matter in the Cosmic Web Cycles of Matter and Energy Study dynamics of Cosmic Feedback

  8. Feedback and its Feedback Effect on Feedback: Photoionization Suppression and its Impact on Galactic Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew M. Pieri; Hugo Martel

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radiative feedback due to reionization has a pronounced effect on the extent of mechanical feedback due to galactic outflows. The photoionization of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) suppresses low-mass galaxy formation by photoheating the gas and limiting atomic line cooling. The number of low-mass galaxies is central for the enrichment of the IGM as these objects have the capacity to enrich a significant fraction (by volume) of the Universe. We use a modified version of our galactic outflow model, combined with a simple criterion for suppression, to investigate the potential impact upon the IGM. We find that this suppression strongly reduces the enrichment of the IGM and is sensitive to the reionization history. We also investigate the contribution of halos of different masses with varying degrees of suppression.

  9. Threat assessment design for driver assistance system at intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoude, Georges

    This paper considers the decision-making problem for a human-driven vehicle crossing a road intersection in the presence of other, potentially errant, drivers. Our approach relies on a novel threat assessment module, which ...

  10. FlightCrew Browser : a safe browser for drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Pineda, Andrés Humberto

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drivers have information needs they want to solve while driving, but current mobile browser interfaces can bring forth safety issues when users browse the web even though their attention is required elsewhere, as it is ...

  11. A Survey of Taxi Drivers’ Aberrant Driving Behavior in Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Jing; Tao, Li; Li, Xiaoyue; Xiao, Yao; Atchley, Paul

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Taxis are an important component in Beijing's urban integrated transport system. They provide passengers with convenient, comfortable, and efficient service. However, aberrant driving behaviors occur frequently among Beijing taxi drivers, leading...

  12. An affective intelligent driving agent: driver's trajectory and activities prediction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratti, Carlo

    The traditional relationship between the car, driver, and city can be described as waypoint navigation with additional traffic and maintenance information. The car can receive and store waypoint information, find the ...

  13. Radiative feedback from ionized gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. O. Glover

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    H2 formation in metal-free gas occurs via the intermediate H- or H2+ ions. Destruction of these ions by photodissociation therefore serves to suppress H2 formation. In this paper, I highlight the fact that several processes that occur in ionized primordial gas produce photons energetic enough to photodissociate H- or H2+ and outline how to compute the photodissociation rates produced by a particular distribution of ionized gas. I also show that there are circumstances of interest, such as during the growth of HII regions around the first stars, in which this previously overlooked form of radiative feedback is of considerable importance.

  14. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  15. Alternative highway sign alphabet styles for older drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Carol Hannah

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ALTERNATIVE HIGHWAY SIGN ALPHABET STYLES FOR OLDER DRIVERS A Thesis by Carol Hannah Tan Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... (Member) Jame T. . Yao (Head of partment) May 1991 ABSTRACT Alternative Highway Sign Alphabet Styles for Older Drivers. (May 1991) Carol Hannah Tan, B. S. , Texas A8 M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Daniel B. Farnbro In the United...

  16. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  17. Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper! ! ! ! ! prepared) driver. The quantitative details of both project cost and facility performance have changed as planning as the driver. Consequently performance is often compared to that of the electron driver concept. If we were re

  18. Driver Models For Timing And Noise Analysis Bogdan Tutuianu and Ross Baldick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldick, Ross

    Driver Models For Timing And Noise Analysis Bogdan Tutuianu and Ross Baldick Abstract errors. This paper presents a new technique to generate accurate non-linear driver models which can driver is holding low or high, the driver is correctly approximated by a linear (RC) model

  19. Feedback Induced Death in Coupled Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming Luo

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate oscillation death in systems of coupled nonlinear oscillators with feedback loop. We find that feedback results in oscillation death both in small sets or large ensembles. More importantly, the death zone in parameter space is significantly enlarged and oscillation death could occur even in coupled identical oscillators in the presence of feedback. We find that there are two different ways to oscillation death, namely desynchronization and completely synchronization induced oscillation death. Feedback induced oscillation death may be used to suppress unexpected oscillations, e.g., in chaotic laser arrays.

  20. Feedback Cooling of a Single Neutral Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Koch; Christian Sames; Alexander Kubanek; Matthias Apel; Maximilian Balbach; Alexei Ourjoumtsev; Pepijn W. H. Pinkse; Gerhard Rempe

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate feedback cooling of the motion of a single rubidium atom trapped in a high-finesse optical resonator to a temperature of about 160 \\mu K. Time-dependent transmission and intensity-correlation measurements prove the reduction of the atomic position uncertainty. The feedback increases the 1/e storage time into the one second regime, 30 times longer than without feedback. Feedback cooling therefore rivals state-of-the-art laser cooling, but with the advantages that it requires less optical access and exhibits less optical pumping.

  1. Information and Feedback Institutional Change Principle | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    monthly energy feedback and staff monitors to reinforce communication and activity, which led to improved routine practices and significant energy savings. Driving Operational...

  2. Combining Feedback Absorption Spectroscopy, Amplified Resonance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On-Board Measurement of Ammonia and Nitrous Oxide Using Feedback Absorption Laser Spectroscopy Combined with Amplified Resonance and Low Pressure Sampling Cummins...

  3. External optical feedback in semiconductor lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mebrahtu, Philemon

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 17 18 18 20 10. Longitudinal mode spectra with and without mirror feedback . . . 22 11. Schematic diagram for the set up of fiber cavity feedback 12a. Picture of tapered PMSM fiber 12b. Set up used to align PMSM fiber 13. L - I plot... MIRROR FEEDBACK t I T' SOLITARY LASER DIODE 6. 25 dB/? + -50dB Fig 10. Longitudinal mode spectra with and without mirror feedback 23 B. Fiber Cavity A polarization-maintaining single-mode (PMSM) fiber 73. 8 cm long supplied by AT&T is used...

  4. Feedback reduction techniques and fairness in multi-user MIMO broadcast channels with random beamforming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugh, Matthew Owen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.72.5 MMSE Receivers and Feedback . . . . . . . . . . .1.2.1 Feedback Reduction Techniques Exploiting Spa- tial

  5. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharamentov, Sergey I. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  6. Effect of downstream feedback on the achievable performance of feedback control loops for serial processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    Effect of downstream feedback on the achievable performance of feedback control loops for serial conditions under which it is advisable to include a control law with downstream feedback besides local Si+1. In reference to that figure, we refer as downstream units (resp. upstream units) as those

  7. Markovian feedback to control continuous variable entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Mancini

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model to realize quantum feedback control of continuous variable entanglement. It consists of two interacting bosonic modes subject to amplitude damping and achieving entangled Gaussian steady state. The possibility to greatly improve the degree of entanglement by means of Markovian (direct) feedback is then shown.

  8. Feedback cooling of a single trapped ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Bushev; Daniel Rotter; Alex Wilson; Francois Dubin; Christoph Becher; Juergen Eschner; Rainer Blatt; Viktor Steixner; Peter Rabl; Peter Zoller

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a real-time measurement of the motion of a single ion in a Paul trap, we demonstrate its electro-mechanical cooling below the Doppler limit by homodyne feedback control (cold damping). The feedback cooling results are well described by a model based on a quantum mechanical Master Equation.

  9. Optical feedback structures and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

  10. Employing feedback in adiabatic quantum dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armen E. Allahverdyan; Guenter Mahler

    2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study quantum adiabatic dynamics, where the slowly moving field is influenced by system's state (feedback). The information for the feedback is gained from non-disturbating measurements done on an ensemble of identical non-interacting systems. The situation without feedback is governed by the adiabatic theorem: adiabatic energy level populations stay constant, while the adiabatic eigenvectors get a specific phase contribution (Berry phase). However, under feedback the adiabatic theorem does not hold: the adiabatic populations satisfy a closed equation of motion that coincides with the replicator dynamics well-known by its applications in evolutionary game theory. The feedback generates a new gauge-invariant adiabatic phase, which is free of the constraints on the Berry phase (e.g., the new phase is non-zero even for real adiabatic eigenfunctions).

  11. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spiridon, Alex (Palo Alto, CA); Benzel, Dave (Livermore, CA); Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Nekoogar, Faranak (San Ramon, CA); Rosenbury, Erwin T. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  12. The Intelligent Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singhose, William

    The Intelligent Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control A Dissertation Presented Combination of Input Shaping and PID Feedback Control Approved by: Dr. William Singhose, Advisor School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.4 PID Feedback Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.5 Comparison

  13. Linguistic constraints on compensation for altered auditory feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katseff, Shira Eden

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Response to 30 Hz /E/ F2 feedback shift. . . . . . . . . . .Response to /2/ F2 feedback shift. The x-axis marks theschematic of the State Feedback Control (SFC) model. From

  14. Feedback communication systems : fundamental limits and control-theoretic approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardestanizadeh, Ehsan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.2 Point-to-Point Channels with Feedback . . 2.2.1 GaussianChapter 3 Gaussian Multiple Access Channel with Feedback 3.1Channel with Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.1

  15. Multimedia Feedback Systems for Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladwell, S.; Gottlieb, E.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Slutter, C.L.

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The World Wide Web has become a key tool for information sharing. Engineers and scientists are finding that the web is especially suited to publishing the graphical, multi-layered information that is typical of their work. Web pages are easier to distribute than hardcopy. Web movies have become more accessible, in many offices, than videos. Good VRML viewing software, bundled with most new PCs, has sufficient power to support many engineering needs. In addition to publishing information science and engineering has an important tradition of peer and customer review. Reports, drawings and graphs are typically printed, distributed, reviewed, marked up, and returned to the author. Adding review comments to paper is easy. When, however, the information is in electronic form, this ease of review goes away. It's hard to write on videos. It's even harder to write comments on animated 3D models. These feedback limitations reduce the value of the information overall. Fortunately, the web can also be a useful tool for collecting peer and customer review information. When properly formed, web reports, movies, and 3D animations can be readily linked to review notes. This paper describes three multimedia feed-back systems that Sandia National Laboratories has developed to tap that potential. Each system allows people to make context-sensitive comments about specific web content and electronically ties the comments back to the web content being referenced. The fuel system ties comments to specific web pages, the second system ties the comments to specific frames of digital movies, and the third ties the comments to specific times and viewpoints within 3D animations. In addition to the technologies, this paper describes how they are being used to support intelligent machine systems design at Sandia.

  16. Energy Department Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program Energy Department Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric...

  17. Energy Department Seeks Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectr...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program Energy Department Seeks Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program...

  18. Getting Useful Real-Time Feedback About Your Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Getting Useful Real-Time Feedback About Your Program Getting Useful Real-Time Feedback About Your Program Better Buildings Webinar - May 25, 2011 20110525realtimefeedback.pdf...

  19. Contractor Rating and Feedback Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contractor Rating and Feedback Systems Contractor Rating and Feedback Systems Better Buildings Residential Workforce Business Partners Peer Exchange Call Series: Contractor Rating...

  20. BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

  1. Feedback Requirements for SASE-FELs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loos, Henrik; /SLAC

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The operation of a Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) Free Electron Lasers (FEL) at soft and hard X-ray wavelengths driven by a high brightness electron beam imposes strong requirements on the stability of the accelerator and feedback systems are necessary to both guarantee saturation of the SASE process as well as a stable photon beam for user experiments. Diagnostics for the relevant transverse and longitudinal beam parameters are presented and various examples of feedback systems for bunches with low repetition rate as well as systems for intra bunch train feedbacks are discussed.

  2. Controlling entanglement by direct quantum feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. R. Carvalho; A. J. S. Reid; J. J. Hope

    2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the generation of entanglement between electronic states of two atoms in a cavity using direct quantum feedback schemes. We compare the effects of different control Hamiltonians and detection processes in the performance of entanglement production and show that the quantum-jump-based feedback proposed by us in Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 76} 010301(R) (2007) can protect highly entangled states against decoherence. We provide analytical results that explain the robustness of jump feedback, and also analyse the perspectives of experimental implementation by scrutinising the effects of imperfections and approximations in our model.

  3. Feedback in AGN heating of galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hoeft; M. Brueggen

    2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the challenges that models of AGN heating of the intracluster medium (ICM) face, is the question how the mechanical luminosity of the AGN is tuned to the radiative losses of the ICM. Here we implement a simple 1D model of a feedback mechanism that links the luminosity of the AGN to the accretion rate. We demonstrate how this simple feedback mechanism leads to a quasi-steady state for a broad range of parameters. Moreover, within this feedback model, we investigate the effect of thermal conduction and find that its relative importance depends strongly on the cluster mass.

  4. Feedback Capacity of the Compound Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrader, Brooke E.

    In this work, we find the capacity of a compound finite-state channel (FSC) with time-invariant deterministic feedback. We consider the use of fixed length block codes over the compound channel. Our achievability result ...

  5. Feedback controller parameterizations for reinforcement learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, John William

    Reinforcement Learning offers a very general framework for learning controllers, but its effectiveness is closely tied to the controller parameterization used. Especially when learning feedback controllers for weakly stable ...

  6. Feedback-controlled adiabatic quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Wilson; A. M. Zagoskin; S. Savel'ev; M. J. Everitt; Franco Nori

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple feedback-control scheme for adiabatic quantum computation with superconducting flux qubits. The proposed method makes use of existing on-chip hardware to monitor the ground-state curvature, which is then used to control the computation speed to maximize the success probability. We show that this scheme can provide a polynomial speed-up in performance and that it is possible to choose a suitable set of feedback-control parameters for an arbitrary problem Hamiltonian.

  7. Assessment of older driver understanding of certain traffic control devices in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulett, Stephanie Renee

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to assess older Texas drivers on their understanding of nine traffic control devices and identify the devices that are misunderstood by people 65 years and older. Additionally, older driver education programs were...

  8. Evaluation of driver braking performance to an unexpected object in the roadway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picha, Dale Louis

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    components, specifically whether the equation accurately reflects driver and vehicle behaviors during a braking maneuver. This research evaluated the two components of the SSD equation. Four field studies were conducted that evaluated driver braking...

  9. Comparative Oncogenomic Analysis of Copy Number Alterations in Human and Zebrafish Tumors Enables Cancer Driver Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, GuangJun

    The identification of cancer drivers is a major goal of current cancer research. Finding driver genes within large chromosomal events is especially challenging because such alterations encompass many genes. Previously, we ...

  10. Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levis, Philip

    Integrating Concurrency Control and Energy Management in Device Drivers Kevin Klues , Vlado@cs.berkeley.edu dgay@intel-research.net Abstract Energy management is a critical concern in wireless sensornets. De- spite its importance, sensor network operating systems today pro- vide minimal energy management support

  11. The Drivers of Mergers and Acquisitions in Pharmaceutical Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Fan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the determinants and drivers of 112 mergers and acquisitions (M&A) activities exceed 50 million values in the pharmaceutical industry using COMPUSTAT, SDC and FDA data during the period 1980-2010 with random effect logit model. We find...

  12. Termites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mortality: 2 dominated by elephant damage, 2 by termite attack and 1 by fire. Wind and human activity wereTermites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality 5 plots suffered substantial tree not major causes of tree mortality. Sample sizes are too small to reasonably determine the most significant

  13. Next Story > SC DMV lifting drivers' suspensions this week

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    The State Next Story > SC DMV lifting drivers' suspensions this week Researcher: Zombie fads peak COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Zombies seem to be everywhere these days. In the popular TV series "The Walking Dead at the University of California at Davis. Lauro said she keeps track of zombie movies, TV shows and video games

  14. Caution, drivers! Children present. Traffic, pollution, and infant health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    air pollution levels on infant health? Our setting is California (with a focus on the Central ValleyCaution, drivers! Children present. Traffic, pollution, and infant health Christopher R. Knittel driving (and especially congestion) on ambient air pollution levels; and (2) what is the impact of modern

  15. Socioeconomic Drivers of Deforestation in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClain, Michael

    RESEARCH Socioeconomic Drivers of Deforestation in the Northern Ecuadorian Amazon CARLOS F. MENA the predictions of future deforestation, which is especially important in the Amazon basin, where large tracts to address this lack of understanding. Its objectives are (a) to quantify deforestation in the Northern

  16. Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Bela Szilagyi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindblom, Lee

    Improved gauge driver for the generalized harmonic Einstein system Lee Lindblom and Be´la Szila´gyi

  17. Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov, and George Candea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Testing Closed-Source Binary Device Drivers with DDT Volodymyr Kuznetsov, Vitaly Chipounov (EPFL), Switzerland Abstract DDT is a system for testing closed-source binary de- vice drivers against think of it as a pesticide against device driver bugs. DDT combines virtualization with a spe- cialized

  18. Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: TEENG-1181R3 Full Title: Modelling Automobile Driver to develop a random utility based discrete multinomial choice model for the behaviour of automobile drivers

  19. The physics issues that determine inertial confinement fusion target gain and driver requirements: A tutorial*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The physics issues that determine inertial confinement fusion target gain and driver requirements ``bookkeeping'' of input parametrized by ICF drivers' coupling efficiencies to the target, and subsequent requirements will be discussed for both the direct drive driver impinging directly on the target and indirect

  20. Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1647901 Improving Empirical Estimation of Demographic Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Demographic Drivers: Fertility, Child Mortality & Malaria Ecology Gordon C. McCorda Columbia University Dalton of Demographic Drivers: Fertility, Child Mortality & Malaria Ecology Abstract Much of Africa has yet to go. Results show that child mortality is a powerfully robust driver of fertility behavior. Meeting

  1. A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid impedance Reggie Weecea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    bone vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver by known masses. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing specialized equipment not available in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed

  2. Research Paper A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    vibrator transducers for clinical measurements, the transfer of energy from the bone driver depends. This absolute calibration is based upon a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency in the clinic, and a refined bone driver circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. Ã?

  3. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK WORKS BOTH WAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Dettmar, R.-J. [Astronomical Institute of Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Norris, R. P. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of galaxy growth need to invoke strong negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress the formation of stars and thus prevent the over-production of very massive systems. While some observations provide evidence for such negative feedback, other studies find either no feedback or even positive feedback, with increased star formation associated with higher AGN luminosities. Here we report an analysis of several hundred AGNs and their host galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South using X-ray and radio data for sample selection. Combined with archival far-infrared data as a reliable tracer of star formation activity in the AGN host galaxies, we find that AGNs with pronounced radio jets exhibit a much higher star formation rate (SFR) than the purely X-ray-selected ones, even at the same X-ray luminosities. This difference implies that positive AGN feedback plays an important role, too, and therefore has to be accounted for in all future simulation work. We interpret this to indicate that the enhanced SFR of radio-selected AGNs arises because of jet-induced star formation, as is suggested by the different jet powers among our AGN samples, while the suppressed SFR of X-ray selected AGN is caused by heating and photo-dissociation of molecular gas by the hot AGN accretion disk.

  4. Gauge Drivers for the Generalized Harmonic Einstein Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Lindblom; Keith D. Matthews; Oliver Rinne; Mark A. Scheel

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized harmonic representation of Einstein's equation is manifestly hyperbolic for a large class of gauge conditions. Unfortunately most of the useful gauges developed over the past several decades by the numerical relativity community are incompatible with the hyperbolicity of the equations in this form. This paper presents a new method of imposing gauge conditions that preserves hyperbolicity for a much wider class of conditions, including as special cases many of the standard ones used in numerical relativity: e.g., K-freezing, Gamma-freezing, Bona-Masso slicing, conformal Gamma-drivers, etc. Analytical and numerical results are presented which test the stability and the effectiveness of this new gauge driver evolution system.

  5. Time-delayed quantum feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arne L. Grimsmo

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of time-delayed coherent quantum feedback is developed. More specifically, we consider a quantum system coupled to a bosonic reservoir creating a unidirectional feedback loop. It is shown that the dynamics can be mapped onto a fictitious quantum cascade, where the system is driven by past versions of itself. The derivation of this model relies on a tensor network representation of the system-reservoir time-propagator. For concreteness, this general theory is applied to a driven two-level atom scattering into a coherent feedback loop. We demonstrate how delay effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the atom, and how quantum control can be implemented in the presence of time-delays. A realization with a superconducting qubit serving as an artificial atom is discussed.

  6. Stellar Feedback in Dwarf Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Mashchenko; James Wadsley; H. M. P. Couchman

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Dwarf galaxies pose significant challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark matter density that is divergent at the center, in sharp contrast with observations which indicate an approximately constant central density core. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motion of the interstellar gas resulting in significant gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations.

  7. Reconsidering Rapid Qubit Purification by Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Wiseman; J. F. Ralph

    2006-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reconsiders the claimed rapidity of a scheme for the purification of the quantum state of a qubit, proposed recently in Jacobs 2003 Phys. Rev. A67 030301(R). The qubit starts in a completely mixed state, and information is obtained by a continuous measurement. Jacobs' rapid purification protocol uses Hamiltonian feedback control to maximise the average purity of the qubit for a given time, with a factor of two increase in the purification rate over the no-feedback protocol. However, by re-examining the latter approach, we show that it mininises the average time taken for a qubit to reach a given purity. In fact, the average time taken for the no-feedback protocol beats that for Jacobs' protocol by a factor of two. We discuss how this is compatible with Jacobs' result, and the usefulness of the different approaches.

  8. Simple SPICE model for comparison of CMOS output driver circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hermann, John Karl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to monitor the ground nodes of output driver circuits for noise. Both relative performance and noise levels are generated through the simulations. A test device was built to confirm that the model was effective in speed and noise comparisons. Values were... on CMOS technologies. Journal model is IEEE 'I?ansactions on Automatic Control. A. Literature Survey Research has been done in the past concerning noise generated by digital logic de- vices. In particular, Advanced CMOS Logic (ACL) integrated circuits...

  9. A study of driver behavior on freeway entrance ramps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Fred Huntley

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE August 1961 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF DRIVER BEHAVIOR ON FREEWAY ENTRANCE RAMPS A Thesis By FRED HUNTLEY EDWARDS Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department August 1961 TABLE... to the problem would be to provide a design which would encourage proper usage of the freeway ramp. At a 1960 meeting of The American Society of Civil Engineers, Mr. Charles Pinnell presented a paper in which he proposed the freeway entrance design shown...

  10. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; /Michigan State U.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  11. Stabilizing feedback controls for quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazyar Mirrahimi; Ramon van Handel

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    No quantum measurement can give full information on the state of a quantum system; hence any quantum feedback control problem is neccessarily one with partial observations, and can generally be converted into a completely observed control problem for an appropriate quantum filter as in classical stochastic control theory. Here we study the properties of controlled quantum filtering equations as classical stochastic differential equations. We then develop methods, using a combination of geometric control and classical probabilistic techniques, for global feedback stabilization of a class of quantum filters around a particular eigenstate of the measurement operator.

  12. Efficient Quantum Filtering for Quantum Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Rouchon; Jason F. Ralph

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss an efficient numerical scheme for the recursive filtering of diffusive quantum stochastic master equations. We show that the resultant quantum trajectory is robust and may be used for feedback based on inefficient measurements. The proposed numerical scheme is amenable to approximation, which can be used to further reduce the computational burden associated with calculating quantum trajectories and may allow real-time quantum filtering. We provide a two-qubit example where feedback control of entanglement may be within the scope of current experimental systems.

  13. Enhancement of Field Squeezing Using Coherent Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Gough; S. Wildfeuer

    2009-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of quantum feedback networks has recently been developed with the aim of showing how quantum input-output components may be connected together so as to control, stabilize or enhance the performance of one of the subcomponents. In this paper we show how the degree to which an idealized component (a degenerate parametric amplifier in the strong-coupling regime) can squeeze input fields may be enhanced by placing the component in-loop in a simple feedback mechanism involving a beam splitter. We study the spectral properties of output fields, placing particular emphasis on the elastic and inelastic components of the power density.

  14. Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilson, Erik

    Ferroelectric plasma sources for NDCX-II and heavy ion drivers E.P. Gilson a,n , R.C. Davidson for plasma sources for driver applications. Plasma sources for drivers will need to be highly reliable using beams with high perveances that are relevant to heavy ion fusion driver systems, the facility

  15. Feedback improves the generalized degrees of freedom of the strong interference channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cadambe, Viveck R; Jafar, Syed A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the mimo interference channel with feedback,” 2008. Preprintthe impact of relays, feedback, co- operation and full-Feedback improves the generalized degrees of freedom of the

  16. Subscribe | About Us | Feedback Business Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Search Subscribe | About Us | Feedback Advantage Business Media Part Search Search Powered by Terms Directory Related Links White Papers Job Search Digital Library Wall Charts Newsletter Subscription Events the project. (Editing by Maggie Fox and Paul Simao) Most Popular on ECNmag.com: Company Introduces World

  17. Feedback from Clustered Sources During Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roban Hultman Kramer; Zoltan Haiman; S. Peng Oh

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The reionization history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift (z > 6) was likely strongly shaped by several global feedback processes. Because the earliest ionizing sources formed at the locations of the rare density peaks, their spatial distribution was strongly clustered. Here we demonstrate that this clustering significantly boosts the impact of feedback processes operating at high redshift. We build a semi-analytical model to include feedback and clustering simultaneously, and apply this model to the suppression of star-formation in minihalos due to photoionization. The model is built on the excursion-set-based formalism of Furlanetto, Zaldarriaga and Hernquist (2004), which incorporates the clustering of ionizing sources, and which we here extend to include suppression of star formation in minihalos. We find that clustering increases the mean HII bubble size by a factor of several, and it dramatically increases the fraction of minihalos that are suppressed, by a factor of up to 60 relative to a randomly distributed population. This enhanced suppression can significantly reduce the electron scattering optical depth, as required by the three-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We argue that source clustering is likely to similarly boost the importance of a variety of other feedback mechanisms.

  18. Detectable Signatures of Cosmic Radiative Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schneider; R. Salvaterra; T. Roy Choudhury; A. Ferrara; C. Burigana; L. A. Popa

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a semi-analytical model to study the impact of reionization, and the associated radiative feedback, on galaxy formation. Two feedback models have been considered: (i) a standard prescription, according to which star formation is totally suppressed in galaxies with circular velocity below a critical threshold (model CF06) and (ii) a characterization based on the filtering scale (model G00), allowing for a gradual reduction of the gas available for star formation in low-mass galaxies. In model CF06 reionization starts at z ~ 15-20, is 85% complete by z ~ 10; at the same z, the ionized fraction is 16% in model G00. The models match SDSS constraints on the evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction at z feedback models. Deviations among radiative feedback prescriptions emerge when considering the expected HI 21 cm background signal, where a ~ 15 mK absorption feature in the range 75-100 MHz is present in model G00 and a global shift of the emission feature preceding reionization towards larger frequencies occurs in the same model. Single dish observations with existing or forthcoming low-frequency radio telescopes can achieve mK sensitivity, allowing the identification of these features provided that foregrounds can be accurately subtracted.

  19. Opportunity for feedback Opportunity for updates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opportunity for feedback Opportunity for updates Opportunity to find out all of the things I don) What do these all mean? Vision (1) Values (5-10) Strategic Priorities (5-7) Education, scholarship update Research Plan Pinnacles or not? Focus on impact Update every 3 yrs Capital Plan Existing

  20. Slow Orbit Feedback at the ALS Using Matlab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portmann, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring Setup and Control Using Matlab®," LSAP Note #248, JuneFeedback at the ALS Using Matlab G_ Port mann Advanced LightFEEDBACK AT THE ALS USING MATLAB* G. Portmann Advanced Light

  1. Feedback control of flow separation using synthetic jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kihwan

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this research is to assess the effect of synthetic jets on flow separation and provide a feedback control strategy for flow separation using synthetic jets. The feedback control synthesis is conducted based upon CFD simulation...

  2. ALSHub: Submit Proposals and Give Us Your Feedback!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALSHub: Submit Proposals and Give Us Your Feedback ALSHub: Submit Proposals and Give Us Your Feedback Print The ALS User Office rolled out ALSHub, a new user portal, five months...

  3. Transmit beamforming for multiple antenna systems with imperfect feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isukapalli, Yogananda R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a transmit beamforming MISO system with imperfect feedback.error proba- bility of a MISO transmit beamforming system,”of finite rate feedback MISO systems in the presence of es-

  4. Enhancing feedback process scheduling via a predictive control approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Como, Giacomo

    Enhancing feedback process scheduling via a predictive control approach Alessandro Vittorio the application possibilities at an affordable additional cost. Keywords: feedback scheduling; control that preemptive process schedulers in multitasking operating systems can be viewed, and above all designed

  5. Investigating a model of optimised AGN feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward C. D. Pope

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback heating from AGN in massive galaxies and galaxy clusters can be thought of as a naturally occurring control system which plays a significant role in regulating both star formation rates and the X-ray luminosity of the surrounding hot gas. In the simplest case, negative feedback can be viewed as a system response that is `optimised' to minimise deviations from equilibrium, such that the system rapidly evolves towards a steady state. However, a general solution of this form appears to be incompatible with radio observations which indicate intermittent AGN outbursts. Here, we explore an energetically favourable scenario in which feedback is required to both balance X-ray gas cooling, and minimise the sum of the energy radiated by the gas and the energy injected by the AGN. This specification is equivalent to ensuring that AGN heating balances the X-ray gas cooling with minimum black hole growth. It is shown that minimum energy heating occurs in discrete events, and not at a continuous, constant level. Furthermore, systems with stronger feedback experience proportionally more powerful heating events, but correspondingly smaller duty cycles. Interpreting observations from this perspective would imply that stronger feedback occurs in less massive objects - elliptical galaxies, rather than galaxy clusters. One direct consequence of this effect would be that AGN heating events are sufficiently powerful to expel hot gas from the gravitational potential of a galaxy, but not a galaxy cluster, which is consistent with theoretical explanations for the steepening of the L_X-T relation at temperatures below 1-2 keV.

  6. Non-dissipative boundary feedback for Rayleigh and Timoshenko beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opmeer, Mark

    Non-dissipative boundary feedback for Rayleigh and Timoshenko beams Chris Guiver and Mark R. Opmeer-dissipative feedback that has been shown in the literature to exponentially stabilize an Euler-Bernoulli beam makes a Rayleigh beam and a Timoshenko beam unstable. 1 Introduction Feedback control of beams is a much studied

  7. Locally Optimal Control of Quantum Systems with Strong Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Shabani; Kurt Jacobs

    2008-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    For quantum systems with high purity, we find all observables that, when continuously monitored, maximize the instantaneous reduction in the von Neumann entropy. This allows us to obtain all locally optimal feedback protocols with strong feedback, and explicit expressions for the best such protocols for systems of size N feedback.

  8. Transverse Feedback in a 100 TeV Storage Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambertson, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings Transverse Feedback in a 100 TeV Storage Ring G.DE93 001571 TRANSVERSE FEEDBACK IN A 100 TeV STORAGE RING*IS UNLIMITED r-t_9. TRANSVERSE FEEDBACK IN A 100 TeV STORAGE

  9. Optimizing Feedback in Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Optimizing Feedback in Energy Harvesting MISO Communication Channels Rajeev Gangula1 , David.gunduz@imperial.ac.uk Abstract--In this work,1 we consider the optimization of feedback in a point-to-point MISO channel in the context of a simple multiple antenna system, namely MISO channel, where feedback can be used to improve

  10. Feedback on vertical velocity. Rotation, convection, self-sustaining process.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebovitz, Norman

    Feedback on vertical velocity. Rotation, convection, self-sustaining process. Fabian Waleffe the mechanisms involved in the nonlinear feedback from u to v, yielding a self-sustaining process for shear flows feedback from the streak instability into the rolls sufficient to lead to a self-sustaining process

  11. Feedback Control RealTime Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    1 Feedback Control Real­Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms * Chenyang Lu John A}@virginia.edu Abstract This paper presents a feedback control real­time scheduling (FCS) framework for adaptive real. In particular, we establish a dynamic model and performance analysis of several feedback control scheduling

  12. Feedback Control Real-Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    1 Feedback Control Real-Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms* Chenyang Lu John A}@virginia.edu Abstract This paper presents a feedback control real-time scheduling (FCS) framework for adaptive real. In particular, we establish a dynamic model and performance analysis of several feedback control scheduling

  13. Multimodal feedback for the acquisition of small targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    -haptic `sticky' feedback. The tactile conditions used stimulation through vibration (rather than force- feedback the need for caution, revealing that excessive feedback can damage interaction though `noise such as vibration on a train or plane, when bright light reduces screen clarity or when using a laptop trackpoint

  14. The effects of driver gas contamination on shock tube test time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkins, Garry Owen

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF DRIVER GAS CONTAMINATION ON SHOCK TUBE TEST TIME A Thesis by CARRY OWEN HAWKINS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Memb e r) (Member) (Member) (Membe r) (Member) December 1970... AB S TRACT The Effects of Driver Gas Contamination on Shock Tube Test Time. (December 1970) Garry 0. Hawkins, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. Richard E. Thomas The effects of driver gas contamination are manifested in a change...

  15. Time Step Size Limitation Introduced by the BSSN Gamma Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Schnetter

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Many mesh refinement simulations currently performed in numerical relativity counteract instabilities near the outer boundary of the simulation domain either by changes to the mesh refinement scheme or by changes to the gauge condition. We point out that the BSSN Gamma Driver gauge condition introduces a time step size limitation in a similar manner as a CFL condition, but which is independent of the spatial resolution. We give a didactic explanation of this issue, show why especially mesh refinement simulations suffer from it, and point to a simple remedy.

  16. ECOdriving - Widespread Implementation for Learner Drivers and Licensed

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified as ASHRAEDuval County, Texas:EECO2 AssetDrivers (ECOWILL)

  17. U-226: Linux Kernel SFC Driver TCP MSS Option Handling Denial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the Solarflare network driver (driversnetethernetsfctx.c) when handling TCP segments and can be exploited via a...

  18. Detecting motorcycles in road scenes: differences between car drivers and motorcyclists.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khashawi, Fadhel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Many motorcycle “right of way” violations are believed to be a result of low conspicuity and a failure to perceive the motorcycle. Drivers with previous… (more)

  19. Philips Light Sources & Electronics is Developing an Efficient, Smaller, Cost-Effective Family of LED Drivers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Philips Light Sources & Electronics is developing a new family of LED drivers that are more efficient and cost-effective as well as smaller in size than currently available drivers. The new drivers are switch-mode power supplies that are similar to today's drivers, but with an improved design. In addition, they have a different topology—boost plus LLC—for wattages of 40W and above, but they retain the commonly used flyback topology at lower wattages.

  20. Residential Feedback Devices and Programs: Opportunities for Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, R.; Tondro, M.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavior-based approaches have been a growing interest in the energy efficiency field over recent years and the use of residential energy feedback has garnered particular interest. By providing an increased level of detail, feedback can greatly increase a consumer's understanding of how energy is used in their home. This project reviewed the existing body of research on electricity feedback to identify parallel lessons for gas, discussed the benefits and challenges of different types of feedback, and identifying three feedback options that show strong potential for natural gas savings.

  1. Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graziani, L; Schneider, R; Kawata, D; de Bennassuti, M; Maselli, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline which implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the redshift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the Milky Way formation and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along the merger-tree assembly. The resulting redshift evolution of the Local Group star formation rates, reionisation and metal enrichment along with the predicted Metallicity Distribution Function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We dis...

  2. Physical regimes for feedback in galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Monaco

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new (semi-)analytic model for feedback in galaxy formation. The ISM is modeled as a two-phase medium in pressure equilibrium. The remnants of exploding type II SNe percolate into super-bubbles (SBs) that sweep the ISM, heating the hot phase (if the SB is adiabatic) or cooling it (in the snowplow stage, when the interior gas of the SB has cooled). The resulting feedback regimes occur in well-defined regions of the space defined by vertical scale-length and surface density of the structure. When SBs blow out in the adiabatic regime, the efficiency of SNe in heating the ISM is ~5 per cent, with \\~80 per cent of the energy budget injected into the external halo, and the outcoming ISM is self-regulated to a state similar to that found in the Milky Way. Feedback is most efficient when SBs are pressure-confined in the adiabatic regime. In some significant regions of the parameter space confinement takes place in the snowplow stage; then the hot phase has a lower temperature and star formation is quicker. In some critical cases, the hot phase is strongly depleted and the cold phase percolates the whole volume, giving rise to a sudden burst of star formation. Strong galactic winds are predicted to happen only in critical cases. This model provides a starting point for constructing a realistic grid of feedback solutions to be used in galaxy formation codes. The predictive power of this model extends to many properties of the ISM, so that most parameters can be constrained by reproducing the main properties of the Milky Way. (Abridged)

  3. Quantum feedback control and classical control theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, Andrew C. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, (New Zealand)] [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, (New Zealand); Habib, Salman [Theoretical Division, T-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, T-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Jacobs, Kurt [Theoretical Division, T-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, T-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Mabuchi, Hideo [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics 12-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics 12-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Tan, Sze M. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, (New Zealand)] [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, (New Zealand)

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss the problem of quantum feedback control in the context of established formulations of classical control theory, examining conceptual analogies and essential differences. We describe the application of state-observer-based control laws, familiar in classical control theory, to quantum systems and apply our methods to the particular case of switching the state of a particle in a double-well potential. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. UWB multi-burst transmit driver for averaging receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dallum, Gregory E

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a sequence of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. There are two oscillators in the transmitter circuit, a gated burst rate oscillator and a gated RF burst or RF power output oscillator. The burst rate oscillator produces a relatively low frequency, i.e., MHz, square wave output for a selected transmit cycle, and drives the RF burst oscillator, which produces RF bursts of much higher frequency, i.e., GHz, during the transmit cycle. The frequency of the burst rate oscillator sets the spacing of the RF burst packets. The first oscillator output passes through a bias driver to the second oscillator. The bias driver conditions, e.g., level shifts, the signal from the first oscillator for input into the second oscillator, and also controls the length of each RF burst. A trigger pulse actuates a timing circuit, formed of a flip-flop and associated reset time delay circuit, that controls the operation of the first oscillator, i.e., how long it oscillates (which defines the transmit cycle).

  5. Gaz de France ordering high-efficiency drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Biasi, V.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For natural gas transmission, distribution, and storage operations, Gaz de France is installing Creusot-Loire's new line of high-efficiency gas-turbine packages, powered by Allison 501 and 570 generators for compressor speeds exceeding 10,000 rpm. The Type CA.3 driver comprises a 501 generator coupled to a two-stage power turbine; the ISO base rating is 3265 kW on gas fuel with a heat rate of 12,050 Btu/kWhr. The CA.5 driver with the stronger 570 gas-turbine engine is base-rated at 4805 kW with a heat rate of 11,360 Btu/kWhr. Designed for direct-drive, with no intermediary gearing, the high-speed compressor operates on the 13,820-rpm output shaft speed of the CA.3 for baseload requirements or on 11,500 rpm for the more powerful CA.5 set. These compressor packages will serve as boosters for the transmission and storage of regasified LNG from Algeria and natural gas from the North Sea, USSR, and France's own Lacq fields.

  6. Simulating galactic outflows with kinetic supernova feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Dalla Vecchia; Joop Schaye

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from star formation is thought to play a key role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, but its implementation in cosmological simulations is currently hampered by a lack of numerical resolution. We present and test a sub-grid recipe to model feedback from massive stars in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The energy is distributed in kinetic form among the gas particles surrounding recently formed stars. The impact of the feedback is studied using a suite of high-resolution simulations of isolated disc galaxies embedded in dark halos with total mass 10^{10} and 10^{12} Msol/h. We focus in particular on the effect of pressure forces on wind particles within the disc, which we turn off temporarily in some of our runs to mimic a recipe that has been widely used in the literature. We find that this popular recipe gives dramatically different results because (ram) pressure forces on expanding superbubbles determine both the structure of the disc and the development of large-scale outflows. Pressure forces exerted by expanding superbubbles puff up the disc, giving the dwarf galaxy an irregular morphology and creating a galactic fountain in the massive galaxy. Hydrodynamic drag within the disc results in a strong increase of the effective mass loading of the wind for the dwarf galaxy, but quenches much of the outflow in the case of the high-mass galaxy.

  7. Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp-Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp@civil.auc.dk leje@elsam-eng.com Abstract: Current offshore wind turbine design methods have matured to a 1st identification of the most important uncertainty drivers specific for offshore wind turbine design loads

  8. 1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation 3 A. Sen Gupta,1 A), 29 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean equatorial 30 circulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/ 31 2012GL051447. 32 1. Introduction 33 [2] The equatorial Pacific Ocean

  9. DRIVER ASSISTED CONTROL STRATEGIES: THEORY AND EXPERIMENT Mark DePoorter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    , the type of handling behavior required of the vehicle. A strategy based on yaw rate control is presented.e. Driver Assisted Control (DAC). The control system would be used to provide stability and performance while still allowing the driver to dictate the path of the vehicle. Parameters such as yaw angle, yaw

  10. AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    AABBSSTTRRAACCTT MA, RUIQI. The Effect of In-Vehicle Automation and Reliability on Driver Situation by automation and in- vehicle device use. Specifically, this study investigated the implications of adaptive; investigate the effect of varying reliability of in-vehicle automation (navigation aids) on driver SA

  11. UC SANTA BARBARA POLICY AND PROCEDURE Driving Records for Designated Employees and Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    when employees are convicted of motor vehicle violations and when actions are taken against a driver a special certificate (ambulance, private school bus, farm labor vehicle, special construction equipment with this policy. C. There are criminal penalties for employing or continuing to employ as a driver a person who

  12. Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1 W. E. Fowler,1 K. R a linear-transformer- driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)]. DOI: 10

  13. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -GENERAL SERVICES -RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT STATE DRIVER ACCIDENT REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA - GENERAL SERVICES - RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT STATE DRIVER ACCIDENT REVIEW STD. 274 (REV. 1/2003) PLEASE PRINT OR TYPE SUPERVISOR'S REVIEW - FOR DEPARTMENTAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PURPOSE: To have supervisor investigate each driver accident, report facts and circumstances, confirm

  14. Recirculating induction accelerator as a low-cost driver for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Newton, M.A.; Reginato, L.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Shay, H.D.; Yu, S.S.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a fusion driver, a heavy ion accelerator offers the advantages of efficient target coupling, high reliability, and long stand-off focusing. While the projected cost of conventional heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers based on multiple beam induction linacs are quite competitive with other inertial driver options, a driver solution which reduces the cost by a factor of two or more will make the case for HIF truly compelling. The recirculating induction accelerator has the potential of large cost reductions. For this reason, an intensive study of the recirculator concept was performed by a team from LLNL and LBL over the past year. We have constructed a concrete point design example of a 4 MJ driver with a projected efficiency of 35% and projected cost of less than 500 million dollars. A detailed report of our findings during this year of intensive studies has been recently completed. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype, Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A ``semistatistical horizontal method`` was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived.

  16. Linac-Based Proton Driver for a Neutrino Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garoby, R; Aiba, M; Meddahi, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Neutrino Factory Proton Driver based on a superconducting proton linac has been designed in the CERN context. The 5 GeV/4 MW H- beam from the linac is accumulated using charge exchange injection in a fixed-energy synchrotron and afterwards transferred to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place. The lattices of the accumulator and compressor are described, as well as magnet technology and RF manipulations. Critical issues related to charge-exchange injection, space-charge effects in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator, are addressed. The analysis is focused on the baseline scenario, which provides 6 bunches on the target. Results of preliminary analysis of options with less bunches (three and one) are also presented.

  17. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. C. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Burleson, Theodore A. [Colorado State U.; Milton, Stephen V. [Colorado State U.; Morin, Auralee L. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Stephen V. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Hannon, Fay E. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Carlsten, Bruce E. [LANL; Lewellen, John W. [LANL

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  18. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR.

  19. A comparison of some relevance feedback techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cashman, Leslie Edward

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the relevant documents. Needless to say, perfect indexing does not exist in document retr1eval systems. Yet to use relevance feedback a basic assumption has to be made. Specifically 1t must be assumed that documents relevant to a given query will res1de... results. Out ut de ictin the functionin of each strate . The vector mentioned above is printed for each iteration of each strategy. At a glance it shows how the ranks of the relevant documents vacillate from one iteration to the next. In addition...

  20. Self-assessing target with automatic feedback

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larkin, Stephen W.; Kramer, Robert L.

    2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A self assessing target with four quadrants and a method of use thereof. Each quadrant containing possible causes for why shots are going into that particular quadrant rather than the center mass of the target. Each possible cause is followed by a solution intended to help the marksman correct the problem causing the marksman to shoot in that particular area. In addition, the self assessing target contains possible causes for general shooting errors and solutions to the causes of the general shooting error. The automatic feedback with instant suggestions and corrections enables the shooter to improve their marksmanship.

  1. Cloud feedback studies with a physics grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dipankar, Anurag [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg; Stevens, Bjorn [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    During this project the investigators implemented a fully parallel version of dual-grid approach in main frame code ICON, implemented a fully conservative first-order interpolation scheme for horizontal remapping, integrated UCLA-LES micro-scale model into ICON to run parallely in selected columns, and did cloud feedback studies on aqua-planet setup to evaluate the classical parameterization on a small domain. The micro-scale model may be run in parallel with the classical parameterization, or it may be run on a "physics grid" independent of the dynamics grid.

  2. Documentation Feedback | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates TheLLE CleanroomDocumentation Feedback

  3. q-deformed logistic map with delay feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manish Dev Shrimali; Subhashish Banerjee

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The delay logistic map with two types of q-deformations: Tsallis and Quantum-group type are studied. The stability of the map and its bifurcation scheme is analyzed as a function of the deformation and delay feedback parameters. Chaos is suppressed in a certain region of deformation and feedback parameter space. The steady state obtained by delay feedback is maintained in one type of deformation while chaotic behavior is recovered in another type with increasing delay.

  4. Feedback Control Using Only Quantum Back-Action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The traditional approach to feedback control is to apply forces to a system by modifying the Hamiltonian. Here we show that quantum systems can be controlled without any Hamiltonian feedback, purely by exploiting the random quantum back-action of a continuous weak measurement. We demonstrate that, quite remarkably, the quantum back-action of such an adaptive measurement is just as effective at controlling quantum systems as traditional feedback.

  5. II MODEL AND FEEDBACK LINEARIZING CONTROLLER 1 A Multilayer Perceptron Replaces a Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amaral, José Nelson

    in a permanent magnetic field DC Programa de P'os Gradua¸c~ao em Engenharia El'etrica, Pontif'icia Universidade magnetic field DC motor connected to a load via a gear train. The nonlinear load is a shaft with a mass and Feedback Linearizing Controller The servomechanism studied in this research consists of a permanent

  6. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  7. Multiplex Chaos Synchronization in Semiconductor Lasers with Multiple Optoelectronic Feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. M. Shahverdiev; K. A. Shore

    2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Secure chaos based multiplex communication system scheme is proposed utilizing globally coupled semiconductor lasers with multiple variable time delay optoelectronic feedbacks.

  8. artificial tactile feedback: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 429 Vectorial Feedback with Carry Registers CERN...

  9. Real-time Information, Uncertainty and Quantum Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Qi; Daoyi Dong; Chunlin Chen; Lijun Liu; Zairong Xi

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback is the core concept in cybernetics and its effective use has made great success in but not limited to the fields of engineering, biology, and computer science. When feedback is used to quantum systems, two major types of feedback control protocols including coherent feedback control (CFC) and measurement-based feedback control (MFC) have been developed. In this paper, we compare the two types of quantum feedback control protocols by focusing on the real-time information used in the feedback loop and the capability in dealing with parameter uncertainty. An equivalent relationship is established between quantum CFC and non-selective quantum MFC in the form of operator-sum representation. Using several examples of quantum feedback control, we show that quantum MFC can theoretically achieve better performance than quantum CFC in stabilizing a quantum state and dealing with Hamiltonian parameter uncertainty. The results enrich understanding of the relative advantages between quantum MFC and quantum CFC, and can provide useful information in choosing suitable feedback protocols for quantum systems.

  10. Feedback Processes [in Massive Star Formation]: A Theoretical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordecai-Mark Mac Low

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the evidence for the importance of feedback from massive stars at small and large scales. The feedback mechanisms include accretion luminosity, ionizing radiation, collimated outflows, and stellar winds. The good news is that feedback doesn't entirely prevent the formation of massive stars, while the bad news is that we don't know what does limit their masses. Feedback from massive stars also influences their surroundings. I argue that this does not produce a triggering efficiency above unity, nor does it prevent lots of prompt star formation in GMCs, though it may preserve massive remnants of the clouds for many dynamical times.

  11. Laser photon statistics in the feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Yu. Golubeva; Yu. M. Golubev

    2005-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A mere correspondence between the electron statistics and the photon one vanishes in the feedback loop (FBL). It means that the direct photodetection, supplying us with the electron statistics, does not provide us with a wished information about the laser photon statistics. For getting this information we should think up another measurement procedure, and we in the article suggest applying the three-level laser as a auxiliary measuring device. This laser has impressive property, namely, its photon statistics survive information about the initial photon statistics of the laser which excites coherently the three-level medium. Thus, if we choose the laser in the FBL as exciting the three-level laser, then we have an possibility to evaluate its initial photon statistics by means of direct detecting the three-level laser emission. Finally, this approach allows us to conclude the feedback is not capable of creating a regularity in the laser light beam. Contrary, the final photon fluctuations turn out to be always even bigger. The mentioned above feature of the three-level laser takes place only for the strong interaction between the lasers (exciting and excited). It means the initial state of the exciting laser is changed dramatically, so our measurement procedure can not be identified with some non-demolition one.

  12. Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as “on the fly” adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include • AC Power Factor Correction; • High power efficiency; • Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular “white” light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

  13. Transition-edge sensor with enhanced electrothermal feedback for cryogenic particle detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nam, Sae Woo (Palo Alto, CA); Cabrera, Blas (Stanford, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting transition-edge sensor with an electrothermal-feedback circuit, a heat sink thermally coupled thereto, a bias-feedback circuit electrically coupled with the electrothermal feedback circuit, and a current sensor electrically coupled with the bias-feedback circuit and inductively coupled with the electrothermal-feedback circuit.

  14. Negative feedback effects on star formation history and cosmic reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Wang; Jirong Mao; Shouping Xiang; Ye-Fei Yuan

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    After considering the effects of negative feedback on the process of star formation, we explore the relationship between star formation process and the associated feedback, by investigating how the mechanical feedback from supernovae(SNe) and radiative feedback from luminous objects regulate the star formation rate and therefore affect the cosmic reionization.Based on our present knowledge of the negative feedback theory and some numerical simulations, we construct an analytic model in the framework of the Lambda cold dark matter model. In certain parameter regions, our model can explain some observational results properly. In large halos(T_vir>10000 K), both mechanical and radiative feedback have a similar behavior: the relative strength of negative feedback reduces as the redshift decreases. In contrast, in small halos (T_virfeedback gets stronger when the redshift decreases. And the star formation rate in these small halos depends very weakly on the star-formation efficiency. Our results show that the radiative feedback is important for the early generation stars. It can suppress the star formation rate considerably. But the mechanical feedback from the SNe explosions is not able to affect the early star formation significantly. The early star formation in small-halo objects is likely to be self-regulated. The radiative and mechanical feedback dominates the star formation rate of the PopII/I stars all along. The feedback from first generation stars is very strong and should not be neglected. However, their effects on the cosmic reionization are not significant, which results in a small contribution to the optical depth of Thomson scattering.

  15. Physics at an upgraded proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Geer

    2004-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The accelerator-based particle physics program in the US is entering a period of transition. This is particularly true at Fermilab which for more than two decades has been the home of the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider, the World's highest energy hadron collider. In a few years time the energy frontier will move to the LHC at CERN. Hence, if an accelerator-based program is to survive at Fermilab, it must evolve. Fermilab is fortunate in that, in addition to hosting the Tevatron Collider, the laboratory also hosts the US accelerator-based neutrino program. The recent discovery that neutrino flavors oscillate has opened a new exciting world for us to explore, and has created an opportunity for the Fermilab accelerator complex to continue to address the cutting-edge questions of particle physics beyond the Tevatron Collider era. The presently foreseen neutrino oscillation experiments at Fermilab (MiniBooNE [1] and MINOS [2]) will enable the laboratory to begin contributing to the Global oscillation physics program in the near future, and will help us better understand the basic parameters describing the oscillations. However, this is only a first step. To be able to pin down all of the oscillation parameters, and hopefully make new discoveries along the way, we will need high statistics experiments, which will require a very intense neutrino beam, and one or more very massive detectors. In particular we will require new MW-scale primary proton beams and perhaps ultimately a Neutrino Factory [3]. Plans to upgrade the Fermilab Proton Driver are presently being developed [4]. The upgrade project would replace the Fermilab Booster with a new 8 GeV accelerator with 0.5-2 MW beam power, a factor of 15-60 more than the current Booster. It would also make the modifications needed to the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) to upgrade it to simultaneously provide 120 GeV beams of 2 MW. This would enable a factor of 5-10 increase in neutrino beam intensities at the MI, while also supporting a vigorous 8 GeV fixed-target program. In addition, a Proton Driver might also serve as a stepping-stone to future accelerators, both as an R&D test bed and as an injector, with connections to the Linear Collider, Neutrino Factories, and a VLHC. Hence, although neutrino physics would provide the main thrust for the science program at an upgraded Fermilab proton source, the new facility would also offer exciting opportunities for other fixed-target particle physics (kaons, muons, neutrons, antiprotons, etc.) and a path towards new accelerators in the future.

  16. Multistability in a semiconductor laser with optoelectronic feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Sze-Chun

    Multistability in a semiconductor laser with optoelectronic feedback Guang-Qiong Xia1,2 , Sze with delayed optoelectronic feedback is observed experimentally. For a given delay time, the observed dynamical-oscillating semiconductor lasers subject to delayed optoelectronic mutual coupling," Phys. Rev. E 73, 047201-1-4 (2006) 8. G

  17. Modular Quantum Memories Using Passive Linear Optics and Coherent Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modular Quantum Memories Using Passive Linear Optics and Coherent Feedback Hendra I. Nurdin photon pulsed optical field has a conceptually simple modular realization using only passive linear optics and coherent feedback. We exploit the idea that two decaying optical cavities can be coupled

  18. Handy feedback: Connecting smart meters with mobile phones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and immediate feedback between 5% and 15% of the electrical household energy consumption can be saved [4 limitations of existing electricity consumption monitor- ing systems. It offers the possibility system provides both: real-time feedback on the entire electricity usage and on the consumption of many

  19. POWER-EFFICIENT OFDM WITH REDUCED COMPLEXITY AND FEEDBACK OVERHEAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Antonio Garcia

    to the transmitter. Our design exploits the correlation among sub-carriers in order to re- duce feedback overheadPOWER-EFFICIENT OFDM WITH REDUCED COMPLEXITY AND FEEDBACK OVERHEAD Antonio G. Marques Dept. of TSC subscriber lines (DSL), digital audio and video broadcasting (DAB/DVB) standards and wireless local area

  20. STABILIZATION OF THE UNICYCLE VIA DYNAMIC FEEDBACK LINEARIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    consider the feedback control problem for a wheeled mobile robot with the kinematics of a unicycle, a typical example of nonholonomic robotic system. It is shown that dynamic feedback linearization can be used to design a simple control law which is valid for trajectory tracking as well as point

  1. LINEAR FEEDBACK CONTROL OF TRANSITION IN SHEAR FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoepffner, Jérôme

    -100 44 Stockholm, Sweden, 2The Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI), SE-172 90, Stockholm Sweden 3 are being developed (see Bewley, 2001, Kim, 2003). A powerful theory for linear feedback control on the control effort. The optimal feedback gains L and K can be computed independently for each wave number pair

  2. Stabilising entanglement by quantum jump-based feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. R. Carvalho; J. J. Hope

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that direct feedback based on quantum jump detection can be used to generate entangled steady states. We present a strategy that is insensitive to detection inefficiencies and robust against errors in the control Hamiltonian. This feedback procedure is also shown to overcome spontaneous emission effects by stabilising states with high degree of entanglement.

  3. Direct laser additive fabrication system with image feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hofmeister, William H. (Nashville, TN); Knorovsky, Gerald A. (Albuquerque, NM); MacCallum, Danny O. (Edgewood, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Smugeresky, John E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed-loop, feedback-controlled direct laser fabrication system is disclosed. The feedback refers to the actual growth conditions obtained by real-time analysis of thermal radiation images. The resulting system can fabricate components with severalfold improvement in dimensional tolerances and surface finish.

  4. Design and Evaluation of a Feedback Control EDF Scheduling Algorithm *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    Design and Evaluation of a Feedback Control EDF Scheduling Algorithm * * Supported in part by NSF. In this paper, we present a feedback control real­time scheduling algorithm and its evaluation. Performance}@cs.virginia.edu, + gt9s@virginia.edu Abstract Despite the significant body of results in real­time scheduling, many real

  5. Feedback stabilization of unstable propagating waves Eugene Mihaliuk,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Feedback stabilization of unstable propagating waves Eugene Mihaliuk,1 Tatsunari Sakurai,1 Florin Received 29 July 2001; revised manuscript received 10 March 2002; published 26 June 2002 Propagating wave s : 82.40.Ck, 47.54. r Propagating waves in active media arise from the cou- pling of a positive feedback

  6. Design of VAX software for a generalized feedback system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, F.; Castillo, S.; Himmel, T.; Sass, B.; Shoaee, H.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast feedback in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) not only works, but is necessary. We have several examples of currently running systems that have greatly improved the performance of the accelerator. In order to increase the number of feedback loops, it has become necessary to redesign the system to allow a database description of any feedback loop. We use digital control theory to formally describe each feedback loop in terms of a matrix equation. Then a new feedback loop requires only an update to the database, and perhaps the installation of a inter-micro communications link. This paper details the design of the VAX software required to implement the new system. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd (Knoxville, TN); Daw, Charles Stuart (Knoxville, TN); Wagner, Robert Milton (Knoxville, TN)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  8. Feedback mechanism for smart nozzles and nebulizers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montaser, Akbar [Potomac, MD; Jorabchi, Kaveh [Arlington, VA; Kahen, Kaveh [Kleinburg, CA

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Nozzles and nebulizers able to produce aerosol with optimum and reproducible quality based on feedback information obtained using laser imaging techniques. Two laser-based imaging techniques based on particle image velocimetry (PTV) and optical patternation map and contrast size and velocity distributions for indirect and direct pneumatic nebulizations in plasma spectrometry. Two pulses from thin laser sheet with known time difference illuminate droplets flow field. Charge coupled device (CCL)) captures scattering of laser light from droplets, providing two instantaneous particle images. Pointwise cross-correlation of corresponding images yields two-dimensional velocity map of aerosol velocity field. For droplet size distribution studies, solution is doped with fluorescent dye and both laser induced florescence (LIF) and Mie scattering images are captured simultaneously by two CCDs with the same field of view. Ratio of LIF/Mie images provides relative droplet size information, then scaled by point calibration method via phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  9. Dynamic analysis of policy drivers for bioenergy commodity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Jeffers; Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin M. Searcy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass is increasingly being considered as a feedstock to provide a clean and renewable source of energy in the form of both liquid fuels and electric power. In the United States, the biofuels and biopower industries are regulated by different policies and have different drivers which impact the maximum price the industries are willing to pay for biomass. This article describes a dynamic computer simulation model that analyzes future behavior of bioenergy feedstock markets given policy and technical options. The model simulates the long-term dynamics of these markets by treating advanced biomass feedstocks as a commodity and projecting the total demand of each industry as well as the market price over time. The model is used for an analysis of the United States bioenergy feedstock market that projects supply, demand, and market price given three independent buyers: domestic biopower, domestic biofuels, and foreign exports. With base-case assumptions, the biofuels industry is able to dominate the market and meet the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets for advanced biofuels. Further analyses suggest that United States bioenergy studies should include estimates of export demand in their projections, and that GHG-limiting policy would partially shield both industries from exporter dominance.

  10. A Usability Study of a Social Media Prototype for Building Energy Feedback and Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehrer, David R.; Vasudev, Janani; Kaam, Soazig

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot for a residential energy feedback program allowedscale residential pilots of real-time energy feedback thatresidential settings using a variety of interventions such as financial incentives, energy feedback,

  11. Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Courtenay; Magnusdottir, Gudrun; Stern, Hal

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variability and climate feedbacks in a global coupled model.Ocean JOURNAL OF CLIMATE feedback on the North Atlantic2009 STRONG ET AL. Observed Feedback between Winter Sea Ice

  12. Summary of sessions B and F: High intensity linacs and frontend & proton drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferdinand, R.; /Saclay; Chou, W.; /Fermilab; Galambos, J.; /Oak Ridge

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the sessions B&F of the 33rd ICFA Advanced Beam Dynamics Workshop on High Intensity & High Brightness Hadron Beams held in Bensheim, Germany. It covers high intensity linacs, front ends and proton driver topics.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile drivers Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile drivers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile driver examination Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile driver examination Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident...

  15. Age and cross-cultural comparison of drivers' cognitive workload and performance in simulated urban driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, J.

    Driving demands significant psychomotor attention and requires even more when drivers are engaged in secondary tasks that increase cognitive workload and divert attention. It is well established that age influences driving ...

  16. Modification of Driver Behavior Based on Information from Pedestrian Countdown Timers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Brandon

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pedestrian countdown timers (CDTs) are promoted as a means of improving pedestrian safety at intersections. However, there are concerns that drivers view the CDTs when approaching the intersection and use that information to drive more aggressively...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambulance drivers Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    your ears... , but many drivers do it anyways. Driving instructors say unlike the cell phone, the iPod can be a problem Source: Salvucci, Dario D. - Department of Computer...

  18. Efficacy, national/international practices and motivational factors of lifelong driver education for the aging population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israels, Richard (Richard Steven)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a society facing a significant increase in its aging population, older driver education/training is emerging as a potential solution to help seniors drive more safely, thus maintaining their mobility and quality of life. ...

  19. Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature as a driver for the expansion of the microalga Gonyostomum semen in Swedish lakes Karin is an example of invasive harmful microalgae (Neilan et al., 2003). Another presumably invasive species

  20. Emergency vehicle driver training by Texas municipal police departments: a descriptive study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westmoreland, Robert Lawrence

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the increase in the number of monetary civil judgments arising out of police emergency driving situations, law enforcement agencies are taking a critical look at their emergency driver training programs. At the present time...

  1. Considerations of driver preferences and performance for selection of electronic automobile instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harwood, Raymond Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSIDERATIONS OF DRIVER PREFERENCES AND PERFORMANCE FOR SELECTION OF ELECTRONIC AUTOMOBILE INSTRUMENTATION A Thesis by RAYMOND SCOTT HARWOOD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering CONSIDERATIONS OF DRIVER PREFERENCES AND PERFORMANCE FOR SELECTION OF ELECTRONIC AUTOMOBILE INSTRUMENTATION A Thesis by RAYMOND SCOTT HARWOOD Approved as to style...

  2. HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HIGH INTENSITY LINAC DRIVER FOR THE SPIRAL-2 PROJECT : DESIGN OF SUPERCONDUCTING 88 MHZ QUARTER to the required energy. · Capability to accelerate ion beams of q/A=1/6 (up to 1 mA) in the future. The initial Abstract A superconducting linac driver, delivering deuterons with an energy up to 40 MeV (5 mA) and heavy

  3. Adaptacin de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autònoma de Barcelona, Universitat

    Adaptación de un driver WLAN Linux a una arquitectura NIOS-Avalon B. Martínez , I. Tarruella, D de un driver Linux se realiza un mapeo sobre una arquitectura basada en un procesador integrado dentro de un SoC. La elección de la partición Hw/Sw y de ciertos parámetros de la arquitectura se

  4. Radiative Feedback in Relic HII Regions at High-Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Mesinger; Greg L. Bryan; Zoltan Haiman

    2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    UV radiation from early astrophysical sources could have a large impact on subsequent star formation in nearby protogalaxies. Here we study the radiative feedback from the first, short-lived stars using hydrodynamical simulations with transient UV backgrounds (UVBs) and persistent Lyman-Werner backgrounds (LWBs) of varying intensity. We extend our prior work in Mesinger et al. (2006), by studying a more typical region whose proto-galaxies form at lower redshifts, z~13-20, in the epoch likely preceding the bulk of reionization. We confirm our previous results that feedback in the relic HII regions resulting from such transient radiation, is itself transient. Feedback effects dwindle away after ~30% of the Hubble time, and the same critical specific intensity of J_UV~0.1 x 10^{-21} ergs/s/cm^2/Hz/sr separates positive and negative feedback regimes. Additionally, we discover a second episode of eventual positive feedback in halos which have not yet collapsed when their progenitor regions were exposed to the transient UVB. This eventual positive feedback appears in all runs, regardless of the strength of the UVB. However, this feedback regime is very sensitive to the presence of Lyman-Werner radiation, and notable effects disappear under fairly modest background intensities of J_LW>10^{-3} x 10^{-21} ergs/s/cm^2/Hz/sr. We conclude that UV radiative feedback in relic HII regions, although a complicated process, seems unlikely to have a major impact on the progress of cosmological reionization, provided that present estimates of the lifetime and luminosity of a PopIII star are accurate. More likely is that the build-up of the LWB ultimately governs the feedback strength until a persistent UV background can be established. [abridged

  5. Quantum effects improve the energy efficiency of feedback control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan M. Horowitz; Kurt Jacobs

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The laws of thermodynamics apply equally well to quantum systems as to classical systems, and because of this quantum effects do not change the fundamental thermodynamic efficiency of isothermal refrigerators or engines. We show that, despite this fact, quantum mechanics permits measurement-based feedback control protocols that are more thermodynamically efficient than their classical counterparts. As part of our analysis we perform a detailed accounting of the thermodynamics of unitary feedback control, and elucidate the sources of inefficiency in measurement-based and coherent feedback.

  6. Feedback generation of quantum Fock states by discrete QND measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazyar Mirrahimi; Igor Dotsenko; Pierre Rouchon

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A feedback scheme for preparation of photon number states in a microwave cavity is proposed. Quantum Non Demolition (QND) measurement of the cavity field provides information on its actual state. The control consists in injecting into the cavity mode a microwave pulse adjusted to maximize the population of the desired target photon number. In the ideal case (perfect cavity and measures), we present the feedback scheme and its detailed convergence proof through stochastic Lyapunov techniques based on super-martingales and other probabilistic arguments. Quantum Monte-Carlo simulations performed with experimental parameters illustrate convergence and robustness of such feedback scheme.

  7. Coherent-feedback quantum control with a dynamic compensator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Mabuchi

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an experimental realization of a coherent-feedback control system that was recently proposed for testing basic principles of linear quantum stochastic control theory [M. R. James, H. I. Nurdin and I. R. Petersen, to appear in IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control (2008), arXiv:quant-ph/0703150v2]. For a dynamical plant consisting of an optical ring-resonator, I demonstrate ~ 7 dB broadband disturbance rejection of injected laser signals via all-optical feedback with a tailored dynamic compensator. Comparison of the results with a transfer function model pinpoints critical parameters that determine the coherent-feedback control system's performance.

  8. Optical bistability in nonlinear system with two loops of feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George P. Miroshnichenko; Alexander I. Trifanov

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of nonlinear optical system surrounded by two loops of feedback is investigated. The cell with the vapor of rubidium - type atoms is taken in the capacity of nonlinear element. Two modes of near-resonant electromagnetic field interacting with the cell are involved in the feedback. Two-dimensional optical bistability domain in location of input field intensities is obtained and dependence of its form and magnitude from the system parameters (photon detunings, feedback factor etc.) is investigated. "Input - output" relations corresponding to different trajectories in the bistability domain are obtained. Cross-hysteresis is studied.

  9. Self-consistent input-output formulation of quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanagisawa, M. [Department of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Hope, J. J. [Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method of analyzing quantum feedback circuits is presented. The classical analysis of feedback circuits can be generalized to apply to quantum systems by mapping the field operators of various outputs to other inputs via the standard input-output formalism. Unfortunately, this has led to unphysical results such as the violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for in-loop fields. This paper shows that this general approach can be redeemed by ensuring a self-consistently Hermitian Hamiltonian. The calculations are based on a noncommutative calculus of operator derivatives. A full description of several examples of quantum linear and nonlinear feedback for optical systems is presented.

  10. The wind power probability density forecast problem can be formulated as: forecast the wind power pdf at time step t for each look-ahead time step t+k of a given time-horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    The wind power probability density forecast problem can be formulated as: forecast the wind power ahead) knowing a set of explanatory variables (e.g. numerical weather predictions (NWPs), wind power measured values). Translating this sentence to an equation, we have: where pt+k is the wind power

  11. Transmit beamforming for multiple antenna systems with imperfect feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isukapalli, Yogananda R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    channel estimation (PCE) at the receiver is investigatedImperfect Channel Feedback PCE: Perfect Channel EstimationICE and ICF; Ana N=2; B=2; PCE, No Delay; Sim N=2; B=2; PCE,

  12. Channel Prediction and Feedback in Multiuser Broadcast Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adve, Raviraj

    Lab LG Electronics, Inc. 533, Hogye-1dong, Dongan-gu, Anyang-shi, 431-749, Korea Email: sixs of feedback reception may be This research was supported in part by LG Electronics, Inc. of Korea. drastically

  13. Microphones and Knock Sensors for Feedback Control of HCCI Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souder, Jason S; Mack, John Hunter; Hedrick, J. Karl; Dibble, Robert W

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion a current sensing for hcci combustion feedback. SAE2004. “Combustion timing in hcci engines deter- mined byof the combustion timing in an HCCI engine at high to medium

  14. Continuous execution : improving user feedback in the development cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Kevin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programming environments are increasing the amount of feedback given to users during the development cycle. This work continues with this trend by exploring continuous execution, a programming environment where the result ...

  15. Second Skin : motion capture with actuated feedback for motor learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miaw, Dennis (Dennis R.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second Skin aims to combine three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking with tactile feedback for the purpose of improving users' motor-learning ability. Such a system would track a user's body and limb movements as he or she ...

  16. Instabilities simulations with wideband feedback systems: CMAD, HEADTAIL, WARP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kevin; Fox, J D; Pivi, M; Rivetta, C; Rumolo, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse mode coupling (TMCI) and electron cloud instabilities (ECI) pose fundamental limitations on the acceptable beam intensities in the SPS at CERN. This in turn limits the ultimate achievable luminosity in the LHC. Therefore, future luminosity upgrades foresee methods for evading TMCI as well as ECI. Proposed approaches within the LHC Injector Upgrade (LIU) project include new optics with reduced transition energy as well as vacuum chamber coating techniques. As a complementary option, high bandwidth feedback systems may provide instability mitigation by actively damping the intra-bunch motion of unstable modes. In an effort to evaluate the potentials and limitations of such feedback systems and to characterise some of the specifications, a numerical model of a realistic feedback system has been developed and integrated into available instabilities simulation codes. Together with the implementation of this new feedback system model, CMAD and HEADTAIL have been used to investigate the impact of differen...

  17. agn feedback observations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christopher S; Heinz, Sebastian 2008-01-01 18 Feeding Versus Feedback in AGNs from Near-Infrared IFU Observations: The Case of Mrk79 CERN Preprints Summary: We have mapped the...

  18. Code design for erasure channels with limited or noisy feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagasubramanian, Karthik

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of feedback in communication channels can significantly increase the reliability of transmission while decreasing the encoding and decoding complexity. Most of the applications like cellular telephony, satellite communications...

  19. Feedback Policies for Measurement-based Quantum State Manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuangshuang Fu; Guodong Shi; Alexandre Proutiere; Matthew R. James

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose feedback designs for manipulating a quantum state to a target state by performing sequential measurements. In light of Belavkin's quantum feedback control theory, for a given set of (projective or non-projective) measurements and a given time horizon, we show that finding the measurement selection policy that maximizes the probability of successful state manipulation is an optimal control problem for a controlled Markovian process. The optimal policy is Markovian and can be solved by dynamical programming. Numerical examples indicate that making use of feedback information significantly improves the success probability compared to classical scheme without taking feedback. We also consider other objective functionals including maximizing the expected fidelity to the target state as well as minimizing the expected arrival time. The connections and differences among these objectives are also discussed.

  20. Code design for erasure channels with limited or noisy feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagasubramanian, Karthik

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of feedback in communication channels can significantly increase the reliability of transmission while decreasing the encoding and decoding complexity. Most of the applications like cellular telephony, satellite communications...

  1. Optimization of neural network feedback control systems using automatic differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Elizabeth, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimal control problems can be challenging to solve, whether using analytic or numerical methods. This thesis examines the application of an adjoint method for optimal feedback control, which combines various algorithmic ...

  2. Comparative analysis of aviation safety information feedback systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funahashi, Yoshifuru

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the aviation system, there are several feedback systems to prevent an accident. First of all, the accident and serious incident reporting and investigation system is established by the Chicago Convention. In general, ...

  3. Bursting in a Subcritical Hopf Oscillator with a Nonlinear Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautam C Sethia; Abhijit Sen

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Bursting is a periodic transition between a quiescent state and a state of repetitive spiking. The phenomenon is ubiquitous in a variety of neurophysical systems. We numerically study the dynamical properties of a normal form of subcritical Hopf oscillator (at the bifurcation point) subjected to a nonlinear feedback. This dynamical system shows an infinite-period or a saddle-node on a limit cycle (SNLC) bifurcation for certain strengths of the nonlinear feedback. When the feedback is time delayed, the bifurcation scenario changes and the limit cycle terminates through a homoclinic or a saddle separatrix loop (SSL) bifurcation. This system when close to the bifurcation point exhibits various types of bursting phenomenon when subjected to a slow periodic external stimulus of an appropriate strength. The time delay in the feedback enhances the spiking rate i.e. reduces the interspike interval in a burst and also increases the width or the duration of a burst.

  4. Injection Related Background due to the Transverse Feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.J.; Akre, R.; Fisher, A.; Iverson, R.; Weaver, M.; /SLAC

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The background in the BaBar detector is especially high during injection, when most components are actually having reduced voltages. The situation is worse for the beam in High Energy Ring (HER) when the LER beam is present. It was found that the transverse feedback system plays an important role when stacking more charge on top of existing bunches. Lowering the feedback gain helped and it was realized later that the best scenario would be to gate off the feedback for only the one bunch, which got additional charge injected into it. The explanation is that the blown-up, but centered, original HER bunch plus the small injected off-axis bunch (each with half the charge) would stay in the ring if not touched, but the feedback system sees half the offset and wants to correct it, therefore disturbing and scraping the blown-up part.

  5. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to these choices of system parameters.

  6. Control of decoherence in open quantum systems using feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan Ganesan; Tzyh Jong Tarn

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum feedback is assuming increasingly important role in quantum control and quantum information processing. In this work we analyze the application of such feedback techniques in eliminating decoherence in open quantum systems. In order to apply such system theoretic methods we first analyze the invariance properties of quadratic forms which corresponds to expected value of a measurement and present conditions for decouplability of measurement outputs of such time-varying open quantum systems from environmental effects.

  7. Adaptive method with intercessory feedback control for an intelligent agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for an intelligent agent provides for adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. An adaptive architecture method with feedback control for multiple intelligent agents provides for coordinating and adaptively integrating reflexive and deliberative responses to a stimulus according to a goal. Re-programming of the adaptive architecture is through a nexus which coordinates reflexive and deliberator components.

  8. Employee Participation Through High Standards and Information Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisenthal, M.

    I EMPLOYEE PARTICIPATION THROUGH HIGH STANDARDS AND INFORMATION FEEDBACK Marvin Weisenthal Good Impressions, Inc. Troy, Michigan The energy problem is only too alive, and un fortunately waiting for the next crisis to raise its... to be followed, directions, feedback and recognition. These are props and guideposts we use to fuel our self motivating nature. Without them we are like a boat without oars or a rudder. These props give us information we need to see ourselves on course...

  9. Improving MU-MIMO Performance in LTE-(Advanced) by Efficiently Exploiting Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    (CDI/PMI). The standard supports finer granularity feedback i.e. sub-band feedback method, but it-band feedback for providing more frequent update of PMI. However, in order to support this feedback method, we), Downlink Control Information (DCI), Multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO), Precoding Matrix Indi- cator (PMI

  10. Feedback Control of the Sawtooth Period through Real Time Control of the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feedback Control of the Sawtooth Period through Real Time Control of the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency

  11. Feedback in simulations of disc-galaxy major mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Cox; Patrik Jonsson; Joel R. Primack; Rachel S. Somerville

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using hydrodynamic simulations of disc-galaxy major mergers, we investigate the star formation history and remnant properties when various parametrizations of a simple stellar feedback model are implemented. The simulations include radiative cooling, a density-dependent star formation recipe and a model for feedback from massive stars. The feedback model stores supernova feedback energy within individual gas particles and dissipates this energy on a time-scale specified by two free parameters; tau_fb, which sets the dissipative time-scale, and n, which sets the effective equation of state in star-forming regions. Using a self-consistent disc galaxy, modelled after a local Sbc spiral, in both isolated and major-merger simulations, we investigate parametrizations of the feedback model that are selected with respect to the quiescent disc stability. These models produce a range of star formation histories that are consistent with the star formation relation found by Kennicutt. All major mergers produce a population of new stars that is highly centrally concentrated, demonstrating a distinct break in the r1/4 surface density profile, consistent with previous findings. The half-mass radius and one-dimensional velocity dispersion are affected by the feedback model used. Finally, we compare our results to those of previous simulations of star formation in disc-galaxy major mergers, addressing the effects of star formation normalization, the version of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) employed and assumptions about the interstellar medium.

  12. The Geant4 Visualisation System - a multi-driver graphics system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Allison; Laurent Garnier; Akinori Kimura; Joseph Perl

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From the beginning the Geant4 Visualisation System was designed to support several simultaneous graphics systems written to common abstract interfaces. Today it has matured into a powerful diagnostic and presentational tool. It comes with a library of models that may be added to the current scene and which include the representation of the Geant4 geometry hierarchy, simulated trajectories and user-written hits and digitisations. The workhorse is the OpenGL suite of drivers for X, Xm, Qt and Win32. There is an Open Inventor driver. Scenes can be exported in special graphics formats for offline viewing in the DAWN, VRML, HepRApp and gMocren browsers. PostScript can be generated through OpenGL, Open Inventor, DAWN and HepRApp. Geant4's own tracking algorithms are used by the Ray Tracer. Not all drivers support all features but all drivers bring added functionality of some sort. This paper describes the interfaces and details the individual drivers.

  13. Cell signaling systems that contain positive-feedback loops or double-negative feedback loops can, in principle, convert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These circuits were originally envisioned as ways of achieving self-sustaining patterns of gene expression, but it is easy to see how double-negative feedback at a post-translational level could produce self-sustaining

  14. Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  15. Effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: Interactions and feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions of these effects with climate change, including feedbacks on climate. Such interactions occur in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. While there is significant uncertainty in the quantification of these effects, they could accelerate the rate of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase and subsequent climate change beyond current predictions. The effects of predicted changes in climate and solar UV radiation on carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are expected to vary significantly between regions. The balance of positive and negative effects on terrestrial carbon cycling remains uncertain, but the interactions between UV radiation and climate change are likely to contribute to decreasing sink strength in many oceanic regions. Interactions between climate and solar UV radiation will affect cycling of elements other than carbon, and so will influence the concentration of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. For example, increases in oxygen-deficient regions of the ocean caused by climate change are projected to enhance the emissions of nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gas. Future changes in UV-induced transformations of aquatic and terrestrial contaminants could have both beneficial and adverse effects. Taken in total, it is clear that the future changes in UV radiation coupled with human-caused global change will have large impacts on biogeochemical cycles at local, regional and global scales.

  16. A 200 C Universal Gate Driver Integrated Circuit for Extreme Environment Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL; Blalock, Benjamin J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature power converters (dc-dc, dc-ac, etc.) have enormous potential in extreme environment applications, including automotive, aerospace, geothermal, nuclear, and well logging. For successful realization of such high-temperature power conversion modules, the associated control electronics also need to perform at high temperature. This paper presents a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based high-temperature gate driver integrated circuit (IC) incorporating an on-chip low-power temperature sensor and demonstrating an improved peak output current drive over our previously reported work. This driver IC has been primarily designed for automotive applications, where the underhood temperature can reach 200 C. This new gate driver prototype has been designed and implemented in a 0.8 {micro}m, 2-poly, and 3-metal bipolar CMOS-DMOS (Double-Diffused Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) on SOI process and has been successfully tested for up to 200 C ambient temperature driving a SiC MOSFET and a SiC normally-ON JFET. The salient feature of the proposed universal gate driver is its ability to drive power switches over a wide range of gate turn-ON voltages such as MOSFET (0 to 20 V), normally-OFF JFET (-7 to 3 V), and normally-ON JFET (-20 to 0 V). The measured peak output current capability of the driver is around 5 A and is thus capable of driving several power switches connected in parallel. An ultralow-power on-chip temperature supervisory circuit has also been integrated into the die to safeguard the driver circuit against excessive die temperature ({ge}220 C). This approach utilizes increased diode leakage current at higher temperature to monitor the die temperature. The power consumption of the proposed temperature sensor circuit is below 10 {micro}W for operating temperature up to 200 C.

  17. MAX232, MAX232I DUAL EIA 232 DRIVERS/RECEIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    + C1- C2+ C2- VS- T2OUT R2IN VCC GND T1OUT R1IN R1OUT T1IN T2IN R2OUT MAX232 . . . D, DW, N, OR NSIN T2OUT R2INR2OUT 11 10 12 9 14 7 13 8 #12;MAX232, MAX232I DUAL EIA 232 DRIVERS/RECEIVERS SLLS047LMAX232, MAX232I DUAL EIA 232 DRIVERS/RECEIVERS SLLS047L - FEBRUARY 1989 - REVISED MARCH 2004 1POST

  18. Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

    2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

  19. Coherent versus measurement feedback: Linear systems theory for quantum information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is the measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages/disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal, hence their comparison in several situation is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals; back-action evasion (BAE), generation of a quantum non-demolished (QND) variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem (DFS), all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Then some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand it is shown that, for each control goal, there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of BAE, QND, and DFS in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

  20. Delayed feedback control of fractional-order chaotic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Trifce Sandev; Viktor Urumov

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility to stabilize unstable steady states and unstable periodic orbits in chaotic fractional-order dynamical systems by the time-delayed feedback method. By performing a linear stability analysis, we establish the parameter ranges for successful stabilization of unstable equilibria in the plane parametrizad by the feedback gain and the time delay. An insight into the control mechanism is gained by analyzing the characteristic equation of the controlled system, showing that the control scheme fails to control unstable equilibria having an odd number of positive real eigenvalues. We demonstrate that the method can also stabilize unstable periodic orbits for a suitable choice of the feedback gain, providing that the time delay is chosen to coincide with the period of the target orbit. In addition, it is shown numerically that delayed feedback control with a sinusoidally modulated time delay significantly enlarges the stability region of the steady states in comparison to the classical time-delayed feedback scheme with a constant delay.

  1. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577 (Japan); Bicknell, G. V., E-mail: ayw@ccs.tsukuba.ac.jp [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  2. Feedback effects of aspherical supernovae explosions on galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekki, Kenji; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how explosions of aspherical supernovae (A-SNe) can influence star formation histories and chemical evolution of dwarf galaxies by using a new chemodynamical model. We mainly present the numerical results of two comparative models so that the A-SN feedback effects on galaxies can be more clearly seen. SNe originating from stars with masses larger than 30M_sun are A-SNe in the "ASN" model whereas all SNe are spherical ones (S-SNe) in the "SSN" model. Each S-SN and A-SN are assumed to release feedback energy of 10^{51} erg and 10^{52} erg, respectively, and chemical yields and feedback energy of A-SN ejecta depend on angles between the axis of symmetry and the ejection directions. We find that star formation can become at least by a factor of ~3 lower in the ASN model in comparison with the SSN one owing to the more energetic feedback of A-SNe. As a result of this, chemical evolution can proceed very slowly in the ASN model. A-SN feedback effects can play a significant role in the formation of gi...

  3. Abstract--There are two types of drivers in production machine systems: constant velocity (CV) motor and servo-motor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, WJ "Chris"

    the dynamic model of the five-bar hybrid mechanism including its electric motors. Section 3 presents) motor and servo-motor. If a system contains two drivers or more, among which some are of the CV motor while the other are the servo-motor, the system has the so-called hybrid driver architecture

  4. Predicting the Effects of Cell-Phone Dialing on Driver Performance Dario D. Salvucci (dario@cbr.com)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    Predicting the Effects of Cell-Phone Dialing on Driver Performance Dario D. Salvucci (dario of attention to the effects of cellular telephone ("cell phone") use on driver behavior and performance the impact of cell-phone dialing in a naturalistic driving task. We developed models of four methods of cell-phone

  5. Install, both Arduino and AmaSeis software programs: Installing Arduino and drivers: Setting up AmaSeis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Install, both Arduino and AmaSeis software programs: Installing Arduino and drivers: Setting up Ama the Arduino drivers. Take note of the assigned com port number, and set up AmaSeis to that number. 3. Some computers will require the following. Keep in mind, Arduino, does not need to run or be involved. You just

  6. Powerful Outflows and Feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Andrew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) represent the growth phases of the supermassive black holes in the center of almost every galaxy. Powerful, highly ionized winds, with velocities $\\sim 0.1- 0.2c$ are a common feature in X--ray spectra of luminous AGN, offering a plausible physical origin for the well known connections between the hole and properties of its host. Observability constraints suggest that the winds must be episodic, and detectable only for a few percent of their lifetimes. The most powerful wind feedback, establishing the $M -\\sigma$ relation, is probably not directly observable at all. The $M - \\sigma$ relation signals a global change in the nature of AGN feedback. At black hole masses below $M-\\sigma$ feedback is confined to the immediate vicinity of the hole. At the $M-\\sigma$ mass it becomes much more energetic and widespread, and can drive away much of the bulge gas as a fast molecular outflow.

  7. Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Stochastic Behaviour of the Electricity Bid Stack: from Fundamental Drivers to Power Prices Michael) 23 October 2008 Abstract We develop a fundamental model for spot electricity prices, based prices with observed data. Keywords: electricity, bid stack, fundamental, margin, demand, natural gas 1

  8. Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Megafauna biomass tradeoff as a driver of Quaternary and future extinctions Anthony D. Barnosky,000 and 3,000 years ago. Estimates of megafauna biomass (including hu- mans as a megafauna species) for before, during, and after the extinction episode suggest that growth of human biomass largely matched

  9. Perception Drivers for Treated Wood by U.S. South Homebuilders and Remodelers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Perception Drivers for Treated Wood by U.S. South Homebuilders and Remodelers Sanna M. Kallioranta1 for the use of treated wood products in construction is considerable, especially in the U.S. South for termite protection and to mitigate moisture related decay. This research investigates the perception about treated

  10. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

  11. UA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    in settings with extreme human conditions (cold storage, waste management , etc....) The device is availableUA researchers develop develop a device for moving industrial vehicles without drivers Researchers Localization And Mapping). This technology is applicable to any business or industrial environment where

  12. Department Name: Center for International Education Org. #: 2062 Position Title: Driver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    Department Name: Center for International Education Org. #: 2062 Position Title: Driver WLS Level if entering mid-year); and 2. Students of any classification whose work is characterized by highly structured for departmental functions and/or programs. This level is assigned to the following: 1. Student managers

  13. Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konar, Megan

    Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: Controls on carrying capacity, niche formation online 3 March 2012 Keywords: Hydrology Biodiversity Dispersal Carrying capacity Niches Climate change and dynamics to biodiversity patterns. The focus of this paper is the key hydrologic controls crucial towards

  14. A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Changxu (Sean)

    A fuel economy optimization system with applications in vehicles with human drivers and autonomous University of New York, Buffalo, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Vehicle fuel economy Eco-driving Human developed and validated a new fuel-economy optimization system (FEOS), which receives input from vehicle

  15. A method for calibration of bone driver transducers to measure the mastoid Reggie Weece a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jont

    2010 Available online xxxx a b s t r a c t When using bone vibrator transducers for clinical a circuit model of the driver, describing it with three frequency-dependent parameters. Once these three circuit model is proposed to better capture the observed behaviors. Ã? 2010 Published by Elsevier B.V. 1

  16. Stratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In this paper we focus on South Eastern South America (SESA), a region that has exhibited one of the largest South America 1 Introduction The depletion of ozone in the polar Antarctic strato- sphere (i.e. `theStratospheric ozone depletion: a key driver of recent precipitation trends in South Eastern South

  17. Resource limitation is a driver of local adaptation in mycorrhizal symbioses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Resource limitation is a driver of local adaptation in mycorrhizal symbioses Nancy Collins Johnsona of the most limiting resource is maximized. Grasses grown in home soil and inoculated with home AM fungi biotrophs with vascular plants, and they facilitate plant acquisition of limiting soil resources. Thus

  18. Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate driver chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate transformer integrated in a CMOS silicon die together with the gate driver and other required functions frequency through the coreless transformer. The chosen design methodology will be explained and experimental

  19. Using Vision-Based Driver Assistance to Augment Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauchemin, Steven S.

    a Vision-Based Driver Assistance (VBDA) system that monitors the environment surrounding the vehicle using in the surrounding environment. The concept of a CCWS has been introduced, studied and validated by a number adoption of the Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) set of standards in production vehicles

  20. Cloud and Star Formation in Disk Galaxy Models with Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Shetty; Eve C. Ostriker

    2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We include feedback in global hydrodynamic simulations in order to study the star formation properties, and gas structure and dynamics, in models of galactic disks. We extend previous models by implementing feedback in gravitationally bound clouds: momentum is injected at a rate proportional to the star formation rate. This mechanical energy disperses cloud gas back into the surrounding ISM, truncating star formation in a given cloud, and raising the overall level of ambient turbulence. Propagating star formation can however occur as expanding shells collide, enhancing the density and triggering new cloud and star formation. By controlling the momentum injection per massive star and the specific star formation rate in dense gas, we find that the negative effects of high turbulence outweigh the positive ones, and in net feedback reduces the fraction of dense gas and thus the overall star formation rate. The properties of the large clouds that form are not, however, very sensitive to feedback, with cutoff masses of a few million solar masses, similar to observations. We find a relationship between the star formation rate surface density and the gas surface density with a power law index ~2 for our models with the largest dynamic range, consistent with theoretical expectations for our model of disk flaring. We point out that the value of the "Kennicutt-Schmidt" index depends on the thickness of the disk. With our simple feedback prescription (a single combined star formation event per cloud), we find that global spiral patterns are not sustained; less correlated feedback and smaller scale turbulence appear to be necessary for spiral patterns to persist.

  1. Feedback control of major disruptions in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, A. K. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10026 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that major disruptions in ITER can be avoided by the feedback control of the causative MHD precursors. The sensors will be 2D-arrays of ECE detectors and the suppressors will be modulated ECH beams injected radially to produce non-thermal radial pressures to counter the radial dynamics of MHD modes. The appropriate amplitude and phase of this signal can stabilize the relevant MHD modes and prevent their evolution to a major disruption. For multimode MHD precursors, an optimal feedback scheme with a Kalman filter is discussed.

  2. Feedback-controlled transport in an interacting colloidal system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Lichtner; Sabine H. L. Klapp

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) we consider a non-equilibrium system of interacting colloidal particles driven by a constant tilting force through a periodic, symmetric "washboard" potential. We demonstrate that, despite of pronounced spatio-temporal correlations, the particle current can be reversed by adding suitable feedback control terms to the DDFT equation of motion. We explore two distinct control protocols with time delay, focussing on either the particle positions or the density profile. Our study shows that the DDFT is an appropriate framework to implement time-delayed feedback control strategies widely used in other fields of nonlinear physics

  3. Feedback control of the squeezing of the fluorescence light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Barchielli; Matteo Gregoratti

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the formulations of the theory of quantum measurements in continuous time, quantum trajectory theory is very suitable for the introduction of measurement based feedback and closed loop control of quantum systems. In this paper we present such a construction in the concrete case of a two-level atom stimulated by a coherent, monochromatic laser. In particular, we show how fast feedback \\`a la Wiseman and Milburn can be introduced in the formulation of the theory. Then, the spectrum of the free fluorescence light is studied and typical quantum phenomena, squeezing and sub-natural line-narrowing, are presented.

  4. Teaching Feedback to First-year Medical Students: Long-term Skill Retention and Accuracy of Student Self-assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruidering-Hall, Marieke; O’Sullivan, Patricia S.; Chou, Calvin L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DK. Oral versus written feedback in medical clinic. J Gen2002; 77(12):1185–8. 3. Ende J. Feedback in clinical medicalWC, ten Cate OTJ. What is feedback in clinical education.

  5. Author's personal copy Feedback control and optimization for the production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the blending objectives are to produce a mixture with some prescribed properties. For gasoline, diesel or fuel by blending M. Chèbre a , Y. Creff b , N. Petit c,* a Advanced Process Control Department, Technical Direction Accepted 31 January 2010 Keywords: Blending Commercial fuel Feedback control Optimization Constraints

  6. Robust Path Planning and Feedback Design under Stochastic Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    . Introduction Autonomous vehicles such as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) need to be able to plan trajectories; prior work showed that a UAV operating at a constant altitude as well as other autonomous vehicles canRobust Path Planning and Feedback Design under Stochastic Uncertainty Lars Blackmore Autonomous

  7. Feedback controlled nanocantilever device Changhong Ke and Horacio D. Espinosaa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    with close-loop feedback is examined. The device consists of a cantilever carbon nanotube clamped to a top December 2003; accepted 1 May 2004) A switchable carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectromechanical systems NEMS resonators,6 field-effect transistors,7 and electrometers.8 Carbon nano- tubes CNTs have long been considered

  8. Feedback damper system for quadrupole oscillations after transition at RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Schultheiss, C.

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The heavy ion beam at RHIC undergoes strong quadrupole oscillations just after it crosses transition, which leads to an increase in bunch length making rebucketing less effective. A feedback system was built to damp these quadrupole oscillations and in this paper the characteristics of the system and the results obtained are presented and discussed.

  9. The entropy distribution in clusters: evidence of feedback?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott T. Kay

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropy of the intracluster medium at large radii has been shown recently to deviate from the self-similar scaling with temperature. Using N-body/hydrodynamic simulations of the LCDM cosmology, we demonstrate that this deviation is evidence that feedback processes are important in generating excess entropy in clusters. While radiative cooling increases the entropy of intracluster gas, resulting in a good match to the data in the centres of clusters, it produces an entropy-temperature relation closer to the self-similar scaling at larger radii. A model that includes feedback from galaxies, however, not only stabilises the cooling rate in the simulation, but is capable of reproducing the observed scaling behaviour both in cluster cores and at large radii. Feedback modifies the entropy distribution in clusters due to its increasing ability at expelling gas from haloes with decreasing mass. The strength of the feedback required, as suggested from our simulations, is consistent with supernova energetics, providing a large fraction of the energy reaches low-density regions and is originally contained within a small mass of gas.

  10. The Design of Eco-Feedback Technology Jon Froehlich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    behaviors with a goal of reducing environmental impact. The history of eco-feedback extends back more than environmental impact (adapted from [39] and [28], see Figure 1 for examples). Despite this goal, few HCI eco 40 years to the origins of environmental psychology. Despite its stated purpose, few HCI eco

  11. Distributed feedback laser biosensor incorporating a titanium dioxide nanorod surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Brian

    Distributed feedback laser biosensor incorporating a titanium dioxide nanorod surface Chun Ge,1 emission wavelength is modulated by the adsorption of biomolecules, whose greater dielectric permittivity- dimensional volume overlap between the DFBLB resonant mode and the region where biomolecule adsorption can oc

  12. Iterated Learning with Human subjects: adding communication and feedback 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Laura

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    with no intentional design on behalf of the subject. However, filtering for homonymy was necessary to produce a language that adapted to be learnable by becoming more structured and expressive. What I proposed was to introduce communication and feedback to investigate...

  13. ISM dust feedback from low to high mass stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falceta-Goncalves; D.

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust component of the interstellar medium (ISM) has been extensively studied in the past decades. Late-type stars have been assumed as the main source of dust to the ISM, but recent observations show that supernova remnants may play a role on the ISM dust feedback. In this work, I study the importance of low and high mass stars, as well as their evolutionary phase, on the ISM dust feedback process. I also determine the changes on the obtained results considering different mass distribution functions and star formation history. We describe a semi-empirical calculation of the relative importance of each star at each evolutionary phase in the dust ejection to the ISM. I compare the obtained results for two stellar mass distribution functions, the classic Salpeter initial mass function and the present day mass function. I used the evolutionary track models for each stellar mass, and the empirical mass-loss rates and dust-to-gas ratio. The relative contribution of each stellar mass depends on the used distribution. Ejecta from massive stars represent the most important objects for the ISM dust replenishment using the Salpeter IMF. On the other hand, for the present day mass function low and intermediate mass stars are dominant. Late-type giant and supergiant stars dominate the ISM dust feedback in our actual Galaxy, but this may not the case of galaxies experiencing high star formation rates, or at high redshifts. In those cases, SNe are dominant in the dust feedback process.

  14. Distributed Precoding for MISO Interference Channels with Channel Mean Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulukus, Sennur

    Distributed Precoding for MISO Interference Channels with Channel Mean Feedback: Algorithms precoding algorithms for multiple-input single-output (MISO) interference channels, where each trans- mitter- antenna wireless interference channels [5]-[7]. For multiple- input single-output (MISO) interference

  15. Feedback Control of Microstate to Control Macrostate Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, Clark J.

    Feedback Control of Microstate to Control Macrostate Properties of Controllable Fluids by John R. Lloyd and Clark J. Radcliffe Department of Mechanical Engineering Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48824-1226 ABSTRACT Controllable fluids are those fluids whose properties can be controlled

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Hunter feedback of individually marked wild boar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL PAPER Hunter feedback of individually marked wild boar Sus scrofa L.: dispersal 2009 # Springer-Verlag 2009 Abstract Increasing wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) population densities all over of wild boar in southwestern Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. From 152 marked wild boar, 105 have been

  17. INVITED SESSION NUMBER: 157 Event-Based Feedback Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehlis, Jeff

    . INTRODUCTION Symptoms of neuromotor disorders, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD), have been linked-compulsive disorder, and even depression [1]. Since its approval by the FDA in 1997 for use in advanced cases of PD models, that are each equipped with both a stimulus and feedback electrode. We seek to develop a control

  18. Scheduling and Feedback Co-Design for Networked Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branicky, Michael S.

    Scheduling and Feedback Co-Design for Networked Control Systems Michael S. Branicky,1 Stephen M mes- sages are transmitted). In the past, control system design and CPU scheduling or network scheduling design have normally been sepa- rated. This separation has allowed the control commu- nity

  19. Cyclic negative feedback systems: what is the chance of oscillation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    self-feedback affects the dynamical behaviour. In the high cooperativity limit, i.e. for large Hill a recurrent motif. Oscillations frequently occur in the regulation of biological systems and play)), the cardiac electrical activity (Keener and Sneyd (1998)), the circadian rhythm (Goldbeter (2002

  20. SURVEY LEADERSHIP The Manager's Guide to Survey Feedback & Action Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squire, Larry R.

    Planning Tools from Morehead A Word about Morehead's Workforce Commitment Model Technical Support Section 2 Activities Appendices Appendix 1 ­ Workforce Commitment Domains Summary Appendix 2 ­ Action Plan Form #12SURVEY LEADERSHIP The Manager's Guide to Survey Feedback & Action Planning A guide designed to help

  1. How Can I Say This? giving feedback at the rca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    on their minds than teaching and learning. At those times it may be best practice to reschedule meetings decisions for themselves. For example, a piece of work may need moving on in response to previous feedback or encouragement, but of the decision or answer, even when the student demands it. I'm confident that my students

  2. Negative Feedback Facilitates Temperature Robustness in Biomolecular Circuit Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    on circuit dynamics. Further, we find that eective negative feedback due to first-order degradation this goal of functional robustness have proceeded at multiple levels. At one level, there have been eorts, in the study of naturally occurring biomolecular circuits, robustness to the impor- tant environmental variable

  3. Augmenting Future In-Vehicle Interactions With Remote Tactile Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Nowadays, also many controllers for in-vehicle information systems such as BMW's iDrive1 are equipped of tactile stimuli could help here. 1 www.bmw.com AutoUI`11, Workshop on Natural User Interfaces, 30th environment. Similar to direct tactile stimuli, the remote application of feedback on touch surfaces has

  4. The role of linguistic contrasts in the auditory feedback control of Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niziolek, Caroline A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Speakers use auditory feedback to monitor their own speech, ensuring that the intended output matches the observed output. By altering the acoustic feedback signal before it reaches the speaker's ear, we can induce auditory ...

  5. An Evaluation of the Interactive Effects of Feedback Sequence and Timing on Efficacy and Preference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, Amy Jessica

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback is an effective method for increasing employee performance in a wide range of settings, although questions remain regarding the most effective characteristics of feedback. Despite the fact that there is little research on the sequence...

  6. RFI Seeks Feedback on Third-party Maintenance Strategy for AMO...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RFI Seeks Feedback on Third-party Maintenance Strategy for AMO's Software Tools RFI Seeks Feedback on Third-party Maintenance Strategy for AMO's Software Tools July 28, 2014 -...

  7. Feedback vertex sets and disjoint cycles in planar (di)graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    graph has a feedback vertex set of cardinality at most k then its treewidth. is bounded ... in linear time, and this is used to nd an algorithm computing a feedback.

  8. Some consideration on the (in)effectiveness of residential energy feedback systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    Some consideration on the (in)effectiveness of residential energy feedback systems James Pierce systems, particularly residential energy feedback systems (REFS), have emerged as a key area for HCI [5]. Residential energy feedback systems (hereafter referred to as REFS) in particular are receiving

  9. Controller design issues in the feedback control of radio frequency plasma processing reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Controller design issues in the feedback control of radio frequency plasma processing reactors feedback control of inductively coupled plasma processing reactors for polysilicon etching and be successfully used for feedback control of plasma processing reactors.4 There are many control strate- gies

  10. Positive Proprioceptive Feedback Elicited By Isometric Contractions of Ankle Flexors on Pretibial Motoneurons in Cats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Positive Proprioceptive Feedback Elicited By Isometric Contractions of Ankle Flexors on Pretibial proprioceptive feedback elicited by isometric contractions of ankle flexors on pretibial motoneurons in cats. J inhibition. This contraction-induced Ia excitatory feedback in ankle flexors might either reinforce Ia

  11. Econometric Feedback for Runtime Risk Management in VoIP Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Econometric Feedback for Runtime Risk Management in VoIP Architectures Oussema Dabbebi, R at automatically adapting these parameters based on an econometric feedback mechanism. We mathematically describe the configuration of such risk models, by refining at runtime the model parameters based on an econometric feedback

  12. RESEARCH Open Access The role of feed-forward and feedback processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayakumar, Sethu

    to amputees. Artificial feedback systems can exploit the idea of sen- sory substitution: feedback delivered with a closed-loop robotic hand and instructed to grasp and lift objects of different weights as we recorded the cognitive processes underlying grasping and lifting. We have shown quantitatively that tactile feedback can

  13. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Connor, P.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit. 11 figs.

  14. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY)

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit.

  15. Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels with Limited Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wei

    Joint Power Control and Beamforming Codebook Design for MISO Channels with Limited Feedback Behrouz-input single-output (MISO) wireless systems with a rate-limited feedback link. The problem is cast in the form-output (MISO) channel with channel state information at the receiver (CSIR) and a noiseless delay-free feedback

  16. Nested Velocity Feedback Control -1 Presented at CS 2007 Dr Richard Mitchell 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Richard

    Nested Velocity Feedback Control - 1 Presented at CS 2007 © Dr Richard Mitchell 2007 Nested tolerant to changes in the plant under control #12;Nested Velocity Feedback Control - 2 Presented at CS path #12;Nested Velocity Feedback Control - 3 Presented at CS 2007 © Dr Richard Mitchell 2007 Cherry

  17. 370MHz 1mA Current Feedback Op Amp General Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavassiliou, Christos

    is manufactured in National's VIPTM10 com- plimentary bipolar process. Features n Large signal bandwidth and slew/D driver n Portable DVD Typical Application 20078936 Single Supply Cable Driver August 2003 LMH6723370MHz1m Temperature -40°C to +85°C Nominal Supply Voltage 4.5V to 12V ±5V Electrical Characteristics Unless specified

  18. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  19. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

  20. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  1. Where do Nissan Leaf drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Don Scoffield

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper invesigates where Nissan Leaf drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at work, home, or some other location?

  2. Where do Chevrolet Volt drivers in The EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Don Scoffield

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates where Chevy Volt drivers in the EV Project charge when they have the opportunity to charge at work. Do they charge at home, work, or some other location.

  3. Analytic Framework for Evaluation of State Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Policies with Reference to Stakeholder Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.; Mosey, G.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the framework that was developed to analyze energy efficiency and renewable energy policies on the state level based on how well they meet the stakeholder drivers.

  4. Survey of Laser Markets Relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy Drivers, information for National Research Council

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayramian, A J; Deri, R J; Erlandson, A C

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a new technology for commercial application can be significantly accelerated by leveraging related technologies used in other markets. Synergies across multiple application domains attract research and development (R and D) talent - widening the innovation pipeline - and increases the market demand in common components and subsystems to provide performance improvements and cost reductions. For these reasons, driver development plans for inertial fusion energy (IFE) should consider the non-fusion technology base that can be lveraged for application to IFE. At this time, two laser driver technologies are being proposed for IFE: solid-state lasers (SSLs) and KrF gas (excimer) lasers. This document provides a brief survey of organizations actively engaged in these technologies. This is intended to facilitate comparison of the opportunities for leveraging the larger technical community for IFE laser driver development. They have included tables that summarize the commercial organizations selling solid-state and KrF lasers, and a brief summary of organizations actively engaged in R and D on these technologies.

  5. Active inductor shunt peaking in high-speed VCSEL driver design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Futian Liang; Datao Gong; Suen Hou; Chonghan Liu; Tiankuan Liu; Da-Shung Su; Ping-Kun Teng; Annie Xiang; Jingbo Ye; Ge Jin

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An all transistor active inductor shunt peaking structure has been used in a prototype of 8-Gbps high-speed VCSEL driver which is designed for the optical link in ATLAS liquid Argon calorimeter upgrade. The VCSEL driver is fabricated in a commercial 0.25-um Silicon-on-Sapphire (SoS) CMOS process for radiation tolerant purpose. The all transistor active inductor shunt peaking is used to overcome the bandwidth limitation from the CMOS process. The peaking structure has the same peaking effect as the passive one, but takes a small area, does not need linear resistors and can overcome the process variation by adjust the peaking strength via an external control. The design has been tapped out, and the prototype has been proofed by the preliminary electrical test results and bit error ratio test results. The driver achieves 8-Gbps data rate as simulated with the peaking. We present the all transistor active inductor shunt peaking structure, simulation and test results in this paper.

  6. Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  7. Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

  8. Theory and calculations of synchrotron instabilities and feedback-mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijssen, T.E.M.

    1981-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of the phenomenon synchrotron radiation are given with general theory on the basic processes and betatron and synchrotron oscillations. A more extended theoretical view at transverse instabilities and the influence of a damping feedback system are discussed. The longitudinal case is covered. For the calculations on the longitudinal case with M equally spaced pointbunches, with N electrons each, in the storage ring, the parasitic modes of the radio-frequency cavity were measured. A description of this is given. The values of damping rates of the longitudinal feedback system found, are as expected, but too low to damp the longitudinal instabilities calculated. This might be caused by the input data. The calculated growth rates are very sensitive to changes in frequency and width of the parasitic modes, which were measured under conditions differing slightly from the operating conditions.

  9. Quasar feedback: accelerated star formation and chaotic accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing Supermassive Black Holes (SMBH) are believed to influence their parent galaxies in a negative way, terminating their growth by ejecting gas out before it could turn into stars. Here we present some of the most sophisticated SMBH feedback simulations to date showing that quasar's effects on galaxies are not always negative. We find that when the ambient shocked gas cools rapidly, the shocked gas is compressed into thin cold dense shells, filaments and clumps. Driving these high density features out is much more difficult than analytical models predict since dense filaments are resilient to the feedback. However, in this regime quasars have another way of affecting the host -- by triggering a massive star formation burst in the cold gas by over-pressurising it. Under these conditions SMBHs actually accelerate star formation in the host, having a positive rather than negative effect on their host galaxies. The relationship between SMBH and galaxies is thus even more complex and symbiotic than currently b...

  10. Modeling feedback from stars and black holes in galaxy mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springel, V; Hernquist, L; Springel, Volker; Matteo, Tiziana Di; Hernquist, Lars

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe techniques for incorporating feedback from star formation and black hole accretion into simulations of isolated and merging galaxies. At present, the details of these processes cannot be resolved in simulations on galactic scales. Our basic approach therefore involves forming coarse-grained representations of the properties of the interstellar medium and black hole accretion starting from basic physical assumptions, so that the impact of these effects can be included on resolved scales. We illustrate our method using a multiphase description of star-forming gas. Feedback from star formation pressurises highly overdense gas, altering its effective equation of state. We show that this allows the construction of stable galaxy models with much larger gas fractions than possible in earlier numerical work. We extend the model by including a treatment of gas accretion onto central supermassive black holes in galaxies. Assuming thermal coupling of a small fraction of the bolometric luminosity of accreting...

  11. Enhanced Energy-Aware Feedback Scheduling of Embedded Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Feng; Zhao, Wenhong; Sun, Youxian; Dong, Jinxiang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic voltage scaling (DVS) is one of the most effective techniques for reducing energy consumption in embedded and real-time systems. However, traditional DVS algorithms have inherent limitations on their capability in energy saving since they rarely take into account the actual application requirements and often exploit fixed timing constraints of real-time tasks. Taking advantage of application adaptation, an enhanced energy-aware feedback scheduling (EEAFS) scheme is proposed, which integrates feedback scheduling with DVS. To achieve further reduction in energy consumption over pure DVS while not jeopardizing the quality of control, the sampling period of each control loop is adapted to its actual control performance, thus exploring flexible timing constraints on control tasks. Extensive simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of EEAFS under different scenarios. Compared with the optimal pure DVS scheme, EEAFS saves much more energy while yielding comparable control performance.

  12. Experimental feedback control of quantum systems using weak measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Gillett; R. B. Dalton; B. P. Lanyon; M. P. Almeida; M. Barbieri; G. J. Pryde; J. L. O'Brien; K. J. Resch; S. D. Bartlett; A. G. White

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A goal of the emerging field of quantum control is to develop methods for quantum technologies to function robustly in the presence of noise. Central issues are the fundamental limitations on the available information about quantum systems and the disturbance they suffer in the process of measurement. In the context of a simple quantum control scenario--the stabilization of non-orthogonal states of a qubit against dephasing--we experimentally explore the use of weak measurements in feedback control. We find that, despite the intrinsic difficultly of implementing them, weak measurements allow us to control the qubit better in practice than is even theoretically possible without them. Our work shows that these more general quantum measurements can play an important role for feedback control of quantum systems.

  13. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  14. Feedback Enhanced Sensitivity in Optomechanics: Surpassing the Parametric Instability Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glen I. Harris; Ulrik L. Andersen; Joachim Knittel; Warwick P. Bowen

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The intracavity power, and hence sensitivity, of optomechanical sensors is commonly limited by parametric instability. Here we characterize the parametric instability induced sensitivity degradation in a micron scale cavity optomechanical system. Feedback via optomechanical transduction and electrical gradient force actuation is applied to suppress the parametric instability. As a result a 5.4 fold increase in mechanical motion transduction sensitivity is achieved to a final value of $1.9\\times 10^{-18}\\rm m Hz^{-1/2}$.

  15. Experimental control of chaos by variable and distributed delay feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Jüngling; Aleksandar Gjurchinovski; Viktor Urumov

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a significant improvement of the classical time-delayed feedback control method for stabilization of unstable periodic orbits or steady states. In an electronic circuit experiment we were able to realize time-varying and distributed delays in the control force leading to successful control for large parameter sets including large time delays. The presented technique makes advanced use of the natural torsion of the orbits, which is also necessary for the original control method to work.

  16. Domestic Audiences, Policy Feedback, and Sequential Decisions During Military Interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuberski, Douglas Walter

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Interventions. (December 2009) Douglas Walter Kuberski, B.A., University of Nebraska, M.A., University of Akron Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Nehemia Geva The literature on escalation situations and audience costs suggests that democratic executives... approach and present a model of sequential decision-making that explains the conditions under which leaders escalate and de-escalate commitment in response to feedback. I attempt to break down the audience cost mechanism to explain why democratic...

  17. Feeling molecular forces: tactile feedback to enhance drug design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jocylin Amber

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Programs 8 Academic Scholarships Texas A8 M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS Approved as to style and content by: Edgar F. Meyer' (Fellows-Co-Advisor) Edward A. Funkhouser... (Executive Director) Stanley . Swanson (Fellows o-Advisor) April 2000 Group: Computer Science ABSTRACT FEELING MOLECULAR FORCES: TACTII E FEEDBACK TO ENHANCE DRUG DESIGN. (April 2000) Jocylin Amber Williams Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics...

  18. Feedback-Controlled LED Photobioreactor for Photophysiological Studies of Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnicki, Matthew R.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Stolyar, Sergey; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A custom photobioreactor (PBR) was designed to enable automatic light adjustments using computerized feedback control. A black anodized aluminum enclosure, constructed to surround the borosilicate reactor vessel, prevents the transmission of ambient light and serves as a mount for arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The high-output LEDs provide narrow-band light of either 630 or 680 nm for preferential excitation of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting pigments, phycobilin or chlorophyll a, respectively. Custom developed software BioLume provides automatic control of optical properties and a computer feedback loop can automatically adjust the incident irradiance as necessary to maintain a fixed transmitted light through the culture, based on user-determined set points. This feedback control serves to compensate for culture dynamics which have optical effects, (e.g., changing cell density, pigment adaptations) and thus can determine the appropriate light conditions for physiological comparisons or to cultivate light-sensitive strains, without prior analyses. The LED PBR may also be controlled as a turbidostat, using a feedback loop to continuously adjust the rate of media-dilution based on the transmitted light measurements, with a fast and precise response. This cultivation system gains further merit as a high-performance analytical device, using non-invasive tools (e.g., dissolved gas sensors, online mass spectrometry) to automate real-time measurements, thus permitting unsupervised experiments to search for optimal growth conditions, to monitor physiological responses to perturbations, as well as to quantitate photophysiological parameters using an in situ light-saturation response routine.

  19. Coherence-enhanced efficiency of feedback-driven quantum engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay Brandner; Michael Bauer; Michael T. Schmid; Udo Seifert

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A genuine feature of projective quantum measurements is that they inevitably alter the mean energy of the observed system if the measured quantity does not commute with the Hamiltonian. Compared to the classical case, Jacobs proved that this additional energetic cost leads to a stronger bound on the work extractable after a single measurement from a system initially in thermal equilibrium [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012322 (2009)]. Here, we extend this bound to a large class of feedback-driven quantum engines operating periodically and in finite time. The bound thus implies a natural definition for the efficiency of information to work conversion in such devices. For a simple model consisting of a laser-driven two-level system, we maximize the efficiency with respect to the observable whose measurement is used to control the feedback operations. We find that the optimal observable typically does not commute with the Hamiltonian and hence would not be available in a classical two level system. This result reveals that periodic feedback engines operating in the quantum realm can exploit quantum coherences to enhance efficiency.

  20. The first galaxies: simulating their feedback-regulated assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Myoungwon; Pawlik, Andreas H; Milosavljevic, Milos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the formation of a galaxy reaching a virial mass of ~10^8 at z~10 by carrying out a zoomed radiation-hydrodynamical cosmological simulation. This simulation traces Population~III (Pop~III) star formation, characterized by a modestly top-heavy initial mass function (IMF), and considers stellar feedback such as photoionization heating from Pop~III and Population~II (Pop~II) stars, mechanical and chemical feedback from supernovae (SNe), and X-ray feedback from accreting black holes (BHs) and high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). We self-consistently impose a transition in star formation mode from top-heavy Pop~III to low-mass Pop~II at the critical metallicity Zcrit=10^{-3.5} solar metallicity. We find that the star formation rate in the computational box is dominated by Pop~III until z~13, and by Pop~II thereafter. The intergalactic medium (IGM) is metal-enriched to an average of Zavg=10^{-4} solar metallicity at z~10, mainly by pair-instability SNe (PISNe), while 70% of the produced Pop~III stars di...

  1. Moment Closure Approximations in a Genetic Negative Feedback Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Soltani; Cesar Vargas; Niraj Kumar; Rahul Kulkarni; Abhyudai Singh

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Auto-regulation, a process wherein a protein negatively regulates its own production, is a common motif in gene expression networks. Negative feedback in gene expression plays a critical role in buffering intracellular fluctuations in protein concentrations around optimal value. Due to the nonlinearities present in these feedbacks, moment dynamics are typically not closed, in the sense that the time derivative of the lower-order statistical moments of the protein copy number depends on high-order moments. Moment equations are closed by expressing higher-order moments as nonlinear functions of lower-order moments, a technique commonly referred to as moment closure. Here, we compare the performance of different moment closure techniques. Our results show that the commonly used closure method, which assumes a priori that the protein population counts are normally distributed, performs poorly. In contrast, conditional derivative matching, a novel closure scheme proposed here provides a good approximation to the exact moments across different parameter regimes. In summary our study provides a new moment closure method for studying stochastic dynamics of genetic negative feedback circuits, and can be extended to probe noise in more complex gene networks.

  2. Feedback Mechanism for Microtubule Length Regulation by Stathmin Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Zeitz; Jan Kierfeld

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate and analyze a theoretical model for the regulation of microtubule (MT) polymerization dynamics by the signaling proteins Rac1 and stathmin. In cells, the MT growth rate is inhibited by cytosolic stathmin, which, in turn, is inactivated by Rac1. Growing MTs activate Rac1 at the cell edge, which closes a positive feedback loop. We investigate both tubulin sequestering and catastrophe promotion as mechanisms for MT growth inhibition by stathmin. For a homogeneous stathmin concentration in the absence of Rac1, we find a switch-like regulation of the MT mean length by stathmin. For constitutively active Rac1 at the cell edge, stathmin is deactivated locally, which establishes a spatial gradient of active stathmin. In this gradient, we find a stationary bimodal MT length distributions for both mechanisms of MT growth inhibition by stathmin. One subpopulation of the bimodal length distribution can be identified with fast growing and long pioneering MTs in the region near the cell edge, which have been observed experimentally. The feedback loop is closed through Rac1 activation by MTs. For tubulin sequestering by stathmin, this establishes a bistable switch with two stable states: one stable state corresponds to upregulated MT mean length and bimodal MT length distributions, i.e., pioneering MTs; the other stable state corresponds to an interrupted feedback with short MTs. Stochastic effects as well as external perturbations can trigger switching events. For catastrophe promoting stathmin we do not find bistability.

  3. Decoherence Control in Open Quantum System via Classical Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan Ganesan; Tzyh Jong Tarn

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we propose a novel strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done so. A novel construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Our approach to decoherence control in contrast to other approaches in the literature involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with non-trivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and Decoherence Free Subspaces(DFS). Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system has to be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. The results are qualitatively different and superior to the ones obtained via master equations. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform decoherence free Quantum Computing.

  4. The Impact of Galactic Feedback on the Circumgalactic Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Joshua; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Torrey, Paul; Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galactic feedback strongly affects the way galactic environments are enriched. We examine this connection by performing a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, exploring a range of parameters based on the galaxy formation model developed in Vogelsberger et al. 2013 (henceforth V13). We examine the effects of AGN feedback, wind mass loading, wind specific energy, and wind metal-loading on the properties of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of galaxies with $M_\\text{halo} > 10^{11} M_\\odot$. Note that while the V13 model was tuned to match observations including the stellar mass function, no explicit tuning was done for the CGM. The wind energy per unit outflow mass has the most significant effect on the CGM enrichment. High energy winds launch metals far beyond the virial radius. AGN feedback also has a significant effect, but only at $z < 3$. We compare to high redshift HI and CIV observations. All our simulations produce the observed number of Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ Absorbers. At lower column densi...

  5. FEEDBACK EFFECTS ON LOW-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Charles E.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fisher, Robert T. [Physics Department, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protostellar feedback, both radiation and bipolar outflows, dramatically affects the fragmentation and mass accretion from star-forming cores. We use ORION, an adaptive mesh refinement gravito-radiation-hydrodynamics code, to simulate low-mass star formation in a turbulent molecular cloud in the presence of protostellar feedback. We present results of the first simulations of a star-forming cluster that include both radiative transfer and protostellar outflows. We run four simulations to isolate the individual effects of radiation feedback and outflow feedback as well as the combination of the two. We find that outflows reduce protostellar masses and accretion rates each by a factor of three and therefore reduce protostellar luminosities by an order of magnitude. This means that, while radiation feedback suppresses fragmentation, outflows render protostellar radiation largely irrelevant for low-mass star formation above a mass scale of 0.05 M{sub Sun }. We find initial fragmentation of our cloud at half the global Jeans length, around 0.1 pc. With insufficient protostellar radiation to stop it, these 0.1 pc cores fragment repeatedly, forming typically 10 stars each. The accretion rate in these stars scales with mass as predicted from core accretion models that include both thermal and turbulent motions; the accretion rate does not appear to be consistent with either competitive accretion or accretion from an isothermal sphere. We find that protostellar outflows do not significantly affect the overall cloud dynamics, in the absence of magnetic fields, due to their small opening angles and poor coupling to the dense gas. The outflows reduce the mass from the cores by 2/3, giving a core to star efficiency, {epsilon}{sub core} {approx_equal} 1/3. The simulations are also able to reproduce many observation of local star-forming regions. Our simulation with radiation and outflows reproduces the observed protostellar luminosity function. All of the simulations can reproduce observed core mass functions, though we find they are sensitive to telescope resolution. We also reproduce the two-point correlation function of these observed cores. Lastly, we reproduce the initial mass function itself, including the low-mass end, when outflows are included.

  6. Battery Electric Vehicles: Range Optimization and Diversification for the U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properly selecting the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the market acceptance and the resulting social benefits of BEVs. Analysis of transportation technology transition could be biased against battery electric vehicles (BEV) and mislead policy making, if BEVs are not represented with optimal ranges. This study proposes a coherent method to optimize the BEV driving range by minimizing the range-related cost, which is formulated as a function of range, battery cost, energy prices, charging frequency, access to backup vehicles, and the cost and refueling hassle of operating the backup vehicle. This method is implemented with a sample of 36,664 drivers, representing U.S. new car drivers, based on the 2009 National Household Travel Survey data. Key findings are: 1) Assuming the near term (2015) battery cost at $405/kWh, about 98% of the sampled drivers are predicted to prefer a range below 200 miles, and about 70% below 100 miles. The most popular 20-mile band of range is 57 to77 miles, unsurprisingly encompassing the Leaf s EPA-certified 73-mile range. With range limited to 4 or 7 discrete options, the majority are predicted to choose a range below 100 miles. 2) Found as a statistically robust rule of thumb, the BEV optimal range is approximately 0.6% of one s annual driving distance. 3) Reducing battery costs could motivate demand for larger range, but improving public charging may cause the opposite. 4) Using a single range to represent BEVs in analysis could significantly underestimate their competitiveness e.g. by $3226/vehicle if BEVs are represented with 73-mile range only or by $7404/BEV if with 150-mile range only. Range optimization and diversification into 4 or 7 range options reduce such analytical bias by 78% or 90%, respectively.

  7. The role of the cant and lateral position of the steering wheel in the orientation of drivers to the location of the automotive pedals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrod, M. G

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examined the effects of three steering wheel cants and three steering wheel lateral positions on drivers' preferred automotive foot pedal locations and separation distances. The dependent variables were the preferred vertical and horizontal positions... in orienting the driver to the locations of the pedals and should be part of any design recommendations detailing the relationship between the driver and the foot pedals. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the chairman of my Advisory Committee, Dr...

  8. Data acquisition with a VAX 11/780 and MBD branch driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, S.E. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Lau, Y.C.; Gould, C.R.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and implemented a general purpose data acquisition system, XSYS, for the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory VAX-11/780. The interface is a CAMAC Branch Highway connected to a Microprogrammed Branch Driver (MBD-11). A single general reentrant MBD program handles CAMAC operations and data transfers to and from the VAX using a DMA transfer. Each of the eight MBD channels is controlled by an independent subprocess in the VAX which communicates with the MBD via the UNIBUS. Data are double buffered and are sorted by VAX user written EVAL codes after the MBD wakes a hibernating subprocess image. Scalar operations and control of external devices are also supported.

  9. What are the main drivers of the Bitcoin price? Evidence from wavelet coherence analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bitcoin has emerged as a fascinating phenomenon of the financial markets. Without any central authority issuing the currency, it has been associated with controversy ever since its popularity and public interest reached high levels. Here, we contribute to the discussion by examining potential drivers of Bitcoin prices ranging from fundamental to speculative and technical sources as well as a potential influence of the Chinese market. The evolution of the relationships is examined in both time and frequency domains utilizing the continuous wavelets framework so that we comment on development of the interconnections in time but we can also distinguish between short-term and long-term connections.

  10. Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommittee Draft Advice9DrillingDriveDrivers

  11. Science Drivers of Particle Physics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial CarbonArticlesHuman ResourcesScience Drivers of Particle Physics High

  12. Low-jitter high-power thyristor array pulse driver and generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanks, Roy L. (Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for generating low-jitter, high-voltage and high-current pulses for driving low impedance loads such as detonator fuses uses a MOSFET driver which, when triggered, discharges a high-voltage pre-charged capacitor into the primary of a toroidal current-multiplying transformer with multiple isolated secondary windings. The secondary outputs are suitable for driving an array of thyristors that discharge a precharged high-voltage capacitor and thus generating the required high-voltage and high-current pulse.

  13. Temperature feedback control for long-term carrier-envelope phase locking

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Zenghu (Manhattan, KS); Yun, Chenxia (Manhattan, KS); Chen, Shouyuan (Manhattan, KS); Wang, He (Manhattan, KS); Chini, Michael (Manhattan, KS)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A feedback control module for stabilizing a carrier-envelope phase of an output of a laser oscillator system comprises a first photodetector, a second photodetector, a phase stabilizer, an optical modulator, and a thermal control element. The first photodetector may generate a first feedback signal corresponding to a first portion of a laser beam from an oscillator. The second photodetector may generate a second feedback signal corresponding to a second portion of the laser beam filtered by a low-pass filter. The phase stabilizer may divide the frequency of the first feedback signal by a factor and generate an error signal corresponding to the difference between the frequency-divided first feedback signal and the second feedback signal. The optical modulator may modulate the laser beam within the oscillator corresponding to the error signal. The thermal control unit may change the temperature of the oscillator corresponding to a signal operable to control the optical modulator.

  14. Star Formation in Disk Galaxies. III. Does stellar feedback result in cloud death?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tasker, Elizabeth J; Pudritz, Ralph

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar feedback, star formation and gravitational interactions are major controlling forces in the evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs). To explore their relative roles, we examine the properties and evolution of GMCs forming in an isolated galactic disk simulation that includes both localised thermal feedback and photoelectric heating. The results are compared with the three previous simulations in this series which consists of a model with no star formation, star formation but no form of feedback and star formation with photoelectric heating in a set with steadily increasing physical effects. We find that the addition of localised thermal feedback greatly suppresses star formation but does not destroy the surrounding GMC, giving cloud properties closely resembling the run in which no stellar physics is included. The outflows from the feedback reduce the mass of the cloud but do not destroy it, allowing the cloud to survive its stellar children. This suggests that weak thermal feedback such as the low...

  15. Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), for site-specific tower measurement years and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from #12;Supplement Table 2. Brasil flux sites instrumentation and measuring methods. *: non aspirated

  16. Self-Excitation and Feedback Cooling of an Isolated Proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guise, N.; DiSciacca, J.; Gabrielse, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The first one-proton self-excited oscillator (SEO) and one-proton feedback cooling are demonstrated. In a Penning trap with a large magnetic gradient, the SEO frequency is resolved to the high precision needed to detect a one-proton spin flip. This is after undamped magnetron motion is sideband cooled to a 14 mK theoretical limit, and despite random frequency shifts (typically larger than those from a spin flip) that take place every time sideband cooling is applied. The observations open a possible path towards a million-fold improved comparison of the p and p magnetic moments.

  17. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  18. Robust quantum parameter estimation: Coherent magnetometry with feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stockton, John K.; Geremia, J.M.; Doherty, Andrew C.; Mabuchi, Hideo [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, Mail Code 12-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the formalism for optimally estimating and controlling both the state of a spin ensemble and a scalar magnetic field with information obtained from a continuous quantum limited measurement of the spin precession due to the field. The full quantum parameter estimation model is reduced to a simplified equivalent representation to which classical estimation and control theory is applied. We consider both the tracking of static and fluctuating fields in the transient and steady-state regimes. By using feedback control, the field estimation can be made robust to uncertainty about the total spin number.

  19. Integrin activation - the importance of a positive feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dagmar Iber; Iain D Campbell

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrins mediate cell adhesion and are essential receptors for the development and functioning of multicellular organisms. Integrin activation is known to require both ligand and talin binding and to correlate with cluster formation but the activation mechanism and precise roles of these processes are not yet resolved. Here mathematical modeling, with known experimental parameters, is used to show that the binding of a stabilizing factor, such as talin, is alone insufficient to enable ligand-dependent integrin activation for all observed conditions; an additional positive feedback is required.

  20. adrenaline-mediated positive feedback: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of galaxy evolution to form massive galaxies compatible with observations. I will present some of our recent results and will put them into further context of other feedback...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive limited feedback Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    relevance feedback in image retrieval Henning Muller, Wolfgang Muller, Stephane Marchand-Maillet and Thierry Pun Summary: techniques using the same judgments. Using automated...

  2. A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xiaofan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idle Laptop Figure 9.4: Aggregated energy usage by applianceenergy usage based on the appliance types, such CHAPTER 8. FEEDBACK as “desktops”, “laptops”, “

  3. age-dependent feedback control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A feedback mechanism based on hamiltonian tracking Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: Enviroment - caused dissipation disrupts the hamiltonian evolution of all quantum systems...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive output feedback Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carl-Arndt Krapp and Bernhard Westfechtel Lehrstuhl fur... executed process steps. In order to han- dle feedback in a process management system, several requirements... need to...

  5. Quantum feedback cooling of a single trapped ion in front of a mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Steixner; P. Rabl; P. Zoller

    2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a theory of quantum feedback cooling of a single ion trapped in front of a mirror. By monitoring the motional sidebands of the light emitted into the mirror mode we infer the position of the ion, and act back with an appropriate force to cool the ion. We derive a feedback master equation along the lines of the quantum feedback theory developed by Wiseman and Milburn, which provides us with cooling times and final temperatures as a function of feedback gain and various system parameters.

  6. Feedback, power control, and beamforming : methods for situational aware wireless networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yichao

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outage balancing in multiuser MISO networks: network dualityOutage balancing in multiuser MISO networks: network dualitywith partial feedback for MISO downlink transmission using

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing radiation feedbacks Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    content from the whole quarter Summary: . Overview 2. Solar radiation and the Greenhouse effect 3. Forcings and feedbacks 4. Who's responsible 5... . Overview 2. Solar...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - analog feedback damper Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    magnetorheological (MR) dampers for semi-active control of structures subject to seismic, wind, Summary: using MR dampers 2-10. Feedback structural control systems can be broadly...

  9. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential for great impact. Biofuels are a promising form ofbe engineered to produce biofuels, the fuels are often toxicKeywords Feedback control Á Biofuels Á Biological control

  10. An Investigation into the Benefits of Tactile Feedback for Laparoscopic, Robotic, and Remote Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wottawa, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote Surgery System with Integrated Tactile Feedback The primary difficulty in using the LapaRobot was the occurrence of power and heating

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator operation feedback Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are based on the use of a feedback controller. Concluding... been assumed. For the maximum vehicle acceleration demand the operation on the fueling rate limiter... gear:...

  12. A thirty-two clock hour driver education classroom curriculum guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, William Lee

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM CURRICULUM GUIDE A R e c o r d o f St u d y by WILLIAM LEE RICHARDSON S u b m i t t e d t o t h e O f f i c e o f G r a d u a t e S t u d i e s o f Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y i n p a r t i... a l f u l f i l l m e n t o f t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r t h e de g r e e o f DOCTOR OF EDUCATION December 1990 M a j o r S u b j e c t : I n d u s t r i a l E d u c a t i o n A THIRTY-TWO CLOCK HOUR DRIVER EDUCATION CLASSROOM...

  13. Optimizing and Diversifying Electric Vehicle Driving Range for U.S. Drivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properly determining the driving range is critical for accurately predicting the sales and social benefits of battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This study proposes a framework for optimizing the driving range by minimizing the sum of battery price, electricity cost, and range limitation cost referred to as the range-related cost as a measurement of range anxiety. The objective function is linked to policy-relevant parameters, including battery cost and price markup, battery utilization, charging infrastructure availability, vehicle efficiency, electricity and gasoline prices, household vehicle ownership, daily driving patterns, discount rate, and perceived vehicle lifetime. Qualitative discussion of the framework and its empirical application to a sample (N=36,664) representing new car drivers in the United States is included. The quantitative results strongly suggest that ranges of less than 100 miles are likely to be more popular in the BEV market for a long period of time. The average optimal range among U.S. drivers is found to be largely inelastic. Still, battery cost reduction significantly drives BEV demand toward longer ranges, whereas improvement in the charging infrastructure is found to significantly drive BEV demand toward shorter ranges. The bias of a single-range assumption and the effects of range optimization and diversification in reducing such biases are both found to be significant.

  14. Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

  15. Cloud Feedbacks on Climate: A Challenging Scientific Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Joel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego) [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    One reason it has been difficult to develop suitable social and economic policies to address global climate change is that projected global warming during the coming century has a large uncertainty range. The primary physical cause of this large uncertainty range is lack of understanding of the magnitude and even sign of cloud feedbacks on the climate system. If Earth's cloudiness responded to global warming by reflecting more solar radiation back to space or allowing more terrestrial radiation to be emitted to space, this would mitigate the warming produced by increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Contrastingly, a cloud response that reduced solar reflection or terrestrial emission would exacerbate anthropogenic greenhouse warming. It is likely that a mixture of responses will occur depending on cloud type and meteorological regime, and at present, we do not know what the net effect will be. This presentation will explain why cloud feedbacks have been a challenging scientific problem from the perspective of theory, modeling, and observations. Recent research results on observed multidecadal cloud-atmosphere-ocean variability over the Pacific Ocean will also be shown, along with suggestions for future research.

  16. Mechanical feedback in the molecular ISM of luminous IR galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Loenen; M. Spaans; W. A. Baan; R. Meijerink

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: Molecular emission lines originating in the nuclei of luminous infra-red galaxies are used to determine the physical properties of the nuclear ISM in these systems. Methods: A large observational database of molecular emission lines is compared with model predictions that include heating by UV and X-ray radiation, mechanical heating, and the effects of cosmic rays. Results: The observed line ratios and model predictions imply a separation of the observedsystems into three groups: XDRs, UV-dominated high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, and lower-density (n=10^4.5 cm-3) PDRs that are dominated by mechanical feedback. Conclusions: The division of the two types of PDRs follows naturally from the evolution of the star formation cycle of these sources, which evolves from deeply embedded young stars, resulting in high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, to a stage where the gas density has decreased (n=10^4.5 cm-3) and mechanical feedback from supernova shocks dominates the heating budget.

  17. Measuring AGN Feedback with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Scannapieco; Robert J. Thacker; H. M. P. Couchman

    2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important and poorly-understood issues in structure formation is the role of outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using large-scale cosmological simulations, we compute the impact of such outflows on the small-scale distribution of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Like gravitationally-heated structures, AGN outflows induce CMB distortions both through thermal motions and peculiar velocities, by processes known as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects, respectively. For AGN outflows the thermal SZ effect is dominant, doubling the angular power spectrum on arcminute scales. But the most distinct imprint of AGN feedback is a substantial increase in the thermal SZ distortions around elliptical galaxies, post-starburst ellipticals, and quasars, which is linearly proportional to the outflow energy. While point source subtraction is difficult for quasars, we show that by appropriately stacking microwave measurements around early-type galaxies, the new generation of small-scale microwave telescopes will be able to directly measure AGN feedback at the level important for current theoretical models.

  18. Feedbacks in a simple prognostic tropical climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, S.C. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple four-cell model of the tropical atmosphere in equilibrium with its boundaries is introduced, which can support a variable diabatic circulation and prognostic temperature and humidity profiles. The model is used to predict atmospheric perturbations away from the observed base state. Prognostic variables include radiation, surface fluxes, and dynamic transports, with temperature and water vapor levels determined by conservation constraints. The model includes a specially developed water vapor scheme that performs favorably compared with observations. The model is used to simulate the local and nonlocal sensitivity of the tropical maritime atmosphere to changes in surface temperature and other boundary conditions at very large horizontal scales. The main findings are as follows: (i) The sensitivity of boundary layer convergence to sea surface temperature (SST) variations depends on the behavior of convective heating over cooler regions and may be overestimated by heuristic models that ignore or oversimplify thermodynamic and radiative constraints; (ii) The maintenance of humidity equilibrium over weakly convective areas is modulated by local radiative feedback; (iii) Evaporation feedbacks on SST may be overestimated by heuristic arguments that do not carefully treat atmospheric water transport. An explanation for the constant-relative humidity behavior of general circulation models under climate changes is also offered based on the results.

  19. Supernova Sweeping and Black-Hole Feedback in Elliptical Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voit, G M; O'Shea, B W; Bryan, G L; Sun, M; Werner, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the massive elliptical galaxies in the universe stopped forming stars billions of years ago, even though plenty of hot gas remains available for star formation. Here we present compelling evidence indicating that quenching of star formation depends on both black-hole feedback and Type Ia supernova heating. We analyze Chandra X-ray observations of ten massive ellipticals, five with extended, potentially star-forming multiphase gas and five single-phase ellipticals with no star formation. The ratio of cooling time to freefall time at 1--10 kpc in the multiphase galaxies is tc/tff ~10, indicating that precipitation-driven feedback limits cooling but does not eliminate condensation. In the same region of the single-phase galaxies, the radial profiles of gas entropy are consistent with a thermally stable (tc/tff > 20) supernova-driven outflow that sweeps stellar ejecta out of the galaxy. However, in one of those single-phase ellipticals (NGC 4261) we find tc/tff < 10 at < 300 pc. Notably, its jets ar...

  20. Jade Sky Technologies Partners with CLTC on LED Replacement Lamp Upgrade Project UC Davis' California Lighting Technology Center will utilize Jade Sky Technologies' driver ICs to help spur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ' California Lighting Technology Center will utilize Jade Sky Technologies' driver ICs to help spur adoption of cost-effective, easy-to-use LED lighting solutions Milpitas, Calif. ­ October 15, 2013 ­ Jade Sky Technologies (JST), a clean-tech start-up manufacturer of driver ICs for LED lighting applications, announces

  1. Factors influencing field performance: utilizing the drug evaluation and classificaiton (DEC) program to identify suspected impaired drivers as reported by selected certified police officers in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walden, Melissa Noggle

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    impaired drivers. Specifically, this study explored how particular factors observed as part of the DEC Program’s decision-making process influence the DRE’s prediction of a drug category that was impairing a suspected impaired driver in the enforcement...

  2. EvaluatingMobilePhonesasEnergyConsumptionFeedbackDevices MarkusWeiss*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EvaluatingMobilePhonesasEnergyConsumptionFeedbackDevices MarkusWeiss* ,ClaireManagement,ETHZurich Abstract. With smart electricity meters being widely deployed, data on residential energy usage of mobile phones as an interface to provide feedback on overall and de- vice-related energy consumption

  3. Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

  4. Effects of Peer Feedback on Contribution: A Field Experiment in Wikipedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    ' contributions over time. Prior studies on peer feedback in online communities have suggested its impactEffects of Peer Feedback on Contribution: A Field Experiment in Wikipedia Haiyi Zhu, Amy Zhang on contribution, but have been limited by their correlational nature. In this paper, we conducted a field

  5. Toward Harnessing User Feedback For Machine Learning Simone Stumpf, Vidya Rajaram, Lida Li, Margaret Burnett,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toward Harnessing User Feedback For Machine Learning Simone Stumpf, Vidya Rajaram, Lida Li University School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Corvallis, OR 97331 USA 1 to the learning algorithm. The results show that user feedback has the potential to significantly improve machine

  6. User Monitor & Feedback Mechanism for Social Scientific Study on Laptop Energy Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamp, Mark

    change among laptop users via interactive energy-usage feedback with college students as the initiali User Monitor & Feedback Mechanism for Social Scientific Study on Laptop Energy Reduction SCIENTIFIC STUDY ON LAPTOP ENERGY REDUCTION by Namrata Buddhadev APPROVED FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER

  7. The Impact of Stochastic Noisy Feedback on Distributed Network Utility Maximization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    The Impact of Stochastic Noisy Feedback on Distributed Network Utility Maximization Junshan Zhang of distributed network utility maximization (NUM) algorithms hinges heavily on information feedback through, that the iterates generated by distributed P-D algorithms converge with probability one to the optimal point, under

  8. Dynamic Feedback Control of XYnR Planar Robots with n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    Dynamic Feedback Control of XYnR¯ Planar Robots with n Rotational Passive Joints Stefano Iannitti for an XYnR¯ planar robot with the first two joints (rotational or prismatic) actuated and n rotational be exploited to recursively design a dy- namic feedback that completely linearizes the system equations. We use

  9. External-feedback laser cooling of molecular gases Vladan Vuleti and James K. Thompson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    results in a friction force. In stochastic cooling in particle accelerators 2 , an electronic delay­13 . For accelerators, an opti- cal version of stochastic cooling has also been proposed 14 . The feedback cooling, a sam- ple's center-of-mass oscillation has been damped 21 by feedback. A method using an optical

  10. Closed Loop System with Feedback Control MISO control laws SISO control law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    Closed Loop System with Feedback Control MISO control laws SISO control law Switching Control demand · Two control modes for wind turbine: MISO & SISO · Proportional Integral (PI) feedback control Modes MISO SISO Inputs Blade Pitch Angle, Generator Torque Blade Pitch Angle Output Power Power

  11. Rendering of Environmental Force Feedback in Mobile Robot Teleoperation based on Fuzzy Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Jee-Hwan

    . Remote control of mobile robot with force reflection and fuzzy logic based velocity control was presentedRendering of Environmental Force Feedback in Mobile Robot Teleoperation based on Fuzzy Logic Ildar force feedback in mobile robot teleoperation based on fuzzy logic is presented. To ensure safety

  12. Feedback from the first stars and galaxies and its influence on structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetta Ciardi

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Once the first sources have formed, their mass deposition, energy injection and emitted radiation can deeply affect the subsequent galaxy formation process and influence the evolution of the IGM via a number of so-called feedback effects. The word 'feedback' is by far one of the most used in modern cosmology, where it is applied to a vast range of situations and astrophysical objects. Generally speaking, the concept of feedback invokes a back reaction of a process on itself or on the causes that have produced it. The character of feedback can be either negative or positive. Here, I will review the present status of investigation of the feedback effects from the first stars and galaxies.

  13. A feedback compression star formation model and the black hole - bulge relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing-Xiao Xu; Xue-Bing Wu

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a "feedback compression" model to describe the galactic spheroid formation and its relation with the central nuclear activity. We suggest that the star formation itself can serve as the "positive feedback" in some extremely dense region to trigger the starburst. The star formation rate as well as the related stellar feedback-induced turbulence will be maximized under the regulation of the background dark halo's gravity. There is also stellar feedback acting inward to confine and obscure the central black hole (BH) till the BH grows sufficiently large to satisfy a balance condition between the accretion disk wind and the inward stellar feedback. The extremely vigorous star formation activity, the BH - bulge relations, the maximum velocity dispersion as well as the maximum BH mass are investigated based on such scenario, and are found to be consistent with observations.

  14. Measuring AGN Feedback with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scannapieco, Evan; Couchman, H M P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important and poorly-understood issues in structure formation is the role of outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using large-scale cosmological simulations, we compute the impact of such outflows on the small-scale distribution of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Like gravitationally-heated structures, AGN outflows induce CMB distortions both through thermal motions and peculiar velocities, by processes known as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects, respectively. For AGN outflows the thermal SZ effect is dominant, doubling the angular power spectrum on arcminute scales. But the most distinct imprint of AGN feedback is a substantial increase in the thermal SZ distortions around elliptical galaxies, post-starburst ellipticals, and quasars, which is linearly proportional to the outflow energy. While point source subtraction is difficult for quasars, we show that by appropriately stacking microwave measurements around early-type galaxies, the new generation of...

  15. Controlling unstable chaos: Stabilizing chimera states by feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Sieber; Oleh Omel'chenko; Matthias Wolfrum

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a control scheme that is able to find and stabilize an unstable chaotic regime in a system with a large number of interacting particles. This allows us to track a high dimensional chaotic attractor through a bifurcation where it loses its attractivity. Similar to classical delayed feedback control, the scheme is non-invasive, however, only in an appropriately relaxed sense considering the chaotic regime as a statistical equilibrium displaying random fluctuations as a finite size effect. We demonstrate the control scheme for so-called chimera states, which are coherence-incoherence patterns in coupled oscillator systems. The control makes chimera states observable close to coherence, for small numbers of oscillators, and for random initial conditions.

  16. Mechanical Feedback: From stellar wind bubbles to starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke; P. Massey

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The current understanding of mechanical feedback is reviewed by evaluating the standard, adiabatic model for shell formation and evolution. This model is relevant to phenomena ranging from individual stellar-wind bubbles to galactic superwinds, forming the basis for our understanding of the multiphase ISM, IGM, and galactic evolutionary processes. Although significant discrepancies between the model and observation have been identified, to date there are none that require a fundamental revision. A variety of evidence, ranging over three orders of magnitude in spatial scale, is broadly consistent with the standard model. This includes kinematics of individual objects, observations of hot gas, the size distribution of HI shells, and outflow rates from starburst galaxies. However, some of the most pressing issues relating to shell evolution are still outstanding and obstruct efforts to resolve key questions like the fate of the hot gas.

  17. Quantum Dissipative Systems and Feedback Control Design by Interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew R. James; John Gough

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to extend J.C. Willems' theory of dissipative systems to the quantum domain. This general theory, which combines perspectives from the quantum physics and control engineering communities, provides useful methods for analysis and design of dissipative quantum systems. We describe the interaction of the plant and a class of exosystems in general quantum feedback network terms. Our results include an infinitesimal characterization of the dissipation property, which generalizes the well-known Positive Real and Bounded Real Lemmas, and is used to study some properties of quantum dissipative systems. We also show how to formulate control design problems using quantum network models, which implements Willems' `control by interconnection' for open quantum systems. This control design formulation includes, for example, standard problems of stabilization, regulation, and robust control.

  18. Black hole feedback in the luminous quasar PDS 456

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nardini, E; Gofford, J; Harrison, F A; Risaliti, G; Braito, V; Costa, M T; Matzeu, G A; Walton, D J; Behar, E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Hailey, C J; Matt, G; Miller, J M; O'Brien, P T; Stern, D; Turner, T J; Ward, M J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of galaxies is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes in their centers. During the quasar phase, a huge luminosity is released as matter falls onto the black hole, and radiation-driven winds can transfer most of this energy back to the host galaxy. Over five different epochs, we detected the signatures of a nearly spherical stream of highly ionized gas in the broadband X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar PDS 456. This persistent wind is expelled at relativistic speeds from the inner accretion disk, and its wide aperture suggests an effective coupling with the ambient gas. The outflow's kinetic power larger than 10^46 ergs per second is enough to provide the feedback required by models of black hole and host galaxy co-evolution.

  19. Feedback-induced oscillations in one-dimensional colloidal transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Lichtner; Andrey Pototsky; Sabine H. L. Klapp

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a driven, one-dimensional system of colloidal particles in a periodically currogated narrow channel subject to a time-delayed feedback control. Our goal is to identify conditions under which the control induces oscillatory, time-periodic states. The investigations are based on the Fokker-Planck equation involving the density distribution of the system. First, by using the numerical continuation technique, we determine the linear stability of a stationary density. Second, the nonlinear regimes are analyzed by studying numerically the temporal evolution of the first moment of the density distribution. In this way we construct a bifurcation diagram revealing the nature of the instability. Apart from the case of a system with periodic boundary conditions, we also consider a microchannel of finite length. Finally, we study the influence of (repulsive) particle interactions based on Dynamical Density Functional Theory (DDFT).

  20. Radio-AGN Feedback: When the Little Ones were Monsters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, W L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the evolution of the fraction of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of their host stellar mass. We make use of two samples of radio galaxies: one in the local universe, $0.01 10^{24}$ W/Hz at z ~ 1-2 while the radio-loud fraction for higher mass galaxies ($M_* > 10^{11.25}$ M$_{\\odot}$) remains the same. We argue that this increase is driven largely by the increase in cold or radiative mode accretion with increasing cold gas supply at earlier epochs. The increasing population of low mass Radio-Loud AGN can thus explain the upturn in the Radio Luminosity Function (RLF) at high redshift which is important for understanding the impact of AGN feedback in galaxy evolution.

  1. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.

    1984-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable porportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005/sup 0/C at a flow rate of 50 cm/sup 3//sec with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  2. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable proportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005.degree. C. at a flow rate of 50 cm.sup.3 /second with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  3. Operating nuclear plant feedback to ASME and French codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Journet, J. [Electricite de France, Clamart (France); O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The French have an advantage in nuclear plant operating experience feedback due to the highly centralized nature of their nuclear industry. There is only one utility in charge of design as well as operations (EDF) and only one reactor vendor (Framatome). The ASME Code has played a key role in resolving technical issues in the design and operation of nuclear plants since the inception of nuclear power. The committee structure of the Code brings an ideal combination of senior technical people with both broad and specialized experience to bear on complex how safe is safe enough technical issues. The authors now see an even greater role for the ASME Code in a proposed new regulatory era for the US nuclear industry. The current legalistic confrontational regulatory era has been quite destructive. There now appears to be a real opportunity to begin a new era of technical consensus as the primary means for resolving safety issues. This change can quickly be brought about by having the industry take operating plant problems and regulatory technical issues directly to the ASME Code for timely resolution. Surprisingly, there is no institution in the US nuclear industry with such a mandate. In fact, the industry is organized to feedback through the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues which could be far better resolved through the ASME Code. Major regulatory benefits can be achieved by closing this loop and providing systematic interaction with the ASME Code. The essential elements of a new regulatory era and ideas for organizing US institutional industry responsibilities, taken from the French experience, are described in this paper.

  4. Massive stars: Feedback effects in the local universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine self-consistent parameterizations of the high-mass stellar population and resulting feedback, including mechanical, radiative, and chemical feedback, as we understand them locally. To date, it appears that the massive star population follows simple power-law clustering that extends down to individual field OB stars, and the robust stellar IMF seems to have a constant upper-mass limit. These properties result in specific patterns in the HII region LF and ionization of the diffuse, warm ionized medium. The resulting SNe generate superbubbles whose size distribution is also described by a simple power law, and from which a galaxy's porosity parameter is easily derived. A critical star-formation threshold can then be estimated, above which the escape of Lyman continuum photons, hot gas, and nucleosynthetic products is predicted. A first comparison with a large H-alpha sample of galaxies is broadly consistent with this prediction, and suggests that ionizing photons likely escapes from starburst galaxies. The superbubble size distribution also offers a basis for a Simple Inhomogeneous Model for galactic chemical evolution, which is especially relevant to metal-poor systems and instantaneous metallicity distributions. This model offers an alternative interpretation of the Galactic halo metallicity distribution and emphasizes the relative importance of star-formation intensity, in addition to age, in a system's evolution. The fraction of zero-metallicity, Population III stars is easily predicted for any such model. We emphasize that all these phenomena can be modeled in a simple, analytic framework over an extreme range in scale, offering powerful tools for understanding the role of massive stars in the cosmos. (Abridged)

  5. Laser-seeded modulation instability in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemon, Carl; Khudik, Vladimir; Austin Yi, S.; Shvets, Gennady [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Pukhov, Alexander [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf 40225 (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf 40225 (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for initiating the modulation instability (MI) of a proton beam in a proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator using a short laser pulse preceding the beam is presented. A diffracting laser pulse is used to produce a plasma wave that provides a seeding modulation of the proton bunch with the period equal to that of the plasma wave. Using the envelope description of the proton beam, this method of seeding the MI is analytically compared with the earlier suggested seeding technique that involves an abrupt truncation of the proton bunch. The full kinetic simulation of a realistic proton bunch is used to validate the analytic results. It is further used to demonstrate that a plasma density ramp placed in the early stages of the laser-seeded MI leads to its stabilization, resulting in sustained accelerating electric fields (of order several hundred MV/m) over long propagation distances (?100–1000 m)

  6. Rotating fiber array molecular driver and molecular momentum transfer device constructed therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milleron, Norman (1854 San Juan, Berkeley, CA 94707)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating fiber array molecular driver is disclosed which includes a magnetically suspended and rotated central hub to which is attached a plurality of elongated fibers extending radially therefrom. The hub is rotated so as to straighten and axially extend the fibers and to provide the fibers with a tip speed which exceeds the average molecular velocity of fluid molecules entering between the fibers. Molecules colliding with the sides of the rotating fibers are accelerated to the tip speed of the fiber and given a momentum having a directional orientation within a relatively narrow distribution angle at a point radially outward of the hub, which is centered and peaks at the normal to the fiber sides in the direction of fiber rotation. The rotating fiber array may be used with other like fiber arrays or with other stationary structures to form molecular momentum transfer devices such as vacuum pumps, molecular separators, molecular coaters, or molecular reactors.

  7. A Family of L-band SRF Cavities for High Power Proton Driver Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Rimmer, Frank Marhauser

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent global interest in high duty factor or CW superconducting linacs with high average beam power highlights the need for robust and reliable SRF structures capable of delivering high average RF power to the beam with moderate HOM damping, low interception of halo and good efficiency. Potential applications include proton or H- drivers for spallation neutron sources, neutrino physics, waste transmutation, subcritical reactors, and high-intensity high-energy physics experiments. We describe a family of SRF cavities with a range of Betas capable of transporting beam currents in excess of 10 mA CW with large irises for minimal interception of halo and HOM and power couplers capable of supporting high average power operation. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and strong HOM damping to ensure stable beam operation,

  8. 2011 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Segments of roads with LSFs (right) have better driver visibility and road surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Segments of roads with LSFs (right) have better driver improve driver visibility, road surface conditions and have the potential to reduce accidents, snow

  9. Author's personal copy Regional-and district-level drivers of timber harvesting in European Russia after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    Author's personal copy Regional- and district-level drivers of timber harvesting in European Russia. Introduction Russia is important globally as a supplier of forest goods and services: it contains 20 percent Russian harvested timber comes from European Russia, even though this area accounts for just 20 percent

  10. Understanding the drivers affecting land use change in Ecuador: an application of the Land Change Modeler software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Rajan, Dhruva

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in forest cover, satellite images (years 1996 and 2001) were used to produce land cover maps which were then used with the software to estimate probabilities of pixels changing from forests to other land use types. Various drivers of deforestation input...

  11. Brazil’s Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3C—Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy Brazil’s Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term? Artur Milanez, Manager of Biofuels Department, Brazilian Development Bank

  12. Materials from 2014 SunShot Summit Breakout Session: Looking...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakout Session: Looking Ahead: PV Manufacturing in 10 Years Materials from 2014 SunShot Summit Breakout Session: Looking Ahead: PV Manufacturing in 10 Years This was a breakout...

  13. Dual Feedback Controlled High Performance Ar Seeded ELMy H-mode Discharges in JET including Trace Tritium Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dual Feedback Controlled High Performance Ar Seeded ELMy H-mode Discharges in JET including Trace Tritium Experiments

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 42, NO. 4, APRIL 1997 473 Robust Feedback Stabilization of Chemical Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    of the controllers. Index Terms--Chemical reactors, robust feedback stabilization, robust observer, temperature control. I. INTRODUCTION THE DESIGN of stabilizing feedback control laws for unstable chemical reactors.g., [2]). The feedback control of chemical reactors is a problem which is made difficult by the inherent

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 62, NO. 4, FEBRUARY 15, 2014 993 Adaptive Limited Feedback for MISO Wiretap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    Feedback for MISO Wiretap Channels With Cooperative Jamming Minyan Pei, A. Lee Swindlehurst, Fellow, IEEE--Cooperative jamming, feedback bits allocation, limited feedback, MISO wiretap channel. I. INTRODUCTION P HYSICAL layer for mul- tiple-input single-output (MISO) wiretap channels, which have Manuscript received May 30, 2013

  16. The Case for Feedback Control RealTime Scheduling John A. Stankovic, Chenyang Lu, Sang H. Son and Gang Tao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    The Case for Feedback Control Real­Time Scheduling John A. Stankovic, Chenyang Lu, Sang H. Son dynamic systems. In this paper, we present a new scheduling paradigm, which we call feedback control real­time scheduling. Feedback control real­time scheduling defines error terms for schedules, monitors the error

  17. The Environmental Change Network (ECN) was established in 1992 to provide a framework for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. The Alice Holt ECN site represents the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems the functioning of ecosystems. Identifying the cause and effect of individual drivers is a major challenge for environmental monitoring, as it requires that the effects of those drivers are distinguished from background

  18. Time-delayed feedback control of unstable periodic orbits near a subcritical Hopf bifurcation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genevieve Brown; Claire M. Postlethwaite; Mary Silber

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that Pyragas delayed feedback control can stabilize an unstable periodic orbit (UPO) that arises from a generic subcritical Hopf bifurcation of a stable equilibrium in an n-dimensional dynamical system. This extends results of Fiedler et al. [PRL 98, 114101 (2007)], who demonstrated that such feedback control can stabilize the UPO associated with a two-dimensional subcritical Hopf normal form. Pyragas feedback requires an appropriate choice of a feedback gain matrix for stabilization, as well as knowledge of the period of the targeted UPO. We apply feedback in the directions tangent to the two-dimensional center manifold. We parameterize the feedback gain by a modulus and a phase angle, and give explicit formulae for choosing these two parameters given the period of the UPO in a neighborhood of the bifurcation point. We show, first heuristically, and then rigorously by a center manifold reduction for delay differential equations, that the stabilization mechanism involves a highly degenerate Hopf bifurcation problem that is induced by the time-delayed feedback. When the feedback gain modulus reaches a threshold for stabilization, both of the genericity assumptions associated with a two-dimensional Hopf bifurcation are violated: the eigenvalues of the linearized problem do not cross the imaginary axis as the bifurcation parameter is varied, and the real part of the cubic coefficient of the normal form vanishes. Our analysis of this degenerate bifurcation problem reveals two qualitatively distinct cases when unfolded in a two-parameter plane. In each case, Pyragas-type feedback successfully stabilizes the branch of small-amplitude UPOs in a neighborhood of the original bifurcation point, provided that the phase angle satisfies a certain restriction.

  19. Feedback control of torsion balance in measurement of gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quan, Li-Di [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurements, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China) [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurements, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Yang, Shan-Qing; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun, E-mail: junluo@mail.hust.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurements, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)] [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurements, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang, Yong-Ji [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)] [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the feedback control system is of central importance in the measurement of the Newton's gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method. In this paper, a PID (Proportion-Integration-Differentiation) feedback loop is discussed in detail. Experimental results show that, with the feedback control activated, the twist angle of the torsion balance is limited to 7.3×10{sup ?7} rad /?( Hz ) at the signal frequency of 2?mHz, which contributes a 0.4 ppm uncertainty to the G value.

  20. Develop feedback system for intelligent dynamic resource allocation to improve application performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, Ann C.; Brandt, James M.; Tucker, Thomas (Open Grid Computing, Inc., Austin, TX); Thompson, David

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia Level II milestone 'Develop feedback system for intelligent dynamic resource allocation to improve application performance'. This milestone demonstrates the use of a scalable data collection analysis and feedback system that enables insight into how an application is utilizing the hardware resources of a high performance computing (HPC) platform in a lightweight fashion. Further we demonstrate utilizing the same mechanisms used for transporting data for remote analysis and visualization to provide low latency run-time feedback to applications. The ultimate goal of this body of work is performance optimization in the face of the ever increasing size and complexity of HPC systems.

  1. Enhancing parameter precision of optimal quantum estimation by direct quantum feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zheng; Li Ge; Yao Yao; Qi-jun Zhi

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various schemes have been proposed to overcome the drawback of the decoherence on quantum-enhanced parameter estimation. Here we suggest an alternative method, quantum feedback, to enhance the parameter precision of optimal quantum estimation of a dissipative qubit by investigating its dynamics of quantum Fisher information. We find that compared with the case without feedback, the quantum Fisher information of the dissipative qubit in the case of feedback has a large maximum value in time evolution and a smaller decay rate in the long time.

  2. Engineering steady states using jump-based feedback for multipartite entanglement generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, R. N.; Hope, J. J.; Carvalho, A. R. R. [Department of Quantum Sciences, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the use of quantum-jump-based feedback to manipulate the stability of multipartite entangled dark states in an open quantum system. Using the model proposed in Phys. Rev. A 76, 010301(R) (2007) for a pair of atoms, we show a general strategy to produce many-body singlet stationary entangled states for larger number of atoms. In the case of four qubits, we propose a simple local feedback control that, although not optimal, is realistic and stabilizes a highly entangled state. We discuss the limitations and analyze alternative strategies within the framework of direct jump feedback schemes.

  3. Feedback from Protostellar Outflows in Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner

    2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic stresses collimate protostellar winds into a common distribution of force with angle. Sweeping into the ambient medium, such winds drive bipolar molecular outflows whose properties are insensitive to the distribution of ambient gas and to the details of how the wind is launched, and how its intensity varies over time. Moreover, these properties are in accord with the commonly observed features of outflows. This model is simple enough to permit a quantitative study of the feedback effects from low-mass star formation. It predicts the rate at which star-forming gas is ejected by winds, and hence the efficiency with which stars form. Applied to individual star formation, it relates the stellar initial mass function to the distribution of pre-stellar cores. Applied to cluster formation, it indicates whether the resulting stellar system will remain gravitationally bound. Using the energy injection and mass ejection implied by this model, we investigate the dynamical evolution of a molecular clump as a stellar cluster forms within it. This depends critically on the rate at which turbulence decays: it may involve equilibrium star formation (slow decay), overstable oscillations, or collapse (fast decay).

  4. Feedback Configuration Tools for LHC Low Level RF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Winkle, D.; Fox, J.; Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; /CERN

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC Low Level RF System (LLRF) is a complex multi-VME crate system which is used to regulate the superconductive cavity gap voltage as well as to lower the impedance as seen by the beam through low latency feedback. This system contains multiple loops with several parameters to be set before the loops can be closed. In this paper, we present a suite of MATLAB based tools developed to perform the preliminary alignment of the RF stations and the beginnings of a closed loop model based alignment routine. We briefly introduce the RF system and in particular the base band (time domain noise based) network analyzer system built into the LHC LLRF. The main focus of this paper is the methodology of the algorithms used by the routines within the context of the overall system. Measured results are presented that validate the technique. Because the RF systems are located in a cavern 120 m underground in a location which is relatively un-accessible without beam and completely un-accessible with beam present or magnets are energized, these remotely operated tools are a necessity for the CERN LLRF team to maintain and tune their LLRF systems in a similar fashion as to what was done very successfully in PEP-II at SLAC.

  5. Creating Adaptive Feedback designed for Improving Data Entry Accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Jaya Prakash; B. Venkateswarlu; S. Abdul Jeelan; Assistant Professors; Andhra Pradesh-india

    Abstract- Data quality is a critical problem in modern databases. Data-entry forms present the first and arguably best opportunity for detecting and mitigating errors, but there has been little research into automatic methods for improving data quality at entry time. In this paper, we propose USHER, an end-to-end system for form design, entry, and data quality assurance. Using previous form submissions, USHER learns a probabilistic model over the questions of the form. USHER then applies this model at every step of the data-entry process to improve data quality. Before entry, it induces a form layout that captures the most important data values of a form instance as quickly as possible and reduces the complexity of error-prone questions. During entry, it dynamically adapts the form to the values being entered by providing real-time interface feedback, reasking questions with dubious responses, and simplifying questions by reformulating them. After entry, it revisits question responses that it deems likely to have been entered incorrectly by reasking the question or a reformulation thereof. We evaluate these components of USHER using two real-world data sets. Our results demonstrate that USHER can improve data quality considerably at a reduced cost when compared to current practice. Index Terms- Data quality, data entry, form design, adaptive form. O I.

  6. Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: numerical method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margarita Petkova; Umberto Maio

    2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from self-consistent 3D numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation with a multi-frequency radiative transfer scheme and non-equilibrium molecular chemistry of 13 primordial species (e-, H, H+, H-, He, He+, He++, H2, H2+, D, D+, HD, HeH+), performed by using the simulation code GADGET. We describe our implementation and show tests for ionized sphere expansion in a static and dynamic density field around a central radiative source, and for cosmological abundance evolution coupled with the cosmic microwave background radiation. As a demonstrative application of radiative feedback on molecular gas, we run also cosmological simulations of early structure formation in a ~1Mpc size box. Our tests agree well with analytical and numerical expectations. Consistently with other works, we find that ionization fronts from central sources can boost H2 fractions in shock-compressed gas. The tight dependence on H2 lead to a corresponding boost of HD fractions, as well. We see a strong lowering of the the typical molecular abundances up to several orders of magnitudes which partially hinders further gas collapse of pristine neutral gas, and clearly suggests the need of re-ionized gas or metal cooling for the formation of the following generation of structures.

  7. Feedback control of inertial microfluidics using axial control forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Prohm; Holger Stark

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial microfluidics is a promising tool for many lab-on-a-chip applications. Particles in channel flows with Reynolds numbers above one undergo cross-streamline migration to a discrete set of equilibrium positions in square and rectangular channel cross sections. This effect has been used extensively for particle sorting and the analysis of particle properties. Using the lattice Boltzmann method, we determine equilibrium positions in square and rectangular cross sections and classify their types of stability for different Reynolds numbers, particle sizes, and channel aspect ratios. Our findings thereby help to design microfluidic channels for particle sorting. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an axial control force, which slows down the particles, shifts the stable equilibrium position towards the channel center. Ultimately, the particles then stay on the centerline for forces exceeding a threshold value. This effect is sensitive to particle size and channel Reynolds number and therefore suggests an efficient method for particle separation. In combination with a hysteretic feedback scheme, we can even increase particle throughput.

  8. Feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and bioremediation induced biogeochemical transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englert, A.; Hubbard, S.S.; Williams, K.H.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For guiding optimal design and interpretation of in-situ treatments that strongly perturb subsurface systems, knowledge about the spatial and temporal patterns of mass transport and reaction intensities are important. Here, a procedure was developed and applied to time-lapse concentrations of a conservative tracer (bromide), an injected amendment (acetate) and reactive species (iron(II), uranium(VI) and sulfate) associated with two field scale biostimulation experiments, which were conducted successively at the same field location over two years. The procedure is based on a temporal moment analysis approach that relies on a streamtube approximation. The study shows that biostimulated reactions can be considerably influenced by subsurface hydrological and geochemical heterogeneities: the delivery of bromide and acetate and the intensity of the sulfate reduction is interpreted to be predominantly driven by the hydrological heterogeneity, while the intensity of the iron reduction is interpreted to be primarily controlled by the geochemical heterogeneity. The intensity of the uranium(VI) reduction appears to be impacted by both the hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. Finally, the study documents the existence of feedbacks between hydrological heterogeneity and remediation-induced biogeochemical transformations at the field scale, particularly the development of precipitates that may cause clogging and flow rerouting.

  9. A large ozone-circulation feedback and its implications for global warming assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowack, Peer J.; Abraham, N. Luke; Maycock, Amanda C.; Braesicke, Peter; Gregory, Jonathan M.; Joshi, Manoj M.; Osprey, Annette; Pyle, John A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a key region for further study and 176 emphasize the need for similar studies; including other climate feedbacks and their 177 interactions in increasingly sophisticated Earth system models. Our results imply that 178 model- and scenario...

  10. The road to multi-dimensional magnetic levitation : realizing two-dimensional control in classical feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlebowitsh, Paul Gerardus

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable multi-dimensional magnetic levitator was characterized and implemented. This thesis contains a full analysis of the feedback specifications, a short summary of the circuits used in the design of the setup, and ...

  11. Reliability of a Gaussian channel in the presence of Gaussian feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chawla, Aman

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communication reliability, or error exponent, of a continuous time, infinite band-width, Additive White Gaussian Noise channel was studied under a peak power constraint, in the presence of a feedback channel that was ...

  12. Using Relevance Feedback in Expert Search Craig Macdonald and Iadh Ounis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose, Joemon M.

    Using Relevance Feedback in Expert Search Craig Macdonald and Iadh Ounis Department of Computing, LNCS 4425, pp. 431­443, 2007. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007 #12;432 C. Macdonald and I

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - active feedback structure Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    53 Biol Cybern (2009) 100:475489 DOI 10.1007s00422-009-0298-5 Summary: in mean firing rate as the feedback from the cerebel- lar structure known as the EGP is opened in...

  14. Participant/assessor personality characteristics that influence feedback acceptance in developmental assessment centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Suzanne Tamara

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether specified factors influenced the acceptance of feedback by participants (N = 113) in an operational developmental assessment center. Specifically, the relationship between participants...

  15. TCR? Feedback Signals Inhibit the Coupling of Recombinationally Accessible V?14 Segments with DJ? Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    Ag receptor allelic exclusion is thought to occur through monoallelic initiation and subsequent feedback inhibition of recombinational accessibility. However, our previous analysis of mice containing a V(D)J recombination ...

  16. Permafrost degradation and methane: low risk of biogeochemical climate-warming feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    Climate change and permafrost thaw have been suggested to increase high latitude methane emissions that could potentially represent a strong feedback to the climate system. Using an integrated earth-system model framework, ...

  17. Coordination of Voltage and Frequency Feedback in Load-Frequency Control Capability of Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Filipe Faria Da

    Coordination of Voltage and Frequency Feedback in Load-Frequency Control Capability of Wind Turbine-Frequency Control (LFC) is gradually shifted to Variable Speed Wind Turbines (VSWTs). In order to equip VSWT

  18. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  19. Adaptive feedback control of ultrafast semiconductor nonlinearities J. Kunde,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    that adaptive feedback optical pulse shaping can be used to control ultrafast semiconductor nonlinearities insight into the interaction of semiconduc- tors and ultrafast optical pulses. Specifically, we develop spectroscopy. More- over, the optimized pulse shape can substantially enhance ultrafast semiconductor

  20. Coherent-feedback-induced photon blockade and optical bistability by an optomechanical controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Long Liu; Zhong-Peng Liu; Jing Zhang; Yu-xi Liu

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-known that some nonlinear phenomena such as strong photon blockade are hard to be observed in optomechanical system with current experimental technology. Here, we present a coherent feedback control strategy in which a linear cavity is coherently controlled by an optomechanical controller in a feedback manner. The coherent feedback loop transfers and enhances quantum nonlinearity from the controller to the controlled cavity, which makes it possible to observe strong nonlinear effects in either linear cavity or optomechanical cavity. More interestingly, we find that the strong photon blockade under single-photon optomechanical weak coupling condition could be observed in the quantum regime. Additionally, the coherent feedback loop leads to two-photon and multiphoton tunnelings for the controlled linear cavity, which are also typical quantum nonlinear phenomenon. We hope that our work can give new perspectives in engineering nonlinear quantum phenomena.

  1. Can Feedback Traders Rock the Markets? A Logistic Tale of Persistence and Chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tambakis, Demosthenes N

    This paper introduces a nonlinear feedback trading model at high frequency. All price adjustment is endogenous, driven by asset return and volatility in the previous trading period. There is no stochastic uncertainty or asymmetric information...

  2. Performing temperature feedback controlled tissue photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampath, Smita

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance imaging as the non-invasive means of temperature feedback. The desired coagulation depth was controlled at a constant temperature of 40 degrees for different amounts of time and the actual coagulation...

  3. Feedback" An Article for Smart Grid News The Smart Grid Transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sharing Smart Grid Experiences through Performance Feedback" An Article for Smart Grid News The Smart Grid Transition-Getting Started We are on the ground floor of a Smart Grid...

  4. Microfluidic device incorporating closed loop feedback control for uniform and tunable production of micro-droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    Microfluidic device incorporating closed loop feedback control for uniform and tunable production, we have designed a microfluidic-based technology utilizing elementary microchannel geometries initial development using flow-focusing microfluidic geometry for droplet formation, computer

  5. | | | | | | | |Home Register Home Delivery Site Map Archives Print Edition Advertise Feedback Help Newspaper Ads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, Gregory

    | | | | | | | |Home Register Home Delivery Site Map Archives Print Edition Advertise Feedback Help Caltrans Still Lagging on Water Pollution Abatement Trying to Win the Baby- Gender Lottery? Turn to Science

  6. A real time status monitor for transistor bank driver power limit resistor in boost injection kicker power supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi, J.; Tan, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For years suffering of Booster Injection Kicker transistor bank driver regulator troubleshooting, a new real time monitor system has been developed. A simple and floating circuit has been designed and tested. This circuit monitor system can monitor the driver regulator power limit resistor status in real time and warn machine operator if the power limit resistor changes values. This paper will mainly introduce the power supply and the new designed monitoring system. This real time resistor monitor circuit shows a useful method to monitor some critical parts in the booster pulse power supply. After two years accelerator operation, it shows that this monitor works well. Previously, we spent a lot of time in booster machine trouble shooting. We will reinstall all 4 PCB into Euro Card Standard Chassis when the power supply system will be updated.

  7. You must be creative! The effect of performance feedback on intrinsic motivation and creativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benzer, Justin Kane

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    YOU MUST BE CREATIVE! THE EFFECT OF PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK ON INTRINSIC MOTIVATION AND CREATIVITY A Thesis by JUSTIN KANE BENZER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Psychology YOU MUST BE CREATIVE! THE EFFECT OF PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK ON INTRINSIC MOTIVATION AND CREATIVITY A Thesis by JUSTIN KANE BENZER Submitted...

  8. An assessment of the measurement equivalence of rating sources in a multisource feedback system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehan, Mary Kathleen

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Tornow, 1993b; Funderburg & Levy, 1997). Supporters of 360-degree feedback systems believe that each rating source provides the ratee with unique information (e. g. , Hazucha, Hezlett, & Schneider, 1993), so high levels of agreement between rating... sources are not expected. However, 360-degree feedback systems have been criticized for the low levels of agreement between rating sources, as psychometric theory states that high levels of agreement between ratings 1'rom different raters are needed...

  9. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  10. Feedback Control of Non-linear Quantum Systems: a Rule of Thumb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs; Austin P. Lund

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in the regime in which feedback control is most effective -- when measurements are relatively efficient, and feedback is relatively strong -- then, in the absence of any sharp inhomogeneity in the noise, it is always best to measure in a basis that does not commute with the system density matrix than one that does. That is, it is optimal to make measurements that disturb the state one is attempting to stabilize.

  11. Feedback from galactic stellar bulges and hot gaseous haloes of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shikui Tang; Q. Daniel Wang; Yu Lu; H. J. Mo

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the feedback from stellar bulges can play an essential role in shaping the halo gas of galaxies with substantial bulge components by conducting 1-D hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback model we consider consists of two distinct phases: 1) an early starburst during the bulge formation and 2) a subsequent long-lasting mass and energy injection from stellar winds of low-mass stars and Type Ia SNe. An energetic outward blastwave is initiated by the starburst and is maintained and enhanced by the long-lasting stellar feedback. For a MW-like galactic bulge, this blastwave sweeps up the halo gas in the proto-galaxy and heats up the surrounding medium to a scale much beyond the virial radius of the halo, thus the accretion of the halo hot gas can be completely stopped. In addition, the long-lasting feedback in the later phase powers a galactic bulge wind that is reverse-shocked at a large radius in the presence of surrounding intergalactic medium and hence maintains a hot gaseous halo. As the mass and energy injection decreases with time, the feedback evolves to a subsonic and quasi-stable outflow, which is enough to prevent halo gas from cooling. The two phases of the feedback thus re-enforce each-other's impact on the gas dynamics. The simulation results demonstrate that the stellar bulge feedback may provide a plausible solution to the long-standing problems in understanding the MW type galaxies, such as the "missing stellar feedback" problem and the "over-cooling" problem. The simulations also show that the properties of the hot gas in the subsonic outflow state depend sensitively on the environment and the formation history of the bulge. This dependence and variance may explain the large dispersion in the X-ray to B-band luminosity ratio of the low $L_X/L_B$ Es.

  12. Optimal open-loop and feedback control of spacecraft using single gimbal control moment gyroscopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoelscher, Brian Ray

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    OPTIMAL OPEN-LOOP AND FEEDBACK CONTROL OF SPACECRAFT USING SINGLE GIMBAL CONTROL MOMENT GYROSCOPES A Thesis by Brian Ray Hoelscher Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering OPTIMAL OPEN-LOOP AND FEEDBACK CONTROL OF SPACECRAFT USING SINGLE GIMBAL CONTROL MOMENT GYROSCOPES A Thesis by Brian Ray Hoelscher Approved as to style and content by...

  13. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

  14. Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

  15. SPL-based Proton Driver for a nu-Factory at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetto, E; Garoby, R; Meddahi, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design and feasibility studies for a nu-Factory Proton Driver based on the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) have been com- pleted. In the proposed scenario, the 4 MW proton beam (H- beam) is acceler- ated with the upgraded High Power (HP)-SPL to 5 GeV, stored in an accumu- lator ring and Þnally transported to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place, in order to achieve the speciÞc time structure. We here summa- rize the choices in terms of lattice, magnet technology and RF manipulations in the two rings. The possible critical issues, such as heating of the foil for the charge-exchange injection, space-charge problems in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator ring, have been addressed and are shown not to be show-stoppers. The analysis focuses on the baseline scenario, consider- ing 6 bunches in the accumulator, and preliminary studies are discussed for the option of 3 or a single bunch per burst.

  16. Towards the optimal energy of the proton driver for a neutrino factory and muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Strait; N. V. Mokhov; S. I. Striganov

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross section data from the HARP experiment for pion production by protons from a tantalum target have been convoluted with the acceptance of the front-end channel for the proposed neutrino factory or muon collider and integrated over the full phase space measured by HARP, to determine the beam-energy dependence of the muon yield. This permits a determination of the optimal beam energy for the proton driver for these projects. The cross section data are corrected for the beam-energy dependent amplification due to the development of hadronic showers in a thick target. The conclusion is that, for constant beam power, the yield is maximum for a beam energy of about 7 GeV, but it is within 10% of this maximum for 4

  17. Quantifying the Drivers of Star Formation on Galactic Scales. I. The Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis Zaritsky; Jason Harris

    2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the star formation history of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) to place quantitative limits on the effect of tidal interactions and gas infall on the star formation and chemical enrichment history of the SMC. The coincident timing of two recent (driver of star formation, but is only near the SMC during the most recent burst. The poorly constrained LMC-SMC orbit is our principal uncertainty. To explore the correspondence between bursts and MW pericenter passages further, we model star formation in the SMC using a combination of continuous and tidally-triggered star formation. The behavior of the tidally-triggered mode is a strong inverse function of the SMC-MW separation (preferred behavior ~ r^-5, resulting in a factor of ~100 difference in the rate of tidally-triggered star formation at pericenter and apocenter). Despite the success of these closed-box evolutionary models in reproducing the recent SMC star formation history and current chemical abundance, they have some systematic shortcomings that are remedied by postulating that a sizable infall event (~ 50% of the total gas mass) occured about 4 Gyr ago. Regardless of whether this infall event is included, the fraction of stars in the SMC that formed via a tidally triggered mode is > 10% and could be as large as 70%.

  18. Forming Young Bulges within Existing Disks: Statistical Evidence for External Drivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheila J. Kannappan; Rolf A. Jansen; Elizabeth J. Barton

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to traditional models of galaxy formation, recent observations suggest that some bulges form within preexisting disk galaxies. Such late-epoch bulge formation within disks seems to be linked to disk gas inflow and central star formation, caused by either internal secular processes or galaxy mergers and interactions. We identify a population of galaxies likely to be experiencing active bulge growth within disks, using the criterion that the color within the half-light radius is bluer than the outer disk color. Such blue-centered galaxies make up >10% of star-forming disk galaxies within the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey, a broad survey designed to represent the natural diversity of the low-z galaxy population over a wide range of luminosities and environments. Blue-centered galaxies correlate at 99% confidence with morphological peculiarities suggestive of minor mergers and interactions. From this and other evidence, we argue that external drivers rather than internal secular processes probably account for the majority of blue-centered galaxies. We go on to discuss quantitative plausibility arguments indicating that blue-centered evolutionary phases may represent an important mode of bulge growth for most disk galaxies, leading to significant changes in bulge-to-disk ratio without destroying disks. If this view is correct, bulge growth within disks may be a natural consequence of the repeated galaxy mergers and interactions inherent in hierarchical galaxy formation.

  19. Design of the SRF Driver ERL for the Jefferson Lab UV FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David R. Douglas; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; Keith Blackburn; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; Cody Dickover; Forrest Ellingsworth; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; Fay Hannon; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; Michael Klopf; James Kortze; Matthew Marchlik; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Frederick Wilson; Shukui Zhang

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the design of the SRF Energy-Recovering Linac (ERL) providing the CW electron drive beam at the Jefferson Lab UV FEL. Based on the same 135 MeV linear accelerator as ? and sharing portions of the recirculator with ? the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL, the UV driver ERL uses a novel bypass geometry to provide transverse phase space control, bunch length compression, and nonlinear aberration compensation (including correction of RF curvature effects) without the use of magnetic chicanes or harmonic RF. Stringent phase space requirements at the wiggler, low beam energy, high beam current, and use of a pre-existing facility and legacy hardware subject the design to numerous constraints. These are imposed not only by the need for both transverse and longitudinal phase space management, but also by the potential impact of collective phenomena (space charge, wakefields, beam break-up (BBU), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)), and by interactions between the FEL and the accelerator RF system. This report addresses these issues and presents the accelerator design solution that is now in operation.

  20. Use of Multipass Recirculation and Energy Recovery In CW SRF X-FEL Driver Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas, David; Akers, Walt; Benson, Stephen V.; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisk, Sally; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Hardy, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; Kortze, J.; Legg, Robert; Li, Rui; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven W.; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shin, Ilkyoung; Shinn, Michelle D.; Tennant, Christopher; Terzic, Balsa; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn P.; Wilson, G.; Zhang, Shukui

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the use of multipass recirculation and energy recovery in CW SRF drivers for short wavelength FELs. Benefits include cost management (through reduced system footprint, required RF and SRF hardware, and associated infrastructure - including high power beam dumps and cryogenic systems), ease in radiation control (low drive beam exhaust energy), ability to accelerate and deliver multiple beams of differing energy to multiple FELs, and opportunity for seamless integration of multistage bunch length compression into the longitudinal matching scenario. Issues include all those associated with ERLs compounded by the challenge of generating and preserving the CW electron drive beam brightness required by short wavelength FELs. We thus consider the impact of space charge, BBU and other environmental wakes and impedances, ISR and CSR, potential for microbunching, intra-beam and beam-residual gas scattering, ion effects, RF transients, and halo, as well as the effect of traditional design, fabrication, installation and operational errors (lattice aberrations, alignment, powering, field quality). Context for the discussion is provided by JLAMP, the proposed VUV/X-ray upgrade to the existing Jefferson Lab FEL.