National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for longer breakeven payback

  1. Breakeven Prices for Photovoltaics on Supermarkets in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Clark, N.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-03-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) breakeven price is the PV system price at which the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. This point is also called 'grid parity' and can be expressed as dollars per watt ($/W) of installed PV system capacity. Achieving the PV breakeven price depends on many factors, including the solar resource, local electricity prices, customer load profile, PV incentives, and financing. In the United States, where these factors vary substantially across regions, breakeven prices vary substantially across regions as well. In this study, we estimate current and future breakeven prices for PV systems installed on supermarkets in the United States. We also evaluate key drivers of current and future commercial PV breakeven prices by region. The results suggest that breakeven prices for PV systems installed on supermarkets vary significantly across the United States. Non-technical factors -- including electricity rates, rate structures, incentives, and the availability of system financing -- drive break-even prices more than technical factors like solar resource or system orientation. In 2020 (where we assume higher electricity prices and lower PV incentives), under base-case assumptions, we estimate that about 17% of supermarkets will be in utility territories where breakeven conditions exist at a PV system price of $3/W; this increases to 79% at $1.25/W (the DOE SunShot Initiative's commercial PV price target for 2020). These percentages increase to 26% and 91%, respectively, when rate structures favorable to PV are used.

  2. The Shockingly Short Payback of Energy Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Shockingly Short Payback of Energy Modeling The Shockingly Short Payback of Energy Modeling May 23, 2016 - 11:31am Addthis Architecture firm HOK calculated the payback of energy modeling—cost of modeling divided by modeled energy cost savings—for a number of their projects. The results? Modeling usually pays for itself in a month or two. Credit: HOK. Architecture firm HOK calculated the payback of energy modeling-cost of modeling divided by modeled energy cost savings-for a number

  3. Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    "Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

  4. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL...

  5. PV vs. Solar Water Heating- Simple Solar Payback

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar energy systems hang their hats on payback. Financial payback is as tangible as money in your bank account, while other types of payback—like environmental externalities—are not usually calculated in dollars. There’s no doubt that photovoltaic (PV) and solar hot water (SHW) systems will pay you back. Maybe not as quickly as you’d like, but all systems will significantly offset their cost over their lifetimes. Here we’ll try to answer: Which system will give the quickest return on investment (ROI)?

  6. Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  7. Chiller-heater unit nets building 2-yr payback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, J.

    1983-05-09

    A 500-ton double-absorption Hitachi Paraflow chiller-heater that switches from purchased steam to natural gas will reduce a Manhattan office building's energy costs by 55% and achieve a two-year payback. The new system replaces a steam-powered, single-stage absorption chiller. By reusing heat in a second-stage generator, the Hitachi unit uses only half as many Btus per ton as a conventional chiller. (DCK)

  8. Nationwide Analysis of U.S. Commercial Building Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Breakeven Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Carolyn; Gagnon, Pieter; Denholm, Paul; Margolis, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The commercial sector offers strong potential for solar photovoltaics (PV) owing to abundant available roof space suitable for PV and the opportunity to offset the sector's substantial retail electricity purchases. This report evaluated the breakeven price of PV for 15 different building types and various financing options by calculating electricity savings based on detailed rate structures for most U.S. utility territories (representing approximately two thirds of U.S. commercial customers). We find that at current capital costs, an estimated 1/3 of U.S. commercial customers break even in the cash scenario and approximately 2/3 break even in the loan scenario. Variation in retail rates is a stronger driver of breakeven prices than is variation in building load or solar generation profiles. At the building level, variation in the average breakeven price is largely driven by the ability for a PV system to reduce demand charges.

  9. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  10. Impact of the control rod consumption on the reactivity control of a SFR break-even core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchet, D.; Fontaine, B.

    2012-07-01

    Current design studies on Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) differ from those performed in the past by the fact that design criteria are now those of the Generation IV reactors. In order to improve their safety, reactors with break-even cores are preferred because they minimize the needs in terms of reactivity control and limit the consequences of control rod withdrawal. Furthermore, as the reactivity control needs are low, break-even core enables the use of absorbing materials with reduced efficiency (natural boron, hafnium...). Nevertheless, the use of control rods with few absorbing materials may present the disadvantage of a non-negligible ({approx}10%) loss of efficiency due to their consumption under irradiation. This paper presents a methodology to calculate accurately and analyze this consumption. (authors)

  11. Development of an Enhanced Payback Function for the Superior Energy Performance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter; Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; Sabouni, Ridah; Sheihing, Paul

    2015-08-03

    The U.S. DOE Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program provides recognition to industrial and commercial facilities that achieve certification to the ISO 50001 energy management system standard and third party verification of energy performance improvements. Over 50 industrial facilities are participating and 28 facilities have been certified in the SEP program. These facilities find value in the robust, data driven energy performance improvement result that the SEP program delivers. Previous analysis of SEP certified facility data demonstrated the cost effectiveness of SEP and identified internal staff time to be the largest cost component related to SEP implementation and certification. This paper analyzes previously reported and newly collected data of costs and benefits associated with the implementation of an ISO 50001 and SEP certification. By disaggregating “sunk energy management system (EnMS) labor costs”, this analysis results in a more accurate and detailed understanding of the costs and benefits of SEP participation. SEP is shown to significantly improve and sustain energy performance and energy cost savings, resulting in a highly attractive return on investment. To illustrate these results, a payback function has been developed and is presented. On average facilities with annual energy spend greater than $2M can expect to implement SEP with a payback of less than 1.5 years. Finally, this paper also observes and details decreasing facility costs associated with implementing ISO 50001 and certifying to the SEP program, as the program has improved from pilot, to demonstration, to full launch.

  12. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmlid, Leif

    2015-08-15

    Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0) give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u{sup −1}. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu) cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles H{sub N}(0) of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm) escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D{sub 2} gas (at <1 mbar pressure) is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  13. Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Fiorina, C.; Franceschini, F.

    2013-07-01

    A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic

  14. 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes Computations at NERSC show how multiply charged metal ions impact battery capacity ...

  15. Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

    2004-03-31

    This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results show how the savings vary among customers facing different electricity prices and other conditions. At 11.5 EER, at least 80% of the users achieve a positive LCC savings. At 12.0 EER, the maximum efficiency analyzed, mean LCC savings are lower but still positive. For the {ge} $65,000 Btu/h to <135,000 Btu/h equipment class, 59% of users achieve a positive LCC savings. For the $135,000 Btu/h to <240,000 Btu/h equipment class, 91% of users achieve a positive LCC savings.

  16. Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, S.

    2012-06-01

    Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

  17. Net Energy Payback and CO{sub 2} Emissions from Three Midwestern Wind Farms: An Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Scott W.

    2006-12-15

    This paper updates a life-cycle net energy analysis and carbon dioxide emissions analysis of three Midwestern utility-scale wind systems. Both the Energy Payback Ratio (EPR) and CO{sub 2} analysis results provide useful data for policy discussions regarding an efficient and low-carbon energy mix. The EPR is the amount of electrical energy produced for the lifetime of the power plant divided by the total amount of energy required to procure and transport the materials, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The CO{sub 2} analysis for each power plant was calculated from the life-cycle energy input data.A previous study also analyzed coal and nuclear fission power plants. At the time of that study, two of the three wind systems had less than a full year of generation data to project the life-cycle energy production. This study updates the analysis of three wind systems with an additional four to eight years of operating data.The EPR for the utility-scale wind systems ranges from a low of 11 for a two-turbine system in Wisconsin to 28 for a 143-turbine system in southwestern Minnesota. The EPR is 11 for coal, 25 for fission with gas centrifuge enriched uranium and 7 for gaseous diffusion enriched uranium. The normalized CO{sub 2} emissions, in tonnes of CO{sub 2} per GW{sub e}h, ranges from 14 to 33 for the wind systems, 974 for coal, and 10 and 34 for nuclear fission using gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion enriched uranium, respectively.

  18. NDMV - Longer Combination Vehicle (LCV) Permit Application |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vehicle (LCV) Permit Application Abstract This form is the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles LCV Application. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Longer Combination...

  19. 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes Computations at NERSC show how multiply charged metal ions impact battery capacity June 30, 2014 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov PCCPxantheascover Imagine a cell phone battery that lasted a whole week on a single charge. A car battery that worked for months between charges. A massive battery that stores the intermittent electricity from wind turbines and releases it when

  20. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  1. An approach for longer lifetime MCFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Tatsumi, Masahiko; Hayano, Takuro

    1996-12-31

    For entering into commercialization of MCFC power plants in the beginning of the 21st century, we will devote to research for increasing lifetime as long as 40,000 hours with cell performance decay rate of 0.25 %/1000hrs as the target in FY 1999. This paper will discuss on our approach for longer lifetime MCFCs through electrolyte-loss management and NiO precipitation management as well as micro-structural control of electrodes and matrix plates. Cell voltage decay rate will be estimated by simulation through series of experiments on accelerated conditions.

  2. Longer Life Lithium Ion Batteries with Silicon Anodes - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Longer Life Lithium Ion Batteries with Silicon Anodes Lawrence Berkeley National ... Researchers have developed a new technology to advance the life of lithium-ion batteries. ...

  3. Comparative life-cycle energy payback analysis of multi-junction a-SiGe and nanocrystalline/a-Si modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

    2010-07-15

    Despite the publicity of nanotechnologies in high tech industries including the photovoltaic sector, their life-cycle energy use and related environmental impacts are understood only to a limited degree as their production is mostly immature. We investigated the life-cycle energy implications of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV designs using a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) bottom layer in the context of a comparative, prospective life-cycle analysis framework. Three R and D options using nc-Si bottom layer were evaluated and compared to the current triple-junction a-Si design, i.e., a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe. The life-cycle energy demand to deposit nc-Si was estimated from parametric analyses of film thickness, deposition rate, precursor gas usage, and power for generating gas plasma. We found that extended deposition time and increased gas usages associated to the relatively high thickness of nc-Si lead to a larger primary energy demand for the nc-Si bottom layer designs, than the current triple-junction a-Si. Assuming an 8% conversion efficiency, the energy payback time of those R and D designs will be 0.7-0.9 years, close to that of currently commercial triple-junction a-Si design, 0.8 years. Future scenario analyses show that if nc-Si film is deposited at a higher rate (i.e., 2-3 nm/s), and at the same time the conversion efficiency reaches 10%, the energy-payback time could drop by 30%.

  4. More Powerful, Longer-Lasting Batteries Rings Around the Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powerful, Longer-Lasting Batteries Rings Around the Earth A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 5, NO. 1 BeThereNow Enhancing Long-distance Collaborations SPRING * 2003 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y Sandia Technology is a quarterly journal published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the Department of Energy. With main facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico,

  5. U32: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Longer Combination Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Broshears, Eric; Chitwood, Caleb; Colbert, Jameson; Hathaway, Richard; Keil, Mitch; LaClair, Tim J; Pape, Doug; Patterson, Jim; Pittro, Collin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the safety and stability of longer combination vehicles (LCVs), in particular a triple trailer combination behind a commercial tractor, which has more complicated dynamics than the more common tractor in combination with a single semitrailer. The goal was to measure and model the behavior of LCVs in simple maneuvers. Example maneuvers tested and modeled were single and double lane changes, a gradual lane change, and a constant radius curve. In addition to test track data collection and a brief highway test, two computer models of LCVs were developed. One model is based on TruckSim , a lumped parameter model widely used for single semitrailer combinations. The other model was built in Adams software, which more explicitly models the geometry of the components of the vehicle, in terms of compliant structural members. Among other results, the models were able to duplicate the experimentally measured rearward amplification behavior that is characteristic of multi-unit combination vehicles.

  6. U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons May...

  7. Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Some Routes - Dataset | Department of Energy 2: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes - Dataset Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes fotw#932_web.xlsx (198.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #929: June 13, 2016 Heavy Truck Speed Limits Are Inconsistent - Dataset Fact #923: May 2, 2016 Cylinder

  8. Fact #656: January 3, 2011 Consumers Hold onto Vehicles Longer | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 6: January 3, 2011 Consumers Hold onto Vehicles Longer Fact #656: January 3, 2011 Consumers Hold onto Vehicles Longer Consumers are holding onto both their new and used vehicles for longer periods of time. The length of time a consumer keeps a new vehicle has risen each quarter since 2008 to an average of 63.9 months in the 2nd quarter of 2010. That is 4.5 months longer than the same quarter last year. For used vehicles, the average length is 46.1 months, up 2.3 months from the 2nd

  9. Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Some Routes | Department of Energy 2: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes Fact #932: July 4, 2016 Longer Combination Trucks Are Only Permitted on Some Routes SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Although all states allow the conventional combinations consisting of two 28-foot semi-trailers, only 14 states and six state turnpike authorities allow longer combination vehicles (LCVs) on some parts of their road networks. LCVs are tractors pulling a semi-trailer

  10. Colorado - C.R.S. 42-4-505, Longer Vehicle Combinations | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado - C.R.S. 42-4-505, Longer Vehicle Combinations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Colorado - C.R.S....

  11. Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do December 29, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Researchers at Argonne National Lab have recently developed a process to improve the efficiency of producing hydrogen to run cars such as this prototype, which was developed at the Oakridge National Lab. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Researchers at Argonne National Lab have recently developed a process to improve the efficiency of producing

  12. Residential GSHPs: Efficiency With Short Payback Periods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-04-30

    This article discusses ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for residential application as an alternative to conventional HVAC systems. A listing of current space heating energy sources are presented which are then followed by a technology overview as advances have made GSHPs more efficient. The article concludes with potential energy savings offered by GSHPs and a brief market overview.

  13. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-Lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Burns, Douglas Edward

    2003-02-01

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someones back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging

  14. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, S. J.; Breckenridge, R. P.; Burns, D. E.

    2003-02-25

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; (c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated

  15. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Edward T.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  16. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

    1991-02-01

    We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

  17. Fusion energy development: Breakeven and beyond: Keynote address

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-02-01

    The scientific feasibility, technological inevitability, and economic necessity of fusion as an energy source are discussed.

  18. Community Wind Handbook/Calculate Simple Payback | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and decide whether wind energy will work for you. The spreadsheet can be opened using Microsoft Excel software. You provide information about how you will finance the system, the...

  19. User to net eleven-month payback on window film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, K.

    1985-08-12

    Solar window insulation manufactured by Solar Master Film Corp. will save a Labor Department building $82,000 annually in electricity costs for air conditioning and $58,000 in steam costs. There could be an additional savings of about $1800 after one year because of lower demand charges for electricity. Solar film decreases the U-value of glass, thus lowering the conduction losses of cool air in the summertime and of warm air in the winter. The quality of Solar Master's two-ply insulation and the experience of the firm and bid price were criteria that helped Solar Master get the contract.

  20. Energy Savings and Breakeven Costs for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, NREL performed simulations of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern United States. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern United States, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  1. Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  2. MedImmune Improves Energy Performance 8.5% to Achieve Quick Payback

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Case Study July 2016 Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 2     Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 3 Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 4 Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 5       Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 6 Monitoring and Metering Equipment $6,000 4% Energy Management Software $11,000 8%

  3. Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thackeray, Michael; CEES Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries' was submitted by the Center for Electrical Energy Storage (CEES) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CEES, an EFRC directed by Michael Thackery at Argonne National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: ANL (lead), Northwestern University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Electrical Energy Storage is 'to acquire a fundamental understanding of interfacial phenomena controlling electrochemical processes that will enable dramatic improvements in the properties and performance of energy storage devices, notable Li ion batteries.' Research topics are: electrical energy storage, batteries, battery electrodes, electrolytes, adaptive materials, interfacial characterization, matter by design; novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and defect tolerant materials.

  4. Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thackeray, Michael (Director, Center for Electrical Energy Storage); CEES Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries' was submitted by the Center for Electrical Energy Storage (CEES) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CEES, an EFRC directed by Michael Thackery at Argonne National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: ANL (lead), Northwestern University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Electrical Energy Storage is 'to acquire a fundamental understanding of interfacial phenomena controlling electrochemical processes that will enable dramatic improvements in the properties and performance of energy storage devices, notable Li ion batteries.' Research topics are: electrical energy storage, batteries, battery electrodes, electrolytes, adaptive materials, interfacial characterization, matter by design; novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and defect tolerant materials.

  5. Nissan: Automaker improves energy performance 7.2% with a four-month payback using Superior Energy Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case Study July 2016 Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 2     Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 3 Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 4 Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 5       Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance 6 Monitoring and Metering Equipment $6,000 4% Energy Management Software $11,000 8%

  6. Nissan: Automaker improves energy performance 7.2% with a four-month payback using Superior Energy Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Learn more at energy.gov/betterbuildings/superior-energy-performance Case Study May 2015 HARBEC-a Specialty Plastics Manufacturer-Improves Energy Performance 16.5% with SEP HARBEC, Inc. worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office to successfully implement an energy management system (EnMS) that meets all requirements of ISO 50001 1 and Superior Energy Performance® (SEP TM ). HARBEC's implementation of the EnMS at its small plastics manufacturing facility in

  7. Nissan: Automaker improves energy performance 7.2% with a four-month payback using Superior Energy Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    performance Case Study April 2016 Nissan Improves Energy Performance 24% over Six Years with SEP 1 Nissan's vehicle assembly plant in Smyrna, Tennessee, improved its energy performance by 24% over six years by participating in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Superior Energy Performance® (SEP TM ) program. The plant first earned SEP certification at the Silver level in 2012 and was recertified to SEP at the Platinum level in 2015. Annual energy cost savings following Nissan's initial

  8. Longer life for glyco-based stationary engine coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohlfeld, R.

    1996-07-01

    Large, stationary diesel engines used to compress natural gas that is to be transported down pipelines generate a great deal of heat. Unless this heat is dissipated efficiently, it will eventually cause an expensive breakdown. Whether the coolant uses ethylene glycol or propylene glycol, the two major causes of glycol degradation are heat and oxidation. The paper discusses inhibitors that enhance coolant service life and presents a comprehensive list of do`s and don`ts for users to gain a 20-year coolant life.

  9. Slower, colder, longer : prospects for a very cold neutron source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micklich, B. J.; Carpenter, J. M.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    2007-01-01

    The motivation for our study is to establish the prospects for a neutron source providing intense pulsed beams with spectra as cold as is realistic. The scientific motivation is to serve applications in nanoscience, biology and technology.

  10. Clean Anodic Lithium Films for Longer Life, Rechargeable Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Clean Anodic Lithium ... polymer electrolytes are used to prepare clean anodic lithium films for use in safe, ...

  11. Chapter 1.03: Solar Photovoltaics Technology: No Longer an Outlier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazmerski, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    The status and future technology, market, and industry opportunities for solar photovoltaics are examined and discussed. The co-importance of both policy and technology investments for the future markets and competitiveness of this solar approach is emphasized. This paper underscores the technology side, with a comprehensive overview and insights to technical, policy, market, industry and other investments needed to tip photovoltaics to its next level of contribution as a significant clean-energy partner in the world energy economy. The requirement to venture from near-term and evolutionary approaches into disruptive and revolutionary technology pathways is argued for our needs in the mid-term (the next 10-15 years) and the long-term (beyond the first quarter of this century).

  12. Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partnered with NETZSCH, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an Isothermal Battery Calorimeter (IBC) used to quantify heat flow in battery cells and modules.

  13. Nano-Sculptures for Longer-Lasting Battery Electrodes | U.S....

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    element with the liquid metal, the uniform solid alloy is transformed into two phases in a manner that is similar to what is seen in cooling a hot mixture of oil and water. ...

  14. The typecasting of active galactic nuclei: Mrk 590 no longer fits the role

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denney, K. D.; De Rosa, G.; Croxall, K.; Gupta, A.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Mathur, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Shappee, B. J.; Bentz, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    We present multiwavelength observations that trace more than 40 yr in the life of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in Mrk 590, traditionally known as a classic Seyfert 1 galaxy. From spectra recently obtained from Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra, and the Large Binocular Telescope, we find that the activity in the nucleus of Mrk 590 has diminished so significantly that the continuum luminosity is a factor of 100 lower than the peak luminosity probed by our long-baseline observations. Furthermore, the broad emission lines, once prominent in the UV/optical spectrum, have all but disappeared. Since AGN type is defined by the presence of broad emission lines in the optical spectrum, our observations demonstrate that Mrk 590 has now become a 'changing-look' AGN. If classified by recent optical spectra, Mrk 590 would be a Seyfert ∼1.9–2, where the only broad emission line still visible in the optical spectrum is a weak component of Hα. As an additional consequence of this change, we have definitively detected UV narrow-line components in a Type 1 AGN, allowing an analysis of these emission-line components with high-resolution COS spectra. These observations challenge the historical paradigm that AGN type is only a consequence of the line-of-sight viewing angle toward the nucleus in the presence of a geometrically flattened, obscuring medium (i.e., the torus). Our data instead suggest that the current state of Mrk 590 is a consequence of the change in luminosity, which implies the black hole accretion rate has significantly decreased.

  15. Mixing Appropriations and Private Financing to Meet Federal Energy Management Goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, John A

    2012-06-01

    This report compares several strategies for mixing appropriations and private financing in a typical federal agency that has identified $100 million in required energy conservation measures (ECMs) at its facilities. The analysis shows that in order to maximize savings and minimize overall life-cycle cost, the best strategy for the agency is to use private financing to fund as many of the ECMs as possible within the statutory maximum 25-year project term, beginning with the ECMs with the shortest paybacks. Available appropriations should either be applied to a privately financed project as a one-time payment from savings (i.e., as a buydown ) or used to directly fund longer-payback ECMs that cannot be included in the privately financed project.

  16. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heat recovery steam generator * One Caterpillar ... diesel engines ANNUAL ENERGY SAVINGS 0.5 million for the first five years PAYBACK 10-year payback on system ...

  17. A limited microbial consortium is responsible for longer-term biostimulation and bioreduction or uranium in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gihring, Thomas; Zhang, Gengxin; Brandt, Craig C; Brooks, Scott C; Carroll, Sue L; Criddle, Craig; Green, Stefan; Jardine, Philip M; Kostka, Joel; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Overholt, Will; Watson, David B; Yang, Zamin; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface amendments of slow-release substrates (e.g., emulsified vegetable oil [EVO]) are thought to be a pragmatic alternative to using short-lived, labile substrates for sustained uranium bioimmobilization within contaminated groundwater systems. Spatial and temporal dynamics of subsurface microbial communities during EVO amendment are unknown and likely differ significantly from those of populations stimulated by soluble substrates, such as ethanol and acetate. In this study, a one-time EVO injection resulted in decreased groundwater U concentrations that remained below initial levels for approximately 4 months. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA from monitoring well samples revealed a rapid decline in groundwater bacterial community richness and diversity after EVO injection, concurrent with increased 16S rRNA copy levels, indicating the selection of a narrow group of taxa rather than a broad community stimulation. Members of the Firmicutes family Veillonellaceae dominated after injection and most likely catalyzed the initial oil decomposition. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulforegula, known for long-chain fatty acid oxidation to acetate, also dominated after EVO amendment. Acetate and H{sub 2} production during EVO degradation appeared to stimulate NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Fe(III), U(VI), and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} reduction by members of the Comamonadaceae, Geobacteriaceae, and Desulfobacterales. Methanogenic archaea flourished late to comprise over 25% of the total microbial community. Bacterial diversity rebounded after 9 months, although community compositions remained distinct from the preamendment conditions. These results demonstrated that a one-time EVO amendment served as an effective electron donor source for in situ U(VI) bioreduction and that subsurface EVO degradation and metal reduction were likely mediated by successive identifiable guilds of organisms.

  18. Longer-term domestic supply problems for nonrenewable materials with special emphasis on energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goeller, H.E.

    1980-01-01

    An examination is made on how materials are used in present and future energy production and use. Problem areas which are discussed include by-products production, import limitations, substitution and recycle, accelerated use, synthesis, and the adequacy of the data bases availability. (FS)

  19. Dimethyl ether fuel proposed as an alternative to LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikkawa, Yoshitsugi; Aoki, Ichizo

    1998-04-06

    To cope with the emerging energy demand in Asia, alternative fuels to LNG must be considered. Alternative measures, which convert the natural gas to liquid fuel, include the Fischer-Tropsch conversion, methanol synthesis, and dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis. Comparisons are evaluated based on both transportation cost and feed-gas cost. The analysis will show that DME, one alternative to LNG as transportation fuel, will be more economical for longer distances between the natural-gas source and the consumer. LNG requires a costly tanker and receiving terminal. The break-even distance will be around 5,000--7,000 km and vary depending on the transported volume. There will be risk, however, since there has never been a DME plant the size of an LNG-equivalent plant [6 million metric tons/year (mty)].

  20. The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunis, B.C.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M. ); Lienau, P.J. . Geo-Heat Center); Spencer, F.J. ); Nitschke, G.F. )

    1991-09-01

    This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combination of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15% discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation, thus power utilities have been selling power for less than 2 cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

  1. Feasibility study of fuel grade ethanol plant for Alcohol Fuels of Mississippi, Inc. , Vicksburg, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-01-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility study performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing an alcohol plant utilizing the N.Y.U. continuous acid hydrolysis process to convert wood wastes to fuel grade alcohol. The following is a summary of the results: (1) The proposed site in the Vicksburg Industrial Foundation Corporation Industrial Park is adequate from all standpoints, for all plant capacities envisioned. (2) Local hardwood sawmills can provide adequate feedstock for the facility. The price per dry ton varies between $5 and $15. (3) Sale of fuel ethanol would be made primarily through local distributors and an adequate market exists for the plant output. (4) With minor modifications to the preparation facilities, other waste cellulose materials can also be utilized. (5) There are no anticipated major environmental, health, safety or socioeconomic risks related to the construction and operation of the proposed facility. (6) The discounted cash flow and rate of return analysis indicated that the smallest capacity unit which should be built is the 16 million gallon per year plant, utilizing cogeneration. This facility has a 3.24 year payback. (7) The 25 million gallon per year plant utilizing cogeneration is an extremely attractive venture, with a zero interest break-even point of 1.87 years, and with a discounted rate of return of 73.6%. (8) While the smaller plant capacities are unattractive from a budgetary viewpoint, a prudent policy would dictate that a one million gallon per year plant be built first, as a demonstration facility. This volume contains process flowsheets and maps of the proposed site.

  2. Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. ... the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. ...

  3. Nationwide Analysis of U.S. Commercial Building Solar Photovoltaic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of breakeven prices than is variation in building load or solar generation profiles. vi This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... increases in rig and well productivity and falling drilling and completion costs. ... productivity improvements, lower breakeven costs, and forecast oil price increases. ...

  5. Community Wind Handbook/Submit Permit Applications | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Costs * Research Local Incentive Programs * Understand Your Wind Resource * Research Turbine Models * Calculate Simple Payback * Understand Preliminary Siting * Understand...

  6. Community Wind Handbook/Engage with Neighbors | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Costs * Research Local Incentive Programs * Understand Your Wind Resource * Research Turbine Models * Calculate Simple Payback * Understand Preliminary Siting * Understand...

  7. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-12-01

    a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

  8. WABASH RIVER IMPPCCT, INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Strickland

    2001-09-28

    the existing Wabash River Energy Ltd., plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. During the reporting period work was furthered to support the development of capital and operating cost estimates associated with the installation of liquid or gas phase methanol synthesis technology in a Commercial Embodiment Plant (CEP) utilizing the six cases previously defined. In addition, continued development of the plant economic model was accomplished by providing combined cycle performance data. Performance and emission estimates for gas turbine combined cycles was based on revised methanol purge gas information. The economic model was used to evaluate project returns with various market conditions and plant configurations and was refined to correct earlier flaws. Updated power price projections were obtained and incorporated in the model. Sensitivity studies show that break-even methanol prices which provide a 12% return are 47-54 cents/gallon for plant scenarios using $1.25/MM Btu coal, and about 40 cents/gallon for most of the scenarios with $0.50/MM Btu petroleum coke as the fuel source. One exception is a high power price and production case which could be economically attractive at 30 cents/gallon methanol. This case was explored in more detail, but includes power costs predicated on natural gas prices at the 95th percentile of expected price distributions. In this case, the breakeven methanol price is highly sensitive to the required project return rate, payback period, and plant on-line time. These sensitivities result mainly from the high capital investment required for the CEP facility ({approx}$500MM for a single train IGCC-methanol synthesis plant). Finally, during the reporting period the Defense Contractor Audit Agency successfully executed an accounting audit of Global Energy Inc. for data accumulated over the first year of the IMPPCCT project under the Cooperative Agreement.

  9. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo ; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  10. Longer than 1.9 μm photoluminescence emission from InAs quantum structure on GaAs (001) substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ke; Ma, Wenquan Huang, Jianliang; Zhang, Yanhua; Cao, Yulian; Huang, Wenjun; Luo, Shuai; Yang, Tao

    2015-07-27

    We report on photoluminescence (PL) emission with long wavelength for quantum structure by the sub-monolayer (SML) growth technique on GaAs (001) substrate. It is found that the PL emission wavelength can be controlled by controlling the SML InAs deposition amount. At 12 K, the PL peak position of the grown samples changes from about 1.66 to 1.78 μm. At 120 K, the PL emission of a sample reaches 1.91 μm. The physical mechanism responsible for the measured long wavelength PL emission may be related to strong In segregation and intermixing effects occurred in the structure grown by SML growth technique.

  11. Financial Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first step in financing a street lighting retrofit is a detailed financial analysis. Because street lighting systems are designed to last ten or twenty years, or even longer, all aspects of first costs, ongoing expenses, and long-term savings are important. While a preliminary or first-level analysis can be used to determine such things as simple payback, rate of return, and cost of light, the results may neglect a number of important economic considerations, such as the time value of money, additional savings and expenses and their relative timing, and future energy price escalations. Hence a first-level analysis does not typically provide the end user with sufficient details to make a fully informed decision. For this reason, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) recommends a full life cycle cost/benefit analysis (LCCBA).

  12. From TSD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    471 Discount needed for breakeven If 100% of power is off-peak 21% If 50% of power is off-peak and rest "average" 42% Alternatively, DR payment needed Annual 99 Monthly 8.28

  13. Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

    2012-08-01

    In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  14. Lesson Learned from Technical and Economic Performance Assessment and Benefit Evaluation of CHP-FCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Brooks, Kriston P.; Srivastava, Viraj; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Foster, Nikolas AF

    2014-08-22

    Recent efforts and interest in combined heat and power (CHP) have increased with the momentum provided by the federal government support for penetration of CHP systems. Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and utilize the heat normally wasted in power generation for useful heating or cooling with lower emissions compared to alternative sources. A recent study investigated the utilization of CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50KWe in various commercial building types and geographic locations. Electricity, heating, and water heating demands were obtained from simulation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial reference building models for various building types. Utility rates, cost of equipment, and system efficiency were used to examine economic payback in different scenarios. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, CHP-FCSs are more expensive than alternative technologies, and the high capital cost of the CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than is typically acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, the installation of these units as on-site power generators also provide several other benefits that make them attractive to building owners and operators. The business case for CHP-FCSs can be made more financially attractive through the provision of government incentives and when installed to support strategic infrastructure, such as military installations or data centers. The results presented in this paper intend to provide policy makers with information to define more customized incentives and tax credits based on a sample of building types and geographic locations in order to attract more business investment in this new technology.

  15. Estimating energy intensity and CO{sub 2} emission reduction potentials in the manufacturing sectors in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wangskarn, P.; Khummongkol, P.; Schrattenholzer, L.

    1996-12-31

    The final energy consumption in Thailand increased at about ten percent annually within the last 10 years. To slow the energy demand growth rate while maintaining the country`s economic advance and environmental sustainability, the Energy Conservation Promotion Act (ECPA) was adopted in 1992. With this Act, a comprehensive Energy Conservation Program (ENCON) was initiated. ENCON commits the government to promoting energy conservation, to developing appropriate regulations, and to providing financial and organizational resources for program implementation. Due to this existing ENCON program a great benefit is expected not only to reducing energy consumption, but also to decreasing GHGs emissions substantially. This study is a part of the ENCON research program which was supported by the German Federal Government under the program called Prompt-Start Measures to Implement the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The basic activities carried out during the project included (1) An assessment of Thailand`s total and specific energy consumption in the industrial sectors and commercial buildings; (2) Identification of existing and candidate technologies for GHG emission reduction and energy efficiency improvements in specific factories and commercial buildings; and (3) Identification of individual factories and commercial buildings as candidates for detailed further study. Although the energy assessment had been carried out for the commercial buildings also, this paper will cover only the work on the manufacturing sector. On the basis of these steps, 14 factories were visited by the project team and preliminary energy audits were performed. As a result, concrete measures and investments were proposed and classified into two groups according to their economic characteristics. Those investments with a payback time of less than four years were considered together in a Moderate scenario, and those with longer payback times in an Intensive scenario.

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Existing Facilities Performance Based Incentive Program Projects with a simple payback greater than 18 years, or less than 1 year (or 6 months for manufacturing and data center...

  17. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for households to see a simple payback from compact fluorescent bulbs depends on the price of electricity. Assuming a 26-watt compact fluorescent bulb that costs 22 dollars,...

  18. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm ... than typical HabitatPBC construction, at a payback of less ... components and building materials. * Air sealing around the ...

  19. Clean Power Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clients. The company has expertise in the design and financial payback analysis of solar photovoltaics and wind power solutions. It shares this expertise with Advanced Partner...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with a simple payback greater than 18 years, or less than 1 year (or 6 months for manufacturing and data center projects) are not eligible for incentives. Eligibility:...

  1. Clean Cities Launches Improved Tool to Help Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The popular VICE Model is newly updated to allow fleets greater flexibility in determining payback periods for natural gas vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

  2. CIBO Energy Efficiency Handbook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... With electricity costs typically at 0.065kwh and higher, the payback analysis justifies the extra expense. Here are some typical motor efficien- cies available today from ...

  3. Audit Report - Opportunities for Energy Savings at Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    evaluation identified conservation measures that could result in a payback within 2 months and an estimated annual savings of about 77,000 for projects including utilizing...

  4. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation. Authors: Myer, Michael ; Goettel, Russell T. ...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and design costs associated with new buildings meeting this standard, the goal of Gold can be reduced to Silver for projects where the payback period for earning Gold......

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    payback greater than 18 years, or less than 1 year (or 6 months for manufacturing and data center projects) are not eligible for incentives. Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial,...

  7. SouthCarolinaSaves Green Community Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Projects are eligible to receive between $500,000 and $5,000,000 of low cost financing and must have a payback period of 15 years.

  8. Tennessee: U.S. Automaker Improves Plants Performance, Saves Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nissan invested $331,000 to implement Superior Energy Performance (including internal staff time), resulting in a payback of just four months.

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    payback greater than 18 years, or less than 1 year (or 6 months for manufacturing and data center projects) are not eligible for incentives. Eligibility: Commercial,...

  10. A Retrofit Tool for Improving Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Feng, Wei; Ke, Jing; Hong, Tianzhen; Zhou, Nan

    2013-06-06

    Existing buildings will dominate energy use in commercial buildings in the United States for three decades or longer and even in China for the about two decades. Retrofitting these buildings to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use is thus critical to achieving the target of reducing energy use in the buildings sector. However there are few evaluation tools that can quickly identify and evaluate energy savings and cost effectiveness of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for retrofits, especially for buildings in China. This paper discusses methods used to develop such a tool and demonstrates an application of the tool for a retrofit analysis. The tool builds on a building performance database with pre-calculated energy consumption of ECMs for selected commercial prototype buildings using the EnergyPlus program. The tool allows users to evaluate individual ECMs or a package of ECMs. It covers building envelope, lighting and daylighting, HVAC, plug loads, service hot water, and renewable energy. The prototype building can be customized to represent an actual building with some limitations. Energy consumption from utility bills can be entered into the tool to compare and calibrate the energy use of the prototype building. The tool currently can evaluate energy savings and payback of ECMs for shopping malls in China. We have used the tool to assess energy and cost savings for retrofit of the prototype shopping mall in Shanghai. Future work on the tool will simplify its use and expand it to cover other commercial building types and other countries.

  11. Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

    2013-10-30

    technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

  12. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit ...

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. ...

  14. Amir Roth | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Most Recent QCoefficient Uses EnergyPlus to Reduce Willis Tower Energy Bills June 23 The Shockingly Short Payback of Energy Modeling May 23 When Saving Energy Helps Save Lives May ...

  15. Energy Conservation Tax Credits- Small Premium Projects (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy conservation projects include projects with investments for which the first year energy savings yields a simple payback period of greater than three years. Projects with a total cost of less...

  16. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Performance (SEP(tm)) program have shown an average energy performance improvement of 10% in the first 18 months of implementing SEP with an average payback of 1.7 years. ...

  17. Better Buildings Alliance, Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign: Rooftop Unit Measurement and Verification (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This document provides facility managers and building owners an introduction to measurement and verification (M&V) methods to estimate energy and cost savings of rooftop units replacement or retrofit projects to estimate paybacks or to justify future projects.

  18. Fort Collins- Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To control the construction and design costs associated with new buildings meeting this standard, the goal of Gold can be reduced to Silver for projects where the payback period for earning Gold...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SouthCarolinaSaves Green Community Loan Program Projects are eligible to receive between 500,000 and 5,000,000 of low cost financing and must have a payback period of 15 years....

  20. Smart Solar Marketing Strategies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... e Cost. Consumers report high up-front and out-of-pocket costs and long payback periods deter them from installing solar ... While state solar pro- grams do not produce solar panels, ...

  1. CBEI - Fault Detection and Diagnostics (FDD) for Advanced RTUs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Expected cost of FDD Even for 6 ton RTU FDD can achieve 3 year payback based on cost estimates This page contains no technical data subject to the EAR or the ITAR. 9 LabView ...

  2. Energy Conservation Tax Credits- Small Premium Projects (Corporate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy conservation projects include projects with investments for which the first year energy savings yields a simple payback period of greater than three years. Projects with a total cost of less...

  3. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Quick-Service Restaurants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Schrock, D. W.; Fisher, D. R.; Livchak, A.; Zabrowski, D. A.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

    2010-09-30

    Document describing PNNL's project to develop a package of energy efficiency measures that demonstrate the feasibility of achieving a 50% energy savings for quick-service restaurants with a simple payback of 5 years or less.

  4. Financial Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This tool takes into account the net cost savings, implementation costs, and operations and maintenance costs of an energy conservation measure, as well as typical project lifetime and the relating discount and escalation rates. The result is a cash flow analysis over the project lifetime with calculations for simple payback, discounted payback, net present value, and savings to investment ratio. The tool also displays the results graphically.

  5. Steam System Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: fixing steam leaks. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  6. Motor Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple motor inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: High Efficiency Motor retrofit and Cogged V-belts retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  7. Scaling of interceptors for theater defense

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1993-11-01

    For nominal GBI and SBI cost parameters GNIs are preferred for missile ranges under {approx} 1.000 km; for multiple theaters breakeven ranges decreases to {approx} 500 km. Penalties for using GBIs rather than SBIs for long-range missiles are {approx} factor of 2; penalties for using SBIs for short-range missiles an be larger.

  8. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alstone, Peter; Mills, Evan; Jacobson, Arne

    2011-01-25

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fuel-based lighting are substantial given the paltry levels of lighting service provided to users, leading to a great opportunity for GHG mitigation byencouraging the switch from fuel-based to rechargeable LED lighting. However, as with most new energy technology, switching to efficient lighting requires an up-front investment of energy(and GHGs) embedded in the manufacture of replacement components. We studied a population of off-grid lighting users in 2008-2009 in Kenya who were given the opportunity to adopt LEDlighting. Based on their use patterns with the LED lights and the levels of kerosene offset we observed, we found that the embodied energy of the LED lamp was"paid for" in only one month for grid charged products and two months for solar charged products. Furthermore, the energyreturn-on investment-ratio (energy produced or offset over the product's service life divided by energy embedded) for off-grid LED lighting ranges from 12 to 24, which is on par with on-gridsolar and large-scale wind energy. We also found that the energy embodied in the manufacture of a typical hurricane lantern is about one-half to one-sixth of that embodied in the particular LEDlights that we evaluated, indicating that the energy payback time would be moderately faster if LEDs ultimately displace the production of kerosene lanterns. As LED products improve, weanticipate longer service lives and more successful displacement of kerosene lighting, both of which will speed the already rapid recovery of embodied energy in these products. Our studyprovides a detailed appendix with embodied energy values for a variety of components used to construct off-grid LED lighting, which can be used to analyze other products.

  9. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  10. Putting icing on the cake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    By reclaiming the waste heat in the stacks of a steam boiler and baking ovens, the Pisano French Baking Company of California has reduced the boiler plant natural gas fuel consumption by 40% and has reduced its need for two boilers to one. Since the bakery produces French breads, live steam is required for the glazing operation. Therefore, two steam generators operate at about 12 psig with a design pressure of 15 psig. Due to the additional hardware requirements of the oven steam generator systems, the payback was extended, but fell within the investment company's guidelines. Installed cost for both generators was $26,865. First year savings for this portion of the project was $9,850, resulting in a simple payback of 33 months. The combined payback for both systems is 25 months.

  11. Skylighting saves over $20,000/year at paint manufacturing site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakawa, W.

    1983-05-01

    A discussion of the economics and installation of skylights in a warehouse and manufacturing area was presented. Included in the discussion were details on the installation, costs, energy conserved, savings, and payback period. In the particular case outlined, the installation costs were dependent on the type of existing roof. These costs ranged from $80 per 4 ft. by 8 ft. unit to $375 per 8 ft. by 8 ft. unit. In skylighting a 250,000 sq. ft. warehouse (1.5% of the roof area), the installation cost was $44,458. The power saving was $14,706 per year, with a payback period of slightly over three years. Later increase in power rates by 20% decreased the payback period by almost a year.

  12. FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

  13. SolOpt

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple hot water system inventory information and general building usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV and solar SHW systems. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV and SHW energy production to optimize rooftop area. Four optimization criteria are offered that will change the sizes of the two solar energy systems: !'Jet-present value, discounted payback period, C02 reduction, and total renewable energymore » production. This tool includes the option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  14. SolOpt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple hot water system inventory information and general building usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV and solar SHW systems. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV and SHW energy production to optimize rooftop area. Four optimization criteria are offered that will change the sizes of the two solar energy systems: !'Jet-present value, discounted payback period, C02 reduction, and total renewable energy production. This tool includes the option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  15. Generator Bidding Strategies in a Competitive Electricity Market with Derating and Bid-Segment Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Chow, Joe H.; Desrochers, Alan A.

    2009-07-31

    This paper develops optimal generator bidding strategies in a competitive electricity market. Starting from a generators cost curve, basic bidding concepts such as the break-even bid curve and the maximum profit bid curve can be readily derived. The maximum profit bid curve can be extended to account for generator availability and derating. In addition, multiple-segment block energy bids can be optimized based on the maximum profit curve and the probabilistic distribution of market clearing prices.

  16. Oak Ridge City Center Technology Demonstration Project | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Oak Ridge City Center Technology Demonstration Project Oak Ridge City Center Technology Demonstration Project Project objectives: To broaden market understanding of large-scale GSHP technology, and the design considerations that will impact front-end costs, ongoing maintenance costs, future energy savings, and system breakeven/lifecycle cost. gshp_thrash_oak_ridge_city_center.pdf (463.1 KB) More Documents & Publications Ground Source Heat Pump System Data Analysis Analysis of

  17. Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

  18. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the U.S.: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2014-01-01

    Residential heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged on the U.S. market. These units have the potential to provide homeowners significant cost and energy savings. However, actual in use performance of a HPWH will vary significantly with climate, installation location, HVAC equipment, and hot water use. To determine what actual in use energy consumption of a HPWH may be in different regions of the U.S., annual simulations of both 50 and 80 gallon HPWHs as well as a standard electric water heater were performed for over 900 locations across the U.S. The simulations included a benchmark home to take into account interactions between the space conditioning equipment and the HPWH and a realistic hot water draw profile. It was found that the HPWH will always save some source energy when compared to a standard electric resistance water heater, although savings varies widely with location. In addition to looking at source energy savings, the breakeven cost (the net installed cost a HPWH would have to have to be a cost neutral replacement for a standard water heater) was also examined. The highest breakeven costs were seen in cases with high energy savings, such as the southeastern U.S., or high energy costs, such as New England and California. While the breakeven cost is higher for 80 gallon units than 50 gallon units, the higher net installed costs of an 80 gallon unit lead to the 50 gallon HPWHs being more likely to be cost effective.

  19. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Residential heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged on the U.S. market, and they have the potential to provide homeowners significant cost and energy savings. However, actual in use performance of a HPWH will vary significantly with climate, installation location, HVAC equipment, and hot water use. To determine the actual energy consumption of a HPWH in different U.S. regions, annual simulations of both 50 and 80 gallon HPWHs as well as a standard electric water heater were performed for over 900 locations across the United States. The simulations included a benchmark home to take into account interactions between the space conditioning equipment and the HPWH and a realistic hot water draw profile. It was found that the HPWH will always save some source energy when compared to a standard electric resistance water heater, although savings varies widely with location. In addition to looking at source energy savings, the breakeven cost (the net installed cost a HPWH would have to have to be a cost neutral replacement for a standard water heater) was also examined. The highest breakeven costs were seen in cases with high energy savings, such as the southeastern U.S., or high energy costs, such as New England and California. While the breakeven cost is higher for 80 gallon units than 50 gallon units, the higher net installed costs of an 80 gallon unit lead to the 50 gallon HPWHs being more likely to be cost effective.

  20. Water Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple water fixture inventory information and calculates the water/energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes water conservation measures for: Low-flow Toilets, Low-flow Urinals, Low-flow Faucets, and Low-flow Showheads. This tool calculates water savings, energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  1. Water Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple water fixture inventory information and calculates the water/energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes water conservation measures for: Low-flow Toilets, Low-flow Urinals, Low-flow Faucets, and Low-flow Showheads. This tool calculates water savings, energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits ofmore » a project.« less

  2. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings tomore » investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  3. Low-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple low-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Low-wattage T8 lighting retrofit, T12 to T8 lighting retrofit, LED Exit signs retrofit, Occupancy sensors, Screw-in lighting retrofit, and central lighting controls. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cooling load reduction, heating load increases, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: Simple payback, discounted payback,more » net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  4. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ≥ 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873

  5. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy Use by 76%

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides an overview of how the IRS and MC Realty Group, its property management firm, achieved a 76% reduction in lighting energy use at an IRS facility parking garage in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2 million kWh, annual cost savings of over $122,000, and a simple payback of 2.5 years.

  6. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

  7. Evaluation of Northern Illinois Residential Retrofit Delivery Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, P.; Kerr, R.; Brand, L.

    2012-11-01

    Using a detailed BEopt analysis, PARR has developed packages of measures following a 'loading order' appropriate for cold climates at increasing levels of savings. Packages of measures to provide 'good, better, best' energy savings were determined based on predicted source energy savings, safety issues, program costs and simple payback for customers.

  8. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The Shaw Industries carpet manufacturing plant #20 in Dalton, Georgia, optimized boiler operation and installed waste heat exchangers on two processes in the dye house and an economizer on one boiler, for a payback of 1.7 years. These results prompted plant #4, also located in Dalton, to participate in an assessment.

  9. Steam System Efficiency Optimized After J.R. Simplot Fertilizer Plant Receives Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The J.R. Simplot Company's Don Plant in Pocatello, Idaho, optimized boiler operation, improved condensate recovery, and fixed steam traps and leaks for a simple payback of 6.5 months. Results are being shared with other Simplot facilities and other recommendations identified during the assessment are under consideration.

  10. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

    2010-06-29

    A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

  11. Evaluation of Northern Illinois Residential Retrofit Delivery Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, P.; Kerr, R.; Brand, L.

    2012-10-01

    Using a detailed BEopt analysis, PARR has developed packages of measures following a 'loading order' appropriate for cold climates at increasing levels of savings. Packages of measures to provide 'good, better, best' energy savings were determined based on predicted source energy savings, safety issues, program costs and simple payback for customers.

  12. Fast reactor core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi

    2015-12-31

    Fast Reactor (FR) core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency were conducted. A heterogeneous MA loaded core was designed based on the 1000MWe-ABR breakeven core. The heterogeneous MA loaded core with Zr-H loaded moderated targets had a better transmutation performance than the MA homogeneous loaded core. The annular pellet rod design was proposed as one of the possible design options for the MA target. It was shown that using annular pellet MA rods mitigates the self-shielding effect in the moderated target so as to enhance the transmutation rate.

  13. Auto propane -- Some technical considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This booklet reviews some of the facts about propane as a vehicle fuel. It describes propane fuel properties, propane vehicle fuel systems and their components, propane vehicles and engines obtainable as original equipment from the vehicle manufacturer, after-market propane fuel system installations, propane vehicle operational characteristics, propane-fueled vehicle maintenance, government regulations and safety measures related to propane vehicles, and the environmental benefits of propane and propane-fueled vehicles. The final sections discuss the economics of propane vehicle ownership and the factors to be considered when estimating annual or lifetime savings or payback periods. Appendices include a directory of information sources, a sample worksheet for calculating payback, and examples of success stories relating the positive experiences of vehicle fleets with propane fueling.

  14. Plant Wide Assessment for SIFCO Industries, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi et. al.

    2005-07-06

    Sifco Industries carreid out a plant wide energy assessment under a collaborative program with the U.S. Department of Energy during October 2004 to September 2005. During the year, personnel from EIS, E3M, DPS, BuyCastings.Com, and Sifco plant facilities and maintenance personnel, as a team collected energy use, construction, process, equipment and operational information about the plant. Based on this information, the team identified 13 energy savings opportunities. Near term savings opportunities have a total potential savings of about $1,329,000 per year and a combined simple payback of about 11 months. Implementation of these recommendations would reduce CO2 emissions by about 16,000,000 pounds per year, which would reduce overall plant CO2 emissions by about 45%. These totals do not include another $830,000 per year in potential savings with an estimated 9-month payback, from converting the forging hammers from steam to compressed air.

  15. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  16. PV Hourly Simulation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple general building characteristics and usage information to calculate the energy and cost benefits of solar PV. This tool conducts and complex hourly simulation of solar PV based primarily on the area available on the rooftop. It uses a simplified efficiency calculation method and real panel characteristics. It includes a detailed rate structure to account for time-of-use rates, on-peak and off-peak pricing, and multiple rate seasons. This tool includes themore » option for advanced system design inputs if they are known. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, incentives and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Public Entities The South Carolina Energy Office (SCEO) provides low interest loans for a variety of energy efficiency improvements, including AFV conversions and incremental costs, with qualified project payback periods. Eligible recipients include state agencies, local governments, public colleges and universities, school districts, and private non-profit organizations. Private non-profit organizations and local government entities may be eligible for loans of up to 100% of eligible project

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Private Entities The South Carolina Business Development Corporation provides low interest loans for a variety of energy efficiency improvements, including AFV conversions and incremental costs, with qualified project payback periods. Eligible recipients include business and industries; utilities, non-profit organizations, and government entities may be eligible under special conditions. The loan may cover up to 100% of the project costs ranging from $50,000 to $1 million and must be repaid

  19. VICE 2.0 Helps Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments (Fact Sheet), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) Model helps you estimate the financial and emissions benefits you can expect by transitioning to compressed natural gas. Using your fleet-specific data: * Number of vehicles * Vehicle types * Fuel use * Planned vehicle-acquisition schedules VICE calculates and displays: * Return on investment * Payback period * Annual greenhouse gas savings * Fuel availability and useage VICE covers the following vehicle types: * Transit Bus * School Bus *

  20. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, New Jersey Photo of Ambient Solar Thermal Collector The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a laboratory in Edison, New Jersey that is the site of an alternative energy project. It uses a super ambient solar thermal collector or solar hot water pre-heater for shower facilities in the lab. Initial investment: $14,448 Payback period: 12 years Cost savings: $1,237/year Energy savings:

  2. Camp Pendleton Saves 91% in Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base replaced high-pressure sodium (HPS) fixtures in one parking lot with high-efficiency induction fixtures for 91% savings in energy use and $5,700 in cost savings annually. This parking lot is estimated to have a simple payback of 2.9 years. Sitewide up-grades yielded annual savings of 1 million kWh.

  3. Army Reserve 63d RSC Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how the Army Reserve 63d Regional Support Command (RSC) achieved 85% energy savings and $4,000 per year in cost savings by replacing 12 old light fixtures with light-emitting diode fixtures in the military equipment parking area. This project was part of a camp-wide parking lighting retrofit which, on average, delivered 78% energy savings and a simple payback of 4.4 years.

  4. Audit Report: DOE/IG-0869 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    69 Audit Report: DOE/IG-0869 August 31, 2012 Opportunities for Energy Savings at Department of Energy Facilities Our review disclosed that the Department had not always effectively identified and implemented energy-saving opportunities through facility evaluations and electricity metering. Three of the five sites we reviewed (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory) had not always identified or implemented low- and no-cost, quick payback

  5. Firm eyes savings from tires-to-fuel system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, J.

    1983-01-31

    A $600,000 pyrolysis system to convert tire scraps into methane will eliminate a tire retreading company's landfill and boiler fuel costs and achieve a five-year payback. The process also yields steel belts, fibers, and carbon black byproducts that can be sold for additional revenue. Heat from the hot exhaust gases will be recycled to the combustion chamber. A 10% federal energy tax credit and a 10% investment tax credit lowered the capital costs for $480,000. (DCK)

  6. Project Financing: From Identification to Implementation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Project Financing: From Identification to Implementation Project Financing: From Identification to Implementation This presentation discusses various means to measure the financial impact of energy efficiency projects from simple payback to annualized cost analysis. Project Financing: From Identification to Implementation (April 16, 2009) (434.04 KB) More Documents & Publications Project Reports for Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa - 2010 Project Field Demonstration of

  7. Fuel Cell Financing Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UTC Power Corporation 195 Governor's Highway South Windsor, CT Fuel Cell Financing Options (CESA/DOE Webinar - August 30, 2011) Paul J. Rescsanski, Manager, Business Finance Paul J. Rescsanski, Manager, Business Finance The UTC Power Advantage Strained Utility Grid, unreliable power * Significant Energy savings through: - 80 - 90% system efficiency - Combined heat and power * Payback in 3-5 years Sustainability and carbon reduction Rising energy costs * Assured power generated on-site: -

  8. Global Energy Management System Implementation: General Dynamics Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Energy Management System Implementation: Case Study 1 USA, Superior Energy Performance Defense contractor improves energy performance nearly 12%, achieving a six-month payback and earning Gold- level certification by Superior Energy Performance Business Benefits Achieved General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems (GD-OTS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office to successfully implement an energy management system (EnMS) at a federal ammunition plant

  9. City of Raleigh, Wilders Grove Service Center, Solid Waste Services Facility. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Cox; Bill Black; Battle, Fred

    2015-07-22

    Final Report for DOE Grant EE0002808. Grant award was for technology demonstration of geothermal energy systems. One of the major objectives identified for the demonstration portion of the grant was to prove the viability of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems in significantly reducing energy usage of HVAC and domestic water heating systems compared to traditional systems. Data were monitored and conclusions drawn, including estimating payback timeframes and documenting lessons learned.

  10. Photovoltaic technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the history of photovoltaic devices and a discussion of the cost goals set for photovoltaic modules, the status of photovoltaic technology is assessed. Included are discussions of: current applications, present industrial production, low-cost silicon production techniques, energy payback periods for solar cells, advanced materials research and development, concentrator systems, balance-of-system components. Also discussed are some nontechnical aspects, including foreign markets, US government program approach, and industry attitudes and approaches. (LEW)

  11. About | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About The Center for Excitonics at MIT: Fundamental Science for Excitonic Materials and Devices excitonic_group_color_2014-crop(full size) The problem with conventional electronic devices is that they are difficult to manufacture; their constituent materials require very high levels of order and achieving such low entropy in a semiconductor requires expensive and energy intensive fabrication. For example, the energy payback time for a crystalline silicon solar cell is on the order of two years,

  12. Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Fluorescent Lamps Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps This tool calculates the payback period for your calc retrofit project. Modify the default values to suit your project requirements. Existing incandescent lamp wattage Watts Incandescent lamp cost dollars Incandescent lamp life 1000 hours calc wattage Watts calc cost dollars calc life (6000 hours for moderate use, 10000 hours for high use) 8000 hours Number of lamps in retrofit project Hours operating per week hours

  13. Assessment of energy-efficiency improvements for paint spray booths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to inform industry and industrial associations of the economic and technical benefits achievable through spray booth control. A discussion of the energy use and potential for conservation in spray booths is presented. Descriptions, costs, and payback potentials of several spray booth control system concepts are provided. In addition, the technological barriers and the R and D needs to overcome these barriers are identified and discussed.

  14. Promoting Combined Heat and Power (CHP) for Multifamily Properties, 2008 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Promoting Combined Heat and Power (CHP) for Multifamily Properties, 2008 Promoting Combined Heat and Power (CHP) for Multifamily Properties, 2008 The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed preliminary feasibility (Level 1) screening software and enlisted the DOE CHP Regional Application Centers (RACs) to help run utility data and estimate paybacks. This paper

  15. BTO Partners Develop Novel, Energy-efficient Thermoelectric Clothes Dryer Prototype

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ORNL and Sheetak, Inc. have developed prototypes of a novel thermoelectric (TE) clothes dryer that is energy efficient and has a potentially short payback period. The solid-state heat pump technology is expected to deliver an energy factor greater than 6 lb/kWh, a major improvement over current electric resistance dryers, which perform at only 3.73 lb/kWh.

  16. Case Study- The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station Through Pump System Modifications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study explores how the City of Milford, Connecticut saved energy at the Welches Point sewage lift station. By adding a small booster pump to the sewage pumping system, the city reduced the station's annual energy consumption by 36,096 kWh, or more than 15 percent, which resulted in annual savings of $2,960. With a total implementation cost of $16,000, the project yielded a simple payback of 5.4 years.

  17. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determine the Feasibility of Installing Energy Efficient Lighting In this part of the exercise, you will plan a new approach to lighting your school library. This new plan will use less energy, cost less, and result in less greenhouse gas. Your plan will also include bottom line calculations and decision factors such as: identifying the costs and payback for buying and installing new lighting equipment and making a determination about whether or not the new, more efficient lighting will provide

  18. Superior Energy Performance: Getting the Most Value from ISO 50001-Energy Management Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Superior Energy Performance cm : Getting the Most Value from ISO 50001- Energy Management Systems US Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office March 13, 2012 Aimee McKane Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 | Industrial Energy Efficiency eere.energy.gov * Time and again, industrial energy efficiency has been demonstrated to be cost effective while having a positive effect on productivity * Despite this, energy efficiency improvements with very favorable payback periods often do not

  19. Trash-fired boiler cuts plant's gas use 30%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, F

    1983-06-27

    A Minneapolis bottling plant will burn trash in a 450-horsepower boiler/incinerator to reduce natural gas consumption 30% and eliminate the costs of hauling and disposing of trash. Combined with a CA1500 heat-recovery system installed in 1982, the project will have a two-year payback. The system is clean enough that even old tires can be burned and still meet air pollution regulations. (DCK)

  20. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Energy Storage, Conversion, And

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Utilization | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Energy Storage, Conversion, And Utilization Energy Technology Perspectives 2012: Executive Summary [Portuguese version] NONE Energy indicators for electricity production : comparing technologies and the nature of the indicators Energy Payback Ratio (EPR), Net Energy Ratio (NER) and Cumulative Energy Demand (CED). [Oestfoldforskning AS] Raadal, Hanne Lerche [Ostfold

  1. Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Vehicles | Department of Energy Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative Fuel Vehicles Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative Fuel Vehicles November 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Clean Cities is providing fleets a new tool to calculate payback periods and emissions benefits of alternative fuel vehicles. Developed by Argonne National Laboratory, the Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET)

  2. Comparative analysis of thorium and uranium fuel for transuranic recycle in a sodium cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Fiorina; N. E. Stauff; F. Franceschini; M. T. Wenner; A. Stanculescu; T. K. Kim; A. Cammi; M. E. Ricotti; R. N. Hill; T. A. Taiwo; M. Salvatores

    2013-12-01

    The present paper compares the reactor physics and transmutation performance of sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (FRs) for TRansUranic (TRU) burning with thorium (Th) or uranium (U) as fertile materials. The 1000 MWt Toshiba-Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) conceptual core has been used as benchmark for the comparison. Both burner and breakeven configurations sustained or started with a TRU supply, and assuming full actinide homogeneous recycle strategy, have been developed. State-of-the-art core physics tools have been employed to establish fuel inventory and reactor physics performances for equilibrium and transition cycles. Results show that Th fosters large improvements in the reactivity coefficients associated with coolant expansion and voiding, which enhances safety margins and, for a burner design, can be traded for maximizing the TRU burning rate. A trade-off of Th compared to U is the significantly larger fuel inventory required to achieve a breakeven design, which entails additional blankets at the detriment of core compactness as well as fuel manufacturing and separation requirements. The gamma field generated by the progeny of U-232 in the U bred from Th challenges fuel handling and manufacturing, but in case of full recycle, the high contents of Am and Cm in the transmutation fuel impose remote fuel operations regardless of the presence of U-232.

  3. HVDC power transmission technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauth, R.L.; Tatro, P.J.; Railing, B.D.; Johnson, B.K.; Stewart, J.R.; Fink, J.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an assessment of the national utility system`s needs for electric transmission during the period 1995-2020 that could be met by future reduced-cost HVDC systems. The assessment was to include an economic evaluation of HVDC as a means for meeting those needs as well as a comparison with competing technologies such as ac transmission with and without Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) controllers. The role of force commutated dc converters was to be assumed where appropriate. The assessment begins by identifying the general needs for transmission in the U.S. in the context of a future deregulated power industry. The possible roles for direct current transmission are then postulated in terms of representative scenarios. A few of the scenarios are illustrated with the help of actual U.S. system examples. non-traditional applications as well as traditional applications such as long lines and asynchronous interconnections are discussed. The classical ``break-even distance`` concept for comparing HVDC and ac lines is used to assess the selected scenarios. The impact of reduced-cost converters is reflected in terms of the break-even distance. This report presents a comprehensive review of the functional benefits of HVDC transmission and updated cost data for both ac and dc system components. It also provides some provocative thoughts on how direct current transmission might be applied to better utilize and expand our nation`s increasingly stressed transmission assets.

  4. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  6. Energy analysis of facade-integrated photovoltaic systems applied to UAE commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhi, Hassan

    2010-12-15

    Developments in the design and manufacture of photovoltaic cells have recently been a growing concern in the UAE. At present, the embodied energy pay-back time (EPBT) is the criterion used for comparing the viability of such technology against other forms. However, the impact of PV technology on the thermal performance of buildings is not considered at the time of EPBT estimation. If additional energy savings gained over the PV system life are also included, the total EPBT could be shorter. This paper explores the variation of the total energy of building integrated photovoltaic systems (BiPV) as a wall cladding system applied to the UAE commercial sector and shows that the ratio between PV output and saving in energy due to PV panels is within the range of 1:3-1:4. The result indicates that for the southern and western facades in the UAE, the embodied energy pay-back time for photovoltaic system is within the range of 12-13 years. When reductions in operational energy are considered, the pay-back time is reduced to 3.0-3.2 years. This study comes to the conclusion that the reduction in operational energy due to PV panels represents an important factor in the estimation of EPBT. (author)

  7. Survey Evidence on the Willingness of U.S. Consumers to Pay for Automotive Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Evans, David H; Hiestand, John

    2013-01-01

    Prospect theory, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002, holds that human beings faced with a risky bet will tend to value potential losses about twice as much as potential gains. Previous research has demonstrated that prospect theory could be sufficient to explain an energy paradox in the market for automotive fuel economy. This paper analyzes data from four random sample surveys of 1,000 U.S. households each in 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Households were asked about willingness to pay for future fuel savings as well as the annual fuel savings necessary to justify a given upfront payment. Payback periods inferred from household responses are consistent over time and across different formulations of questions. Mean calculated payback periods are short, about 3 years, but there is substantial dispersion among individual responses. Calculated payback periods do not appear to be correlated with the attributes of respondents. Respondents were able to quantitatively describe their uncertainty about both vehicle fuel economy and future fuel prices. Simulation of loss averse behavior based on this stated uncertainty illustrate how loss aversion could lead consumers to substantially undervalue future fuel savings relative to their expected value.

  8. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Walkway Lighting at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center, in Atlantic City, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2008-03-18

    This report documents the results of a collaborative project to demonstrate a solid state lighting (SSL) general illumination product in an outdoor area walkway application. In the project, six light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were installed to replace six existing high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires mounted on 14-foot poles on a set of exterior walkways and stairs at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, during December, 2007. The effort was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Technology Gateway Demonstration that involved a collaborative teaming agreement between DOE, FAA and Ruud Lighting (and their wholly owned division, Beta LED). Pre- and post-installation power and illumination measurements were taken and used in calculations of energy savings and related economic payback, while personnel impacted by the new lights were provided questionnaires to gauge their perceptions and feedback. The SSL product demonstrated energy savings of over 25% while maintaining illuminance levels and improving illuminance uniformity. PNNL's economic analysis yielded a variety of potential payback results depending on the assumptions used. In the best case, replacing HPS with the LED luminaire can yield a payback as low as 3 years. The new lamps were quite popular with the affected personnel, who gave the lighting an average score of 4.46 out of 5 for improvement.

  9. Slide 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    longer be validated * Concise Note Indicator field will no longer be captured * Port of Entry field will no longer be captured * Production Code is no longer captured 5 NMMSS...

  10. Stockbridge Munsee Community Health and Wellness Center and the Mohican Family Center Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRocher, Andy; Barrnett, Michael

    2014-03-14

    The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Health and Wellness Center (HWC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the HWC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the HWC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the HWC performs in the lowest 8 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with paybacks of less than five years to yield an estimated 25-percent decrease in annual energyconsumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $26,800 per year with an implementation cost of just $4,650 (0.2 year payback). For the Mohican Family Center document: The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Mohican Family Center (MFC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the MFC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the MFC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the MFC performs better than 80 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with short term paybacks to yield an estimated 13-percent decrease in energy consumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated

  11. Not-In-Kind Technologies for Residential and Commercial Unitary Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.

    2001-01-11

    maintenance costs although energy use would be higher. There are strong opportunities for gas-fired heat pumps to reduce both energy use and operating costs outside of the high cooling climates in the southeast, south central states, and the southwest. Diesel and IC (Otto) engine-driven heat pumps are commercially available and should be able to increase their market share relative to gas furnaces on a life cycle cost basis; the cost premiums associated with these products, however, make it difficult to achieve three or five year paybacks which adversely affects their use in the U.S. Stirling engine-driven and duplex Stirling heat pumps have been investigated in the past as potential gas-fired appliances that would have longer lives and lower maintenance costs than diesel and IC engine-driven heat pumps at slightly lower efficiencies. These potential advantages have not been demonstrated and there has been a low level of interest in Stirling engine-driven heat pumps since the late 1980's. GAX absorption heat pumps have high heating efficiencies relative to conventional gas furnaces and are viable alternatives to furnace/air conditioner combinations in all parts of the country outside of the southeast, south central states, and desert southwest. Adsorption heat pumps may be competitive with the GAX absorption system at a higher degree of mechanical complexity; insufficient information is available to be more precise in that assessment.

  12. Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind PowerUnder Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

    2004-11-28

    This paper presents a method for evaluation of investments in small-scale wind power under uncertainty. It is assumed that the price of electricity is uncertain and that an owner of a property with wind resources has a deferrable opportunity to invest in one wind power turbine within a capacity range. The model evaluates investment in a set of projects with different capacity. It is assumed that the owner substitutes own electricity load with electricity from the wind mill and sells excess electricity back to the grid on an hourly basis. The problem for the owner is to find the price levels at which it is optimal to invest, and in which capacity to invest. The results suggests it is optimal to wait for significantly higher prices than the net present value break-even. Optimal scale and timing depend on the expected price growth rate and the uncertainty in the future prices.

  13. CAlorimetric observation of excess heat during electrochemical insertion of deuterium into palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guer, T.M.; Schreiber, M.; Huggins, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    In order to address the energy break-even issue, the thermal behavior of the Pd-D system was studied during electrolysis of heavy water in a thermodynamically closed cell. A specially designed isoperibolic calorimeter was developed for this purpose and was fully characterized. Eleven pretreated, fresh Pd cathodes were individually tested in identically designed calorimeters and their thermal behavior were monitored starting from time zero. In two of the cases, excess power was observed in which the overall energy balance became positive after a relatively short period, leading to the generation of significant amounts of excess energy. In one case, excess power was maintained over a period of ten days, and produced over 23 MJ of excess energy per mole of palladium.

  14. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  15. Preliminary Neutronic Study of D2O-cooled High Conversion PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled high-conversion PWRs loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects.

  16. Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

  17. Cost reductions in absorption chillers. Final report, June 1984-May 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Absorption chillers have great difficulty competing with the electric-driven compression alternative, due in part to modest operating efficiencies and largely to high first costs. This project is an assessment of the possibility of lowering the costs of absorption chillers dramatically by the use of low material intensity in the design of a new generation of these machines. Breakeven costs for absorption chillers, their heat exchangers and heat exchanger materials were established which will allow commercial success. Polymeric and metallic materials appropriate to particular components and which meet the cost goals were identified. A subset of these materials were tested and ordered by success in tolerating conditions and materials found in absorption chiller applications. Conceptual designs which indicate the practicality of the low material intensity approach were developed. The work reported here indicates that there is a high probability that this apporach will be successful.

  18. An Evaluation of the Flywheel Potential for Providing Regulation Service in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde

    2010-07-26

    Flywheels can provide regulation and frequency response services to the power grids. This study presents the technical characteristics, modeling approach, methodologies, and results for providing regulation services in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) market. Breakeven cost analyses were developed for two cases: 1) flywheel provides the regulation service alone; and 2) flywheel provides the regulation service together with a hydro power plant. For both cases, we evaluated two payment methods: pay-by-energy and pay-by-capacity. Based on the results of the technical and cost analyses, the opportunities for the flywheel providing regulation services are discussed; field test results for the flywheel’s physical characteristics are presented; and performance metrics of the flywheel to provide the regulation services are suggested.

  19. Iron production maintenance effectiveness system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augstman, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

  20. Instability Control in a Staged Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank J. WESSEL

    2011-04-22

    A \\Staged Z-Pinch” is a fusion-energy concept in which stored-electric energy is first converted into plasma-liner-kinetic energy, and then transferred to a coaxialtarget plasma [H. U. Rahman, F. J. Wessel, and N. Rostoker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, p. 714(1996)]. Proper choice of the liner and target materials, and their initial radii and mass densities, leads to dynamic stabilization, current amplification, and shock heating of the target. Simulations suggest that this configuration has merit as a alternative inertial-confinement-fusion concept, and may provide an energy release exceeding thermonuclear break-even, if tested on one of many newer pulsed power systems, for example those located at Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  2. THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

    2003-07-01

    This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

  3. Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mighton, Steven, J.

    2007-08-06

    Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the companys global facility environmental footprint.

  4. Geothermal Retrofit of Illinois National Guard's State headquarters Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Mark

    2015-04-27

    The goal of this project was to assess the feasibility of utilizing mine water as a heat sink for a geothermal heat pump system to heat and cool the 74,000 sq. ft. Illinois National Guard State Headquarters’ building in Springfield Illinois. If successful, this type of system would be less expensive to install than a traditional closed loop geothermal (ground source) heat pump system by significantly reducing the size of the well field, thus shortening or eliminate the payback period compared to a conventional system. In the end, a conventional ground loop was used for the project.

  5. Energy savings potential in air conditioners and chiller systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaya, Durmus; Alidrisi, Hisham

    2014-01-22

    In the current paper we quantified and evaluated the energy saving potential in air conditioners and chiller systems. Here, we also showed how to reduce the cost of air conditioners and chiller systems in existing facilities on the basis of payback periods. Among the measures investigated were: (1) installing higher efficiency air conditioners, (2) installing higher efficiency chillers, (3) duty cycling air conditioning units, and (4) utilizing existing economizers on air conditioning units. For each method, examples were provided from Arizona, USA. In these examples, the amount of saved energy, the financial evaluation of this energy, and the investment costmore » and pay back periods were calculated.« less

  6. Energy savings potential in air conditioners and chiller systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaya, Durmus; Alidrisi, Hisham

    2014-01-22

    In the current paper we quantified and evaluated the energy saving potential in air conditioners and chiller systems. Here, we also showed how to reduce the cost of air conditioners and chiller systems in existing facilities on the basis of payback periods. Among the measures investigated were: (1) installing higher efficiency air conditioners, (2) installing higher efficiency chillers, (3) duty cycling air conditioning units, and (4) utilizing existing economizers on air conditioning units. For each method, examples were provided from Arizona, USA. In these examples, the amount of saved energy, the financial evaluation of this energy, and the investment cost and pay back periods were calculated.

  7. Retro-Commissioning Increases Data Center Efficiency at Low Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Achieved at SRS Basic Retro-Cx: 1. Eliminated electric reheat. 2. Turned off humidification devices. 3. Tuned floor tile airflow. 4. Turned off three CRAC units. Total estimated savings ≅ 1,400,000 kWh/year Retro-Cx cost at SRS: Engineering consultant: preliminary, on-site, and follow-up work including data measurements and retrieval. SRS on-site facilities personnel and engineering support. Total estimated cost ≅ $25,000 Simple Payback at SRS: Estimated, at $0.045/kWh = 2.5 months. taken

  8. Waste gas to save steel firm $160,000/mo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, J.

    1982-07-19

    An Armco Inc. plant at Houston will save $160,000 a month in avoided fuel costs by burning waste gas produced in its blast furnace. The $5.3 million Schack boiler system will have a three-year payback and a 25% return on investment. Armco will apply both the 10% business investment and the 10% energy-conservation tax credits. Armco decided not to renew a natural gas contract after prices rose to over $4 per thousand cubic feet. There will be no economic benefits, however, until improvements in the economy warrant restarting the blast furnace, which has been idle since mid-June. (DCK)

  9. Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Street and Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool was developed by a partnership of the DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, the Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI)/C40, and the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), for the financial analysis of retrofitting street and parking facility lighting with more efficient alternatives. Property owners, city and other government agencies, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations can use this tool to compute annualized energy and energy-cost savings, maintenance savings, greenhouse gas reductions, net present value, and simple payback associated with potential lighting upgrades.

  10. Bucket-type steam traps removed in $82K retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplett, J.

    1985-08-19

    A retrofit of 481 mostly failed steam traps at Martin Marietta's Aerospace Division should reduce steam costs by $70,000 and require little or no maintenance. Payback should occur within 14 months. The new traps include orifice, bellow-type thermostatic, and float-type traps that have few or no moving parts. Lack of maintenance was responsible for the poor performance of the bucket traps that were replaced, although manufacturers of the bucket traps disagree that replacement of certain parts is necessary every six months. The author describes the design and operation of each type of trap.

  11. Improving Motor and Drive System Performance – A Sourcebook for Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    This sourcebook outlines opportunities to improve motor and drive systems performance. The sourcebook is divided into four main sections: (1) Motor and Drive System Basics: Summarizes important terms, relationships, and system design considerations relating to motor and drive systems. (2) Performance Opportunity Road Map: Details the key components of well-functioning motor and drive systems and opportunities for energy performance opportunities. (3) Motor System Economics: Offers recommendations on how to propose improvement projects based on corporate priorities, efficiency gains, and financial payback periods. (4) Where to Find Help: Provides a directory of organizations associated with motors and drives, as well as resources for additional information, tools, software, videos, and training opportunities.

  12. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  13. Do-it-yourself solar heating. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, J.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is a do-it-yourself method of building a solar greenhouse for the purpose of heating a house. During the operational periods, following the construction of the greenhouse, severe problems were encountered. The heat losses at night during the heating season lowered temperatures inside the greenhouse to below freezing on some occasions. Overheating was a problem encountered during the summer months. Daily high and low temperatures are recorded for both inside and outside of the greenhouse. The payback period for the present greenhouse was calculated to be approximately 21.5 years. Recommendations for improving the greenhouse design and efficiency are included. (BCS)

  14. Heat pipes for industrial waste heat recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Development work on the high temperature ceramic recuperator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described and involved material investigations, fabrication methods development, compatibility tests, heat pipe operation, and the modeling of application conditions based on current industrial usage. Solid ceramic heat pipes, ceramic coated refractory pipes, and high-temperature oxide protected metallic pipes have been investigated. Economic studies of the use of heat-pipe based recuperators in industrial furnaces have been conducted and payback periods determined as a function of material, fabrication, and installation cost.

  15. Procurement Data Reporting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    related to DOE Furnace NOPR LCC model and TSD Priority Questions A) It appears that the assignment of base case efficiency for each individual home is chosen based on a random assignment in the Base Case AFUE sheet D12. This ignores the likelihood that there is an economic motive for consumers in selecting condensing vs. non-condensing furnaces. That is, consumers who have good payback economics for condensing furnaces are actually less likely to be affected by a rule than those with poor

  16. Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-03-04

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

  17. Energy Cost Control: How the Money Works

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Christopher Russell Energy PathFINDER www.energypathfinder.com crussell@energypathfinder.com Energy Cost Control: How the Money Works (Copies of these slides to be provided by DOE-ITP) (c)2009 Energy Pathfinder Mangement Consulting, LLC www.energypathfinder.com 2 Samuel Goldwyn (1879-1974) "Spare no expense to save money on this one." (c)2009 Energy Pathfinder Mangement Consulting, LLC www.energypathfinder.com 3 OUTLINE A "money" perspective on energy Projects, payback

  18. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 281 Solar Hot Water Application Assessment for U.S. Army IMCOM-Southeast Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Chvala, William D.

    2010-09-30

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires installations (EISA) to install solar systems of sufficient capacity to provide 30% of service hot water in new construction and renovations where cost-effective. However, installations are struggling with how to implement solar hot water, and while several installations are installing solar hot water on a limited basis, paybacks remain long. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to address this issue to help determine how best to implement solar hot water projects. This documents discusses the results of that project.

  19. Priority Questions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    related to DOE Furnace NOPR LCC model and TSD Priority Questions A) It appears that the assignment of base case efficiency for each individual home is chosen based on a random assignment in the Base Case AFUE sheet D12. This ignores the likelihood that there is an economic motive for consumers in selecting condensing vs. non-condensing furnaces. That is, consumers who have good payback economics for condensing furnaces are actually less likely to be affected by a rule than those with poor

  20. Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System If you went through the planning steps to evaluate whether a small wind electric system will work at your location, you will already have a general idea about: The amount of wind at your site The zoning requirements and covenants in your area The economics, payback, and incentives of installing a wind system at your site. Now, it is time to look at

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science gifts back $50K award August 2, 2016 Last month, Flow Science, a Santa Fe-based software company, gifted back $50,000 to the Venture Acceleration Fund (VAF). The company was awarded the money in 2014 through a VAF award-a zero-interest loan with payback only required when a company meets certain revenue goals, is acquired, or moves out of state. Although Flow Science has not yet met any of the requirements to pay back the loan, President Thomas Jensen felt the time was right for Flow

  2. Case Study- The Challenge: Improving Sewage Pump System Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study looks at how Trumbull, Connecticut increased the energy and operating efficiency of its Reservoir Avenue sewage pump station. With the help of ITT Flygt Corporation, the town altered the existing pump system by adding a smaller pump and modifying the system control scheme. The changes reduced annual electricity consumption by almost 44 percent, or nearly 31,900 kWh, saving more than $2,600 per year. The $12,000 project had a simple payback of 4.6 years.

  3. Chapter 1.19: Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaic Thin Film: CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    The chapter reviews the history, development, and present processes used to fabricate thin-film, CdTe-based photovoltaic (PV) devices. It is intended for readers who are generally familiar with the operation and material aspects of PV devices but desire a deeper understanding of the process sequences used in CdTe PV technology. The discussion identifies why certain processes may have commercial production advantages and how the various process steps can interact with each other to affect device performance and reliability. The chapter concludes with a discussion of considerations of large-area CdTe PV deployment including issues related to material availability and energy-payback time.

  4. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy at a Lehigh Southwest Cement Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  5. Techni-Cast: Foundry Saves Energy with Compressed Air System Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-03-01

    In 2002, Techni-Cast improved its compressed air system at its foundry in Southgate, California. The project allowed the foundry to reduce its compressor capacity by 50%, which greatly reduced the foundry's energy and maintenance costs. The annual energy and maintenance savings from the project implementation are 242,000 kWh and $24,200, and the project's cost was $38,000. Because the plant received a $10,000 incentive payment from the California Public Utilities Commission, the total project cost was reduced to $28,000, yielding a 14-month simple payback.

  6. Techni-Cast: Foundry Saves Energy with Compressed Air System Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-03-01

    In 2002, Techni-Cast improved its compressed air system at its foundry in Southgate, California. The project allowed the foundry to reduce its compressor capacity by 50%, which greatly reduced the foundry's energy and maintenance costs. The annual energy and maintenance savings from the project implementation are 242,000 kWh and $24,200, and the projects cost was $38,000. Because the plant received a $10,000 incentive payment from the California Public Utilities Commission, the total project cost was reduced to $28,000, yielding a 14-month simple payback.

  7. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  8. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  9. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-27

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Office Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  10. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  11. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases Reliability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This case study outlines how General Motors (GM) developed a highly efficient pumping system for their Pontiac Operations Complex in Pontiac, Michigan. In short, GM was able to replace five original 60- to 100-hp pumps with three 15-hp pumps whose speed could be adjusted to meet plant requirements. As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual $11,255 in pumping costs. With a capital investment of $44,966 in the energy efficiency portion of their new system, GM projected a simple payback of 4 years.

  12. Chapter 16: Retrocommissioning Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiessen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Retrocommissioning (RCx) is a systematic process for optimizing energy performance in existing buildings. It specifically focuses on improving the control of energy-using equipment (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment and lighting) and typically does not involve equipment replacement. Field results have shown proper RCx can achieve energy savings ranging from 5% to 20%, with a typical payback of 2 years or less. A study conducted on behalf of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory analyzed data from 11 utilities operating RCx programs across the United States. The dataset included 122 RCx projects and more than 950 RCx measures.

  13. Naftokrak-Naftdbudowa & MPEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szewczyk, T.; Mazur, J.

    1995-12-31

    Polish graded coal is being burned on existing stoker boilers at MPEC`s Balicka plant, using Control Techtronics microprocess-based system. Pictures were shown of the equipment controlling three hot water WR-10 boilers, and (two) steam 22.5 boilers. The results of this installation include; 85% reduction in stack particulate emission, 25% increase in boiler energy efficiency, 65% reduction in fan electrical energy, achieving {open_quotes}ultra low fire{close_quotes} which provides 3 or 4 to 1 turndown, versus 2 to 1, for substantially reduced fuel use at low heating requirements, and 2 to 3 years payback on invested capital.

  14. Waste fuel, EMS may save plant $1M yearly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, J.

    1982-05-24

    A mixture of paper trash and coal ash fueling an Erie, Pa. General Electric plant and a Network 90 microprocessor-based energy-management system (EMS) to optimize boiler efficiency will cost about $3 million and have a three-to-four-year payback. Over half the savings will come from the avoided costs of burning plant-generated trash. The EMS system will monitor fuel requirements in the boiler and compensate for changes in steam demand. It will also monitor plant electrical needs and control the steam diverted for cogeneration. (DCK)

  15. Hospital to save $71,800/year burning trash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, M.

    1984-01-01

    A waste-to-steam dual-fuel boiler system will save the Geisinger Medical Center in Pennsylvania $71,800 a year in avoided natural gas, trash-hauling, and incinerating costs. In operation less than a year, the system currently generates 6.3% of hospital steam for an anticipated three-year payback. A waste-heat-recovery system, with a net cost of $360,000, will pay for itself in an estimated five years. The case-history report describes how the system fits into hospital operations. (DCK)

  16. Camp Pendleton Saves 91% in Parking Lot Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Camp Pendleton Saves 91% in Parking Lot Lighting Camp Pendleton Saves 91% in Parking Lot Lighting Case study describes how Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base replaced high-pressure sodium (HPS) fixtures in one parking lot with high-efficiency induction fixtures for 91% savings in energy use and $5,700 in cost savings annually. This parking lot is estimated to have a simple payback of 2.9 years. Sitewide up-grades yielded annual savings of 1 million kWh. Download the Camp Pendleton case study.

  17. Thermostatic Radiator Valve (TRV) Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This research measured the energy savings associated with installing thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) on one-pipe low-pressure steam systems in New York City multifamily buildings. There were three primary objectives: to determine whether fuel consumption was lower in buildings using TRVs; to determine if occupants would accept the TRVs; and to determine if overheating in apartments could be eliminated using TRVs. Eight buildings, ranging in size from 15 to 26 apartments, were monitored for three years. Each building was audited to determine fuel history and quick-payback energy conservation measures. The project covered three phases; phase-1 consisted of installing low-cost energy conservation measures such as pipe insulation, air vents and burner tune-tips; determining each building`s baseline energy use, and recording baseline apartment temperatures. TRV installations occurred in phases 2 and 3. In phase-2, TRVs were installed in half the apartments in four buildings. In phase-3, TRVs were installed in the remainder of the apartments. Experimental results were conclusive. Buildings with overheated apartments achieved energy savings through the installation of TRVs. The authors research shows an average reduction of 9.45% in space heating energy use occurred with partial installation of TRVs, and savings of 15.5% were achieved after full installation. Buildings with the highest average apartment temperatures during the base year showed the greatest energy savings. Simple payback, based on an installed price of $50 per TRV, averaged 3.1 years.

  18. Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer; LaFrance, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

  19. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Third Quarterly Report, April--June 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence R. Zirker; James E. Francfort

    2003-08-01

    This Third Quarterly report details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the PuraDYN Corporation. The reported engine lubricating oil-filtering capability (down to 0.1 microns) and additive package of the bypass filter system is intended to extend oil-drain intervals. To validate the extended oil-drain intervals, an oil-analysis regime monitors the presence of necessary additives in the oil, detects undesirable contaminants and engine wear metals, and evaluates the fitness of the oil for continued service. The eight buses have accumulated 185,000 miles to date without any oil changes. The preliminary economic analysis suggests that the per bus payback point for the oil bypass filter technology should be between 108,000 miles when 74 gallons of oil use is avoided and 168,000 miles when 118 gallons of oil use is avoided. As discussed in the report, the variation in the payback point is dependant on the assumed cost of oil. In anticipation of also evaluating oil bypass systems on six Chevrolet Tahoe sport utility vehicles, the oil is being sampled on the six Tahoes to develop an oil characterization history for each engine.

  20. Local government energy management: liquid petroleum gas (LPG) as a motor vehicle fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, G.A.; Kerstetter, J.

    1983-10-01

    The retrofit or conversion of automotive engines to operate on liquid petroleum gas (LPG) or propane fuel is one of many potentially cost-effective strategies for reducing a local government's annual fleet operating and maintenance costs. The cost effectiveness of an LPG conversion decision is highly dependent on the initial conversion cost, vehicle type, current and projected fuel costs, vehicle fuel economy (miles per gallon), and yearly average mileage. A series of plots have been developed which indicate simple paybacks for the conversion of several vehicle types (passenger car, small and standard pickups, and two and three ton trucks) over a wide range of fuel economies and annual usage patterns. A simple payback of less than three years can be achieved for vehicles with poor fuel economy and high annual use. The figures provided in this report may be used by fleet management personnel as a screening tool to identify those passenger cars, small or standard pickups, or light duty trucks which are candidates for LPG conversion. In addition to examining the benefits of an LPG conversion, local governments should also consider the competing energy management strategies of downsizing, and the acquisition of fuel efficient, diesel powered vehicles.

  1. Analysis of IECC2003 Chiller Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating Requirement for New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winiarski, David W.

    2004-08-15

    The state of New York asked the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the requirement for Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating that exists in the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code to determine whether this requirement should be adopted into the New York State Energy Code. A typical hotel application that would trigger this requirement was examined using whole building simulation software to generate baseline annual chiller and service hot water loads, and a spreadsheet was used to examine the energy savings potential for heat recovery using hourly load files from the simulation. An example application meeting the code requirement was developed, and the energy savings, energy cost savings, and first costs for the heat recovery installation were developed. The calculated payback for this application was 6.3 years using 2002 New York state average energy costs. This payback met the minimum requirements for cost effectiveness established for the state of New York for updating the commercial energy conservation code.

  2. Demonstration of Datacenter Automation Software and Hardware (DASH) at the California Franchise Tax Board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Federspiel, Clifford

    2009-12-18

    Control software and wireless sensors designed for closed-loop, monitoring and control of IT equipment's inlet air temperatures in datacenters were evaluated and tested while other datacenter cooling best practices were implemented. The controls software and hardware along with each best practice were installed sequentially and evaluated using a measurement and verification procedure between each measure. The results show that the overall project eliminates 475,239 kWh per year, which is 21.3percent of the baseline energy consumption of the data center. The total project, including the best practices will save $42,772 per year and cost $134,057 yielding a simple payback of 3.1 years. However, the control system alone eliminates 59.6percent of the baseline energy used to move air in the datacenter and 13.6percent of the baseline cooling energy, which is 15.2percent of the baseline energy consumption (see Project Approach, Task 1, below, for additional information) while keeping temperatures substantially within the limits recommended by ASHRAE. Savings attributed to the control system are $30,564 per year with a cost $56,824 for a simple payback of 1.9 years.

  3. Energy-conservation-investment decision making in developing countries: A review of project implementation in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Despite recent efforts in a number of developing countries to promote energy conservation (EC) and efficiency, only a fraction of EC potential has been captured, especially for projects that require significant investments. The document analyzes EC efforts in 11 countries where energy audit and/or feasibility study programs have been carried out (Bangladesh, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Pakistan, Panama, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka), covering some 1,500 EC projects involving 242 industrial companies. Cost and length of payback seem to be the determining factors for companies considering EC measures; no-cost or low-cost projects with paybacks of less than a year (such as power factor improvement projects) had the highest rate of implementation, while expensive, complicated projects (e.g., cogeneration or fuel substitution projects) were most often rejected. The document concludes, however, that the rate of implementation of EC programs has been quite high, and recommends that inexpensive, short-term projects be featured in future EC programs and increased levels of TA and financial assistance be made available to companies implementing long-term EC measures.

  4. Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01

    This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

  5. An easy-to-fabricate low-temperature TiO{sub 2} electron collection layer for high efficiency planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conings, B.; Baeten, L.; Jacobs, T.; Dera, R.; D’Haen, J.; Manca, J.; Boyen, H.-G.

    2014-08-01

    Organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells arguably represent the most auspicious new photovoltaic technology so far, as they possess an astonishing combination of properties. The impressive and brisk advances achieved so far bring forth highly efficient and solution processable solar cells, holding great promise to grow into a mature technology that is ready to be embedded on a large scale. However, the vast majority of state-of-the-art perovskite solar cells contains a dense TiO{sub 2} electron collection layer that requires a high temperature treatment (>450 °C), which obstructs the road towards roll-to-roll processing on flexible foils that can withstand no more than ∼150 °C. Furthermore, this high temperature treatment leads to an overall increased energy payback time and cumulative energy demand for this emerging photovoltaic technology. Here we present the implementation of an alternative TiO{sub 2} layer formed from an easily prepared nanoparticle dispersion, with annealing needs well within reach of roll-to-roll processing, making this technology also appealing from the energy payback aspect. Chemical and morphological analysis allows to understand and optimize the processing conditions of the TiO{sub 2} layer, finally resulting in a maximum obtained efficiency of 13.6% for a planar heterojunction solar cell within an ITO/TiO{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3-x}Cl{sub x}poly(3-hexylthiophene)/Ag architecture.

  6. Productivity genefits from new energy technology: A case study of a paint manufacturing company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghunathan, P.; Capehart, B.L.

    1997-06-01

    In many cases, implementing new energy efficiency technologies not only helps facilities reduce their energy costs, but it also creates greater profits by increasing productivity. These added benefits from productivity improvements can sometimes be greater than the energy cost savings, and can result in an attractive overall payback period for implementing the new technology. This paper presents a case study of productivity improvement at a paint manufacturing company as a result of implementing new energy efficiency technology. During an industrial energy assessment, it was noted that the company had experienced frequent failures of motor belts and sheaves on five paint mixers resulting in significant replacement costs and labor costs. In addition, a bigger loss was being suffered due to lost potential profit associated with the frequent work stoppages. The IAC recommendation was to install motor soft starters (also known as motor voltage controllers) on the five mixing machines. Installation of soft starters would have the following benefits: lower energy costs, lower replacement costs for transmission components, lower labor costs, and higher production levels and increased profits. The total annual benefits were estimated at $122,659, of which the benefits from increased productivity were nearly $67,000. The overall simple payback period for installing the soft starters was less than 2 months.

  7. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackketter, Donald

    2015-06-30

    Executive Summary An innovative 50-ton ground-source heat pump (GSHP) system was installed to provide space heating and cooling for a 56,000 square foot (5,200 square meter) building in Butte Montana, in conjunction with its heating and chiller systems. Butte is a location with winter conditions much colder than the national average. The GSHP uses flooded mine waters at 78F (25C) as the heat source and heat sink. The heat transfer performance and efficiency of the system were analyzed using data from January through July 2014. This analysis indicated that for typical winter conditions in Butte, Montana, the GSHP could deliver about 88% of the building’s annual heating needs. Compared with a baseline natural-gas/electric system, the system demonstrated at least 69% site energy savings, 38% source energy savings, 39% carbon dioxide emissions reduction, and a savings of $17,000 per year (40%) in utility costs. Assuming a $10,000 per ton cost for installing a production system, the payback period at natural gas costs of $9.63/MMBtu and electricity costs of $0.08/kWh would be in the range of 40 to 50 years. At higher utility prices, or lower installation costs, the payback period would obviously be reduced.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

    2006-03-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

  9. Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A A; Wipke, K

    1992-05-01

    The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69% more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44% less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration. 8 refs.

  10. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  11. Phase 1A Final Report for the AREVA Team Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, Mike E.

    2015-03-19

    In response to the Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to develop and deploy lead fuel assemblies (LFAs) of Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel (EATF) into a US reactor within 10 years, AREVA put together a team to develop promising technologies for improved fuel performance during off normal operations. This team consisted of the University of Florida (UF) and the University of Wisconsin (UW), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Duke Energy and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). This team brought broad experience and expertise to bear on EATF development. AREVA has been designing; manufacturing and testing nuclear fuel for over 50 years and is one of the 3 large international companies supplying fuel to the nuclear industry. The university and National Laboratory team members brought expertise in nuclear fuel concepts and materials development. Duke and TVA brought practical utility operating experience. This report documents the results from the initial “discovery phase” where the team explored options for EATF concepts that provide enhanced accident tolerance for both Design Basis (DB) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDB). The main driver for the concepts under development were that they could be implemented in a 10 year time frame and be economically viable and acceptable to the nuclear fuel marketplace. The economics of fuel design make this DOE funded project very important to the nuclear industry. Even incremental changes to an existing fuel design can cost in the range of $100M to implement through to LFAs. If this money is invested evenly over 10 years then it can take the fuel vendor several decades after the start of the project to recover their initial investment and reach a breakeven point on the initial investment. Step or radical changes to a fuel assembly design can cost upwards of $500M and will take even longer for the fuel vendor to recover their investment. With the projected lifetimes of the current generation of nuclear power

  12. Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2010 - 2011 Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon, C.; Parker, D.

    2013-03-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Stacey.Rothgeb@nrel.gov for further information.

  13. Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report - Austin, Texas: February 29 - March 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-05-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Cheryn.Metzger@nrel.gov for further information.

  14. Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2013-05-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Michael.Gestwick@nrel.gov for further information.

  15. Strategy Guideline: Proper Water Heater Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; German, A.; Staller, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-08-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Cheryn.Metzger@nrel.gov for further information.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of Energy Recovery Ventilators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosar, D.

    2013-05-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Stacey.Rothgeb@nrel.gov for further information.

  17. World Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    World Crude Oil Prices (Dollars per Barrel) The data on this page are no longer available.

  18. Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

    2012-11-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Michael.Gestwick@nrel.gov for further information.

  19. A Preliminary Analysis of the Economics of Using Distributed Energy as a Source of Reactive Power Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fangxing; Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom; King, Thomas F

    2006-04-01

    A major blackout affecting 50 million people in the Northeast United States, where insufficient reactive power supply was an issue, and an increased number of filings made to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by generators for reactive power has led to a closer look at reactive power supply and compensation. The Northeastern Massachusetts region is one such area where there is an insufficiency in reactive power compensation. Distributed energy due to its close proximity to loads seems to be a viable option for solving any present or future reactive power shortage problems. Industry experts believe that supplying reactive power from synchronized distributed energy sources can be 2 to 3 times more effective than providing reactive support in bulk from longer distances at the transmission or generation level. Several technology options are available to supply reactive power from distributed energy sources such as small generators, synchronous condensers, fuel cells or microturbines. In addition, simple payback analysis indicates that investments in DG to provide reactive power can be recouped in less than 5 years when capacity payments for providing reactive power are larger than $5,000/kVAR and the DG capital and installation costs are lower than $30/kVAR. However, the current institutional arrangements for reactive power compensation present a significant barrier to wider adoption of distributed energy as a source of reactive power. Furthermore, there is a significant difference between how generators and transmission owners/providers are compensated for reactive power supplied. The situation for distributed energy sources is even more difficult, as there are no arrangements to compensate independent DE owners interested in supplying reactive power to the grid other than those for very large IPPs. There are comparable functionality barriers as well, as these smaller devices do not have the control and communications requirements necessary for automatic

  20. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2009-07-16

    available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the

  1. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively used for both heating and cooling. The same examination was done for the 5,000 m{sup 2} buildings. Although CHP installation capacity is smaller and the payback periods are longer, economic, fuel efficiency, and environmental benefits are still seen. While these benefits remain even when subsidies are removed, the increased installation costs lead to lower levels of installation capacity and thus benefit.

  2. An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2011-12-01

    In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even

  3. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsner, N. B.; Bass, J. C.; Ghamaty, S.; Krommenhoek, D.; Kushch, A.; Snowden, D.; Marchetti, S.

    2005-03-16

    Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCAR's test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of

  4. Desiccant-Based Preconditioning Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J.

    2001-01-11

    A number of important conclusions can be drawn as a result of this broad, first-phase market evaluation. The more important conclusions include the following: (1) A very significant market opportunity will exist for specialized outdoor air-handling units (SOAHUs) as more construction and renovation projects are designed to incorporate the recommendations made by the ASHRAE 62-1989 standard. Based on this investigation, the total potential market is currently $725,000,000 annually (see Table 6, Sect. 3). Based on the market evaluations completed, it is estimated that approximately $398,000,000 (55%) of this total market could be served by DBC systems if they were made cost-effective through mass production. Approximately $306,000,000 (42%) of the total can be served by a non-regenerated, desiccant-based total recovery approach, based on the information provided by this investigation. Approximately $92,000,000 (13%) can be served by a regenerated desiccant-based cooling approach (see Table 7, Sect. 3). (2) A projection of the market selling price of various desiccant-based SOAHU systems was prepared using prices provided by Trane for central-station, air-handling modules currently manufactured. The wheel-component pricing was added to these components by SEMCO. This resulted in projected pricing for these systems that is significantly less than that currently offered by custom suppliers (see Table 4, Sect. 2). Estimated payback periods for all SOAHU approaches were quite short when compared with conventional over-cooling and reheat systems. Actual paybacks may vary significantly depending on site-specific considerations. (3) In comparing cost vs benefit of each SOAHU approach, it is critical that the total system design be evaluated. For example, the cost premium of a DBC system is very significant when compared to a conventional air handling system, yet the reduced chiller, boiler, cooling tower, and other expense often equals or exceeds this premium, resulting in a

  5. How to lose money with advanced controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.J. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that advanced control is a well established technology in the oil and petrochemical industries, and it is tempting to believe that a large portion of its users have captured the greatest share of the available benefits. However, despite massive investments in hardware, few companies have fully exploited the opportunities made available by this investment. In the Western world probably about 85% of the total investment justified on existing plants has already been committed. The benefits captured, however, are probably less than 50% of those readily available. Assuming this investment was justified on a three year payback, the incremental cost to finish the job should pay back in about six months. So why isn't everyone doing it The following gives guidance on how to maintain, or even worsen the status quo. Known as the Whitehouse Rules, violation of most of them could cause a significant improvement in process profitability.

  6. Solarnorth '81 by Tymura Solardesigns: diverse residential, commercial and industrial projects at and above the 48th parallel in Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tymura, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Solar Energy Heating Applications are On the Rise in and above the Northwestern City of Thunder Bay, on the northern shore of Lake Superior. Unique in their diversifications, the architectural commissions range from pure passive residential design thru hybrid systems; residential Greenhouse-Solarium active swimming pool and commercial hotel pool to inexpensive hybrid system for Canada's First Commercial Solar Lumber Drying Kiln; as well as combined earth sheltered with solar system design for a dormitory complex and shopping center. By May 1981, 7 buildings designed by Tymura Solardesigns in the Thunder Bay area will have been subjected to the Extreme Canadian climate (10,500/sup 0/F degree days, yearly temperature maximums from -41/sup 0/F to 90/sup 0/F, and solar fractions vary from 50% to 75%, with economic payback periods ranging between 7 and 10 years.

  7. DOE’s Superior Energy Performance Program Publishes Early Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nine companies certified under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Superior Energy Performance Program (SEP) have shown an average energy performance improvement of 10% in the first 18 months of implementing SEP with an average payback of 1.7 years. These findings and other results are included in a paper presented at the July 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy and are now provided in a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) report, Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program. Through SEP, industrial facilities implement the ISO 50001 energy management standard and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements.

  8. Low-Cost Phase Change Material for Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2015-08-06

    A low-cost PCM process consisting of conversion of fats and oils to PCM-range paraffins, and subsequent “encapsulation” of the paraffin using conventional plastic compounding/pelletizing equipment was demonstrated. The PCM pellets produced were field-tested in a building envelope application. This involved combining the PCM pellets with cellulose insulation, whereby 33% reduction in peak heat flux and 12% reduction in heat gain was observed (average summertime performance). The selling price of the PCM pellets produced according to this low-cost process is expected to be in the $1.50-$3.00/lb range, compared to current encapsulated PCM price of about $7.00/lb. Whole-building simulations using corresponding PCM thermal analysis data suggest a payback time of 8 to 16 years (at current energy prices) for an attic insulation retrofit project in the Phoenix climate area.

  9. Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-01

    A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of $6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities. This publication details specifications of the parabolic trough solar system and highlights 5 years of measured performance data.

  10. Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-09-01

    A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of$6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities.

  11. Natural gas powered rotary water chiller development. Phase 1. Final report, September 1991-June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanborn, D.F.; Lakowske, R.L.; Byars, M.

    1993-06-01

    Objectives of the project were to evaluate performance and marketability of a rotary engine driven screw compressor for water chiller applications. Choice of a rotary engine was aimed at rotary compressor. Initial testing done with modified stock 13B rotary engine and experimental open compressor. Engine torque not sufficient for 70 ton compressor. Analysis concluded 50 ton best match for air cooled applications and 60 ton best for water cooled to get highest gas COP. Market analysis covered total water chiller market assuming relative costs of power would lead to gas cooling sales. Allowable cost premium for 3 yr payback determined for areas of country. Premium cost of 100 ton air cooled unit estimated and compared to market allowable premiums. Concluded product acceptance will be primarily in niche markets with high local electric power demand charges.

  12. Near earth object fuels (neo-fuels): Discovery, prospecting and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-08-25

    The 1992 discovery of a water-ice, near-Earth object (NEO) in the space near Earth is evaluated as a source of rocket fuel and life support materials for Earth orbit use. Nuclear thermal rockets using steam propellant are evaluated and suggested. The space geological formation containing such water-rich NEO's is described. An architecture couples near-Earth object fuels (neo-fuel) extraction with use in Earth orbits. Preliminary mass payback analyses show that space tanker systems fueled from space can return in excess of 100 times their launched mass from the NEO, per trip. Preliminary cost estimates indicate neo-fuel costs at Earth orbit can be 3 orders of magnitude below today's cost. A suggested resource verification plan is presented.

  13. Near earth object fuels (neo-fuels): Discovery, prospecting and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-08-25

    The 1992 discovery of a water-ice, near-Earth object (NEO) in the space near Earth is evaluated as a source of rocket fuel and life support materials for Earth orbit use. Nuclear thermal rockets using steam propellant are evaluated and suggested. The space geological formation containing such water-rich NEO`s is described. An architecture couples near-Earth object fuels (neo-fuel) extraction with use in Earth orbits. Preliminary mass payback analyses show that space tanker systems fueled from space can return in excess of 100 times their launched mass from the NEO, per trip. Preliminary cost estimates indicate neo-fuel costs at Earth orbit can be 3 orders of magnitude below today`s cost. A suggested resource verification plan is presented.

  14. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were substituted for the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires and evaluated for relative light quantity and performance. The demonstration results show energy savings of 52% from the initial conversion of HPS to the LED product. These savings were increased to 88% by using occupancy sensor controls that were ultimately set to reduce power to 10% of high state operation after a time delay of 2.5 minutes. Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. Staff at DOL Headquarters reported high satisfaction with the operation of the LED product.

  15. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  16. Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived Value of Solar Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2011-10-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed by several types of market participants, ranging from residential customers to large-scale project developers and utilities. Each type of market participant frequently uses a different economic performance metric to characterize PV value because they are looking for different types of returns from a PV investment. This report finds that different economic performance metrics frequently show different price thresholds for when a PV investment becomes profitable or attractive. Several project parameters, such as financing terms, can have a significant impact on some metrics [e.g., internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and benefit-to-cost (B/C) ratio] while having a minimal impact on other metrics (e.g., simple payback time). As such, the choice of economic performance metric by different customer types can significantly shape each customer's perception of PV investment value and ultimately their adoption decision.

  17. Gas cooler sets the perfect balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilder, M.; Aubry, L.; Schwartz, G.; Anderson, R.; Burkhardt, C. ); Wilson, J.; Vallort, J.; Ransick, M.F. )

    1993-05-20

    In July 1991, a 65-ton electric chiller was in need of major repair at NutraSweet's R and D facility outside of Chicago. Instead of automatically repairing or replacing that chiller, NutraSweet engineers Larry Aubry and Gerald Schwartz began to look at other alternatives. What they discovered was that a natural gas absorption chiller was a cost-effective, environmentally safe alternative effective, environmentally safe alternative perfectly suited for their application. The benefits for NutraSweet are straightforward: energy bills have been cut by more than [dollar sign]70,000 annually, existing boiler capacity is better utilized, existing electrical cooling system life is extended, maintenance costs are reduced, and no-ozone-depleting CFCs are utilized by the natural gas chiller. Simple payback on the unit, originally expected to be almost four years, has been reduced to closer to three.

  18. An improved absorption generator for solar-thermal powered heat pumps. Part 2: Energy and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fineblum, S.

    1997-12-31

    Solar heated absorption chiller installations have been very expensive for their rating. To enhance collector thermal efficiency the liquid flowing within the collectors must be kept as cool as possible. However, there is also a need to operate the absorption reported earlier. The compromise usually results in poor collector efficiency as well as a relatively poor specific chiller effect. The proposed vortex generator permits a heat pump to operate efficiently with relatively low temperature solar heated fluid (70--80 C). As a result, the collectors are cooler and more efficient. As noted in Part 1, the specific heat pumping capacity is about 27% greater than conventional systems operating at the same reduced generator temperatures. Therefore, a smaller, less expensive chiller is required. The reduced investment in solar arrays and absorption chillers is estimated along with a range of paybacks.

  19. Means of improving the operating efficiency of air condensers at the Verkhne-Mutnovskaya Geothermal Power Plant in Kamchatka

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parshin, B. E.; Muratov, P. V.; Pashkevich, R. I.

    2007-07-15

    Operation of the Verkhne-Mutnovskaya Geothermal Power Plant (VMGPP) has revealed ineffective summer-time performance of air condensers (AC), which is caused by an insufficient heat reserve. Four alternate schemes are examined for improvement of the operational efficiency of the AC: replacement of the four-by five-tier heat-exchange modules; installation of high-output fans; a combination of the first two schemes; and, installation of additional sections in each power-generating set. Based on thermodynamic analysis that we have adapted for conditions at the VMGPP, it is established that the last alternate scheme is optimal, andwill have a payback period of six years, and a heat reserve of more than 40%, a figure approaching requirements now in force.

  20. Economic, efficiency, and environmental comparison of alternative vehicular fuels: 1982 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-05

    At an operating cost of only 4 cents/mile, methane vehicles are cheaper than gasoline, propane, or electric ones, claims the American Gas Association. The payback period for the natural gas - CNG (compressed natural gas) or LNG - vehicle would be 1-3.4 years depending on the location, conversion and station costs, fleet size, fuel cost, and mileage. The typical cost of converting a 100-vehicle fleet could be $1550/vehicle; a slow-fill station is a $100,000-200,000 investment. Widespread use of gas-powered cars would lower traffic emissions while increasing the use of pipeline capacity. It would not place a strain on gas supplies because vehicle demand is projected at 0.4-1.9 trillion CF by the year 2000, only 2-6% of expected supplies.

  1. Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparrow, F.T.

    1983-06-01

    Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

  2. Dual fuel Russian urban transit buses: Economical reduced emissions. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This study, conducted by Caterpillar, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The scope of this project was to examine the financial and environmental aspects of introducing new alternative fuel engines to the buses of Russia`s public transportation system. The report consists of the following: (1) executive summary; (2) background/overview; (3) 3306 design, development, test; (4) electronic governed engines; (5) Moscow bus testing; (6) conclusions; (7) appendices. The appendices include: (1) Caterpillar emissions lab report; (2) dyno tests -- dual fuel data sheets; (3) 3360 horizontal engine lub tilt test; (4) 1000 hour endurance test -- engine operator sheets; (5) 1000 hour endurance test -- 250 hour check; (6) Caterpillar dual fuel electronic engines; (7) product description -- dual fuel electronic governed engines; (8) California Environmental Protection Agency -- certification of caterpillar electronic governed engines; (9) annual payback data.

  3. Development of technology in the production of fertilizers in ammoniation-granulation plants. Progress report No. 12, September 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Work conducted to demonstrate procedures and equipment to conserve about 83% of fuel oil used for drying and generating steam in the ammoniation-granulation plants is reported. The general mechanism of granulation is examined. Conventional ammoniation-granulation plants are described and the new pipe-cross reactor system is described and schematics of their design are presented. Results of some demonstration tests reveal that an average of 785,000 Btu's per ton of production is eliminated with the installation of the TVA pipe-cross reactor process. It also reduces atmospheric emissions. Data on investment cost and payback period of the installation of a pipe-cross reactor in an existing TVA granulation fertilizer plant are presented.

  4. Research Opportunities in Reliability of Photovoltaic Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.

    2010-05-01

    The motivation for an increased scope and a more proactive effort in reliability research of photovoltaic modules and systems includes reducing the levelized cost of energy and gaining better confidence in the energy and financial payback for photovoltaic systems. This increased reliability and confidence will lead to greater penetration of photovoltaics in the energy portfolio and greater employment in photovoltaics and related industries. Present research needs include the fundamental degradation mechanisms of polymers, connectors and other module components, mapping of failure mechanisms observed in the field to those in accelerated lifetime tests, determining the acceleration factors, and improving standards for modules such that tests can appropriately be assigned to evaluate their long term durability. Specific mechanisms discussed are corrosion in module components, metastability in thin-film active layers, delamination and loss of elastic properties in module polymeric materials, and inverter failure. Presently, there is hiring of reliability scientists and engineers at many levels of the value chain for photovoltaics.

  5. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-11-26

    Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

  6. Largest Producer of Steel Products in the United States Achieves Significant Energy Savings at its Minntac Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study looks at the results of a DOE energy assessment at U.S. Steel’s Minntac plant in Mt. Iron, Minnesota, to analyze the efficiency of the plant’s process heating systems and determine energy savings opportunities. The assessment confirmed the energy savings from recently installed burners and determined the potential savings from retrofitting the kilns in the plant's other process lines with such burner systems. The new burners are yielding annual cost and energy savings of $760,000 and 95,000 MMBtu respectively. Additionally, the plant saves $30,000 in annual maintenance labor costs. With project costs of approximately $1.2 million, the plant achieved a simple payback of 1.5 years.

  7. QER- Comment of Tremolux

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Sirs, Despite what might have been your best intentions, your 2013 report on Low-E storm windows is Worthless! All of the careful calculations and measurements are Worthless if the actual price of low-E storms is 4X what you claim! Given that a high-quality low-E storm window costs over $220 each, including installation, the payback period is Absurd! Who the hell is responsible for this Bullshit? Go shopping for low-E storms ... we Dare You! You might find some very cheap, plain grey, aluminum units ... but even those will be 3X the price that you claim. Don't you understand what we're saying? Your entire Cost/Benefit analysis is a FRAUD! Time to wake up! Tremolux

  8. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 5.1:Expand the Number of Faculty Working in Wind Energy: Wind Energy Supply Chain and Logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Wind as a source of energy has gained a significant amount of attention because it is free and green. Construction of a wind farm involves considerable investment, which includes the cost of turbines, nacelles, and towers as well as logistical costs such as transportation of oversized parts and installation costs such as crane-rental costs. The terrain effects at the project site exert considerable influence on the turbine assembly rate and the project duration, which increases the overall installation cost. For higher capacity wind turbines (>3MW), the rental cost of the cranes is significant. In this study, the impact of interest rate, sales price of electricity, terrain effects and availability of cranes on the duration of installation and payback period for the project is analyzed. Optimization of the logistic activities involved during the construction phase of a wind farm contributes to the reduction of the project duration and also increases electricity generation during the construction phase.

  9. Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve Productivity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes how a DOE energy assessment at Kaiser Aluminum's extrusion plant in Sherman, Texas, identified significant potential energy savings in its process heating systems. Employees at the Sherman plant wasted no time moving forward with assessment recommendations. First, they adjusted burner controls on one of the main reverberatory melting furnaces to lower excess oxygen levels. They also made some repairs to the furnace’s door sill and jamb to prevent cold air from seeping into it. By implementing these measures the plant achieved annual energy savings of approximately 45,000 MMBtu and improved the furnace’s energy intensity by 11.1% between 2006 and 2007. With project costs of approximately $28,000 and energy cost savings of $360,000, the simple payback was under 1 month.

  10. Black Bear Prep plant replaces high-frequency screens with fine wire sieves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, C.J.; Nottingham, J.

    2007-12-15

    At the Black Bear prep plant (near Wharncliffe, WV, USA) the clean coal from the spirals traditionally reported to high-frequency screens, which removed high-ash clay fines. Screens have inherent inefficiencies that allow clean coal to report to the screen underflow. The goal of this project was to capture the maximum amount of spiral clean coal while still removing the high-ash clay material found in the spiral product. The reduction of the circulating load and plant downtime for unscheduled maintenance were projected as additional benefits. After the plant upgrade, the maintenance related to the high frequency screens was eliminated and an additional 2.27 tons per hour (tph) of fine coal was recovered, which resulted in a payback period of less than one year. The article was adapted from a paper presented at Coal Prep 2007 in April 2007, Lexington, KY, USA. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Energy savings and economics of advanced control strategies for packaged air conditioners with gas heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the potential energy savings from adding advanced control to existing packaged air conditioners. Advanced control options include air-side economizer, multi-speed fan control, demand control ventilation and staged cooling. The energy and cost savings from the different control strategies individually and in combination are estimated using the EnergyPlus detailed energy simulation program for four building types, namely, a small office building, a stand-alone retail building, a strip mall building and a supermarket building. For each of the four building types, the simulation was run for 16 locations covering all 15 climate zones in the U.S. The maximum installed cost of a replacement controller that provides acceptable payback periods to owners is estimated.

  12. Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Bozchalui, Mohammed C.; Sharma, Ratnesh; Marnay, Chris; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

    2013-12-06

    The large scale penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) will introduce technical challenges to the distribution grid, but also carries the potential for vehicle-to-grid services. Namely, if available in large enough numbers, EVs can be used as a distributed energy resource (DER) and their presence can influence optimal DER investment and scheduling decisions in microgrids. In this work, a novel EV fleet aggregator model is introduced in a stochastic formulation of DER-CAM [1], an optimization tool used to address DER investment and scheduling problems. This is used to assess the impact of EV interconnections on optimal DER solutions considering uncertainty in EV driving schedules. Optimization results indicate that EVs can have a significant impact on DER investments, particularly if considering short payback periods. Furthermore, results suggest that uncertainty in driving schedules carries little significance to total energy costs, which is corroborated by results obtained using the stochastic formulation of the problem.

  13. Cotton gin trash incinerator-air heat project. Consultant report (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The California Energy Commission has funded the final phase of a four year project resulting in development of a successful system for burning cotton gin trash as a fuel providing the heat for ginning. The incinerator - air heater system installed in Corcoran, California operates continuously throughout the ginning season. Trash feeding and burning rate is automatically controlled from the combustion temperature, hot air temperature is controlled by the drying needs, and ashes are automatically removed from the system and pneumatically conveyed to the disposal site. The system complies with state and county air pollution codes by means of baghouse collectors. Savings in fossil fuel and trash disposal costs have demonstrated the equipment system is feasible for a four year payback at large, well utilized gins.

  14. Scenario analysis of hybrid class 3-7 heavy vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, F.; Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Eberhardt, J. J.

    1999-12-23

    The effects of hybridization on heavy-duty vehicles are not well understood. Heavy vehicles represent a broader range of applications than light-duty vehicles, resulting in a wide variety of chassis and engine combinations, as well as diverse driving conditions. Thus, the strategies, incremental costs, and energy/emission benefits associated with hybridizing heavy vehicles could differ significantly from those for passenger cars. Using a modal energy and emissions model, they quantify the potential energy savings of hybridizing commercial Class 3-7 heavy vehicles, analyze hybrid configuration scenarios, and estimate the associated investment cost and payback time. From the analysis, they conclude that (1) hybridization can significantly reduce energy consumption of Class 3-7 heavy vehicles under urban driving conditions; (2) the grid-independent, conventional vehicle (CV)-like hybrid is more cost-effective than the grid-dependent, electric vehicle (EV)-like hybrid, and the parallel configuration is more cost-effective than the series configuration; (3) for CV-like hybridization, the on-board engine can be significantly downsized, with a gasoline or diesel engine used for SUVs perhaps being a good candidate for an on-board engine; (4) over the long term, the incremental cost of a CV-like, parallel-configured Class 3-4 hybrid heavy vehicle is about %5,800 in the year 2005 and $3,000 in 2020, while for a Class 6-7 truck, it is about $7,100 in 2005 and $3,300 in 2020; and (5) investment payback time, which depends on the specific type and application of the vehicle, averages about 6 years under urban driving conditions in 2005 and 2--3 years in 2020.

  15. Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

  16. Direct application of geothermal energy at the L'eggs Product Plant, Las Cruces, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The study program to determine the feasibility of interfacing a potential geothermal resource of Dona Ana County, New Mexico L'eggs Product industrial process is discussed in this final report. Five separate sites were evaluated initially as to geothermal potential and technical feasibility. Preliminary analysis revealed that three sites were considered normal, but that two sites (about three miles from the L'eggs Plant) had very high shallow subsurface temperature gradients (up to 14.85/sup 0/F/100 ft). An initial engineering analysis showed that to meet the L'eggs plant temperature and energy requirements a geothermal fluid temperature of about 250/sup 0/F and 200 gpm flow rate would be necessary. A brief economic comparison indicated that the L'eggs plant site and a geothermal site approximately four miles from the plant did merit further investigation. Detailed engineering and economic design and analysis of these two sites (including the drilling of an 1873 feet deep temperature gradient test hole at the L'eggs Plant) showed that development of the four mile distant site was technically feasible and was the more economic option. It was determined that a single-stage flash system interface design would be most appropriate for the L'eggs Plant. Approximately 39 billion Btu/yr of fossil fuel could be replaced with geothermal energy at the L'eggs facility for a total installed system cost of slightly over $2 million. The projected economic payback period was calculated to be 9.2 years before taxes. This payback was not considered acceptable by L'eggs Products, Inc., to merit additional design or construction work at this time.

  17. Transesterification process to manufacture ethyl ester of rape oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korus, R.A.; Hoffman, D.S.; Bam, N.; Peterson, C.L.; Drown, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    A process for the production of the ethyl ester of winter rape [EEWR] for use as a biodiesel fuel has been studied. The essential part of the process is the transesterification of rape oil with ethanol, in the presence of a catalyst, to yield the ethyl ester of rape oil as a product and glycerin as a by-product. Experiments have been performed to determine the optimum conditions for the preparation of EEWR. The process variables were: (1) temperature, (2) catalyst, (3) rate of agitation, (4) water content of the alcohol used, and (5) the amount of excess alcohol used. The optimum conditions were: (1) room temperature, (2) 0.5% sodium methoxide or 1% potassium hydroxide catalyst by weight of rapeseed oil, (3) extremely vigorous agitation with some splashing during the initial phase of the reaction and agitation was not necessary after the reaction mixture became homogeneous, (4) absolute ethanol was necessary for high conversion, and (5) 50% excess ethanol with NaOCH{sub 3} or 100% excess with KOH gave a maximum conversion. Viscosity, cloud point and pour point of the EEWR were measured. A preliminary break-even cost for the commercial production of EEWR was found to be $0.55/liter [$2.08/US gallon].

  18. Impacts of Vehicle Weight Reduction via Material Substitution on Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Jarod C.; Sullivan, John L.; Burnham, Andrew; Elgowainy, Amgad

    2015-10-20

    This study examines the vehicle-cycle impacts associated with substituting lightweight materials for those currently found in light-duty passenger vehicles. We determine part-based energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission ratios by collecting material substitution data from both the literature and automotive experts and evaluating that alongside known mass-based energy use and GHG emission ratios associated with material pair substitutions. Several vehicle parts, along with full vehicle systems, are examined for lightweighting via material substitution to observe the associated impact on GHG emissions. Results are contextualized by additionally examining fuel-cycle GHG reductions associated with mass reductions relative to the baseline vehicle during the use phase and also determining material pair breakeven driving distances for GHG emissions. The findings show that, while material substitution is useful in reducing vehicle weight, it often increases vehicle-cycle GHGs depending upon the material substitution pair. However, for a vehicle’s total life cycle, fuel economy benefits are greater than the increased burdens associated with the vehicle manufacturing cycle, resulting in a net total life-cycle GHG benefit. The vehicle cycle will become increasingly important in total vehicle life-cycle GHGs, since fuel-cycle GHGs will be gradually reduced as automakers ramp up vehicle efficiency to meet fuel economy standards.

  19. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  20. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L L; Mintz, M M

    1994-03-01

    This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

  1. Prospects for inertial fusion energy based on a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver: Overview and development path

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orth, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    It is now known with certainty that the type of fusion known as inertial fusion will work with sufficient energy input, so inertial fusion is really beyond the ``scientific breakeven`` point in many respects. The most important question that remains for inertial fusion energy (IFE) is whether this type of fusion can operate with sufficiently low input energy to make it economically feasible for energy production. The constraint for low input energy demands operation near the inertial fusion ignition threshold, and such operation creates enormous challenges to discover a target design that will produce sufficient energy gain. There are also multiple issues relating to the scientific feasibility of using a laboratory-type ``driver`` to energize a target, such as those concerning bandwidth and beam smoothing for ``direct drive,`` and extension of hohlraum plasma physics to the IFE scale for ``indirect drive.`` One driver that appears as though it will be able to meet the IFE requirements, assuming modest development and sufficient target gain, is a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL). We give an overview of this type of laser system, and explain what development remains for the economic production of electricity using this type of driver for IFE.

  2. Deepwater pipeline intervention work with an acoustically controlled power module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conter, A.; Launaro, F.; Bigoni, G.

    1997-02-01

    The stabilization of submarine pipeline free spans along uneven sea bottoms is performed conventionally using technologies such as gravel dumping, post trenching, and mattress installation. A new technology has been developed to support free spans along the 26-inch Transmed Gas Pipelines crossing the Sicily Channel in water depths ranging from 50 m to 510 m. This technology is based on the pipeline mechanical support Atlantis and its installation module Pegaso and was developed keeping requirements such as short installation time, system redundancy, operational flexibility, and simple interface with the support vessel in mind. The installation time reduction is achieved by automatic operational procedures that are controlled acoustically from the surface. Power is stored inside two dedicated battery packs placed on board pegaso; no umbilical cable is necessary, so that a vessel equipped with a normal crane is enough to launch and operate the system. Marine operations carried out in 1993 showed that a support can be installed in about 1 hour. In good weather conditions, three Atlantis were installed in 24 hours, including deck operations for recharging the battery packs. A total of 16 supports was installed along the 4th and 5th Transmed Gas Pipelines. The system has proved to be a cost-effective and flexible alternative to conventional technologies for free-span support, especially in deep waters. A cost/benefit analysis also shows the break-even point of the new technology vs. gravel dumping.

  3. Deep water pipeline intervention work with an acoustically controlled power module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conter, A.; Launaro, F.; Bigoni, G.

    1995-12-31

    The stabilisation of submarine pipeline free spans along uneven sea bottoms is conventionally performed using technologies such as gravel dumping, post trenching, matresses installation etc.. A new technology has been developed to support free spans along the 26 inches Transmed Gas Pipelines crossing the Sicily Channel in water depths ranging from 50m to 510m. This technology is based on the pipeline mechanical supports {open_quotes}Atlantis{close_quotes} and their installation module {open_quotes}Pegaso{close_quotes} and was developed having in mind requirements such as short installation time, system redundancy, operational flexibility and simple interface with the support vessel. The installation time reduction is achieved by automatic operational procedures which are acoustically controlled from surface. Power is stored inside two dedicated battery packs placed onboard Pegaso; no umbilical cable is necessary so that a vessel equipped with a normal crane is enough to launch and operate the system. Marine operations carried out in 1993 showed that a support can be installed in about one hour; in good weather conditions three Atlantis were installed in 24 hours including deck operations for recharging the battery packs; as a total sixteen supports were installed along the 4th and 5th Transmed Gas Pipelines. The system has proved to be a cost effective and flexible alternative to conventional technologies for free span support, especially in deep waters. A cost/benefit analysis also shows the breakeven point of the new technology versus gravel dumping.

  4. Substrate inhibition and control for high rate biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    This research addresses a critical aspect of the technical feasibility of biogas recovery with poultry manure using anaerobic digestion, namely, inhibition and toxicity factors limiting methane generation under high rate conditions. The research was designed to identify the limiting factors and to examine alternative pretreatment and in situ control methods for the anaerobic digestion of poultry manure as an energy producing system. Biogas production was indicated by the daily gas volume produced per unit digester capacity. Enhanced biogas generation from the anaerobic digester systems using poultry manure was studied in laboratory- and pilot-scale digester operations. It was found that ammonia nitrogen concentration above 4000 mg/l was inhibitory to biogas production. Pretreatment of the manure by elutriation was effective for decreasing inhibitory/toxic conditions. Increased gas production resulted without an indication of serious inhibition by increased volatile acids, indicating a limitation of available carbon sources. For poultry manure digestion, the optimum pH range was 7.1 to 7.6. Annual costs for pretreatment/biogas systems for 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 birds were estimated and compared with annual surplus energy produced. The economic break-even point was achieved in digesters for greater than 30,000 birds. Capital cost of the digester system was estimated to be $18,300 with annual costs around $4000. It is anticipated that the digester system could be economically applied to smaller farms as energy costs increase.

  5. Assessment of research directions for high-voltage direct-current power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, W F

    1982-09-01

    High voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission continues to be an emerging technology nearly thirty years after its introduction into modern power systems. To date its use has been restricted to either specialized applications having identifiable economic advantages (e.g., breakeven distance) or, rarely, applications where decoupling is needed. Only recently have the operational advantages (e.g., power modulation) of HVDC been realized on operating systems. A research project whose objective was to identify hardware developments and, where appropriate, system applications which can exemplify cost and operational advantages of integrated ac/dc power systems is discussed. The three principal tasks undertaken were: assessment of equipment developments; quantification of operational advantages; and interaction with system planners. Interest in HVDC power transmission has increased markedly over the past several years, and many new systems are now being investigated. The dissemination of information about HVDC, including specifically the symposium undertaken for Task 3, is a critical factor in fostering an understanding of this important adjunct to ac power transmission.

  6. July 19

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OutagesIncidents: The 713 maintenance ended up taking longer than scheduled due to some server issues. The power upgrade took longer than expected so there wasn't time for the ...

  7. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bulbs and can last up to three times longer than traditional incandescent light bulbs. ... ENERGY STAR-qualified CFLs use about 75% less energy and last up to 10 times longer than ...

  8. Gas Networks- Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: As of September 1, 2015, rebates are no longer available for commercial water heating equipment through the prescriptive form.

  9. Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Summary. To study the transport and recovery of injected SiO2 nanoparticles through a longer flow path.

  10. Early Detection Saves Lives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Former Department of Energy (DOE) workers tell how medical screening helped them lead healthier and longer lives.

  11. Delegation Order No. 0204-59 to the Governor of the State of Wisconsin

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  12. Delegation Order No. 0204-58 to the Governor of the State of South Carolina

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  13. Delegation Order No. 0204-56 to the Governor of the State of Maine

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  14. Delegation Order No. 0204-40 to the Government of the State of Arizona

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  15. Delegation Order No. 0204-60 to the Governor of the State of Kentucky

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  16. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

    2011-05-06

    . However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  17. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical

  18. Preliminary analysis of surface mining options for Naval Oil Shale Reserve 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-20

    The study was undertaken to determine the economic viability of surface mining to exploit the reserves. It is based on resource information already developed for NOSR 1 and conceptual designs of mining systems compatible with this resource. Environmental considerations as they relate to surface mining have been addressed qualitatively. The conclusions on economic viability were based primarily on mining costs projected from other industries using surface mining. An analysis of surface mining for the NOSR 1 resource was performed based on its particular overburden thickness, oil shale thickness, oil shale grade, and topography. This evaluation considered reclamation of the surface as part of its design and cost estimate. The capital costs for mining 25 GPT and 30 GPT shale and the operating costs for mining 25 GPT, 30 GPT, and 35 GPT shale are presented. The relationship between operating cost and stripping ratio, and the break-even stripping ratio (BESR) for surface mining to be competitive with room-and-pillar mining, are shown. Identification of potential environmental impacts shows that environmental control procedures for surface mining are more difficult to implement than those for underground mining. The following three areas are of prime concern: maintenance of air quality standards by disruption, movement, and placement of large quantities of overburden; disruption or cutting of aquifers during the mining process which affect area water supplies; and potential mineral leaching from spent shales into the aquifers. Although it is an operational benefit to place spent shale in the open pit, leaching of the spent shales and contamination of the water is detrimental. It is therefore concluded that surface mining on NOSR 1 currently is neither economically desirable nor environmentally safe. Stringent mitigation measures would have to be implemented to overcome some of the potential environmental hazards.

  19. Product evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch derived fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marano, J.J.; Rogers, S.; Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have placed stringent requirements on the quality of transportation fuels. Most petroleum refiners are scrambling to meet provisions of the Amendments to be implemented between 1995 and 2000. These requirements will also have significant implications for the production of alternative fuels. These have been examined for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) derived fuels. This analysis was conducted in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project, Baseline Design/Economics for Advanced Fischer-Tropsch Technology, conducted by Bechtel and Amoco. The goal of this study was to develop a baseline design for indirect liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal using gasification, syngas conversion in slurry reactors with iron catalysts, and conventional refinery upgrading of the F-T derived hydrocarbon liquids. One alternative case using ZSM-5 upgrading technology was also considered. This study included complete capital and operating cost estimates for the processes. To perform economic analyses for the different design cases, the products from the liquefaction plant had to be valued relative to conventional transportation fuels. This task was accomplished by developing a Linear Programming (LP) model for a typical midwest refinery, and then feeding the F-T liquids to the refinery. In this way, the breakeven value determined for these materials is indicative of the price they could command if available in the marketplace. Inputs to the LP model include: refinery size, configuration, feedstocks, products, specifications, prices, and operating and capital recovery costs. The model was set up to be representative of conditions anticipated for the turn of the century. This required inclusion of fuel specifications from the CAAA of 1990 which have or will come into force by the year 2000.

  20. Searching for the Optimal Mix of Solar and Efficiency in Zero Net Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Anderson, R.

    2008-01-01

    Zero net energy (ZNE) buildings employ efficiency to reduce energy consumption and solar technologies to produce as much energy on site as is consumed on an annual basis. Such buildings leverage utility grids and net-metering agreements to reduce solar system costs and maintenance requirements relative to off-grid photovoltaic (PV)-powered buildings with batteries. The BEopt software was developed to efficiently identify cost-optimal building designs using detailed hour-by-hour energy simulation programs to evaluate the user-selected options. A search technique identifies optimal and near-optimal building designs (based on energy-related costs) at various levels of energy savings along the path from a reference building to a ZNE design. In this paper, we describe results based on use of the BEopt software to develop cost-optimal paths to ZNE for various climates. Comparing the different cases shows optimal building design characteristics, percent energy savings and cash flows at key points along the path, including the point at which investments shift from building improvements to purchasing PV, and PV array sizes required to achieve ZNE. From optimizations using the BEopt software for a 2,000-ft{sup 2} house in 4 climates, we conclude that, relative to a code-compliant (IECC 2006) reference house, the following are achievable: (1) minimum cost point: 22 to 38% source energy savings and 15 to 24% annual cash flow savings; (2) PV start point: 40 to 49% source energy savings at 10 to 12% annual cash flow savings; (3) break-even point: 43 to 53% source energy savings at 0% annual cash flow savings; and (4) ZNE point: 100% source energy savings with 4.5 to 8.1 kW{sub DC} PV arrays and 76 to 169% increase in cash flow.

  1. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  2. Life Cycle Energy and Environmental Assessment of Aluminum-Intensive Vehicle Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Advanced lightweight materials are increasingly being incorporated into new vehicle designs by automakers to enhance performance and assist in complying with increasing requirements of corporate average fuel economy standards. To assess the primary energy and carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) implications of vehicle designs utilizing these materials, this study examines the potential life cycle impacts of two lightweight material alternative vehicle designs, i.e., steel and aluminum of a typical passenger vehicle operated today in North America. LCA for three common alternative lightweight vehicle designs are evaluated: current production ( Baseline ), an advanced high strength steel and aluminum design ( LWSV ), and an aluminum-intensive design (AIV). This study focuses on body-in-white and closures since these are the largest automotive systems by weight accounting for approximately 40% of total curb weight of a typical passenger vehicle. Secondary mass savings resulting from body lightweighting are considered for the vehicles engine, driveline and suspension. A cradle-to-cradle life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for these three vehicle material alternatives. LCA methodology for this study included material production, mill semi-fabrication, vehicle use phase operation, and end-of-life recycling. This study followed international standards ISO 14040:2006 [1] and ISO 14044:2006 [2], consistent with the automotive LCA guidance document currently being developed [3]. Vehicle use phase mass reduction was found to account for over 90% of total vehicle life cycle energy and CO2e emissions. The AIV design achieved mass reduction of 25% (versus baseline) resulting in reductions in total life cycle primary energy consumption by 20% and CO2e emissions by 17%. Overall, the AIV design showed the best breakeven vehicle mileage from both primary energy consumption and climate change perspectives.

  3. Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland Hilty, Lorenz M.

    2011-04-15

    With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

  4. Market trends in the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Osborn, Julie G.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Singer, Terry E.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective information and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects-the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry. We estimate that the ESCO industry completed $1.8-2.1B of projects in 2000. The industry has grown rapidly over the last decade with revenues increasing at a 24% annualized rate. We summarize and compare project characteristics and costs and analyze energy savings, including the relationship between predicted and actual savings. ESCOs typically invested about $2.30/ft{sup 2} per project in various energy efficiency improvements, although there is large variation in project costs within and across market segments. We find that lighting-only projects report median electricity savings of 47% of targeted equipment consumption; the median for lighting-&-non-lighting projects is 23% of the total electric bill baseline. We examine project economics, including project net benefits, benefit/cost ratio and simple payback time. Median simple payback time is seven years for institutional sector projects and three years in the private sector. We estimate direct economic benefits of $1.62 billion for the 1080 projects in our database with both cost and savings data. The median benefit/cost ratio is 2.1 for 309 private sector projects and 1.6 for 771 institutional sector projects. We discuss the role of policies and programs adopted by state/federal legislatures and agencies that have played an important role in stimulating ESCO activity

  5. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

    2012-06-29

    A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires

  6. Essential Power Systems Workshop - OEM Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Gouse

    2001-12-12

    In California, idling is largely done for climate control. This suggests that climate control devices alone could be used to reduce idling. Line-haul truck drivers surveyed require an average of 4-6 kW of power for a stereo, CB radio, light, refrigerator, and climate control found in the average truck. More power may likely be necessary for peak power demands. The amount of time line-haul trucks reported to have stopped is between 25 and 30 hours per week. It was not possible to accurately determine from the pilot survey the location, purpose, and duration of idling. Consulting driver logs or electronically monitoring trucks could yield more accurate data, including seasonal and geographic differences. Truck drivers were receptive to idling alternatives. Two-thirds of truck drivers surveyed support a program to reduce idling. Two-thirds of drivers reported they would purchase idling reduction technologies if the technology yielded a payback period of two years or less. Willingness to purchase auxiliary power units appears to be higher for owner-operators than for company drivers. With a 2-year payback period, 82% of owner- operators would be willing to buy an idle- reducing device, while 63% of company drivers thought their company would do the same. Contact with companies is necessary to discern whether this difference between owner- operators and companies is true or simply due to the perception of the company drivers. Truck stops appear to be a much more attractive option for electrification than rest areas by a 48% to 21% margin. Much of this discrepancy may be due to perceived safety problems with rest areas. This survey did not properly differentiate between using these areas for breaks or overnight. The next, full survey will quantify where the truck drivers are staying overnight, where they go for breaks, and the duration of time they spend at each place. The nationwide survey, which is in progress, will indicate how applicable the results are to the US in

  7. Energy and economic assessment of desiccant cooling systems coupled with single glazed air and hybrid PV/thermal solar collectors for applications in hot and humid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beccali, Marco; Finocchiaro, Pietro; Nocke, Bettina

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the energy and economic performance of desiccant cooling systems (DEC) equipped with both single glazed standard air and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/t) collectors for applications in hot and humid climates. The use of 'solar cogeneration' by means of PV/t hybrid collectors enables the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, which can be directly used by desiccant air handling units, thereby making it possible to achieve very energy savings. The present work shows the results of detailed simulations conducted for a set of desiccant cooling systems operating without any heat storage. System performance was investigated through hourly simulations for different systems and load combinations. Three configurations of DEC systems were considered: standard DEC, DEC with an integrated heat pump and DEC with an enthalpy wheel. Two kinds of building occupations were considered: office and lecture room. Moreover, three configurations of solar-assisted air handling units (AHU) equipped with desiccant wheels were considered and compared with standard AHUs, focusing on achievable primary energy savings. The relationship between the solar collector's area and the specific primary energy consumption for different system configurations and building occupation patterns is described. For both occupation patterns, sensitivity analysis on system performance was performed for different solar collector areas. Also, this work presents an economic assessment of the systems. The cost of conserved energy and the payback time were calculated, with and without public incentives for solar cooling systems. It is worth noting that the use of photovoltaics, and thus the exploitation of related available incentives in many European countries, could positively influence the spread of solar air cooling technologies (SAC). An outcome of this work is that SAC systems equipped with PV/t collectors are shown to have better performance in terms of

  8. Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles A.; Satchwell, Andrew

    2012-05-08

    The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private sector business model where energy savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. This study was conceived as a snapshot of the ESCO industry prior to the economic slowdown and the introduction of federal stimulus funding mandated by enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This study utilizes two parallel analytic approaches to characterize ESCO industry and market trends in the U.S.: (1) a “top-down” approach involving a survey of individual ESCOs to estimate aggregate industry activity and (2) a “bottom-up” analysis of a database of -3,265 projects (representing over $8B in project investment) that reports market trends including installed EE retrofit strategies, project installation costs and savings, project payback times, and benefit-cost ratios over time. Despite the onset of an economic recession, the U.S. ESCO industry managed to grow at about 7% per year between 2006 and 2008. ESCO industry revenues are relatively small compared to total U.S. energy expenditures (about $4.1 billion in 2008), but ESCOs anticipated accelerated growth through 2011 (25% per year). We found that 2,484 ESCO projects in our database generated -$4.0 billion ($2009) in net, direct economic benefits to their customers. We estimate that the ESCO project database includes about 20% of all U.S. ESCO market activity from 1990-2008. Assuming the net benefits per project are comparable for ESCO projects that are not included in the LBNL database, this would suggest that the ESCO industry has generated -$23 billion in net direct economic benefits for customers at projects installed between 1990 and 2008. We found that nearly 85% of all public and institutional projects met or exceeded the guaranteed level of savings. We estimated that a typical ESCO project generated $1.5 dollars of direct benefits for every dollar of customer

  9. U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Satchwell, Andrew

    2012-08-21

    The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private sector business model where energy savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. This study was conceived as a snapshot of the ESCO industry prior to the economic slowdown and the introduction of federal stimulus funding mandated by enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This study utilizes two parallel analytic approaches to characterize ESCO industry and market trends in the U.S.: (1) a ?top-down? approach involving a survey of individual ESCOs to estimate aggregate industry activity and (2) a ?bottom-up? analysis of a database of ~;;3,250 projects (representing over $8B in project investment) that reports market trends including installed EE retrofit strategies, project installation costs and savings, project payback times, and benefit-cost ratios over time. Despite the onset of a severe economic recession, the U.S. ESCO industry managed to grow at about 7percent per year between 2006 and 2008. ESCO industry revenues were about $4.1 billion in 2008 and ESCOs anticipate accelerated growth through 2011 (25percent per year). We found that 2,484 ESCO projects in our database generated ~;;$4.0 billion ($2009) in net, direct economic benefits to their customers. We estimate that the ESCO project database includes about 20percent of all U.S. ESCO market activity from 1990-2008. Assuming the net benefits per project are comparable for ESCO projects that are not included in the LBNL database, this would suggest that the ESCO industry has generated ~;;$23 billion in net direct economic benefits for customers at projects installed between 1990 and 2008. There is empirical evidence confirming that the industry is evolving by installing more comprehensive and complex measures?including onsite generation and measures to address deferred maintenance?but this evolution has significant implications for customer project

  10. EERE Success Story-Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries | Department of Energy Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries EERE Success Story-Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries August 19, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis Partnered with NETZSCH, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an Isothermal Battery Calorimeter (IBC) used to quantify heat flow in

  11. Mandatory Renewable Energy Educational Materials | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or longer, the utility must provide the customer with information about on-site renewable energy and distributed-generation (DG) technology alternatives. The information must be...

  12. Massachusetts realizes wind center dream

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The new testing center will be able to test blades longer than 50 meters, which currently can only be done overseas.

  13. Towards three-dimensional and attosecond x-ray imaging at the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-ray wavelength appears desirable to achieve maximal spatial resolution in x-ray diffraction experiments, longer wavelengths turns out to enable the identification of...

  14. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AccelerAting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... is used to test the integrity of pipeline welds and also in irradiation of tumors. * Thorium helps fluorescent lights last longer. * Spacecraft benefit from isotopes such as ...

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over a longer period of time Notes The permanent 18-station network of three-component digital seismometers at the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, provides...

  16. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    delivery declined substantially more than prices for delivery further into the future. In January 2015, the price discount of near-term deliveries to longer-dated...

  17. ALCC program announces 24 projects at ALCF | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    received 72 million core-hours for "Toward a Longer-Life Core: Thermal-Hydraulic CFD Simulations of Deformed Fuel Assemblies." Joe Olson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  18. Microsoft Word - PSH-13-0022.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... acknowledged his prior use of marijuana, but stated that he no longer uses it. ... I have no desire to use marijuana ever again." Exhibit E. The individual's girlfriend ...

  19. Monthly Generation System Peak (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Monthly Generation System Peak (GSP) This site is no longer maintained. Page last...

  20. SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-9011 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ......... 11 2.2.1 No DC Power Data Available ......down to and away from zero, meaning the outage had an effect on the data for longer ...

  1. GE MEMS for LTE Advanced Mobile Devices | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GE MEMS Switch Technology Demonstrates Performance Which Could Meet Demands for ... longer battery life, and the advanced RF designs required of LTE-Advanced devices. ...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Goldner - NEAC Presentation (FINAL)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period ... Improved Cladding Properties -Clad fracture -Geometric stability -Thermal shock resistance ...

  3. EA-1236: Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    distribution systems and associated power poles, when they are no longer needed for production, and the development of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). ...

  4. NREL: Wind Research - Structural Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and improve new blade designs, analyze blade structural properties, and improve their manufacturing processes. As wind turbines grow in size and their blades become longer and...

  5. UMass-EFRC-Highlight-2011-09.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that absorb energy at longer wavelengths than the present typical standard for organic polymer solar cells ("P3HT", structure not shown). This will allow capture of a...

  6. HVAC Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: As of January 1, 2016, rebates for unitary air conditioning and split systems and integrated dual enthalpy economizer controls are no longer available.

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Note: Funding is no longer available for residential systems that displace electricity or propane in any of the program service territories. Additionally, funding...

  8. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    longer-term prices (contango), which typically signifies weak near-term market fundamentals, encouraging inventory builds. There are many factors that could alter the current...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    it will no longer provide transportation service to the Plant Daniel delivery point in Jackson County, Mississippi. According to the pipeline the delivery point has been...

  10. Biogas Markets and Federal Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... CEC proposed wholesale moratorium on biomethane projects Biomethane no longer would qualify for RPS; biogas to electricity unaffected Reason: CEC wants to stop new ...

  11. Energy Materials Network News from the Consortia and National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 21, 2016 RESEARCH COLLABORATION FOR LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS NO LONGER A HEAVY LIFT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory For press releases, blogs, and news articles from the ...

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Funding...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The Center's testing capabilities will accelerate technical innovation in turbine and blade design and speed up deployment of longer turbine blades, which can produce more energy ...

  13. Getting the Lead Out

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Gibson, Kerry

    2011-04-08

    Discarded electronics no longer pose an environmental hazard from lead solder thanks to a lead-free alternative developed at the Ames Laboratory.

  14. Most Commonly Identified Recommendations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... savings, times recommended Location (state by state, or center by center) Example: list of top 10 ... Better color rendering * Better distribution of light * Longer life ...

  15. Electrovaya Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vehicles Product: Canada-based battery technology company, produces rechargeable lithium polymer batteries with a longer run-time and its application such as electiric...

  16. NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    traditional methods of homogenization are no longer appropriate, but without uniform dispersion in the ingot, the microstructure becomes unstable for long-term, high-temperature...

  17. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    may explain why we have seen stocks fall in recent weeks. As of June 2007, pursuant to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, fuel suppliers are no longer distributing...

  18. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Wind energy costs are significantly lower than natural gas, solar power, or coal with ... efficiency, reduced noise, and longer lifetimes, all this comes at an expensive price. ...

  19. Direct Fast-Neutron Detection: A Progress Report (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The lower average density leads to longer interaction times for both neutrons and gamma rays, allowing easier discrimination. The modeling, optimization, and design of detection ...

  20. 2013 Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... August 19, 2013 Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries Partnered with NETZSCH, the National Renewable Energy ...

  1. Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make ...

  2. Proposed Changes to Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic)...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2017 Proposed Solar & Electricity Survey Form ... Fuel receipts and costs EIA-923: Natural gas receipts would no longer be reported by ...

  3. Microsoft Word - Letter to Region-Dig signed.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 13, 2009. BPA is still evaluating the Opinion and potential implications regarding longer term DSI service. Sincerely, s Allen L. Burns Allen L. Burns, Acting Deputy...

  4. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a patterned structure on a longer mesoscopic length scale. One way for this pattern to emerge from building blocks that are nominally random and disordered is through hidden...

  5. Neaton.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... B 84, 201402(R) (2011) Longer-Term: Hybrid Systems of 1000-5000 atoms Chromophore graphene junctions Electrochemical interfaces Gratzel cells Chromophore-Oxide Interfaces ...

  6. Berkeley Lab Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space Committee Charter Articles Presentations Feedback Contact Us ANNOUNCEMENTS Feb. 13, 2014 Courtesy Salvage Pickup Factsheet To assist the community in disposing of "no longer...

  7. Archives | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Article Archives Several publications containing articles about the APS are released intermittently, or are no longer active. APS News and User News archives are also available....

  8. Paving the Way to Nanoelectronics 16 nm and Smaller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will no longer be feasible. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, utilizing reflective optics and 13-nm-wavelength light to print chips, is the leading candidate to meet the...

  9. EIS-0330: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    power plant and 33-mile transmission line. It also evaluates an alternative using taller towers and longer spans between towers along part of the transmission line, and the...

  10. Installing and Operating an Efficient Swimming Pool Pump | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    or vacuum. Furthermore, longer circulation doesn't necessarily reduce the growth of algae. Instead, using chemicals in the water and scrubbing the walls are the best methods....

  11. Application of a Turbulent Metal Foil Substrate for a PGM optimized...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    group catalysts can be used to save money while offering equivalent or better hydrocarbon performanc and longer life and durability. PDF icon deer08kramer.pdf More...

  12. DOE-DOD-USDA Joint Initiative to use DPA to support US Biorefineries

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... of animal residues (Neste Oil, Diamond Green Diesel) - Thermo-catalytic conversion of ... natural gas). * Novel feedstocks (energy grasses, cane) are small scale and longer term. ...

  13. EERE Success Story-Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries EERE Success Story-Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies ...

  14. EIS-0293: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tract (about 55 acres). DOENNSA has determined that it is no longer necessary to retain these lands and will make them available for conveyance and transfer. PDF icon...

  15. DOE/GJ/79491-944 CONTRACT NO. DE-ACO1-02GJ79491 WELDON SPRING...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act The site no longer stores large quantities ... The program furnishes guidance and directives to detect and prevent quality problems ...

  16. Photo of the Week: Tiny Batteries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    younger, smaller fish over longer distances. Slightly larger than grains of rice, the new batteries power a transmitter small enough to inject into these fish -- rather than ...

  17. Central Plateau Principles Public Involvement Advice DETAILED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    v0, 12914 Central Plateau Principles Public Involvement Advice DETAILED BACKGROUND Cleanup of Hanford's Central Plateau is expected to take another four decades or longer, and...

  18. DE-AC27/-1 ORV15051 Modification M007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking System): No longer required. ii. Reserved iii. HILLS (Hanford Information Lessons Learned Sharing): This Web site contains Hanford related operating experience...

  19. Sandia helping to improve endurance of legged robots | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Increased efficiency could enable bots to operate for much longer periods of time without recharging batteries, an important factor in emergency situations. Photo by Randy Montoya. ...

  20. From: Citizens for Common Sense To: Congestion Study Comments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    If the federal government no longer needs the states, when did the federal government a dictatorship? Furthermore, the federal use of eminent domain has always been for projects ...

  1. NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are no longer active. See current models and tools here. ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) Simulate and analyze conventional, advanced, light, and heavy vehicles, including...

  2. LED Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of lighting in the United States. Residential LEDs -- especially ENERGY STAR rated products -- use at least 75% less energy, and last 25 times longer, than incandescent lighting. ...

  3. Record of Decision: Stabilization of Plutonium Solutions Stored...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... activities, and decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are no longer ... The Department of Energy received letters from the following organizations following the ...

  4. Archiving EERE Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You should archive an Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) website or application when it no longer serves a purpose. Follow these guidelines for archiving.

  5. City of Palo Alto Utilities- PV Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Funds for residential and large commercial rebates have been fully reserved. Rebates are no longer available for residential systems or large commercial systems. 

  6. Novel Thermophilic Cellobiohydrolase - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Higher activity, longer duration and greater tolerance to ionic liquids compared to commercially available cellulase cocktails Facilitates one pot pretreatmentsaccharification of ...

  7. Stainless Steel Hotplate Heater for Long Objects --- Inventor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stainless Steel Hotplate Heater for Long Objects --- Inventor(s): Stephan Jurczynski and ... High electrical current is passed through a stainless steel plate longer and slightly ...

  8. Facility Security Officer Contractor Toolcart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Note: New Clearance applicants will receive an email advising them to enroll, with a ... SEC225, Termination Briefing Required For Clearance-holders who no longer need their ...

  9. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Meeting Oct 2012 Minutes_2_14...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... overall maintenance costs and extend project expenditures for 10 to 20 years longer ... were markedly lower than previous years and were less than forecast throughout the year. ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... OH (United States) PNNL Microscopy Data Portal Pacific Northwest National ... Hence, these withdrawals are, permanently, no longer subject to public land, mining, and ...

  11. CAB Investment Review Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to improve performance and reliability. Specifically, the objectives of this investment are to: * Replace equipment that is beyond its service life and no longer has the...

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Technical Notes at http:www.eia.gov statesedsseds-technical-notes-complete.cfm. ... in 1986, EIA data series no longer report refinery fuel and feedstock use ...

  13. SRP - Solar Water Heating Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on SRCC rating) Summary NOTE: SRP no longer provides incentives for solar electric photovoltaic systems. SRP's Solar Electric Program provides incentives to its residential...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or longer, the utility must provide the customer with information about on-site renewable energy and distributed-generation (DG) technology alternatives. The information must be...

  15. Microsoft Word - Final TTR Landfill Extension EA--December 2006...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Once the landfill reaches capacity, sources of air pollution associated with the landfill would no longer be present. Waste transport vehicles would cause minor increases in car- ...

  16. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 17: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    activities. Many of these records have continuing historical value after they are no longer of use to the Department. This records schedule covers only disposable records

  17. Winter Preparedness ? Slips on Ice

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    can further increase traction; however, they must be removed when ice is no longer present, because their use on floors, smooth concrete, or gravel, presents a different...

  18. NREL Bolsters Batteries with Nanotubes - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approach represents an exciting opportunity-improving the performance of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries while make them last longer," Pesaran said. "Increasing the life and...

  19. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #07 Current Appropriations Law and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Due to recent changes in appropriations law, the Department no longer has the authority to ... POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM 07 Current Appropriations Law and Compensation of Foreign ...

  20. Introduction

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in Livermore, California, was no longer permitted to perform large high explosive experiments at the facility due to community encroachment, a new site had to be identified. ...

  1. Project Profile: Low-Cost Heliostat Development | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    configuration that has a lower cost and longer life than conventional gear drives. ... Innovation This project targets three heliostat sub-components to reduce the overall ...

  2. Microsoft Word - 20110322_MoundNotice.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Legal Notice for Mound Site 2011 CERCLA Five-Year Review has been removed from the LM website. This document is outdated and no longer neededrequired...

  3. Microsoft Word - Blue Cover

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    are now commercially viable. For example, cost- effective solid state light-emitting diode (LED) products that offer lighting uniformity and longer operating life are now...

  4. Promising Technology: Parking Lot Light-Emitting Diodes with Controls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEDs offer several advantages over conventional high intensity discharge (HID) luminaires. LEDs have longer life times, reduced maintenance and operating costs, superior color rendition, and lower energy consumption.

  5. Promising Technology: High Bay Light-Emitting Diodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High bay LEDs offer several advantages over conventional high intensity discharge (HID) luminaires including longer lifetimes, reduced maintenance costs, and lower energy consumption.

  6. Innovative Way to Test Batteries Fills a Market Niche | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (IBC 284), developed by NREL and NETZSCH researchers, performs precise thermal measurements needed to design safer, longer-lasting, and more cost-effective battery systems. ...

  7. We have a new Community Commitment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan is no longer a specific contractual obligation. We listened to many Northern New Mexicans and worked diligently to demonstrate that the previous 3 million LANS spent each...

  8. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... noise impacts on residential developments and other ... and applying protective coverings to denuded areas during ... Low-discharge sites may have a longer window of opportunity ...

  9. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... These methods are effective in the current dispatch curve, ... is utilized longer, reducing its lifetime through more ... higher emissions of NOx and SO2, and CO 2 emissions ...

  10. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2013-06-02

    In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

  11. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, Joyce

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  12. Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

    2000-06-01

    Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

  13. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  14. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  15. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

    2013-07-01

    Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

  16. The Cost-Effectiveness of Investments to Meet the Guiding Principles for High-Performance Sustainable Buildings on the PNNL Campus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Judd, Kathleen S.

    2014-08-29

    As part its campus sustainability efforts, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has invested in eight new and existing buildings to ensure they meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s requirements for high performance sustainable buildings (HPSB) at DOE sites. These investments are expected to benefit PNNL by reducing the total life-cycle cost of facilities, improving energy efficiency and water conservation, and making buildings safer and healthier for the occupants. This study examines the cost-effectiveness of the implementing measures that meet the criteria for HPSBs in 3 different types of buildings on the PNNL campus: offices, scientific laboratories, and data centers. In each of the three case studies examined the investments made to achieve HPSB status demonstrated a high return on the HPSB investments that have taken place in these varied environments. Simple paybacks for total investments in the three case study buildings ranged from just 2 to 5 years; savings-to-investment ratios all exceeded the desirable threshold of 1; and the net present values associated with these investments were all positive.

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  18. Technical and economic aspects of coal injection at blast furnace tuyeres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, L.N.

    1981-01-01

    The basic factors in selection of an auxiliary fuel have been mentioned. These include availability and cost of the auxiliary fuel, cost of injection facilities, and coke availability. Operating factors such as coal particle size, hot blast temperature, lance location, and flame temperature were discussed as they relate to the efficiency of coal combustion, therefore the economics of a system. Safety is a must when preparing and storing pulverized coal. An unsafe system will never be economical. Based on years of experience at Bellefonte a safe system has been installed at Amanda with no problems in seven years of operation. Coal quality must be considered primarily as regards ash content. A significant penalty is paid for injected ash. Both coking and non-coking coals with the same ash content have been injected with equally successful results. A simplified economic analysis gives an indication of the possible justification of a coal injection system. Replacing 130 lbs oil per net ton of hot metal with an equivalent amount of coal will result in an annual savings of 12.3 million dollars for a 5000 TPD furnace, and a cost payback of three (3) years after start-up. 3 figures, 1 table.

  19. Recovery of chemical values from waste gypsum. Final report, December 1989-August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.A.; Litt, R.D.

    1992-10-15

    A two-stage, two reactor process is being developed to recover sulfur or sulfuric acid and lime from waste gypsum. Waste gypsum is produced by a variety of industries including chemical, fertilizer and electric utilities. Current environmental regulations are increasing the landfill disposal cost to $30/ton or more depending on specific local conditions. These costs are expected to increase and the quantity of waste gypsum is also expected to increase. The two-stage gypsum recovery process uses two separate fluidized bed reactors to (1) reduce the gypsum to calcium sulfide (CaS) and then (2) roast the sulfide with air producing a SO2-rich gas and regenerated CaO. Fluidization and elutriation problems in the first stage were overcome to achieve up to 85 percent conversion of gypsum to CaS. Reducing gas composition, temperature, and solids residence time were shown to be the primary parameters affecting the reactions. Additional work is needed to achieve even greater conversion and to demonstrate the integrated 2-stage operation. A preliminary economic evaluation indicated a 3-year payback could be achieved for a 1000 ton/day plant. The capital cost was estimated to be $8.5 million. Operating cost savings were based on reduced disposal cost, use/sale of sulfuric acid and use/sale of lime.

  20. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, P.; Podorson, D.; Varshney, K.

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques -- manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  1. Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

    2003-09-01

    Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

  3. New Mexico State University Campus geothermal demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuniff, R.A.; Fisher, K.P.; Chintawongvanich, P.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents the design, construction highlights, and performance of the New Mexico State University Campus Geothermal Demonstration Project at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Construction started in July 1981, first system use was January 1982, and the system was dedicated on April 21, 1982. Included herein are summary observations after two years of use. The geothermal hot water from New Mexico State University wells is used to heat potable water, which in turn provides 83 percent of the domestic hot water on the New Mexico State University campus, as well as space heat to two buildings, and for two heated swimming pools. The original system is providing service to 30 total buildings, with two additional buildings (150,000 square feet) in process of geothermal conversion.) The system overall performance has been excellent, except for geothermal well pump problems. In terms of operating efficiency, the system has exceeded the design parameters. In spite of abnormally high costs for well and pump repairs, the system has shown a positive cost avoidance of more than $118,000 for the first year of operation. For the first two full years of operation, the system has produced a net positive cost avoidance of more than $200,000. Payback on the total investment of $1,670,000 is projected to be 6 to 10 years, depending on the future prices of natural gas and electricity.

  4. Building America Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification, Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor. 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  6. Waste minimization in an autobody repair shop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baria, D.N.; Dorland, D.; Bergeron, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    This work was done to document the waste minimization incorporated in a new autobody repair facility in Hermantown, Minnesota. Humes Collision Center incorporated new waste reduction techniques when it expanded its old facilities in 1992 and it was able to achieve the benefits of cost reduction and waste reduction. Humes Collision Center repairs an average of 500 cars annually and is a very small quantity generator (VSQG) of hazardous waste, as defined by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The hazardous waste consists of antifreeze, batteries, paint sludge, refrigerants, and used oil, while the nonhazardous waste consists of cardboard, glass, paint filters, plastic, sanding dust, scrap metal, and wastewater. The hazardous and nonhazardous waste output were decreased by 72%. In addition, there was a 63% reduction in the operating costs. The waste minimization includes antifreeze recovery and recycling, reduction in unused waste paint, reduction, recovery and recycle of waste lacquer thinner for cleaning spray guns and paint cups, elimination of used plastic car bags, recovery and recycle of refrigerant, reduction in waste sandpaper and elimination of sanding dust, and elimination of waste paint filters. The rate of return on the investment in waste minimization equipment is estimated from 37% per year for the distillation unit, 80% for vacuum sanding, 146% for computerized paint mixing, 211% for the refrigerant recycler, to 588% per year for the gun washer. The corresponding payback time varies from 3 years to 2 months.

  7. Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Angelini, Tana; Masanet, Eric

    2010-07-27

    In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy consumption are available, and this Energy Guide discusses energy-efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be applied over a broad spectrum of companies. Strategies in the guide address hot water and steam, compressed air, pumps, motors, fans, lighting, refrigeration, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. This guide includes descriptions of expected energy and cost savings, based on real-world applications, typical payback periods, and references to more detailed information. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers achieve cost-effective energy reductions while maintaining product quality. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  8. COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

  9. COFIRING OF BIOMASS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip N. Hutton

    2002-01-01

    A project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory was completed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center to explore the potential for cofiring biomass at the University of North Dakota (UND). The results demonstrate how 25% sunflower hulls can be cofired with subbituminous coal and provide a 20% return on investment or 5-year payback for the modifications required to enable firing biomass. Significant outcomes of the study are as follows. A complete resource assessment presented all biomass options to UND within a 100-mile radius. Among the most promising options in order of preference were sunflower hulls, wood residues, and turkey manure. The firing of up to 28% sunflower hulls by weight was completed at the university's steam plant to identify plant modifications that would be necessary to enable cofiring sunflower hulls. The results indicated investments in a new equipment could be less than $408,711. Data collected from test burns, which were not optimized for biomass firing, resulted in a 15% reduction in sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions, no increase in opacity, and slightly better boiler efficiency. Fouling and clinkering potential were not evaluated; however, no noticeable detrimental effects occurred during testing. As a result of this study, UND has the potential to achieve a cost savings of approximately $100,000 per year from a $1,500,000 annual fossil fuel budget by implementing the cofiring of 25% sunflower hulls.

  10. Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-21

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes willmore » be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.« less

  11. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

    2013-05-01

    Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

  12. Institutional project summary University of Redlands direct fired gas absorption chiller system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    The University of Redlands, located in the California Inland Empire City of Redlands supplies six campus building with chilled and hot water for cooling and space heating from a centrally located Mechanical Center. The University was interested in lowering chilled water production costs and eliminating Ozone depleting chloroflourocarbon (CFC) refrigerants in addition to adding chiller capacity for future building to be added to the central plant piping {open_quotes}loop{close_quotes}. After initially providing a feasibility study of chiller addition alternatives and annual hourly load models, GRT & Associates, Inc. (GRT) provided design engineering for the installation of a 500 Ton direct gas fired absorption chiller addition to the University of Redland`s mechanical center. Based on the feasibility study and energy consumption tests done after the new absorption chiller was added, the university estimates annual energy cost saving versus the existing electric chiller is approximately $65,000 per year. Using actual construction costs, the simple before tax payback period for the project is six years.

  13. Field evaluation of advanced controls for the retrofit of packaged air conditioners and heat pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2015-09-01

    This paper documents the magnitude of energy savings achievable in the field by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop units (RTUs) with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for RTUs. A total of 66 RTUs on 8 different buildings were retrofitted with a commercially available advanced controller for improving RTU operational efficiency. The controller features enhanced air-side economizer control, multi-speed fan control, and demand controlled ventilation. Of the 66 RTUs, 18 are packaged heat pumps and the rest are packaged air conditioners with gas heat. The eight buildings cover four building types and four climate conditions. Based on the data collected for about a whole year, the advanced controller reduced the normalized annual RTU energy consumption between 22% and 90%, with an average of 57% for all RTUs. The average fractional savings uncertainty was 12% at 95% confidence level. Normalized annual electricity savings were in the range between 0.47 kWh/h (kWh per hour of RTU operation) and 7.21 kWh/h, with an average of 2.39 kWh/h. RTUs greater than 53 kW and runtime greater than 14 hours per day had payback periods less than 3 years even at $0.05/kWh.

  14. Transformation of California's Residential Photovoltaics Market Through Third-Party Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Miller, M.; Macal, C. M.; Graziano, D. J.; Heimiller, D.; Ozik, J.; Perry, T. D.

    2012-03-01

    Third-party photovoltaics (PV) ownership is a rapidly growing market trend, where commercial companies own and operate customer-sited PV systems and lease PV equipment or sell PV electricity to the building occupant. Third-party PV companies can reduce or eliminate up-front adoption costs, reduce technology risk and complexity by monitoring system performance, and can repackage the PV value proposition by showing cost savings in the first month of ownership rather than payback times on the order of a decade. We find that the entrance of third-party business models in southern California residential PV markets has enticed a new demographic to adopt PV systems that is more highly correlated to younger, less affluent, and less educated populations than the demographics correlated to purchasing PV systems. By enticing new demographics to adopt PV, we find that third-party PV products are likely increasing total PV demand rather than gaining market share entirely at the expense of existing customer owned PV demand. We also find that mean population demographics are good predictors of third-party and customer owned PV adoption, and mean voting trends on California carbon policy (Proposition 23) are poor predictors of PV adoption.

  15. Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home Program Certification of Production Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.; Loomis, H.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor; 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense(R) Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  16. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  17. Amplifying Real Estate Value through Energy&WaterManagement: From ESCO to 'Energy Services Partner'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2004-06-08

    The energy service company (ESCO) business model could become significantly more effective by integrating the energy-efficiency purveyor and their capital into the underlying building ownership and operation partnership, rather than the current model in which the ESCO remains an outsider with higher transaction costs and limited interest and participation in the value created by the cost savings. Resource conservation advocates rarely use the language of real estate to articulate the cost effectiveness of capital improvements aimed at reducing utility costs in commercial and residential income properties. Conventional methods that rely on rarefied academic notions of simple payback time or a narrow definition of return on investment fail to capture a significant component of the true market value created by virtue of reduced operating expenses. Improvements in energy and water efficiency can increase the fundamental profitability of real estate investments by raising Net Operating Income (NOI), and hence returns during the holding period, and, ultimately, proceeds at time of sale. We introduce the concept of an Energy Services Partner, who takes an equity interest in a real estate partnership in exchange for providing the expertise and capital required to reduce utility operating costs. Profit to all partners increases considerably as a result. This approach would also help to address a crisis facing ESCOs today stemming from their considerable liabilities (through guaranteed savings) and negligible offsetting assets.

  18. Review of U.S. ESCO industry market trends: An empirical analysis of project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Osborn, Julie G.; Singer, Terry E.

    2003-03-01

    This article summarizes a comprehensive empirical analysis of U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) industry trends and performance. We employ two parallel analytical approaches: a comprehensive survey of firms to estimate total industry size and a database of {approx}1500 ESCO projects, from which we report target markets and typical project characteristics, energy savings and customer economics. We estimate that industry investment for energy-efficiency related services reached US $2 billion in 2000 following a decade of strong growth. ESCO activity is concentrated in states with high economic activity and strong policy support. Typical projects save 150-200 MJ/m2/year and are cost-effective with median benefit/cost ratios of 1.6 and 2.1 for institutional and private sector projects. The median simple payback time is 7 years among institutional customers; 3 years is typical in the private sector. Reliance on DSM incentives has decreased since 1995. Preliminary evidence suggests that state enabling policies have boosted the industry in medium-sized states. ESCOs have proven resilient in the face of restructuring and will probably shift toward selling ''energy solutions,'' with energy efficiency part of a package. We conclude that a private sector energy-efficiency services industry that targets large commercial and industrial customers is viable and self-sustaining with appropriate policy support both financial and non-financial.

  19. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  20. Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home Program Certification of Production Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.; Loomis, H.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three cold climate production builders in three U.S. cities and worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Also, BSC provided support through performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor; and increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense® Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  1. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energys (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

  3. Building a Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Fleet Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, George

    2015-03-01

    VICE 2.0 is the second generation of the VICE financial model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for fleet managers to assess the financial soundness of converting their fleets to run on CNG. VICE 2.0 uses a number of variables for infrastructure and vehicles to estimate the business case for decision-makers when considering CNG as a vehicle fuel. Enhancements in version 2.0 include the ability to select the project type (vehicles and infrastructure or vehicle acquisitions only), and to decouple vehicle acquisition from the infrastructure investment, so the two investments may be made independently. Outputs now include graphical presentations of investment cash flow, payback period (simple and discounted), petroleum displacement (annual and cumulative), and annual greenhouse gas reductions. Also, the Vehicle Data are now built around several common conventionally fueled (gasoline and diesel) fleet vehicles. Descriptions of the various model sections and available inputs follow. Each description includes default values for the base-case business model, which was created so economic sensitivities can be investigated by altering various project parameters one at a time.

  4. Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, M; Burnham, A.

    2014-08-31

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) effort to deploy transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported petroleum, this study examines five school districts, one in Virginia and four in Texas, successful use of propane school buses. These school districts used school buses equipped with the newly developed liquid propane injection system that improves vehicle performance. Some of the school districts in this study saved nearly 50% on a cost per mile basis for fuel and maintenance relative to diesel. Using Argonne National Laboratory’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool developed for the DOE’s Clean Cities program to help Clean Cities stakeholders estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions and cost of ownership of light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles, the results showed payback period ranges from 3—8 years, recouping the incremental cost of the vehicles and infrastructure. Overall, fuel economy for these propane vehicles is close to that of displaced diesel vehicles, on an energy-equivalent basis. In addition, the 110 propane buses examined demonstrated petroleum displacement, 212,000 diesel gallon equivalents per year, and GHG benefits of 770 tons per year.

  5. Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

  6. Cogeneration: Economics and politics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prince, R.G.H.; Poole, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Cogeneration is a well established process for supplying heat and electricity from a single fuel source. Its feasibility and implementation in any particular case depend on technical, economic and internal and external {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors, including government policies. This paper describes the current status of small scale industrial cogeneration in Australia. A model has been developed to analyse the technical and economic aspects of retrofitting gas turbine cogeneration in the size range 3 to 30MW to industrial sites. The model demonstrates that for typical Australian energy cost data, the payback and the size of the optimized cogeneration plant depend strongly on electricity buyback prices. Also reviewed are some of the {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors which often militate against an otherwise economic installation, and government policies which may retard cogeneration by concern about local air emissions or favor it as increasing efficiency of energy use and reducing greenhouse emissions. A case study of a small gas turbine plant in Australia is outlined. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Usage possibilities of diesel aggregate for room heating and electric energy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kegl, K.; Vor Ic, J.

    1998-07-01

    Article shows reasons for introduction of cogeneration generally. The present manner of heating and electricity connection at the Faculty of electrical engineering and computer science in Maribor is described. The idea is to build in the cogeneration complex in heating room next to the existent boilers. Gathered data of electricity and heat demand are presented. Paper deals with question of electrical, heat and fuel connections. Comparison between two types of cogeneration (motor and turbine) helps to make a decision: cogeneration with motor. Depending to the daily electricity demands diagram and arranged heating diagram the authors focused to the small cogeneration (around 200 kWe). Availability of natural gas at the placement of the cogeneration leads us to the gas motor but leaves the diesel engine possibility opened. A brief economical estimation includes common investment costs regarding to the savings of energy and fuel expenses. Payback time calculation gives precedence to the gas motor if diesel is used with motor instead of fuel oil. Except the energy savings there are greater benefits of the cogeneration: it can be good study case for students of electrotechnics as well as future mechanical engineers.

  8. Evaluation of the heating operation and transmission district: Feasibility of cogeneration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cable, J.H.; Gilday, L.T.; Moss, M.E.

    1995-11-01

    The General Services Administration, through its National Capital Region, operates a district heating system - called the Heating Operation and Transmission District - that provides steam to approximately 100 government buildings in Washington, D.C. HOTD is examining a host of options that will improve its ability to provide reliable, environmentally sound, and cost-effective service to its customers. This report evaluates one of those options - cogeneration, a technology that would enable HOTD to produce steam and electricity simultaneously. The study concluded that, under current regulations, cogeneration is not attractive economically because the payback period (15 years) exceeds Federal return-on-investment guidelines. However, if the regulatory environment changes to allow wheeling (transmission of power by a non-utility power producer to another user), cogeneration would be attractive; HOTD would save anywhere from $38 million to $118 million and the investment would pay back in 7 to 10 years. Although incorporating cogeneration into the HOTD system has no strong benefit at this time, the report recommends that GSA reevaluate cogeneration in one or two years because Federal regulations regarding wheeling are under review. It also recommends that GSA work with the District of Columbia government to develop standards for cogeneration.

  9. Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  10. Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland - Second Year of Data Collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

    2013-08-01

    Steam heated buildings often suffer from uneven heating as a result of poor control of the amount of steam entering each radiator. In order to satisfy the heating load to the coldest units, other units are overheated. As a result, some tenants complain of being too hot and open their windows in the middle of winter, while others complain of being too cold and are compelled to use supplemental heat sources. Building on previous research, CNT Energy identified 10 test buildings in Chicago and conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam system balancing. A package of common steam balancing measures was assembled and data were collected on the buildings before and after these retrofits were installed to investigate the process, challenges, and the cost effectiveness of improving steam systems through improved venting and control systems. The test buildings that received venting upgrades and new control systems showed 10.2% savings on their natural gas heating load, with a simple payback of 5.1 years. The methodologies for and findings from this study are presented in detail in this report. This report has been updated from a version published in August 2012 to include natural gas usage information from the 2012 heating season and updated natural gas savings calculations.

  11. Final report of Project 617, the Energy Saver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Project work was begun in January of 1995 and was completed in May of 1996. The authors performed a broad value engineering study to examine all parts and functions to lower costs, improve functioning and safety. The results of the Phase 1 work was a total redesign of the original Energy Saver resulting in two components instead of three, a weight of four pounds versus the original fourteen pounds and a reduction from 21 pieces to 10 pieces. The manufactured cost dropped from $350 to $175. Based on these improvements the Value Improvement Project has been successful. The second generation unit was named the BROIL-MASTER and has been registered under the Provisional Application (Patent) Program. The authors performed a technical analysis to determine the potential energy savings of applications identified and collect data on host product gas consumption, payback period, and other cost/saving relationships. The industrial search for energy project applications for the authors design was not successful. Seven Broil-Master demonstration projects have been successfully completed. The Broil-Master has received certification from the American Gas Association and UL approval is due by the end of July. The Restaurant Equipment Test Center of Pacific Gas and Electric is interested in testing the Broil-Master sometime in 1996. The Broil-Master was shown at an International Restaurant Equipment Show in September, 1995 and the National Restaurant Show in May, 1996. The authors now have under way four tests with chains and several other tests pending.

  12. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  13. Design consideration and economic analysis of a community size biogas unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbus, S.P.

    1983-12-01

    At present, various organizations in Pakistan are involved in RandD work in biogas technology. Most of them are government organizations. The units developed or advertised by these organizations are of small size, i.e., for a single family, to provide gas for cooking and lighting only. In this paper, the design of a community-size biogas unit for power generation has been discussed based on hydraulic flow characteristics. The type of digesters which have been discussed are plug flow, arbitrary flow and complete mix flow. As the biological activity of the organic material in the reactor depends on the residence time and also on the temperature of the digesting liquor, hence the flow characteristics play a major role in the sizing of the digestion reactor tank. A diesel engine coupled with the biogas unit has been discussed. This not only provides power for pumping water, power for cottage industries, etc., but also the waste heat from the internal combustion engine can be used to heat the digester or for other heating needs. The economic evaluation of such a plant has been completed and the payback period has been calculated.

  14. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; Thompson, Lisa; Letschert, Virginie

    2010-11-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a rulemaking process in which it amended the existing energy efficiency standards for residential water heaters. A key factor in DOE?s consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers. Determining such impacts requires a comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This paper describes the method used to conduct the life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period analysis for gas and electric storage water heaters. It presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment, including heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters, for a representative sample of U.S. homes. The study included a detailed accounting of installation costs for the considered design options, with a focus on approaches for accommodating the larger dimensions of more efficient water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also considered airflow requirements, venting issues, and the impact of these products on the indoor environment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design reduces the LCC in the majority of homes for both gas and electric storage water heaters, and heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters provide a lower LCC for homes with large rated volume water heaters.

  15. Lubricant oil production: The proper marriage of process and catalyst technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, G.L.; Suchanek, A.

    1996-12-01

    As the industry moves into the next millennium, higher product quality demands to meet the higher performance needs of modern engine technology and rising costs of traditional good quality lube crudes are driving lubricant base oil manufacturers to select hydroprocessing options versus traditional solvent refining techniques. This paper discusses how to properly select the best economic hydroprocessing technology necessary to produce high quality lubricant base oils and waxes. The economic success of such operations depends on the proper combination of process and catalyst technologies that maximizes yields of high quality products with minimum consumption of hydrogen resources and process utilities. This is particular true on the extreme end of the quality spectrum, namely, Very High Viscosity Index (VHVI) base oils and food grade white oils and waxes where there is no room for marginal product quality. Multiplicity of operations is also becoming more important as refiners try to upgrade their facilities with as little capital expense as possible, while at the same time, broaden their high valued product slate to recoup these expenses in the shortest possible payback period. Lyondell Licensing and Criterion Catalyst have put together an effective alliance based on years of development and commercial experience in both the process and catalyst areas to assist lubricant oil manufacturers in meeting these future challenges using as much existing equipment and infrastructure as is practical. Their experience will permit the proper fitting of the chemistry of hydroprocessing to make lubricant base oils to existing or new operations.

  16. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan; Michel, Bruno

    2015-09-28

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of different solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes.

  17. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  18. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Small Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Lane, Michael D.; Liu, Bing

    2010-04-30

    The Technical Support Document (TSD) for 50% energy savings in small office buildings documents the analysis and results for a recommended package of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) referred to as the advanced EEMs. These are changes to a building design that will reduce energy usage. The package of advanced EEMs achieves a minimum of 50% energy savings and a construction area weighted average energy savings of 56.6% over the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 for 16 cities which represent the full range of climate zones in the United States. The 50% goal is for site energy usage reduction. The weighted average is based on data on the building area of construction in the various climate locations. Cost-effectiveness of the EEMs is determined showing an average simple payback of 6.7 years for all 16 climate locations. An alternative set of results is provided which includes a variable air volume HVAC system that achieves at least 50% energy savings in 7 of the 16 climate zones with a construction area weighted average savings of 48.5%. Other packages of EEMs may also achieve 50% energy savings; this report does not consider all alternatives but rather presents at least one way to reach the goal. Design teams using this TSD should follow an integrated design approach and utilize additional analysis to evaluate the specific conditions of a project.

  19. Energy efficient low-income housing demonstration with Houston Habitat for Humanity. Final status report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-30

    Using DOE grant funds, the Alliance to Save Energy developed and managed an award-winning low-income housing demonstration in cooperation with Houston Habitat for Humanity at the 1996 and 1997 annual NAHB Builders Show in Houston, Texas. Using a unique group of over 30 national, state and local partners, the energy design of Houston Habitat houses was permanently upgraded to the Energy Star Homes Program threshold. Meeting Energy Star Homes Program criteria, the partner design team increased the level of efficiency approximately 30% over the 1992 Model Energy Code. This innovative design using commercially available materials added approximately $1,400 in cost-effective energy upgrades with an estimated payback of less than 8 years. The 30 public-private partners successfully demonstrated energy and resource efficient housing techniques to the 65,000 NAHB home show attendees and the over 3,000 Habitat affiliates. This project resulted in the Houston Habitat affiliate becoming the nation`s first low-income Energy Star Homes Program home builder. By the year 2000, Houston Habitat anticipates building over 500 homes to this new level of efficiency as well as set an example for other Habitat affiliates nationwide to follow. The 1997 demonstration house utilized an all-women volunteer builders team to construct a 3 bedroom home in Houston Habitat`s Woodglen Subdivision. Energy consumption was remotely metered by Texas A and M.

  20. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heatmore » absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.« less

  1. Opportunities to improve energy efficiency in the U.S. pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Anglani, Norma; Einstein, Dan; Krushch, Marta; Price, Lynn

    2001-02-02

    This paper analyzes the energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reductions potential of the U.S. pulp and paper industry, one of the largest energy users in the U.S. manufacturing sector. We examined over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures. The measures were characterized, and then ordered on the basis of cost-effectiveness. The report indicates that there still exists significant potential for energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reduction in this industry. The cost-effective potential for energy efficiency improvement is defined as having a simple pay-back period of three years or less. Not including increased recycling the study identifies a cost-effective savings potential of 16% of the primary energy use in 1994. Including increased recycling leads to a higher potential for energy savings, i.e. a range of cost-effective savings between 16% and 24% of primary energy use. Future work is needed to further elaborate on key energy efficiency measures identified in the report including barriers and opportunities for increased recycling of waste paper.

  2. Introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    This section of the report describes the history of the tribology program of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) in the Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT). The mission of the Office of Transportation Technology is discussed. OTT`s research objectives focus on (1) automobiles and light-duty trucks and vans and (2) heavy duty trucks and buses. Even small gains in efficiency can produce large paybacks for the tax dollar. The mission of the Office of Transportation Materials is also described. Its research objective is to enable the development and engineering of energy-efficient transportation systems that will make possible the transition of the U.S. transportation sector from dependence on petroleum to alternative fuels and electricity. The mission of the Tibology Program is to provide the base technology to enable savings in annual U.S. energy consumption through tribological advances in the transportation sector. Current task areas are in the fields of advanced lubrication, engineered tribological interfaces, advanced tribomaterials and components, and project management.

  3. Pilot project for a commercial buildings Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capehart, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    Commercial energy use costs businesses around $70 billion annually. Many of these businesses are small and medium sized organizations that do not have the resources to help themselves, or to pay for professional engineering services to help reduce their energy costs and improve their economic competitiveness. Energy cost reduction actions with payback times of around two years could save the commercial sector 15--20%, or $10--$15 billion per year. This project was initially intended to evaluate the feasibility of performing commercial energy audits as an adjunct to the industrial audit program run by the US Department of Energy Industrial Office. This program is housed in 30 universities throughout the United States. Formerly known as Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Centers (EADC`s), the university programs are now called Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC`s) to reflect their expansion from energy use analyses to include waste and productivity analyses. The success of the EADC/IAC program in helping the manufacturing sector provides an excellent model for a similar program in the commercial buildings sector. This project has investigated using the EADC/IAC approach to performing energy audits for the commercial sector, and has determined that such an approach is feasible and cost effective.

  4. Non-CFC air conditioning for transit buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.A.; Parent, Y.O.; Bharathan, D.

    1992-11-01

    In the United Sates, more than 80% of transit city buses are air conditioned. Vapor compression refrigeration systems are standard for air conditioning buses and account for up to 25% of fuel consumption in the cooling season. Vapor compression devices use chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chemicals that contributes to Earths`s ozone depletion and to global warming. Currently, evaporative cooling is an economical alternative to CFC vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning buses. It does not use CFCs but is restricted in use to arid climates. This limitation can be eliminated by dehumidifying the supply air using desiccants. We studied desiccant systems for cooling transit buses and found that the use of a desiccant-assisted evaporative cooling system is feasible and can deliver the required cooling. The weight and the size of the desiccant system though larger than vapor compression systems, can be easily accommodated within a bus. Fuel consumption for naming desiccant systems was about 70% less than CFC refrigeration system, resulting in payback periods of less than 2.5 years under most circumstances. This preliminary study indicated that desiccant systems combined with evaporative cooling is a CFC-free option to vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning of transit buses. The concept is ready to be tested in a fun prototype scale in a commercial bus.

  5. Non-CFC air conditioning for transit buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.A.; Parent, Y.O.; Bharathan, D.

    1992-11-01

    In the United Sates, more than 80% of transit city buses are air conditioned. Vapor compression refrigeration systems are standard for air conditioning buses and account for up to 25% of fuel consumption in the cooling season. Vapor compression devices use chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chemicals that contributes to Earths's ozone depletion and to global warming. Currently, evaporative cooling is an economical alternative to CFC vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning buses. It does not use CFCs but is restricted in use to arid climates. This limitation can be eliminated by dehumidifying the supply air using desiccants. We studied desiccant systems for cooling transit buses and found that the use of a desiccant-assisted evaporative cooling system is feasible and can deliver the required cooling. The weight and the size of the desiccant system though larger than vapor compression systems, can be easily accommodated within a bus. Fuel consumption for naming desiccant systems was about 70% less than CFC refrigeration system, resulting in payback periods of less than 2.5 years under most circumstances. This preliminary study indicated that desiccant systems combined with evaporative cooling is a CFC-free option to vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning of transit buses. The concept is ready to be tested in a fun prototype scale in a commercial bus.

  6. Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.

    2012-01-01

    This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific data recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of operating wind turbines. This report is intended to help develop a basic understanding of the data needed for reliability analysis from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and analysis and reporting needs. The 'Motivation' section of this report provides a rationale for collecting and analyzing field data for reliability analysis. The benefits of this type of effort can include increased energy delivered, decreased operating costs, enhanced preventive maintenance schedules, solutions to issues with the largest payback, and identification of early failure indicators.

  7. JV Task 75 - Lignite Fuel Enhancement via Air-Jigging Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Lamb; Steven Benson; Joshua Stanislowski

    2007-03-01

    Several North Dakota lignite coals from the Falkirk Mine were processed in a 5-ton-per-hour dry coal-cleaning plant. The plant uses air-jigging technology to separate undesirable ash constituents as well as sulfur and mercury. The results of this study indicate average ash, sulfur, and mercury reductions on a weight basis of 15%, 22%, and 28%, respectively. The average heating value was increased by 2% on a Btu/lb basis. Two computer models were used to understand the impact of a cleaned fuel on boiler performance: PCQUEST{reg_sign} and Vista. The PCQUEST model indicated improvements in slagging and fouling potential when cleaned coals are used over feed coals. The Vista model was set up to simulate coal performance and economics at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station. In all cases, the cleaned fuel performed better than the original feed coal, with economic benefits being realized for all fuels tested. The model also indicated that one fuel considered to be unusable before cleaning was transformed into a potentially salable product. While these data indicate full-scale implementation of air-jigging technology may be beneficial to the mine and the plant, complete economic analysis, including payback period, is needed to make the final decision to implement.

  8. Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xing; Dong, Jing; Lin, Zhenhong

    2014-01-01

    Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

  9. Measured heating system efficiency retrofits in eight manufactured (HUD-code) homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, J.; Davis, B.; Francisco, P.; Palmiter, L.

    1998-07-01

    This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency performed on eight all-electric manufactured homes sited in the Pacific Northwest with forced-air distribution systems. These homes, like more than four million existing manufactured homes in the US, were constructed to thermal specifications that were mandated by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1976. The test protocol compares real-time measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during periods when zonal heaters heat the homes to the same internal temperature. By alternating between the furnace and zonal heaters on 2 hour cycles, a short-term coheat test is performed. Additional measurements, including blower door and duct tightness tests, are conducted to measure and characterize the home's tightness and duct leakage so that coheat test results might be linked to other measures of building performance. The testing was done at each home before and after an extensive duct sealing retrofit was performed. The average pre-retrofit system efficiency for these homes was 69%. After the retrofit, the average system efficiency increased to 83%. The average simple payback period for the retrofits ranges from 1 to 5 years in Western Oregon and 1 to 3 years in colder Eastern Oregon.

  10. Deterrents to energy conservation investment in public housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, E.; Ritschard, R.L.; Goldman, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    In an effort to reduce rising energy costs, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has strongly urged local public housing authorities (PHAs) to improve the energy efficiency of their building stock. In this study, the authors examine the relative impact on HUD and PHAs of four retrofit financing strategies used by two local housing authorities. They find that the existing Performance Funding System (PFS) regulations tend to discourage PHAs from actively pursuing cost-effective investments that improve the energy efficiency of their housing projects. The authors' results indicate that HUD policies distribute the dollar savings from conservation retrofits in such a way that HUD receives substantial benefits, while local public housing authorities get few benefits. In fact, PHAs can lose money, even in cases where there are significant energy savings and payback periods of less than three years. The authors tested several alternatives to the current regulations and found that the best way to encourage PHAs to conserve is for HUD to reimburse them for new maintenance and capital costs of the conservation retrofits.

  11. Economic penalties of problems and errors in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, K.; Sparkes, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Experience with a large number of installed solar energy systems in the HUD Solar Program has shown that a variety of problems and design/installation errors have occurred in many solar systems, sometimes resulting in substantial additional costs for repair and/or replacement. In this paper, the effect of problems and errors on the economics of solar energy systems is examined. A method is outlined for doing this in terms of selected economic indicators. The method is illustrated by a simple example of a residential solar DHW system. An example of an installed, instrumented solar energy system in the HUD Solar Program is then discussed. Detailed results are given for the effects of the problems and errors on the cash flow, cost of delivered heat, discounted payback period, and life-cycle cost of the solar energy system. Conclusions are drawn regarding the most suitable economic indicators for showing the effects of problems and errors in solar energy systems. A method is outlined for deciding on the maximum justifiable expenditure for maintenance on a solar energy system with problems or errors.

  12. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, Parker; Podorson, David; Varshney, Kapil

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques, manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder are two story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  13. Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan; Conlin, Francis; Podorson, David; Alaigh, Kunal

    2014-06-01

    More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 public housing authorities (PHAs) across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low-cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two PHAs to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation 10 ten housing units. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6%-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of units per year nationally.

  14. Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Podorson, D.; Alaigh, K.

    2014-06-01

    Over one million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

  15. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  16. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Togore, Sam; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  17. Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-30

    This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

  18. Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  19. Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

  20. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Gilligan, Donald; Singer, Terry

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the issue of non-energy benefits within the context of the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry?a growing industry comprised of companies that provide energy savings and other benefits to customers through the use of performance-based contracting. Recent analysis has found that ESCO projects in the public/institutional sector, especially at K-12 schools, are using performance-based contracting, at the behest of the customers, to partially -- but not fully -- offset substantial accumulated deferred maintenance needs (e.g., asbestos removal, wiring) and measures that have very long paybacks (roof replacement). This trend is affecting the traditional economic measures policymakers use to evaluate success on a benefit to cost basis. Moreover, the value of non-energy benefits which can offset some or all of the cost of the non-energy measures -- including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoided capital costs, and tradable pollution emissions allowances-- are not always incorporated into a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of ESCO projects. Nonenergy benefits are clearly important to customers, but state and federal laws that govern the acceptance of these types of benefits for ESCO projects vary widely (i.e., 0-100percent of allowable savings can come from one or more non-energy categories). Clear and consistent guidance on what types of savings are recognized in Energy Savings agreements under performance contracts is necessary, particularly where customers are searching for deep energy efficiency gains in the building sector.

  1. Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce Site's Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Footprint (Alpha 5 and 9720-38 No Longer Designated as Nuclear Facilities) | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce Site's Nuclear Footprint (Alpha 5 and 9720-38 No Longer Designated as Nuclear Facilities) September 03, 2010 Microsoft Office document icon R-9-2

  2. D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George H.

    2012-10-24

    Facility (NIF) in CA within a year. This will usher in the technology development Phase of ICF after years of research aimed at achieving breakeven experiment. Methods to achieve the high energy gain needed for a competitive power plant will then be a key developmental issue, and our D-cluster target for Fast Ignition (FI) is expected to meet that need.

  3. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2005-12-31

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

  4. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Thomas Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  5. Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-06-01

    effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 Mg) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin, they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

  6. Illuminating the Pecking Order in Off-Grid Lighting: A Demonstration of LED Lighting for Saving Energy in the Poultry Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Mills, Evan

    2010-11-06

    The Lumina Project and Lighting Africa conducted a full-scale field test involving a switch from kerosene to solar-LED lighting for commercial broiler chicken production at an off-grid farm in Kenya. The test achieved lower operating costs, produced substantially more light, improved the working environment, and had no adverse effect on yields. A strategy using conventional solar-fluorescent lighting also achieved comparable yields, but entailed a six-fold higher capital cost and significantly higher recurring battery replacement costs. Thanks to higher energy and optical efficiencies, the LED system provided approximately twice the illumination to the chicken-production area and yet drew less than half the power.At the study farm, 3000 chickens were grown in each of three identical houses under kerosene, fluorescent, and LED lighting configurations. Under baseline conditions, a yearly expenditure of 1,200 USD is required to illuminate the three houses with kerosene. The LED system eliminates this fuel use and expense with a corresponding simple payback time of 1.5 years, while the solar-fluorescent system has a payback time of 9.3 years. The corresponding reduction in fuel expenditure in both cases represents a 15percent increase in after-tax net income (revenues minus expenses) across the entire business operation. The differential cost-effectiveness between the LED and fluorescent systems would be substantially greater if the fluorescent system were upsized to provide the same light as the LED system. Providing light with the fluorescent or LED systems is also far more economical than connecting to the grid in this case. The estimated grid-connection cost at this facility is 1.7 million Kenya Schillings (approximately 21,250 USD), which is nearly six-times the cost of the fluorescent system and 35-times the cost of the LED system.The LED system also confers various non-energy benefits. The relative uniformity of LED lighting, compared to the fluorescent or

  7. Plantwide Energy Assessment of a Sugarcane Farming and Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakeway, L.A.; Turn, S.Q.; Keffer, V.I.; Kinoshita, C.M.

    2006-02-27

    A plantwide energy assessment was performed at Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., an integrated sugarcane farming and processing facility on the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii. There were four main tasks performed for the plantwide energy assessment: 1) pump energy assessment in both field and factory operations, 2) steam generation assessment in the power production operations, 3) steam distribution assessment in the sugar manufacturing operation, and 4) electric power distribution assessment of the company system grid. The energy savings identified in each of these tasks were summarized in terms of fuel savings, electricity savings, or opportunity revenue that potentially exists mostly from increased electric power sales to the local electric utility. The results of this investigation revealed eight energy saving projects that can be implemented at HC&S. These eight projects were determined to have potential for $1.5 million in annual fuel savings or 22,337 MWh equivalent annual electricity savings. Most of the savings were derived from pump efficiency improvements and steam efficiency improvements both in generation and distribution. If all the energy saving projects were implemented and the energy savings were realized as less fuel consumed, there would be corresponding reductions in regulated air pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions from supplemental coal fuel. As HC&S is already a significant user of renewable biomass fuel for its operations, the projected reductions in air pollutants and emissions will not be as great compared to using only coal fuel for example. A classification of implementation priority into operations was performed for the identified energy saving projects based on payback period and ease of implementation.

  8. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

  9. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel T. Hennessy

    2010-06-15

    Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

  10. Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

  11. Very High Fuel Economy, Heavy Duty, Constant Speed, Truck Engine Optimized Via Unique Energy Recovery Turbines and Facilitated High Efficiency Continuously Variable Drivetrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahman Habibzadeh

    2010-01-31

    The project began under a corporative agreement between Mack Trucks, Inc and the Department of Energy starting from September 1, 2005. The major objective of the four year project is to demonstrate a 10% efficiency gain by operating a Volvo 13 Litre heavy-duty diesel engine at a constant or narrow speed and coupled to a continuously variable transmission. The simulation work on the Constant Speed Engine started on October 1st. The initial simulations are aimed to give a basic engine model for the VTEC vehicle simulations. Compressor and turbine maps are based upon existing maps and/or qualified, realistic estimations. The reference engine is a MD 13 US07 475 Hp. Phase I was completed in May 2006 which determined that an increase in fuel efficiency for the engine of 10.5% over the OICA cycle, and 8.2% over a road cycle was possible. The net increase in fuel efficiency would be 5% when coupled to a CVT and operated over simulated highway conditions. In Phase II an economic analysis was performed on the engine with turbocompound (TC) and a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). The system was analyzed to determine the payback time needed for the added cost of the TC and CVT system. The analysis was performed by considering two different production scenarios of 10,000 and 60,000 units annually. The cost estimate includes the turbocharger, the turbocompound unit, the interstage duct diffuser and installation details, the modifications necessary on the engine and the CVT. Even with the cheapest fuel and the lowest improvement, the pay back time is only slightly more than 12 months. A gear train is necessary between the engine crankshaft and turbocompound unit. This is considered to be relatively straight forward with no design problems.

  12. Refrigerated Warehouse Demand Response Strategy Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Doug; Castillo, Rafael; Larson, Kyle; Dobbs, Brian; Olsen, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    This guide summarizes demand response measures that can be implemented in refrigerated warehouses. In an appendix, it also addresses related energy efficiency opportunities. Reducing overall grid demand during peak periods and energy consumption has benefits for facility operators, grid operators, utility companies, and society. State wide demand response potential for the refrigerated warehouse sector in California is estimated to be over 22.1 Megawatts. Two categories of demand response strategies are described in this guide: load shifting and load shedding. Load shifting can be accomplished via pre-cooling, capacity limiting, and battery charger load management. Load shedding can be achieved by lighting reduction, demand defrost and defrost termination, infiltration reduction, and shutting down miscellaneous equipment. Estimation of the costs and benefits of demand response participation yields simple payback periods of 2-4 years. To improve demand response performance, it’s suggested to install air curtains and another form of infiltration barrier, such as a rollup door, for the passageways. Further modifications to increase efficiency of the refrigeration unit are also analyzed. A larger condenser can maintain the minimum saturated condensing temperature (SCT) for more hours of the day. Lowering the SCT reduces the compressor lift, which results in an overall increase in refrigeration system capacity and energy efficiency. Another way of saving energy in refrigerated warehouses is eliminating the use of under-floor resistance heaters. A more energy efficient alternative to resistance heaters is to utilize the heat that is being rejected from the condenser through a heat exchanger. These energy efficiency measures improve efficiency either by reducing the required electric energy input for the refrigeration system, by helping to curtail the refrigeration load on the system, or by reducing both the load and required energy input.

  13. Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

    2013-01-21

    For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production

  15. Automation of the longwall mining system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, W.; Aster, R.; Harris, J.; High, J.

    1982-11-01

    The longwall automation study presented is the first phase of a study to evaluate mining automation opportunities. The objective was to identify cost-effective, safe, and technologically sound applications of automation technology to understand coal mining. The prime automation candidates resulting from the industry experience and survey were: (1) the shearer operation, (2) shield and conveyor pan-line advance, (3) a management information system to allow improved mine logistics support, and (4) component fault isolation and diagnostics to reduce untimely maintenance delays. A system network analysis indicated that a 40% improvement in productivity was feasible if system delays associated with all of the above four areas were removed. A technology assessment and conceptual system design of each of the four automation candidate areas showed that state-of-the-art digital computer, servomechanism, and actuator technologies could be applied to automate the longwall system. The final cost benefit analysis of all of the automation areas indicated a total net national benefit (profit) of roughly $200 million to the longwall mining industry if all automation candidates were installed. This cost benefit represented an approximate order of magnitude payback on the research and development (R and D) investment. In conclusion, it is recommended that the shearer operation be automated first because it provides a large number of other sensor inputs required for face alignment (i.e., shields and conveyor). Automation of the shield and conveyor pan-line advance is suggested as the next step since both the shearer and face alignment operations contributed the greatest time delays to the overall system downtime.

  16. Converting campus waste into renewable energy – A case study for the University of Cincinnati

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Qingshi; Zhu, Chao; McAvoy, Drew C.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A case study to show the benefits of waste-to-energy projects at a university. • Evaluated the technical and economic feasibilities as well as GHG reduction. • A tool for other universities/communities to evaluate waste-to-energy projects. - Abstract: This paper evaluates the implementation of three waste-to-energy projects at the University of Cincinnati: waste cooking oil-to-biodiesel, waste paper-to-fuel pellets and food waste-to-biogas, respectively. The implementation of these waste-to-energy (WTE) projects would lead to the improvement of campus sustainability by minimizing waste management efforts and reducing GHG emissions via the displacement of fossil fuel usage. Technical and economic aspects of their implementation were assessed and the corresponding GHG reduction was estimated. Results showed that on-site implementation of these projects would: (1) divert 3682 L (974 gallons) of waste cooking oil to 3712 L (982 gallons) of biodiesel; (2) produce 138 tonnes of fuel pellets from 133 tonnes of waste paper (with the addition of 20.75 tonnes of plastics) to replace121 tonnes of coal; and (3) produce biogas that would be enough to replace 12,767 m{sup 3} natural gas every year from 146 tonnes of food waste. The economic analysis determined that the payback periods for the three projects would be 16 months for the biodiesel, 155 months for the fuel pellet, and 74 months for the biogas projects. The reduction of GHG emission from the implementation of the three WTE projects was determined to be 9.37 (biodiesel), 260.49 (fuel pellets), and 11.36 (biogas) tonnes of CO{sub 2}-eq per year, respectively.

  17. The Potential for Biomass District Energy Production in Port Graham, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Sink, Chugachmiut; Keeryanne Leroux, EERC

    2008-05-08

    This project was a collaboration between The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Chugachmiut – A Tribal organization Serving the Chugach Native People of Alaska and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program. It was conducted to determine the economic and technical feasibility for implementing a biomass energy system to service the Chugachmiut community of Port Graham, Alaska. The Port Graham tribe has been investigating opportunities to reduce energy costs and reliance on energy imports and support subsistence. The dramatic rise in the prices of petroleum fuels have been a hardship to the village of Port Graham, located on the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. The Port Graham Village Council views the forest timber surrounding the village and the established salmon industry as potential resources for providing biomass energy power to the facilities in their community. Benefits of implementing a biomass fuel include reduced energy costs, energy independence, economic development, and environmental improvement. Fish oil–diesel blended fuel and indoor wood boilers are the most economical and technically viable options for biomass energy in the village of Port Graham. Sufficient regional biomass resources allow up to 50% in annual heating savings to the user, displacing up to 70% current diesel imports, with a simple payback of less than 3 years for an estimated capital investment under $300,000. Distributive energy options are also economically viable and would displace all imported diesel, albeit offering less savings potential and requiring greater capital. These include a large-scale wood combustion system to provide heat to the entire village, a wood gasification system for cogeneration of heat and power, and moderate outdoor wood furnaces providing heat to 3–4 homes or community buildings per furnace. Coordination of biomass procurement and delivery, ensuring resource reliability and technology acceptance, and arbitrating

  18. Crop drying by indirect active hybrid solar - Electrical dryer in the eastern Algerian Septentrional Sahara

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boughali, S.; Bouchekima, B.; Mennouche, D.; Bouguettaia, H.; Bechki, D.; Benmoussa, H.

    2009-12-15

    In the present work, a new specific prototype of an indirect active hybrid solar-electrical dryer for agricultural products was constructed and investigated at LENREZA Laboratory, University of Ouargla (Algerian Sahara). In the new configuration of air drying passage; the study was done in a somewhat high range of mass flow rate between 0.04 and 0.08 kg/m{sup 2} s a range not properly investigated by most researchers. Experimental tests with and without load were performed in winter season in order to study the thermal behavior of the dryer and the effect of high air masse flow on the collector and system drying efficiency. The fraction of electrical and solar energy contribution versus air mass flow rate was investigated. Slice tomato was studied with different temperatures and velocities of drying air in order to study the influence of these parameters on the removal moisture content from the product and on the kinetics drying and also to determine their suitable values. Many different thin layer mathematical drying models were compared according to their coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) and reduced chi square ({chi}{sup 2}) to estimate experimental drying curves. The Middli model in this condition proved to be the best for predicting drying behavior of tomato slice with (R{sup 2} = 0.9995, {chi}{sup 2} = 0.0001). Finally an economic evaluation was calculated using the criterion of payback period which is found very small 1.27 years compared to the life of the dryer 15 years. (author)

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  2. Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. CommercialSector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman,Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems in developed countries over the next two decades. In the U.S., private and public expectations for this technology are heavily influenced by forecasts published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), most notably the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). EIA's forecasts are typically made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. Annual penetration is forecast by estimating the payback period for each technology, for each of a limited number of representative building types, for each of nine regions. This process results in an AEO2004 forecast deployment of about a total 3 GW of DG electrical generating capacity by 2025, which is only 0.25 percent of total forecast U.S. capacity. Analyses conducted using both the AEO2003 and AEO2004 versions of NEMS changes the baseline costs and performance characteristics of DG to reflect a world without U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research into several thermal DG technologies, which is then compared to a case with enhanced technology representative of the successful achievement of DOE research goals. The net difference in 2025 DG penetration is dramatic using the AEO2003 version of NEMS, but much smaller in the AEO2004 version. The significance and validity of these contradictory results are discussed, and possibilities for improving estimates of commercial U.S. DG potential are explored.

  3. Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

  4. An advanced feed pump based on magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, L.

    1996-11-01

    Pumps have not used magnetic bearings commercially due to their high initial cost and the perception of a high risk to reward ratio. However, by taking advantage of the capability of the bearings to operate submerged in the pumped liquid, an advanced boiler feed pump has been developed with measurably improved efficiency and reduced seal maintenance. When the economic value of these improvements are evaluated against the additional first cost of the bearing change, attractive paybacks are generated for most new plant applications and even for some retrofits where the first cost reductions from eliminating the oil system, bearings, and seals do not apply. These savings are in addition to the benefits long recognized for magnetic bearings: improved reliability; built-in remote monitoring and diagnostics; elimination of the pressure feed oil system and its maintenance and potential fire hazard. Based on these advantages a research and development prototype pump incorporating the new technology was built and tested. A commercial opportunity to demonstrate this new design arose in 1994 and resulted in the sale of an eight stage, 3500 HP feed pump to Tampa Electric Company for their new Polk Station Generating Plant. This is the largest known magnetic bearing pump delivered for commercial operation worldwide. The pump was shipped during August 1995 and is expected to enter service during the first half of 1996. This paper will briefly introduce magnetic bearings and then discuss the design of the advanced pump. The basis for predicting improved efficiency and estimating its value will be presented followed by the experience in manufacturing and testing the pump for Polk Generating Station.

  5. Evaluation of the near-term commercial potential of technologies being developed by the Office of Building Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weijo, R.O. ); Nicholls, A.K.; Weakley, S.A.; Eckert, R.L.; Shankle, D.L.; Anderson, M.R.; Anderson, A.R. )

    1991-03-01

    This project developed an inventory of the Office of Building Technologies (OBT) from a survey administered in 1988 to program managers and principal investigators from OBT. Information provided on these surveys was evaluated to identify equipment and practices that are near-term opportunities for technology commercialization and to determine whether they needed some form of assistance from OBT to be successful in the marketplace. The near-term commercial potential of OBT technologies was assessed by using a technology selection screening methodology. The screening first identified those technologies that were ready to be commercialized in the next two years. The second screen identified the technologies that had a simple payback period of less than five years, and the third identified those that met a current need in the marketplace. Twenty-six OBT technologies met all the criteria. These commercially promising technologies were further screened to determine which would succeed on their own and which would require further commercialization support. Additional commercialization support was recommended for OBT technologies where serious barriers to adoption existed or where no private sector interest in a technology could be identified. Twenty-three technologies were identified as requiring commercialization support from OBT. These are categorized by each division within OBT and are shown in Table S.1. The methodology used could easily be adapted to screen other DOE-developed technologies to determine commercialization potential and to allocate resources accordingly. It provides a systematic way to analyze numerous technologies and a defensible and documented procedure for comparing them. 4 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Fossil plant maintenance optimization at FPC`s Crystal River Units 4 & 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossey, J.; Pflasterer, R.; Colsher, R.; Toomey, G.; Smith, S.; Abbott, P.

    1996-07-01

    Florida Power Corporation recently completed a Fossil Plant Maintenance Optimization project at it`s Crystal River Units 4 and 5 coal fired power plant. The project combined Streamlined Reliability Centered Maintenance (SRCM) techniques with a Predictive Maintenance (PDM) Assessment to analyze eleven of the plants systems that represent the principal contributors to maintenance costs. The plant had an extensive existing maintenance program that included several types of condition monitoring. The Benefit-to-Cost analysis indicates that the annual savings associated with the project recommendations result in a payback period of less than one year. This paper summarizes the types of recommendations that were made and describes the processes used for both the SRCM analysis and the PDM Assessment. The SRCM analysis used proven techniques and software that have been used on other projects, including some sponsored by EPRI. The PDM Assessment process was similar to processes used previously for EPRI and non- EPRI utilities; however, this was the first project where the two processes were modified to take advantage of work performed using the other. All of the recommendations developed by the SRCM analysts were reviewed by the PDM analysts before they were finalized. The structure and flow of the project is also described including how the SRCM and PDM analysts interfaced with the plant staff and how implementation was facilitated. The analysis relied on plant experience related to the operation and maintenance history of the equipment. The recommendations for each system were reviewed by a team consisting of the first-line maintenance supervisors, the maintenance planners, and the plant technical services group. The project recommendations are essentially two-thirds implemented, with many of them implemented before the analysis was completed.

  7. Performance assessment and adoption processes of an information monitoring and diagnostic system prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann

    1999-10-01

    This report addresses the problem that buildings do not perform as well as anticipated during design. We partnered with an innovative building operator to evaluate a prototype Information Monitoring and Diagnostic System (IMDS). The IMDS consists of high-quality measurements archived each minute, a data visualization tool, and a web-based capability. The operators recommend similar technology be adopted in other buildings. The IMDS has been used to identify and correct a series of control problems. It has also allowed the operators to make more effective use of the building control system, freeing up time to take care of other tenant needs. They believe they have significantly improved building comfort, potentially improving tenant health, and productivity. The reduction in hours to operate the building are worth about $20,000 per year, which could pay for the IMDS in about five years. A control system retrofit based on findings from the IMDS is expected to reduce energy use by 20 percent over the next year, worth over $30,000 per year. The main conclusion of the model-based chiller fault detection work is that steady-state models can be used as reference models to monitor chiller operation and detect faults. The ability of the IMDS to measure cooling load and chiller power to one-percent accuracy with a one-minute sampling interval permits detection of additional faults. Evolutionary programming techniques were also evaluated, showing promise in the detection of patterns in building data. We also evaluated two technology adoption processes, radical and routine. In routine adoption, managers enhance features of existing products that are already well understood. In radical adoption, innovative building managers introduce novel technology into their organizations without using the rigorous payback criteria used in routine innovations.

  8. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, the Raleigh Housing Authority worked with Building America team, the Advanced Residential Integrated Solutions Collaborative to determine the most cost-effective ways to reduce duct leakage in its low-rise housing units.Two retrofit duct sealing techniquesmanually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealantwere implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. Ihe cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  9. Central vacuum system with programmable controller reduces energy costs 40%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Silva, R.; Varnes, W.; Gaines, A.

    1985-11-01

    The B.F. Goodrich Company needed a more efficient vacuum source for the pilot plant facilities in Avon Lake, OH where new products and manufacturing procedures are developed and evaluated. Fourteen multi-stage steam jet ejector vacuum systems were installed in one building, since a number of vacuum users could be operating concurrently at different levels in the range of 15 to 150 Torr. Ejectors were normally turned on or off to provide the desired vacuum and to conserve steam. Steam is wasted, however, if all stages are on and the amount of vacuum is regulated by bleeding inert gas into the system. Water can also enter the system by kick back, if steam to the ejectors is abruptly shut off. The jet ejector vacuum systems required a steady supply of high pressure steam day and night, but fluctuating demands could create problems in the quality of vacuum obtained. Steam and maintenance costs were also significant. Goodrich decided to replace most of the steam-operated vacuum units because of the high energy requirements, and concurrently reduce hydrocarbon emissions. A major manufacturer or mechanical vacuum equipment was asked to design a vacuum system that could provide steady vacuum in the range of 10 to 250 Torr. The system had to have sufficient capacity for a number of concurrently operating processes, and handle a wide variety of hydrocarbons. The system, designed to meet these requirements and installed in June 1984, consists of a Roots-type vacuum booster with bypass valves, discharging into an intercondenser. The progammable-controlled vacuum system has reduced energy requirements by approximately 40%, and has helped in minimizing emissions. The projected pay-back for the entire system is 1 1/2 years.

  10. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration at Denver Museum of Nature & Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-11-30

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects were competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This report highlights the findings of a case study of one such GSHP demonstration projects that uses a recycled water heat pump (RWHP) system installed at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in Denver, Colorado. The RWHP system uses recycled water from the city’s water system as the heat sink and source for a modular water-to-water heat pump (WWHP). This case study was conducted based on the available measured performance data from December 2014 through August 2015, utility bills of the building in 2014 and 2015, construction drawings, maintenance records, personal communications, and construction costs. The annual energy consumption of the RWHP system was calculated based on the available measured data and other related information. It was compared with the performance of a baseline scenario— a conventional VAV system using a water-cooled chiller and a natural gas fired boiler, both of which have the minimum energy efficiencies allowed by ASHRAE 90.1-2010. The comparison was made to determine energy savings, operating cost savings, and CO2 emission reductions achieved by the RWHP system. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the simple payback of the RWHP system. Summarized below are the results of the performance analysis, the learned lessons, and recommended improvement in the operation of the RWHP system.

  11. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-09-30

    This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

  12. The Business Value of Superior Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Evans, Tracy; Glatt, Sandy; Meffert, William

    2015-08-04

    Industrial facilities participating in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (US DOE) Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program are finding that it provides them with significant business value. This value starts with the implementation of ISO 50001-Energy management system standard, which provides an internationally-relevant framework for integration of energy management into an organization’s business processes. The resulting structure emphasizes effective use of available data and supports continual improvement of energy performance. International relevance is particularly important for companies with a global presence or trading interests, providing them with access to supporting ISO standards and a growing body of certified companies representing the collective knowledge of communities of practice. This paper examines the business value of SEP, a voluntary program that builds on ISO 50001, inviting industry to demonstrate an even greater commitment through third-party verification of energy performance improvement to a specified level of achievement. Information from 28 facilities that have already achieved SEP certification will illustrate key findings concerning both the value and the challenges from SEP/ISO 50001 implementation. These include the facilities’ experience with implementation, internal and external value of third-party verification of energy performance improvement; attractive payback periods and the importance of SEP tools and guidance. US DOE is working to bring the program to scale, including the Enterprise-Wide Accelerator (SEP for multiple facilities in a company), the Ratepayer-Funded Program Accelerator (supporting tools for utilities and program administrators to include SEP in their program offerings), and expansion of the program to other sectors and industry supply chains.

  13. Investment in different sized SMRs: Economic evaluation of stochastic scenarios by INCAS code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barenghi, S.; Boarin, S.; Ricotti, M. E.

    2012-07-01

    Small Modular LWR concepts are being developed and proposed to investors worldwide. They capitalize on operating track record of GEN II LWR, while introducing innovative design enhancements allowed by smaller size and additional benefits from the higher degree of modularization and from deployment of multiple units on the same site. (i.e. 'Economy of Multiple' paradigm) Nevertheless Small Modular Reactors pay for a dis-economy of scale that represents a relevant penalty on a capital intensive investment. Investors in the nuclear power generation industry face a very high financial risk, due to high capital commitment and exceptionally long pay-back time. Investment risk arise from uncertainty that affects scenario conditions over such a long time horizon. Risk aversion is increased by current adverse conditions of financial markets and general economic downturn, as is the case nowadays. This work investigates both the investment profitability and risk of alternative investments in a single Large Reactor or in multiple SMR of different sizes drawing information from project's Internal Rate of Return stochastic distribution. multiple SMR deployment on a single site with total power installed, equivalent to a single LR. Uncertain scenario conditions and stochastic input assumptions are included in the analysis, representing investment uncertainty and risk. Results show that, despite the combination of much larger number of stochastic variables in SMR fleets, uncertainty of project profitability is not increased, as compared to LR: SMR have features able to smooth IRR variance and control investment risk. Despite dis-economy of scale, SMR represent a limited capital commitment and a scalable investment option that meet investors' interest, even in developed and mature markets, that are traditional marketplace for LR. (authors)

  14. Measured Energy Savings from the Application of Reflective Roofs in 3 AT and T Regeneration Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashen; Rainer, Leo

    2000-11-01

    Energy use and environmental parameters were monitored in three AT and T regeneration buildings during the summer of 2000. These buildings are constructed with concrete and are about 14.9 m2 (160 f2; 10x16 ft)in size. The buildings were initially monitored for about 1 1/2 months to establish a base condition. Then, the roofs of the buildings were painted with a white coating and the monitoring was continued. The original roof reflectances were about 26 percent; after the application of roof coatings the reflectivities increased to about 72 percent. In two of these buildings, we monitored savings of about 0.5kWh per day (8.6 kWh/m2 [0.8 kWh/ft2]). The third building showed a reduction in air-conditioning energy use of about 13kWh per day. These savings probably resulted from the differences in the performance (EER) of the two dissimilar AC units in this building. The estimated annual savings for two of the buildings are about 125kWh per year; at a cost of dollar 0.1/kWh, savings are about dollar 12.5 per year. Obviously, it costs significantly more than this amount to coat the roofs with reflective coating, particularly because of the remote location of the buildings. However, since the prefabricated roofs are already painted green at the factory, painting them with white (reflective) color would bring no additional cost. Hence the payback time for having reflective roofs is nil, and the reflective roofs save an accumulated 370kWh over 30 years of the life of the roof.

  15. Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

    2005-10-01

    a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years.

  16. Development of the RFID System for nuclear materials management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.; Tsai, H.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) is one of today's most rapidly growing technologies in the automatic data collection industry. Although commercial applications are already widespread, the use of this technology for managing nuclear materials is only in its infancy. Employing an RFID system has the potential to offer an immense payback: enhanced safety and security, reduced need for manned surveillance, real-time access to status and event history data, and overall cost-effectiveness. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Packaging and Transportation (EM-63), is developing an RFID system for nuclear materials management. The system consists of battery-powered RFID tags with onboard sensors and memories, a reader network, application software, a database server and web pages. The tags monitor and record critical parameters, including the status of seals, movement of objects, and environmental conditions of the nuclear material packages in real time. They also provide instant warnings or alarms when preset thresholds for the sensors are exceeded. The information collected by the readers is transmitted to a dedicated central database server that can be accessed by authorized users across the DOE complex via a secured network. The onboard memory of the tags allows the materials manifest and event history data to reside with the packages throughout their life cycles in storage, transportation, and disposal. Data security is currently based on Advanced Encryption Standard-256. The software provides easy-to-use graphical interfaces that allow access to all vital information once the security and privilege requirements are met. An innovative scheme has been developed for managing batteries in service for more than 10 years without needing to be changed. A miniature onboard dosimeter is being developed for applications that require radiation surveillance. A field

  17. Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind

  18. International cooperation and technology transfer, a success U.S. and german environmental technology exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlessman, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. - German Annual Environmental Technology Data Exchange (Jahrestagung Umwelttechnologie Datenaustauschabkommen) is coming up on its tenth year, and is a real success story. The 1994 program is the source of this case study, which identifies the lessons learned from nine years of running this international forum to exchange ideas, research, and technology needs. This data exchange is a component of the {open_quotes}Mutual Weapons Development Master Data Exchange Agreement US//GE.{close_quotes} This component focuses on the environmental technology that the two countries military research and development (R&D) communities are working on. Five focus areas of interest for this group are: hazardous material substitutes, air emissions reductions, soil and groundwater contamination characterization and restoration, and demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions. Under the U.S. - German agreement, scientist and R&D organizations use this agreement to share research results and develop a forum for collaboration on similar work. This study will highlight the scope of the research presented at the 1994 exchange. In addition, the study will capture many lessons learned from administering a successful program that bridged the challenges of distance, culture, language, patient right, and government bureaucracy. A side benefit that is just now being explored is using the forum to have U.S. developed technologies introduced and accepted within the German environmental regulatory community. In these austere days in the two governments, the ultimate success of a program like this is the payback received by customers of the R&D community. The U.S. Army, Europe is one of those fortunate customers.

  19. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

    2009-01-31

    Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. • Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. • Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. • Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind’s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level

  20. Caterpillar MorElectric DOE Idle Reduction Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Bernardi

    2007-09-30

    This project titled 'Demonstration of the New MorElectric{trademark} Technology as an Idle Reduction Solution' is one of four demonstration projects awarded by the US Department of Energy in 2002. The goal of these demonstration and evaluation projects was to gather objective in-use information on the performance of available idle reduction technologies by characterizing the cost; fuel, maintenance, and engine life savings; payback; and user impressions of various systems and techniques. In brief, the Caterpillar Inc. project involved applying electrically driven accessories for cab comfort during engine-off stops and for reducing fuel consumption during on-highway operation. Caterpillar had equipped and operated five new trucks with the technology in conjunction with International Truck and Engine Corporation and COX Transfer. The most significant result of the project was a demonstrated average idle reduction of 13.8% for the 5 truck MEI fleet over the control fleet. It should be noted that the control fleet trucks were also equipped with an idle reduction device that would start and stop the main engine automatically in order to maintain cab temperature. The control fleet idle usage would have been reduced by 3858 hours over the 2 year period with the MEI system installed, or approximately 2315 gallons of fuel less (calculations assume a fuel consumption of 0.6 gallons per hour for the 13 liter engine at idle). The fuel saved will be significantly larger for higher displacement engines without idle reduction equipment such as the engine auto start/stop device used by COX Transfer. It is common for engines to consume 1.0 gallons per hour which would increase the fuel savings to approximately 1260 gallons per truck per year of typical idling (1800 hours idle/yr).