National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for longer breakeven payback

  1. Energy Payback for Energy Systems Ensembles During Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy G.

    During periods of growth, the energy payback performance of new energy generating technologies deviates substantially from the usual static measures of energy return on investment (EROI), and time to breakeven (tB) for ...

  2. Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

  3. Breakeven Prices for Photovoltaics on Supermarkets in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Clark, N.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-03-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) breakeven price is the PV system price at which the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. This point is also called 'grid parity' and can be expressed as dollars per watt ($/W) of installed PV system capacity. Achieving the PV breakeven price depends on many factors, including the solar resource, local electricity prices, customer load profile, PV incentives, and financing. In the United States, where these factors vary substantially across regions, breakeven prices vary substantially across regions as well. In this study, we estimate current and future breakeven prices for PV systems installed on supermarkets in the United States. We also evaluate key drivers of current and future commercial PV breakeven prices by region. The results suggest that breakeven prices for PV systems installed on supermarkets vary significantly across the United States. Non-technical factors -- including electricity rates, rate structures, incentives, and the availability of system financing -- drive break-even prices more than technical factors like solar resource or system orientation. In 2020 (where we assume higher electricity prices and lower PV incentives), under base-case assumptions, we estimate that about 17% of supermarkets will be in utility territories where breakeven conditions exist at a PV system price of $3/W; this increases to 79% at $1.25/W (the DOE SunShot Initiative's commercial PV price target for 2020). These percentages increase to 26% and 91%, respectively, when rate structures favorable to PV are used.

  4. PV vs. Solar Water Heating- Simple Solar Payback

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar energy systems hang their hats on payback. Financial payback is as tangible as money in your bank account, while other types of payback—like environmental externalities—are not usually calculated in dollars. There’s no doubt that photovoltaic (PV) and solar hot water (SHW) systems will pay you back. Maybe not as quickly as you’d like, but all systems will significantly offset their cost over their lifetimes. Here we’ll try to answer: Which system will give the quickest return on investment (ROI)?

  5. Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    "Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

  6. Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  7. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    Break-Even Turnkey Cost of Residential Wind Systems in theaggregate installed cost of a small wind system that couldand wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions

  8. Nationwide Analysis of U.S. Commercial Building Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Breakeven Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Carolyn; Gagnon, Pieter; Denholm, Paul; Margolis, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The commercial sector offers strong potential for solar photovoltaics (PV) owing to abundant available roof space suitable for PV and the opportunity to offset the sector's substantial retail electricity purchases. This report evaluated the breakeven price of PV for 15 different building types and various financing options by calculating electricity savings based on detailed rate structures for most U.S. utility territories (representing approximately two thirds of U.S. commercial customers). We find that at current capital costs, an estimated 1/3 of U.S. commercial customers break even in the cash scenario and approximately 2/3 break even in the loan scenario. Variation in retail rates is a stronger driver of breakeven prices than is variation in building load or solar generation profiles. At the building level, variation in the average breakeven price is largely driven by the ability for a PV system to reduce demand charges.

  9. A BreakEven Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    A Break­Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency # Michele Co, Dee A demonstrated that a better branch pre­ dictor can increase the energy­efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval­ uating the tradeoff between processor energy­efficiency and branch

  10. QUANTIFYING RESIDENTIAL PV ECONOMICS IN THE US PAYBACK vs. CASH FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    QUANTIFYING RESIDENTIAL PV ECONOMICS IN THE US --- PAYBACK vs. CASH FLOW DETERMINATION OF FAIR by prospective PV owners. Contrasting this measure with another financial gauge -- life-cycle cash flow -- the paper discusses why payback may not be the most appropriate measure for residential PV applications

  11. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  12. Impact of the control rod consumption on the reactivity control of a SFR break-even core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchet, D.; Fontaine, B.

    2012-07-01

    Current design studies on Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) differ from those performed in the past by the fact that design criteria are now those of the Generation IV reactors. In order to improve their safety, reactors with break-even cores are preferred because they minimize the needs in terms of reactivity control and limit the consequences of control rod withdrawal. Furthermore, as the reactivity control needs are low, break-even core enables the use of absorbing materials with reduced efficiency (natural boron, hafnium...). Nevertheless, the use of control rods with few absorbing materials may present the disadvantage of a non-negligible ({approx}10%) loss of efficiency due to their consumption under irradiation. This paper presents a methodology to calculate accurately and analyze this consumption. (authors)

  13. LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -344-3957, vmf5@columbia.edu 2 Center for Life Cycle Analysis, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA 3 SunLIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE Vasilis Fthenakis1,2 , Rick Betita2 , Mark Shields3 , Rob

  14. Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has adopted: achieving a fusion gain of 1 as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has as fusion energy produced divided the external energy incident on the fusion reaction chamber. Typical fusion power plant design concepts require a fusion gain of 30 for MFE and 70 for IFE. Fusion energy

  15. Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, S.

    2012-06-01

    Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

  16. Net Energy Payback and CO{sub 2} Emissions from Three Midwestern Wind Farms: An Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Scott W.

    2006-12-15

    This paper updates a life-cycle net energy analysis and carbon dioxide emissions analysis of three Midwestern utility-scale wind systems. Both the Energy Payback Ratio (EPR) and CO{sub 2} analysis results provide useful data for policy discussions regarding an efficient and low-carbon energy mix. The EPR is the amount of electrical energy produced for the lifetime of the power plant divided by the total amount of energy required to procure and transport the materials, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The CO{sub 2} analysis for each power plant was calculated from the life-cycle energy input data.A previous study also analyzed coal and nuclear fission power plants. At the time of that study, two of the three wind systems had less than a full year of generation data to project the life-cycle energy production. This study updates the analysis of three wind systems with an additional four to eight years of operating data.The EPR for the utility-scale wind systems ranges from a low of 11 for a two-turbine system in Wisconsin to 28 for a 143-turbine system in southwestern Minnesota. The EPR is 11 for coal, 25 for fission with gas centrifuge enriched uranium and 7 for gaseous diffusion enriched uranium. The normalized CO{sub 2} emissions, in tonnes of CO{sub 2} per GW{sub e}h, ranges from 14 to 33 for the wind systems, 974 for coal, and 10 and 34 for nuclear fission using gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion enriched uranium, respectively.

  17. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  18. Longer View The Road Less Driven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    Longer View The Road Less Driven Susan Handy I n September 2005, Hurricane Katrina slammed into New.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2005a), a level unseen in inflation-adjusted terms even at the peak of the late 1970s energy crisis (DOE, 2005b). Shortages in the gasoline supply occurred temporarily in many parts

  19. Integrated Design: Because Nothing Lasts Longer Than Bad Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westbrook, P.

    2014-01-01

    Nothing Lasts Longer Than Bad Design Paul Westbrook Sustainable Development Manager, LEED AP Texas Instruments Facilities Senior Fellow, US State Department Energy & Climate Partnership for the Americas (ECPA) ESL-KT-14-11-25 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through... ideas – Made a first pass at LEED score sheet ESL-KT-14-11-25 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Case Two: Project Management • Sustainable Development Manager role assigned – Chief integrator of ideas...

  20. U32: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Longer Combination Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Broshears, Eric; Chitwood, Caleb; Colbert, Jameson; Hathaway, Richard; Keil, Mitch; LaClair, Tim J; Pape, Doug; Patterson, Jim; Pittro, Collin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the safety and stability of longer combination vehicles (LCVs), in particular a triple trailer combination behind a commercial tractor, which has more complicated dynamics than the more common tractor in combination with a single semitrailer. The goal was to measure and model the behavior of LCVs in simple maneuvers. Example maneuvers tested and modeled were single and double lane changes, a gradual lane change, and a constant radius curve. In addition to test track data collection and a brief highway test, two computer models of LCVs were developed. One model is based on TruckSim , a lumped parameter model widely used for single semitrailer combinations. The other model was built in Adams software, which more explicitly models the geometry of the components of the vehicle, in terms of compliant structural members. Among other results, the models were able to duplicate the experimentally measured rearward amplification behavior that is characteristic of multi-unit combination vehicles.

  1. Payback Analysis of Energy Proposals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blevins, L. D.; Estes, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    as a rate), they desire to continue making current and future investments which earn at least as much to avoid dilution of the rate. This rate is known as the minimum attractive rate of return (MARR), and can be used as a criteria for selecting... flow (in the future) would result at an ex plicit point in time with an interest rate of ~ at work. To illustrate, from Example 1, the $1800 saving expected one year from now when discounted to its equivalent dollars today, asstuning a MARR equal...

  2. Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do December 29, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Researchers at Argonne National Lab have recently...

  3. Duke Health Briefs: Positive Outlook Linked to Longer Life in Heart Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, David

    Duke Health Briefs: Positive Outlook Linked to Longer Life in Heart Patients keywords : CardiologyMinute. Here's some health advice to take to heart: if you want to live longer, stay happy. A recent Duke study of more than 800 heart patients found that those who reported experiencing more positive emotions

  4. When interest rates are stochastic, forward and futures prices are no longer theoretically identical.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    Remarks Ā· When interest rates are stochastic, forward and futures prices are no longer theoretically identical. Ā­ Suppose interest rates are uncertain and futures prices move in the same direction as interest rates. Ā­ Then futures prices will exceed forward prices. Ā· For short-term contracts

  5. Residential GSHPs: Efficiency With Short Payback Periods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-04-30

    This article discusses ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for residential application as an alternative to conventional HVAC systems. A listing of current space heating energy sources are presented which are then followed by a technology overview as advances have made GSHPs more efficient. The article concludes with potential energy savings offered by GSHPs and a brief market overview.

  6. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-Lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Burns, Douglas Edward

    2003-02-01

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone’s back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

  7. Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-lived Surface Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piet, S. J.; Breckenridge, R. P.; Burns, D. E.

    2003-02-25

    Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; (c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

  8. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Edward T.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  9. THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF CAFFEINE Everything you need to know to think faster, exercise harder, and live longer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockery, Shawn

    to let you know it's time to turn off Conan and recharge your batteries. Adenosine accomplishes, and live longer By Lauren Russell Griffin, Photo Illustrations by Eddie Guy By now you'd think scientists

  10. Color No Longer A Sign of Bondage: Race, Identity and the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment (1862-1865)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringquist, John Paul

    2011-08-31

    "Color No Longer A Sign of Bondage" is an account of the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment from its earliest days in 1862 to the regiment's triumphant return to Kansas in November 1865. This work encompasses ...

  11. A Time-Variant Probabilistic Model for Predicting the Longer-Term Performance of GFRP Reinforcing Bars Embedded in Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jeongjoo

    2011-08-08

    effort was made to estimate the durability performance of GFRP in concrete; however, it is widely believed the data from accelerated aging tests is not appropriate to predict the longer-term performance of GFRP reinforcing bars. The lack of validated long...

  12. Improving performance and rotordynamic characteristics of injection compressors via much longer balance-piston and division-wall seals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues Rodrigues, Margarita

    2009-05-15

    Predictions are presented for a selected compressor using longer hole-pattern seals with L/D ratios from 0.5 to 2.5. Results were obtained for back-to-back and in-line compressors with the seal located at mid-span and at ...

  13. Carbon and energy payback of variable renewable generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, Rachel Camilla

    2014-06-30

    The continued drive to reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions in order to mitigate climate change has led to an increase in demand for low-carbon energy sources, and the development of new technologies to harness the ...

  14. Overcoming Conservative Payback Rules for Energy Efficiency Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Fontaine, A.

    2015-01-01

    FINANCING RULES FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROJECTS: EXAMPLES FROM BETTER PLANTS PARTNERS Industrial Energy Technology Conference, June 2-4, 2015 ESL-IE-15-06-28 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2...-4, 2015 Background ? U.S. manufacturers spend > $200 billion annually on energy ? Industrial sector accounts for ~1/3 of U.S. energy consumption ? Despite an impressive gains, significant opportunities exist ESL-IE-15-06-28 Proceedings of the Thrity...

  15. Effective Steam Trap Selection/Maintenance - Its Payback 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, E.

    1984-01-01

    In oil refineries and petrochemical plants large number of steam traps are used to discharge condensate from steam mains, tracers and process equipment. Early efforts on steam traps focused almost exclusively on their selection and sizing...

  16. Community Wind Handbook/Calculate Simple Payback | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal TechnologiesClio PowerElecCommonwealthEnergyOpenProject

  17. Technical Note: Survivor treatment selection bias and all that The article about Oscar winners living longer mentioned lead time bias and sur-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    living longer mentioned lead time bias and sur- vivor treatment selection bias. Both of these are usually some more. Here is a list, with abbreviated definitions. lead time bias (also called length/time bias this 'lead time' from the survival times of the screened patients. Redelmeier and Singh describe

  18. Tell Barack Obama the Truth The Whole Truth Embers of election night elation will glow longer than any prior election. Glowing even

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    global warming to date is smaller than day-to-day weather fluctuations, it has brought global temperatureTell Barack Obama the Truth ­ The Whole Truth Embers of election night elation will glow longer areas. Further warming is "in the pipeline" due to gases already in the air (because of climate system

  19. The file below has been archived for historical reference purposes only. The content and links are no longer maintained and may be outdated. See the OER Public Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    , Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Department of Commerce, Department are no longer maintained and may be outdated. See the OER Public Archive Home Page for more details about archived files. #12;Thursday, March, 16, 2000 Part IV Department of Agriculture Department of Energy

  20. PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor unit of a HVAC system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor and repaired promptly. PV systems suffer gradual degradation that is often not monitored, and the PV array may with copper conductors. On the other hand, PV systems have numerous modules (tens to thousands) and mounting

  1. A dose of bacteria early in life may help babies to live longer Sarah Staples. The Vancouver Sun Vancouver, B.C.:Aug 17, 2004. p. A6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seroude, Laurent

    A dose of bacteria early in life may help babies to live longer Sarah Staples. The Vancouver Sun Vancouver, B.C.:Aug 17, 2004. p. A6 Abstract (Article Summary) "We derive nutrients from bacteria, and many systems and organisms need bacteria to properly develop. Exposure to [bacteria] is required to train

  2. Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  3. Energy Savings and Breakeven Costs for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, NREL performed simulations of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern United States. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern United States, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  4. Nationwide Analysis of U.S. Commercial Building Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Breakeven Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic SolarLab Programs NationalNations Work Together

  5. A truck has a fuel tank which is a 20 inch diameter cylinder resting on its rounded side. The driver notices that his fuel gauge is no longer giving the correct readings, so he has to improvise. He places a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    A truck has a fuel tank which is a 20 inch diameter cylinder resting on its rounded side. The driver notices that his fuel gauge is no longer giving the correct readings, so he has to improvise. He to the bottom. He pulls the measuring stick out and finds that the height of the fuel is 6 inches. What fraction

  6. Payback Analysis for Ground Source Heat Pump Retrofits Using eQuest Modeling Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahlers, Drake

    2011-12-16

    There has been much research and analysis done on the performance and potential energy savings related to installing a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system. Much of this research has been dedicated to the new construction industry, and focused on a...

  7. Energy Conservation Recommendations, Implementation Costs, and Projected Paybacks for Georgia's Targeted Schools and Hospitals Conservation Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M. L.; Moore, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    During the past year the Georgia Tech Research Institute performed technical assistance studies on over 100 school and hospital buildings under a program funded by the Governor's Office of Energy Resources. This program is known as the Targeted...

  8. 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Replacing lithium with other metals with multiple charges could greatly increase battery capacity. But first researchers need to understand how to keep multiply charged...

  9. Children's Brain Development Benefits from Longer Gestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Mapping of the Human Brain. NeuroImage, Sendai, Japan.2005). Regional deficits in brain volume in schizophrenia: areso- nance imaging of brain development in premature and

  10. 'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentatabout

  11. A bio-economic model for penaeid shrimp mariculture systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Charles M

    1978-01-01

    Investment and the Payback Period for an Operation Employin 2. 5-Acre Ponds by Number of Pond. . . . . 122 15. Cost ConstiLuents of Break-Even Price (Co. t of Production by Pound of Tails) for an Operation Employing Twenty-Four 2. 5-Acre Ponds 126 Table... to be employed is that of economies of size. Be. sed. upon costs and returns generated by the mod. el for a facility consisting of twenty . 5-a. cre ponds, a 4, 000 stocking density exhibits the least, amount of loss. This density is utilized. throughout...

  12. Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thackeray, Michael (Director, Center for Electrical Energy Storage); CEES Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries' was submitted by the Center for Electrical Energy Storage (CEES) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CEES, an EFRC directed by Michael Thackery at Argonne National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: ANL (lead), Northwestern University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Electrical Energy Storage is 'to acquire a fundamental understanding of interfacial phenomena controlling electrochemical processes that will enable dramatic improvements in the properties and performance of energy storage devices, notable Li ion batteries.' Research topics are: electrical energy storage, batteries, battery electrodes, electrolytes, adaptive materials, interfacial characterization, matter by design; novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and defect tolerant materials.

  13. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    Wind Energy Association WindPower 2002 Conference, 3-5 JunePRESENTED AT GLOBAL WINDPOWER 2004 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS W IND EModel, prepared by Bergey Windpower Co. for the National

  14. LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Daniel

    . A light-emitting diode (LED) is a solid-state lighting source that switches on instantly, is readily

  15. Break-Even Investment in a Wind Energy Conversion System for an Irrigated Farm on the Texas High Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, D. C.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    costs were included. The basic LP model was applied to develop the benchmark case (i.e., without wind power). The farm operation with wind power was analyzed by applying the LP model with the monthly expectations of wind-generated electricity added...

  16. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    L ABORATORY Building a Market for Small Wind: The Break-Evenemployer. BUILDING A MARKET FOR SMALL WIND: T HE B REAK -E

  17. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01

    Association (2002). The U.S. Small Wind Turbine Industryof Grid-Connected Small Wind Turbines in the Domesticto Market Customer-Sited Small Wind Systems. 2002 Conference

  18. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen Plasma Asher An O2 RF plasma can be used at

  19. Nissan: Automaker improves energy performance 7.2% with a four-month payback using Superior Energy Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew Jersey isDepartment ofInstitute<

  20. Nissan: Automaker improves energy performance 7.2% with a four-month payback using Superior Energy Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew Jersey isDepartment ofInstitute<performance Case

  1. MAUI: Making Smartphones Last Longer with Code Offload Eduardo Cuervo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    by an op- timization engine that achieves the best energy savings possible un- der the mobile device-grained energy-aware offload of mobile code to the infrastructure. Previous approaches to these problems either the best of both worlds: it supports fine-grained code offload to maximize energy savings with minimal

  2. Slower, colder, longer : prospects for a very cold neutron source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micklich, B. J.; Carpenter, J. M.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    2007-01-01

    The motivation for our study is to establish the prospects for a neutron source providing intense pulsed beams with spectra as cold as is realistic. The scientific motivation is to serve applications in nanoscience, biology and technology.

  3. Longer life for glyco-based stationary engine coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohlfeld, R.

    1996-07-01

    Large, stationary diesel engines used to compress natural gas that is to be transported down pipelines generate a great deal of heat. Unless this heat is dissipated efficiently, it will eventually cause an expensive breakdown. Whether the coolant uses ethylene glycol or propylene glycol, the two major causes of glycol degradation are heat and oxidation. The paper discusses inhibitors that enhance coolant service life and presents a comprehensive list of do`s and don`ts for users to gain a 20-year coolant life.

  4. Fact #656: January 3, 2011 Consumers Hold onto Vehicles Longer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Vehicle Ownership by Quarter, 2008 - 2010 Bar graph showing the number of months a new car buyer and a used car buyer hold onto their vehicles before purchasing a...

  5. NDMV - Longer Combination Vehicle (LCV) Permit Application | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI Jump to:BWQP website

  6. Longer Life Lithium Ion Batteries with Silicon Anodes - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S CLoginLong-RangeTermB

  7. Progress in Photovoltaics Research and Applications, 14:179-190, 2006 Energy Pay-Back and Life Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an innovative PV installation program guided by design optimization and cost minimization. The advanced design. The total cost of the balance of system components was $940 US per kWp of installed PV, another milestone Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an Optimized 3.5 MW PV Installation J.M. Mason1 , V.M. Fthenakis2 , T

  8. The typecasting of active galactic nuclei: Mrk 590 no longer fits the role

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denney, K. D.; De Rosa, G.; Croxall, K.; Gupta, A.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Mathur, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Shappee, B. J. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bentz, M. C., E-mail: denney@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present multiwavelength observations that trace more than 40 yr in the life of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in Mrk 590, traditionally known as a classic Seyfert 1 galaxy. From spectra recently obtained from Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra, and the Large Binocular Telescope, we find that the activity in the nucleus of Mrk 590 has diminished so significantly that the continuum luminosity is a factor of 100 lower than the peak luminosity probed by our long-baseline observations. Furthermore, the broad emission lines, once prominent in the UV/optical spectrum, have all but disappeared. Since AGN type is defined by the presence of broad emission lines in the optical spectrum, our observations demonstrate that Mrk 590 has now become a 'changing-look' AGN. If classified by recent optical spectra, Mrk 590 would be a Seyfert ?1.9–2, where the only broad emission line still visible in the optical spectrum is a weak component of H?. As an additional consequence of this change, we have definitively detected UV narrow-line components in a Type 1 AGN, allowing an analysis of these emission-line components with high-resolution COS spectra. These observations challenge the historical paradigm that AGN type is only a consequence of the line-of-sight viewing angle toward the nucleus in the presence of a geometrically flattened, obscuring medium (i.e., the torus). Our data instead suggest that the current state of Mrk 590 is a consequence of the change in luminosity, which implies the black hole accretion rate has significantly decreased.

  9. High Speed Pumps Are No Longer Limited to Low Flow Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, P. Y.

    1986-01-01

    number) impellers have been introduced to produce a smooth, ris ing to shut-off head/flow curve shape. mounted upstream of the impell er to ra ise the process flu id pressure (pump suction) to a sufficient level to prevent cavitation within...

  10. ORIGINAL RESEARCH--PSYCHOLOGY Women Who Prefer Longer Penises Are More Likely to Have

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Scotland, Paisley, UK DOI: 10.1111/j.1743-6109.2012.02917.x A B S T R A C T Introduction. Research

  11. Cheminformatics at Scale: Bigger, Longer, and Uncut Imran S. Haque1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    , Virginia, USA. Copyright 2009 ACM 978-1-60558-452-2/09/03 ...$5.00. competition between the need to open up

  12. Chapter 1.03: Solar Photovoltaics Technology: No Longer an Outlier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazmerski, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    The status and future technology, market, and industry opportunities for solar photovoltaics are examined and discussed. The co-importance of both policy and technology investments for the future markets and competitiveness of this solar approach is emphasized. This paper underscores the technology side, with a comprehensive overview and insights to technical, policy, market, industry and other investments needed to tip photovoltaics to its next level of contribution as a significant clean-energy partner in the world energy economy. The requirement to venture from near-term and evolutionary approaches into disruptive and revolutionary technology pathways is argued for our needs in the mid-term (the next 10-15 years) and the long-term (beyond the first quarter of this century).

  13. Destroy thIs repon when no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Laboratory foe. AOORESS (City, Stlltt', lind liP Cod~) 7b. ADDRESS (CIty, 511ltt'. lind lIP Cod~) PO Box 631.NTlFICATlQN NUM8ER ORGANIZATION Of .ppiic.b/~) US Army Corps of Engineers DAEN-CW 8e. ADDRESS (CIty, SIIItt'. lind Macrophyte Growth and Sediment Nutrient Availability 12. PERSONAL AUTtiOR(S) Barko, John w.; Smart, R

  14. No longer living together: how does Scots cohabitation law work in practice? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasoff, Fran; Miles, Jo; Mordaunt, Edith

    In response to the greater diversity of family life in Scotland, the Family Law (Scotland) Act 2006 gives some recognition to people who live together without marriage or civil partnership and provides limited financial ...

  15. The FE exam is no longer of-fered on the TAMU-K campus.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Weimin

    (not ideal) turbine on the right takes superheated steam at T1 and P1 and dis- charges wet steam at P2

  16. Middleboxes No Longer Considered Harmful Michael Walfish, Jeremy Stribling, Maxwell Krohn,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    things, ended the halcyon days of unique identity and transparent reachability. Now, many Internet hosts they violate important architectural principles) and dismay (because these vi­ olations make the Internet less an Internet fact of life for impor­ tant reasons. To retain their functions while eliminating their dangerous

  17. Colorado - C.R.S. 42-4-505, Longer Vehicle Combinations | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) JumpIowa:Colmar,EnergyInformationColorado -

  18. U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE: AprilCubic Feet)Million CubicMonth

  19. Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchers atDayWhenBethanyOn Friday,FebruaryJuneResearchers

  20. The economics of photovoltaics in the commercial, institutional and industrical sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Alan J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a model which computes system break-even capital costs, array break-even capital costs and profits from photovoltaic investments in the industrial, commercial and institutional ...

  1. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    due to the high crude oil price and also owing toin terms of Breakeven Crude Oil Price (BCOP) in $/bbl whichrespectively. Breakeven Crude Oil Price, $/bbl BCOP CERT-2

  2. Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative Fuel Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AFLEET Tool allows fleets to calculate payback periods and emissions benefits of alternative fuel vehicles.

  3. Review and comparison of web- and disk-based tools for residential energy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2002-01-01

    cost and payback Twenty Percent Solution Western Massachusetts Online Energy Calculator Your California

  4. Dimethyl ether fuel proposed as an alternative to LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikkawa, Yoshitsugi; Aoki, Ichizo

    1998-04-06

    To cope with the emerging energy demand in Asia, alternative fuels to LNG must be considered. Alternative measures, which convert the natural gas to liquid fuel, include the Fischer-Tropsch conversion, methanol synthesis, and dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis. Comparisons are evaluated based on both transportation cost and feed-gas cost. The analysis will show that DME, one alternative to LNG as transportation fuel, will be more economical for longer distances between the natural-gas source and the consumer. LNG requires a costly tanker and receiving terminal. The break-even distance will be around 5,000--7,000 km and vary depending on the transported volume. There will be risk, however, since there has never been a DME plant the size of an LNG-equivalent plant [6 million metric tons/year (mty)].

  5. 2 MARCH 2007 VOL 315 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org1224 he world may no longer face a serious

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    and light- weight and are readily transported (by car, truck, missile, plane, or boat) (8). The basic of light-absorbing smoke into the upper atmosphere. If 100 small nuclear weapons were detonated within

  6. The nature of biodiversity has long been a central focus in biology. This may not seem the case any longer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restricted set of organisms--the house mouse (Mus musculus), the fruit fly (Drosophila spp.), the nematode of diversity is, in a sense, provided by"adaptation"to an "ecological niche." Adaptation results from the force of selection; and the notion of the ecological niche,to which the organism adapts,remains obscure and poorly

  7. Finding a Humana Physician Printed Physician Directories are no longer available. If you are enrolling in the HMO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " 4. The search default is Employer Group Plan. Leave this as is and enter the zip code of the address "Go." 6. Under the "Search by Address" section you can select a distance surrounding your location to search from, or by state and county. Select the method for your search and click "Go." Please check box

  8. longer be a region of uncertainty near the centre of the cable. Further improvements are still possible. Cooling a photo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesśs A.

    -p+ BIFACIAL B.S.F. SOLAR CELLS BY ION IMPLANTATION Indexing terms: Doping, Solar cells, Ion implantation High-low junctions of n+ -p-p+ bifacial back surface field solar cells have been fabricated by B 1 I + implantation with the determination of an optimum doping level for the p+ layer of n+ -p-p+ bifacial b.s.f. solar cells made by ion

  9. A limited microbial consortium is responsible for longer-term biostimulation and bioreduction or uranium in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gihring, Thomas; Zhang, Gengxin; Brandt, Craig C; Brooks, Scott C; Carroll, Sue L; Criddle, Craig; Green, Stefan; Jardine, Philip M; Kostka, Joel; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Overholt, Will; Watson, David B; Yang, Zamin; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface amendments of slow-release substrates (e.g., emulsified vegetable oil [EVO]) are thought to be a pragmatic alternative to using short-lived, labile substrates for sustained uranium bioimmobilization within contaminated groundwater systems. Spatial and temporal dynamics of subsurface microbial communities during EVO amendment are unknown and likely differ significantly from those of populations stimulated by soluble substrates, such as ethanol and acetate. In this study, a one-time EVO injection resulted in decreased groundwater U concentrations that remained below initial levels for approximately 4 months. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA from monitoring well samples revealed a rapid decline in groundwater bacterial community richness and diversity after EVO injection, concurrent with increased 16S rRNA copy levels, indicating the selection of a narrow group of taxa rather than a broad community stimulation. Members of the Firmicutes family Veillonellaceae dominated after injection and most likely catalyzed the initial oil decomposition. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulforegula, known for long-chain fatty acid oxidation to acetate, also dominated after EVO amendment. Acetate and H{sub 2} production during EVO degradation appeared to stimulate NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Fe(III), U(VI), and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} reduction by members of the Comamonadaceae, Geobacteriaceae, and Desulfobacterales. Methanogenic archaea flourished late to comprise over 25% of the total microbial community. Bacterial diversity rebounded after 9 months, although community compositions remained distinct from the preamendment conditions. These results demonstrated that a one-time EVO amendment served as an effective electron donor source for in situ U(VI) bioreduction and that subsurface EVO degradation and metal reduction were likely mediated by successive identifiable guilds of organisms.

  10. Longer-term domestic supply problems for nonrenewable materials with special emphasis on energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goeller, H.E.

    1980-01-01

    An examination is made on how materials are used in present and future energy production and use. Problem areas which are discussed include by-products production, import limitations, substitution and recycle, accelerated use, synthesis, and the adequacy of the data bases availability. (FS)

  11. Feasibility study of fuel grade ethanol plant for Alcohol Fuels of Mississippi, Inc. , Vicksburg, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility study performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing an alcohol plant utilizing the N.Y.U. continuous acid hydrolysis process to convert wood wastes to fuel grade alcohol. The following is a summary of the results: (1) The proposed site in the Vicksburg Industrial Foundation Corporation Industrial Park is adequate from all standpoints, for all plant capacities envisioned. (2) Local hardwood sawmills can provide adequate feedstock for the facility. The price per dry ton varies between $5 and $15. (3) Sale of fuel ethanol would be made primarily through local distributors and an adequate market exists for the plant output. (4) With minor modifications to the preparation facilities, other waste cellulose materials can also be utilized. (5) There are no anticipated major environmental, health, safety or socioeconomic risks related to the construction and operation of the proposed facility. (6) The discounted cash flow and rate of return analysis indicated that the smallest capacity unit which should be built is the 16 million gallon per year plant, utilizing cogeneration. This facility has a 3.24 year payback. (7) The 25 million gallon per year plant utilizing cogeneration is an extremely attractive venture, with a zero interest break-even point of 1.87 years, and with a discounted rate of return of 73.6%. (8) While the smaller plant capacities are unattractive from a budgetary viewpoint, a prudent policy would dictate that a one million gallon per year plant be built first, as a demonstration facility. This volume contains process flowsheets and maps of the proposed site.

  12. HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefe, D.

    2008-01-01

    along the road to useful energy is "scientific-breakeven"then the promise of useful energy from inertial fusionstill farther from useful net energy production). Scientific

  13. Alternative Fuel Tools and Technical Assistance Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    due to refuse truck MPG uncertainty Payback for F-550s 7 yrs for LPG & CNG Oil reduction for LPG 1,900 bblyr & CNG 2,900 bblyr Payback for refuse trucks ...

  14. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    for buildings with high churn rates where speed and cost isfor space reconfiguration or churn is included, payback time

  15. Heavy vehicle industry site visits: comments from companies and conclusions from technical committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report documents the results of several visits with industry as part of the Department of Energy (DOE), office of Transportation Technology, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology, supported Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project. The purpose of the DOE Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project is to use government resources to bring the aerodynamic expertise available in government organizations and academia to bear in assisting the heavy vehicle industry to reduce aerodynamic drag on trucks. The obvious payback from this investment is the reduction in fuel usage and derivative reduction in the US's dependence on foreign oil imports. This report covers 2 projects: (1) The stated purpose of Project 1 was to provide near-term impact through emphasis on existing tools and capabilities and to focus on the trailer drag problem. (2) The stated purpose of Project 2 was to provide the tools necessary to accomplish the longer term goal of a fully-integrated, aerodynamic tractor-trailer combination.

  16. New Zealand Police Vetting Service Request and Consent Form Complete pgs 1416 if you have resided in New Zealand for six months or longer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    will be released in accordance with the Criminal Records (Clean Slate) Act 2004; this means that, if I am `eligible offending, etc ­ see section 7 of the Act): a) my criminal record of convictions will not be disclosed.g. predominantly involving care and protection of a child or young person), my criminal record of convictions

  17. One-Up On L1: Can X-rays Provide Longer Advanced Warning of Solar Wind Flux Enhancements Than Upstream Monitors?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Collier; T. E. Moore; S. L. Snowden; K. D. Kuntz

    2005-02-17

    Observations of strong solar wind proton flux correlations with ROSAT X-ray rates along with high spectral resolution Chandra observations of X-rays from the dark Moon show that soft X-ray emission mirrors the behavior of the solar wind. In this paper, based on an analysis of an X-ray event observed by XMM-Newton resulting from charge exchange of high charge state solar wind ions and contemporaneous neutral solar wind data, we argue that X-ray observations may be able to provide reliable advance warning, perhaps by as much as half a day, of dramatic increases in solar wind flux at Earth. Like neutral atom imaging, this provides the capability to monitor the solar wind remotely rather than in-situ.

  18. Mapping molecular flexibility of spin labeled proteins on the nanosecond and longer time scales via CW lineshape analysis and osmolyte-perturbation EPR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López, Carlos Javier

    2012-01-01

    Unfolded proteins and protein folding studied by NMR. Chem.resonance as a probe for protein folding/unfolding of the C-and implications for protein folding. Nat. Struc. Biol. 5:

  19. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Angelita and Joaquim Gama Institute, Sao Paulo ; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  20. The file below has been archived for historical reference purposes only. The content and links are no longer maintained and may be outdated. See the OER Public Archive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    , including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining will be found in the Federal agency's grant regulations or in the terms and conditions of the award. You may. Self-explanatory. Enter the Employer Identification Number (EIN) assigned by the U.S. Internal Revenue

  1. Tumor hypomethylation at 6p21.3 associates with longer time to recurrence of high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Mayo Clinic SPORE in Ovarian Cancer to E.L. Goode, and R25Grade Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Chen Wang 1 , Mine S.et al. Epigenome-wide ovarian cancer analysis identi?es a

  2. "This work has been submitted to the IEEE for possible publication. Copyright may be transferred without notice, after which this version may no longer be accessible."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeting, July 2003, Toronto, Ontario. #12;- 2 - DESIGN OF DELAYED-INPUT WIDE AREA POWER SYSTEM STABILIZER Transformation (LFT). 1. INTRODUCTION The general configuration of a modern power system is that power sources such as in the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) system. The interconnection of different control areas can

  3. Lesson Learned from Technical and Economic Performance Assessment and Benefit Evaluation of CHP-FCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Brooks, Kriston P.; Srivastava, Viraj; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Foster, Nikolas AF

    2014-08-22

    Recent efforts and interest in combined heat and power (CHP) have increased with the momentum provided by the federal government support for penetration of CHP systems. Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and utilize the heat normally wasted in power generation for useful heating or cooling with lower emissions compared to alternative sources. A recent study investigated the utilization of CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50KWe in various commercial building types and geographic locations. Electricity, heating, and water heating demands were obtained from simulation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial reference building models for various building types. Utility rates, cost of equipment, and system efficiency were used to examine economic payback in different scenarios. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, CHP-FCSs are more expensive than alternative technologies, and the high capital cost of the CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than is typically acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, the installation of these units as on-site power generators also provide several other benefits that make them attractive to building owners and operators. The business case for CHP-FCSs can be made more financially attractive through the provision of government incentives and when installed to support strategic infrastructure, such as military installations or data centers. The results presented in this paper intend to provide policy makers with information to define more customized incentives and tax credits based on a sample of building types and geographic locations in order to attract more business investment in this new technology.

  4. Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    147 Lifecycle cost (break-even gasoline price): base-casegrease. 37B part: Fuel Gasoline, for the conventional ICEVs.BTU-from-battery to mi/BTU-gasoline. C OST SUMMARY (F ORD T

  5. Approaches To Integrating A HIgh Penertration Of Solar PV and CPV Onto The Electrical Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Steven Craig

    2013-01-01

    for peaking or base load generation and PV cost. The paper1) the break-even cost of PV is unacceptably high unless PVlarge scale PV inverters due to the cost of energy storage

  6. Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

    2012-08-01

    In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  7. Simulation, integration, and economic analysis of gas-to-liquid processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao, Buping

    2009-05-15

    , and (d) recovery of catalystsupporting hydrocarbon solvents. Finally, an economic analysis is undertaken to determine the plant capacity needed to achieve the break-even point and to estimate the return on investment for the base-case study. After...

  8. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    MWh electricity, 12% IRR Coal Price, $/metric ton BreakevenCERT-3B 42 $/metric ton coal price Electricity Sale Price,electricity, 42 $/metric ton coal price IRR, percent Figure

  9. Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hengbing

    2013-01-01

    by 24-39% over the day drive cycle and 12-29% over thehaul and the long haul drive cycles. The breakeven fueldrive, and the long haul drive cycles. The fuel economies (

  10. Evaluating the costs and benefits of increased funding for public transportation in Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Mark L., 1973-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) off-peak ridership, is at or slightly below break-even with respect to net benefits if the CTA cost structure and tax source of subsidy remains unchanged. In order to justify any significant additional long-term ...

  11. Leveraging Manufacturing for a Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01

    payback time Carbon footprint Efficiency improvement (forin embedded energy, carbon footprint, etc. ) would be moreenergy consumption or carbon footprint in operation of the “

  12. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Increased utilization of natural gas produced in the USA Increases benefits of shale gas production Lower cost of ownership shortens payback period and broadens the...

  13. Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for specific recommendations with cost, performance and payback time estimates. The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is part of the Department's Office of Energy Efficiency...

  14. Engineering, Financial and Net Energy Performance, and Risk Analysis for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Jun

    2014-08-08

    An investigation was conducted to determine how technology innovations, potential risks, plant configuration and size, operating strategy, and financial incentives affect the electricity output, financial payback, and net ...

  15. A Cradle to Grave Framework for Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Teresa; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01

    impacts and costs of photovoltaic systems: Current state ofEnergy Payback Time for Photovoltaic Modules,” ProceedingsLife-cycle assessment of photovoltaic modules: Comparison of

  16. Clean Cities Launches Improved Tool to Help Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The popular VICE Model is newly updated to allow fleets greater flexibility in determining payback periods for natural gas vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    payback greater than 18 years, or less than 1 year (or 6 months for manufacturing and data center projects) are not eligible for incentives. Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial,...

  18. ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladale, R.

    2010-01-01

    important until photovoltaic system costs fall dramatically,payback period on a photovoltaic system is twenty years, butwith commercializing photovoltaic systems. are expensive. --

  19. CBEI - Fault Detection and Diagnostics (FDD) for Advanced RTUs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rate of 10% performance degradation, < 1% false alarms and 3 year payback period Target MarketAudience: Market: small commercial buildings utilizing RTUs Audience: RTU...

  20. Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Service Companies operations and maintenance (DOE Office of)payback times, and operation and maintenance (O&M) savings.construction, operation and maintenance of savings, ability

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    CO 2 Energy Efficiency Measure Savings Savings PaybackCO 2 Energy Efficiency Measure Savings Savings Paybackefficiency data unavailable because case studies generally measure fuel savings

  2. Geothermal Direct Use Technology and the Marketplace

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Marketplace (in the Eastern United States) What are GSHP Payback and Market Space? What are the economics behind hybrid energy systems? How do federal, state...

  3. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01

    BEST: Benchmarking and Energy Saving Tool for industry toregarding energy use and energy saving measures. Accordingand quantifies the energy savings and simple payback period

  4. Asparagus and rhubarb are perennial vegetables that produce a new crop year after year for 10 to 15 years or longer if the plants are given adequate care. Because these crops remain in the same

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    of limestone or wood ashes as recommended by the test lab. Fertilizer requirements are also determined

  5. FRONTISPIECE. Three-striped Warblers (Basileuterus tristriatus) were studied in the northern Andes of Venezuela. Temperate and tropical parulids differ strongly in life histories. Three-striped Warblers have smaller clutches, longer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Thomas E.

    of Venezuela. Temperate and tropical parulids differ strongly in life histories. Three-striped Warblers have(4):667­678, 2009 BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE THREE-STRIPED WARBLER IN VENEZUELA: A CONTRAST BETWEEN TROPICAL traits of the Three-striped Warbler (Basileuterus tristriatus) from 146 nests in Venezuela and compare

  6. Project 4: Predicting Price (50 pts; due Monday 4/26 at the beginning of class) You have attained new status at Umbridge and Associates; the company no longer wants you to focus on single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolverton, Steve

    Project 4: Predicting Price (50 pts; due Monday 4/26 at the beginning of class) You have attained is a logical starting point for developing a model of factors that can be used to predict price. 1) Using your, and/or age of home, relate best to sale price. Is multicollinearlity a potential problem? 2) Build

  7. A Retrofit Tool for Improving Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Feng, Wei; Ke, Jing; Hong, Tianzhen; Zhou, Nan

    2013-06-06

    Existing buildings will dominate energy use in commercial buildings in the United States for three decades or longer and even in China for the about two decades. Retrofitting these buildings to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use is thus critical to achieving the target of reducing energy use in the buildings sector. However there are few evaluation tools that can quickly identify and evaluate energy savings and cost effectiveness of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for retrofits, especially for buildings in China. This paper discusses methods used to develop such a tool and demonstrates an application of the tool for a retrofit analysis. The tool builds on a building performance database with pre-calculated energy consumption of ECMs for selected commercial prototype buildings using the EnergyPlus program. The tool allows users to evaluate individual ECMs or a package of ECMs. It covers building envelope, lighting and daylighting, HVAC, plug loads, service hot water, and renewable energy. The prototype building can be customized to represent an actual building with some limitations. Energy consumption from utility bills can be entered into the tool to compare and calibrate the energy use of the prototype building. The tool currently can evaluate energy savings and payback of ECMs for shopping malls in China. We have used the tool to assess energy and cost savings for retrofit of the prototype shopping mall in Shanghai. Future work on the tool will simplify its use and expand it to cover other commercial building types and other countries.

  8. Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

    2013-10-30

    Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

  9. Decision-Making to Reduce Manufacturing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    6.1.2 Greenhouse Gas Emission Metrics . . . . . . iii 72.1.2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impact Assessment 2.1.3energy payback times, greenhouse gas emissions and external

  10. Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

    1998-01-01

    .S. Department of Energy, as part of their "Industry of the Future Program". Total combined benefits are projected to be approximately $1 million/year with a 1.6 year simple payback including the grant funding....

  11. Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    analysis of energy costs h) Calculation of energy savings i)energy The calculation of purchased energy costs shouldenergy and costs. Economic and financial analysis in energy audits should go beyond the simple payback calculation

  12. Turkeys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan

    2009-01-01

    In the market, the embodied energy payback time (EPBT) is the scale to measure and compare the viability of PV systems against other technologies. Although the impact of PV panels on the operational energy is significant, it is not considered...

  13. Energy Information: The Key to Cost-Effective Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, J. R.; Flanagan, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper analyzes the cost-effectiveness- simple payback, Net Present Value (NPV) and Return on Investment (ROI) -of permanently installed energy consumption monitoring equipment used as the basis for applying value-added engineering services...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    melded rate for this site was 0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of 0.1022kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five...

  15. Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesko, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    . The plants analyzed employ fluidized bed boilers for generation of steam for process and building/heating/cooling demands, in conjunction with electric power co-generation. Results of the analysis are presented, using life cycle costs and investment payback...

  16. Financing the growth of energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang; Gilligan, Donald; Zhao, Yinghua

    2005-01-01

    capacity to use to finance an energy-saving project. Becausefinance for other reasons. Industrial customers typically expected a very short payback on energyfinance industrial and commercial projects. The resistance of commercial and industrial customers to implementing energy

  17. The development and testing of an automated building commissioning anlaysis tool (abcat) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtin, Jonathan M.

    2009-05-15

    More than $18 billion of energy is wasted annually in the U.S. commercial building sector. Retro-Commissioning services have proven to be successful with relatively short payback times, but tools that support the commissioning effort in maintaining...

  18. Priority Questions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    condensing vs. non-condensing furnaces. That is, consumers who have good payback economics for condensing furnaces are actually less likely to be affected by a rule than those...

  19. Improved performance and stability in quantum dot solar cells through band alignment engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.

    Solution processing is a promising route for the realization of low-cost, large-area, flexible and lightweight photovoltaic devices with short energy payback time and high specific power. However, solar cells based on ...

  20. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A NOVEL BUILDING-INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAIC-THERMAL (BIPVT) SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ), and energy payback time (EPBT). The results were compared with those of alternative/12. The studied renewable energy system consists of BIPVT panels, a balance of system (BOS as major indicators like global warming potential (GWP), cumulated energy demand (CED

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SouthCarolinaSaves Green Community Loan Program Projects are eligible to receive between 500,000 and 5,000,000 of low cost financing and must have a payback period of 15 years....

  2. Micro-Management of Lighting Controls Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. H.

    1994-01-01

    A common lighting project is to evaluate a block of rooms for savings and payback from the use of photocells or occupancy sensors. The designer counts the fixtures to be controlled, calculates the watts used and then the expected savings...

  3. DOE's Superior Energy Performance Program Publishes Early Results...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with an average payback of 1.7 years. These findings and other results are included in a paper presented at the July 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry hosted by...

  4. Ir. Charles Mussche 8 Spruce St, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development in Bio, Wind, Solar and Hybrid Systems: On-site Waste, Heat Semester: Kassel University: Specialization Studies: Hybrid Systems Third Semester, a 35% reduction in heating requirements and an investment payback of 5 years

  5. Why Energy Projects Do Not Get Approved 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    We have all struggled to convince management to pursue energy conservation alternatives using economic arguments such as internal rates of return, project payback, and net present value. Some have tried life cycle ...

  6. Better Buildings Alliance, Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign: Rooftop Unit Measurement and Verification (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This document provides facility managers and building owners an introduction to measurement and verification (M&V) methods to estimate energy and cost savings of rooftop units replacement or retrofit projects to estimate paybacks or to justify future projects.

  7. J.R. Simplot: Burner Upgrade Project Improves Performance and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in annual energy costs * Saves 52,000 MMBtu of natural gas annually * Improves boiler performance * Saves 526,000 kWh per year * Achieves a simple payback of less than 14...

  8. Recommendations for 2009 IECC 15% Above Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Residential Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, H.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.

    2010-01-01

    , lighting, equipment, and DHW were considered for emissions reductions determination. The recommendations were developed for three 2009 IECC climate zones in Texas along with simple payback calculations. This information is useful to homebuilders, utility...

  9. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Quick-Service Restaurants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Schrock, D. W.; Fisher, D. R.; Livchak, A.; Zabrowski, D. A.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

    2010-09-30

    Document describing PNNL's project to develop a package of energy efficiency measures that demonstrate the feasibility of achieving a 50% energy savings for quick-service restaurants with a simple payback of 5 years or less.

  10. Absorption Cycle Fundamentals and Applications Guidelines for Distillation Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Davidson, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    of applications, embody characteristics that inherently make them economic candidates for absorption cycle heat upgrading. Practical applications to current U.S. distillations could save 30 trillion BTU per year, at payback periods ranging from 1 to 3 years. So...

  11. IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and a simple payback of 2.5 years. mcrealtypnnl.pdf More Documents & Publications Marine Corps Base Quantico (MCBQ) in Virginia Marine Corps Base Quantico Achieves 85% Savings...

  12. The Economics and Corporate Culture of Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    five points and conservative here, you will probably find that 3, 4, or even 5 year payback items get approved. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS Recognizing your manager's style and corporate pos ture as well as timing your conservation sug gestions...

  13. CC® of Retrofitted, Renovated, and Rented Systems and Equipment in Utilities Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, C.; Chen, Q.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.

    2005-01-01

    steam systems and make recommendations to improve system efficiency. [n nearly 400 industrial assessments, we have recommended 210 steam system improvements, excluding heat recovery, that would save $1.5 million/year with a O.4-year payback. 75... steam system effic iency. Steam System Opportunities ]n nearly 400 industrial assessments, we have recommended 210 steam system improvements, excluding heat recovery, that would save $1.5 million/year with a O.4-year payback. 75% of those...

  14. Nutritional Requirements of the Angora Goat. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, J. E.; Shelton, Maurice; Ellis, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    forage and the latter is charged to the animal at a substantially cheaper cost than harvested feeds, the break-even mohair price for increased protein supple- , mentation would likely be in the order of $1 per pound. ~MineraZ requirements of any...

  15. Economic Evaluation of Eucalypt Energy Plantations1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    invested in the plantation. The second analysis calculates a benefit-cost ratio from an actual case of the analysis was to calculate a break-even price for a eucalypt energy planta tion for the two levelsEconomic Evaluation of Eucalypt Energy Plantations1 Richard B. Standiford and F Thomas Ledig2

  16. Improvement April 7 & 9, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    ;Separations ­ Cost at 6 months l April 2011 Human Capital Institute Whitepaper shows: ­ Breakeven point;Separations ­ Cost of New Hire l Studies vary on total cost of hires but a conservative benchmark is 20 Equals $9,400 as an average cost per hire o This is a total cost of almost $16M in the 3 years

  17. Contents lists available at ScienceDirect journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2011 Keywords: Wind power Offshore wind power Levelized cost of energy Breakeven priceQ1 a b s t r a c in CO2 and other harmful pollutants. The private cost of offshore wind power is lower than that of most other new renewable energy technologies, though it is more costly than land-based wind power and most

  18. > REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvarigo, Emmanouel "Manos"

    . Index Terms-- Flexible Optical Networking, Optical OFDM, Energy Efficiency, Cost Analysis I are essential to achieve cost and energy efficiency. Additionally, the break-even cost of the flexible E the vision of spectrum-and-rate flexible networking. In [5] an excellent overview of the drivers

  19. Palkopoulou et al. VOL. 4, NO. 11/NOVEMBER 2012/J. OPT. COMMUN. NETW. B1 Quantifying Spectrum, Cost, and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvarigo, Emmanouel "Manos"

    . Index Terms--Cost analysis; Energy efficiency; Flexible optical networking; Optical OFDM. I, and Energy Efficiency in Fixed-Grid and Flex-Grid Networks [Invited] E. Palkopoulou, M. Angelou, D. Klonidis to achieve cost and energy efficiency. Additionally, the break-even cost of flexible orthogonal frequency

  20. Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooperative Development Center has recently sponsored a study in wood residue for wood pellet production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

  1. THE BIVALVE BULLETIN Pilot Clam Crop Insurance Program Extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    . This transfers risk from the producer to another for a price ­ the insurance premium. Government policy makers. Commodity markets, such as the clam market, respond decisively to these projections. Both a clam farmer and wholesaler must also be aware of respective break-even prices and market prices received in all growing areas

  2. Policy Analysis Landfill-Gas-to-Energy Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    perspectives in comparison to current subsidies. It was found that the private breakeven price of electricityPolicy Analysis Landfill-Gas-to-Energy Projects: Analysis of Net Private and Social Benefits P A U gas also has the potential to be used to generate electricity.In1994,the

  3. Ten Myths of ICT4D Kentaro Toyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    end global poverty?" "The Internet should be a human right in and of itself." "Kids in the developing? Where would the break-even point come? Where would the saving in rate of change catch up: The Role of Information in the Developing Countries. Pp. 231 #12;Technology X will save the world. Wasn

  4. Ten Myths of ICT4D (And One Key Lesson)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    development and the modernization of farming? Where would the break-even point come? Where would the saving;Technology X will save the world. Wasn't true for X = radio, TV, or landline phone, despite initial ­ E.g., health insurance "Poverty premium" exists for a reason. Poor populations are... ­ Harder

  5. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alstone, Peter; Mills, Evan; Jacobson, Arne

    2011-01-25

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fuel-based lighting are substantial given the paltry levels of lighting service provided to users, leading to a great opportunity for GHG mitigation byencouraging the switch from fuel-based to rechargeable LED lighting. However, as with most new energy technology, switching to efficient lighting requires an up-front investment of energy(and GHGs) embedded in the manufacture of replacement components. We studied a population of off-grid lighting users in 2008-2009 in Kenya who were given the opportunity to adopt LEDlighting. Based on their use patterns with the LED lights and the levels of kerosene offset we observed, we found that the embodied energy of the LED lamp was"paid for" in only one month for grid charged products and two months for solar charged products. Furthermore, the energyreturn-on investment-ratio (energy produced or offset over the product's service life divided by energy embedded) for off-grid LED lighting ranges from 12 to 24, which is on par with on-gridsolar and large-scale wind energy. We also found that the energy embodied in the manufacture of a typical hurricane lantern is about one-half to one-sixth of that embodied in the particular LEDlights that we evaluated, indicating that the energy payback time would be moderately faster if LEDs ultimately displace the production of kerosene lanterns. As LED products improve, weanticipate longer service lives and more successful displacement of kerosene lighting, both of which will speed the already rapid recovery of embodied energy in these products. Our studyprovides a detailed appendix with embodied energy values for a variety of components used to construct off-grid LED lighting, which can be used to analyze other products.

  6. FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming; LaClair, Tim J; Daw, C Stuart; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

  7. Skylighting saves over $20,000/year at paint manufacturing site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakawa, W.

    1983-05-01

    A discussion of the economics and installation of skylights in a warehouse and manufacturing area was presented. Included in the discussion were details on the installation, costs, energy conserved, savings, and payback period. In the particular case outlined, the installation costs were dependent on the type of existing roof. These costs ranged from $80 per 4 ft. by 8 ft. unit to $375 per 8 ft. by 8 ft. unit. In skylighting a 250,000 sq. ft. warehouse (1.5% of the roof area), the installation cost was $44,458. The power saving was $14,706 per year, with a payback period of slightly over three years. Later increase in power rates by 20% decreased the payback period by almost a year.

  8. Generator Bidding Strategies in a Competitive Electricity Market with Derating and Bid-Segment Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Chow, Joe H.; Desrochers, Alan A.

    2009-07-31

    This paper develops optimal generator bidding strategies in a competitive electricity market. Starting from a generator’s cost curve, basic bidding concepts such as the break-even bid curve and the maximum profit bid curve can be readily derived. The maximum profit bid curve can be extended to account for generator availability and derating. In addition, multiple-segment block energy bids can be optimized based on the maximum profit curve and the probabilistic distribution of market clearing prices.

  9. Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

  10. Prioritizing Water Pipe Replacement and Rehabilitation by Evaluating Failure Risk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Hyun

    2012-02-14

    .1 Problem Statement Damage to water pipes is influenced by various factors, including design, construction, and management. Grey cast iron pipes without any coating or lining in or outside and unlined ductile iron pipes (DIPs) are under the direct... ......................................................................................... 5 2.2 Methods to Access Failure Risk of Water Pipes................................. 6 2.2.1 Deterioration Point Assignment (DPA) Method ....................... 6 2.2.2 Break-even Analysis...

  11. Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

  12. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the U.S.: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2014-01-01

    Residential heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged on the U.S. market. These units have the potential to provide homeowners significant cost and energy savings. However, actual in use performance of a HPWH will vary significantly with climate, installation location, HVAC equipment, and hot water use. To determine what actual in use energy consumption of a HPWH may be in different regions of the U.S., annual simulations of both 50 and 80 gallon HPWHs as well as a standard electric water heater were performed for over 900 locations across the U.S. The simulations included a benchmark home to take into account interactions between the space conditioning equipment and the HPWH and a realistic hot water draw profile. It was found that the HPWH will always save some source energy when compared to a standard electric resistance water heater, although savings varies widely with location. In addition to looking at source energy savings, the breakeven cost (the net installed cost a HPWH would have to have to be a cost neutral replacement for a standard water heater) was also examined. The highest breakeven costs were seen in cases with high energy savings, such as the southeastern U.S., or high energy costs, such as New England and California. While the breakeven cost is higher for 80 gallon units than 50 gallon units, the higher net installed costs of an 80 gallon unit lead to the 50 gallon HPWHs being more likely to be cost effective.

  13. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Residential heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged on the U.S. market, and they have the potential to provide homeowners significant cost and energy savings. However, actual in use performance of a HPWH will vary significantly with climate, installation location, HVAC equipment, and hot water use. To determine the actual energy consumption of a HPWH in different U.S. regions, annual simulations of both 50 and 80 gallon HPWHs as well as a standard electric water heater were performed for over 900 locations across the United States. The simulations included a benchmark home to take into account interactions between the space conditioning equipment and the HPWH and a realistic hot water draw profile. It was found that the HPWH will always save some source energy when compared to a standard electric resistance water heater, although savings varies widely with location. In addition to looking at source energy savings, the breakeven cost (the net installed cost a HPWH would have to have to be a cost neutral replacement for a standard water heater) was also examined. The highest breakeven costs were seen in cases with high energy savings, such as the southeastern U.S., or high energy costs, such as New England and California. While the breakeven cost is higher for 80 gallon units than 50 gallon units, the higher net installed costs of an 80 gallon unit lead to the 50 gallon HPWHs being more likely to be cost effective.

  14. Heat Pump Strategies and Payoffs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    (Evaporator) Heat Source Heat Pump Turbine Compressor Compressed Vapor Pump IZl:G1 Type IV - Rankine Cycle (Waste Heat Driven) Heat Sink (Condenser) Fig. 3 Basic Heat Pump Categories 324 ESL-IE-82-04-66 Proceedings from the Fourth Industrial... payback. 500 450 400 Leas Than G:" ~ 2! 350 2-Vear Payback .a e 300 !. E ~ 250 Simple Waste Heat Boller 200 100 1.-........_-'-_.1.---1"---.1._..&0.._1.---'-_'-__ o 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Heat Removed (%) 82291 Fig. 4 Heat...

  15. LoneSTAR Program: Maximizing Energy Efficiency while Protecting the Envrionment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevino, E.

    2014-01-01

    iency whi le Protect ing the Envi ronment LoanSTAR PROGRAM ESL-KT-14-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 ? Executed 240 loans totaling $407,923,762.32 ? 93 loans to publ ic schools distr icts ? 80 loans...-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 BASICS ? I t ’s al l about the ut i l i ty dollar savings ? Loan must have a composite simple payback of 10 years or less ? The simple payback is the loan term ? Each loan...

  16. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ? 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873K and 83 CRI. As such, the package’s performance exceeds DOE’s warm-white phosphor LED efficacy target for 2013. At the end of the program, we assembled an A19 sized demonstration bulb housing the integrated package which met Energy Star intensity variation requirements. With further development to reduce overall component cost, we anticipate that an integrated remote converter package such as developed during this program will find application in compact, high-efficacy LED-based lamps, particularly those requiring omnidirectional emission.

  17. Rank Project Name Directorate,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 0.5 400 lbs industrial waste, eliminates potential for oil contaminated run-off 3 RetrofitRank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1 Minimization of Silver Waste from Silver-Staining Electrophoretic Mini-Gels Life Sciences, Biology (B

  18. Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gallons industrial waste 7 Oil-free Vacuum Pumps and new Catalyst EENS, Environmental Sciences Dept. (L. Nunnermacker) $6,000 $3,516 1.7 50 pounds of hazardous waste 8 Bulk Motor Oil F&A, Staff Services (H. HauptmanRank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1

  19. Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electronic Recycling Procurement & Property Management (John Collins) $3,500 TBD N/A 10 tons of e-waste 7 Oil,000 $830.00 7.23 6 liters of industrial waste 8 Disposal of #6 Fuel Oil * EENS (Yousif Celebi $500 $4Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1

  20. Assessment of Load and Energy Reduction Techniques (ALERT) Retrocommissioning Case Study of Two National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Schwab, J.; Beattie, D.

    2003-01-01

    are 231,924 kWh, 51,550 therms, and $28,920 annual energy savings. Implementation costs were estimated at $56,380, which would result in a 1.9 year average payback. It cost approximately $0.09 per square foot to perform the ALERT RCx assessment. Of the 33...

  1. Viability study of photo-voltaic systems added to terrestrial electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rippel, W.E.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of the following computer study is to determine the set of necessary conditions under which the addition of photo-voltaic (PV) cells to electric vehicles provides a net utility or economic benefit. Economic benefits are given the primary focus and are evaluated in terms of a payback period.

  2. In the July 2011 PE magazine article "Why We Need Rational Selection of Energy Projects," the author stated that "photovoltaic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ," the author stated that "photovoltaic electricity generation cannot be an energy source for the future" because photovoltaics require more energy than they produce (during their lifetime), thus their "Energy Payback Times The life cycle of photovoltaics starts from the extraction of raw mate- rials (cradle

  3. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the author for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors applications (small and large scale water heating) and solar power plants for electricity production of large- scale application of solar energy for water heating and electricity generation in Brazil. Payback

  4. Where are your BTUs? Watt are you doing about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    ) Assist the Early and Cost Effective Implementation of Emerging Technologies in: Energy Efficiency andand (1015 BTUs) EIA AER 2007 #12;YOUR BTU Consumption Rate USA P C it E C tiUSA Per Capita Energy% eat) Industrial 38% #12;Energy Efficiency Benefits 27% Savings Cost Effective · 3 Yr Payback Comm

  5. September 2010 American Recovery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ,724. The capital cost for the project was estimated based on the cost information obtained from a Japanese GSHP installer and other literature. The capital cost for the proposed system would be about $250,000, and the 32 years of simple payback can be achieved with the given capital cost and energy cost savings

  6. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings % Average Savings (sq.ft.) Average Cost (sq.ft.) Average Payback (years) Education 8.71 0.30 0.33 2.39 Healthcare 14.87 0.38 0.42 1.45 Laboratory 30.38 1.01 0.60 0.77...

  7. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

  8. Presented July 16, 2015 12:45 PM Solar Breakout Session

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    benefit to TaxEquity Flip, but transaction cost are lower. Community Solar #12;TaxEquity Flip · National · Financing Costs · Payback Options · SRECs Community Solar Multiple Options #12;Lessons Learned CommunityPresented July 16, 2015 12:45 PM Solar Breakout Session Jo-Carroll Energy, Inc. Community Solar

  9. Save Energy Now Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The Shaw Industries carpet manufacturing plant #20 in Dalton, Georgia, optimized boiler operation and installed waste heat exchangers on two processes in the dye house and an economizer on one boiler, for a payback of 1.7 years. These results prompted plant #4, also located in Dalton, to participate in an assessment.

  10. Global Change: Solutions? Combating climate change is local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    ;Alternative Energy: Solar Photovoltaic Current electricity costs Cost of solar averaged over 20 years Includes 5% annual finance charge #12;Alternative Energy: Solar Photovoltaic Energy companies are targeting residential and commercial buildings #12;Household Electricity: Solar Thermal ~5-10 year payback time #12

  11. Building Energy Use and Conservation in Cycle VIII of the Texas Institutional Conservation Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrecengost, R. C.; Lum, S. K.; Notman, J. R.; Sattler, D. R.; Heffington, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    results for implementation of ECHs are $2,232,000 and $555,000, resulting in a four-year payback. Also, some obvious problems in the preparation of technical assistance reports along with the general background and implementation of the Institutional...

  12. NIFES Consulting Group, NIFES House, Sinderland Road, Broadheath, Altrincham, Cheshire, WA14 5HQ Tel: 0161 928 5791 | Fax: 0161 926 8718| www.nifes.co.uk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIFES Consulting Group, NIFES House, Sinderland Road, Broadheath, Altrincham, Cheshire, WA14 5HQ Tel: 0161 247 1408 E-mail: j.hindley@mmu.ac.uk Prepared by: Mr S. Elkin NIFES Consulting Group, NIFES considered for implementation at the campus. However the seven year payback criteria communicated to NIFES

  13. Evaluation of Northern Illinois Residential Retrofit Delivery Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, P.; Kerr, R.; Brand, L.

    2012-11-01

    Using a detailed BEopt analysis, PARR has developed packages of measures following a 'loading order' appropriate for cold climates at increasing levels of savings. Packages of measures to provide 'good, better, best' energy savings were determined based on predicted source energy savings, safety issues, program costs and simple payback for customers.

  14. Evaluation of Northern Illinois Residential Retrofit Delivery Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, P.; Kerr, R.; Brand, L.

    2012-10-01

    Using a detailed BEopt analysis, PARR has developed packages of measures following a 'loading order' appropriate for cold climates at increasing levels of savings. Packages of measures to provide 'good, better, best' energy savings were determined based on predicted source energy savings, safety issues, program costs and simple payback for customers.

  15. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1980-01-01

    payback of 18 to 24 months. As one prominence in recent years, due to the energy plant manager said, "I pay more than that shortage and the increased cost of electricity each year, just to sweep my floors." -- Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation....

  16. Aalborg Universitet High efficiency battery converter with SiC devices for residential PV systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodorescu, Remus

    electricity with spot price and maximize the system and shorter the payback time, thus a high]. The high efficiency is a very important factor for the PV industry, where the generated energy price. World leader in terms of cumulative PV installation, Germany, who is showing a constant commitment from

  17. Large Sheet Process Consolidation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Keith

    2005-12-16

    that with an investment of $776,800, the net present value (NPV) will be $2,386,170 and have a payback of 2.0 yrs. The after tax rate of return will be 67.8% with a weighted return on assets managed of 1035.1%. The recommendation is for the approval of this appropriation...

  18. Energy Efficiency Design Evaluation for the Texas Department of Corrections 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Krati, M.; Turner, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    ,000 with an average payback of 1.8 - 2.5 years, depending on the gas rates paid. Subsequent redesign of cell lighting fixtures resulted in reduced first cost of $91,418 and expected annual operating savings in excess of $75,000....

  19. Analysis of the Double Window in Saving Energy and Economical Efficiency in Nanjing in the Winter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; He, J.; Gao, S.

    2006-01-01

    steel window can save energy by 37.68% is reached. As part of the economical efficiency analysis, an investment payback period is analyzed using the methods of static state and dynamic state. The analysis shows that by using single frame-double plastic...

  20. How to Sell GSHP Systems A Quick Guide to Making the Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their maximum efficiencies years ago EPA Report 430-R-93-004 #12;Did You Say "Geothermal.geoexchange.org Environmental Bene ts #12;! Mechanically Reliable · Long service life o 20-30 years Payback w/ GSHPs: 6-10 years without incen30+ years without

  1. SURVEILLANCE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS USING METEOSAT DERIVED IRRADIANCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    be related to a bad performance of numerous PV systems: the overall energy production 1 #12;(and thus. Regarding the increasing pay-back rates for PV energy (0.99 DM/kWh in Germany from spring 2000 onwardsSURVEILLANCE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS USING METEOSAT DERIVED IRRADIANCES Annette Hammer

  2. PV ENERGY ROI Tracks Efficiency Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PV ENERGY ROI Tracks Efficiency Gains the state of PV today E nergy payback time (EPBT) is the time it takes for a photovoltaic (PV) system to produce all the energy used through- out its life cycle. A short, current com- mercial PV technologies "pay back" the energy used in only six months to two years (depending

  3. Phase 1A Final Report for the AREVA Team Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, Mike E.

    2015-03-19

    In response to the Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to develop and deploy lead fuel assemblies (LFAs) of Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel (EATF) into a US reactor within 10 years, AREVA put together a team to develop promising technologies for improved fuel performance during off normal operations. This team consisted of the University of Florida (UF) and the University of Wisconsin (UW), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Duke Energy and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). This team brought broad experience and expertise to bear on EATF development. AREVA has been designing; manufacturing and testing nuclear fuel for over 50 years and is one of the 3 large international companies supplying fuel to the nuclear industry. The university and National Laboratory team members brought expertise in nuclear fuel concepts and materials development. Duke and TVA brought practical utility operating experience. This report documents the results from the initial “discovery phase” where the team explored options for EATF concepts that provide enhanced accident tolerance for both Design Basis (DB) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDB). The main driver for the concepts under development were that they could be implemented in a 10 year time frame and be economically viable and acceptable to the nuclear fuel marketplace. The economics of fuel design make this DOE funded project very important to the nuclear industry. Even incremental changes to an existing fuel design can cost in the range of $100M to implement through to LFAs. If this money is invested evenly over 10 years then it can take the fuel vendor several decades after the start of the project to recover their initial investment and reach a breakeven point on the initial investment. Step or radical changes to a fuel assembly design can cost upwards of $500M and will take even longer for the fuel vendor to recover their investment. With the projected lifetimes of the current generation of nuclear power plants large scale investment by the fuel vendors is difficult to justify. Specific EATF enhancements considered by the AREVA team were; Improved performance in DB and BDB conditions; Reduced release to the environment in a catastrophic accident; Improved performance during normal operating conditions; Improved performance if US reactors start to load follow; Equal or improved economics of the fuel; and Improvements to the fuel behavior to support future transportation and storage of the used nuclear fuel (UNF). In pursuit of the above enhancements, EATF technology concepts that our team considered were; Additives to the fuel pellets which included; Chromia doping to increase fission gas retention. Chromia doping has the potential to improve load following characteristics, improve performance of the fuel pellet during clad failure, and potentially lock up cesium into the fuel matrix; Silicon Carbide (SiC) Fibers to improve thermal heat transfer in normal operating conditions which also improves margin in accident conditions and the potential to lock up iodine into the fuel matrix; Nano-diamond particles to enhance thermal conductivity; Coatings on the fuel cladding; and Nine coatings on the existing Zircaloy cladding to increase coping time and reduce clad oxidation and hydrogen generation during accident conditions, as well as reduce hydrogen pickup and mitigate hydride reorientation in the cladding. To facilitate the development process AREVA adopted a formal “Gate Review Process” (GR) that was used to review results and focus resources onto promising technologies to reduce costs and identify the technologies that would potentially be carried forward to LFAs within a 10 year period. During the initial discovery phase of the project AREVA took the decision to be relatively hands off and allow our university and National Laboratory partners to be free thinking and consider options that would not be constrained by preconceived ideas from the fuel vendor. To counter this and to keep the partners focused, the GR process was utilized. During this GR process each

  4. Fusion in a magnetically-shielded-grid inertial electrostatic confinement device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedditch, John; Khachan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented that shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively-biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  5. Slide 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    longer be validated * Concise Note Indicator field will no longer be captured * Port of Entry field will no longer be captured * Production Code is no longer captured 5 NMMSS...

  6. Electrical Analysis Tool Suite for Inductrial Energy Audits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morelli, F.

    2014-01-01

    20-23, 2014 AGENDA Current Available Tools Analysis Tools Demand Visualization Weather Disaggregation Demand Aberrations Photovoltaic Optimization Demand Scheduling Automatic Report Generation Demonstration ESL-IE-14-05-39 Proceedings of the Thrity... Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Photovoltaic Optimization Solar Tracking TMY3 Surface Radiation Data Radiative Power Model Cost Optimization Photovoltaic Array Size PV Array Cost Expected Power Savings Payback Period ESL-IE-14-05-39 Proceedings...

  7. Process Integration Study of a Food Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, P.; Tripathi, P.

    1991-01-01

    installation. Potential process modification option is also presented which reduces the amount of heat being released to the room from hot tanks and thus provides the plant with a more comfortable working environment. INTRODUCTION An analysis is performed... of the payback periods for suggested retrofit schemes. PROCESS DESCRIPTION Cereal meal at 70?F is mixed and cooked with hot water and steam in the wet mixer. The product is then passed through cooker. The large amount of moisture contained in the product...

  8. The Role of the UK Energy Efficiency Office 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finer, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    publication "Energy Efficiency in Buildings", which gives standard energy costs in pence per square foot per year, has been widely promoted and well received. Similarly the underdevelopment of marketing skills among the energy efficiency industries ha... and commerce alone that amounts to ?2bn worth of energy wasted every year. Half of this surn could be saved through management measures l'equiring little or no investment, the rest through Investment with relatively short payback perIods. Indeed...

  9. Industrial Energy Conservation Potentials in North Carolina 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barakat, M. G.; Singh, H.; Mallik, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    CONSERVATION POTENTIALS IN NORTH CAROLINA MONJED G. BARAKAT Chief Engineer Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center North Carolina A & T State University HARMOHINDAR SINGH Associate Professor Architectural Engineering Department North Carolina A... of payback periods less than a year. These energy conservation opportunities and their potential savings in the state of North Carolina are discussed in this paper. INTRODUCTION Maximizing profit and minimizing operating cost are the the major driving...

  10. Photovoltaic technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the history of photovoltaic devices and a discussion of the cost goals set for photovoltaic modules, the status of photovoltaic technology is assessed. Included are discussions of: current applications, present industrial production, low-cost silicon production techniques, energy payback periods for solar cells, advanced materials research and development, concentrator systems, balance-of-system components. Also discussed are some nontechnical aspects, including foreign markets, US government program approach, and industry attitudes and approaches. (LEW)

  11. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  12. Firm eyes savings from tires-to-fuel system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, J.

    1983-01-31

    A $600,000 pyrolysis system to convert tire scraps into methane will eliminate a tire retreading company's landfill and boiler fuel costs and achieve a five-year payback. The process also yields steel belts, fibers, and carbon black byproducts that can be sold for additional revenue. Heat from the hot exhaust gases will be recycled to the combustion chamber. A 10% federal energy tax credit and a 10% investment tax credit lowered the capital costs for $480,000. (DCK)

  13. Five Common Energy Conversion Projects in Small and Medium-Sized Industrial Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britton, A. J.; Heffington, W. M.; Nutter, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    were recommended which would save $4 million annually (about 9 % of utility costs) for Texas manufacturers. Projects actually implemented realize just over half of the recommended earnings and the overall payback for implemented projects is slightly... includes the weather in the estimated The clear sky factor is determined from information from the U.S. Weather Bureaus' Local Climatological Data. For example: Houston has thunderstorms an average of 62 days per year, and heavy fog 37 days per year (8...

  14. Implicit Discount Rates and the Purchase of Untried, Energy-Saving Durable Goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Douglas A.

    1983-09-01

    Implicit Discount Rates and the Purchase of Untried, Energy-Saving Durable Goods DOUGLAS A. HOUSTON* Many consumers appear to rationally calculate the net worth of a household in­ vestment, but a substantial minority may lack the skills... and hesitant when monetary paybacks stretch over many years; they may be unable to choose rationally among investment options. Gately (1980) found that extremely high discount rates were applied by consumers in the purchase of an energy-using durable...

  15. Effects of 'Limited Product Line Audits' 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Ormer, H.

    2006-01-01

    Wh Third-party Incentives Obtained: Audit Cost 5 of 12 Project Cost 8 of 12 RESULTS SUMMARY: Audit Costs (12 x 20,000) $240,000 Audit Rebates received $86,000 Net Audit Costs... $154,000 Project Cost $3,500,000 Project Rebates $1,200,000 Net Project Costs $2,300,000 Total Annual Electrical Energy Savings $3,663,000/yr Simple Payback 7 Months 2...

  16. How to Evaluate Low Excess Air Controls for Packaged Boilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Londerville, S. B.; Kerler, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    at reduced excess air levels is ~e the one that best suits your particular boiler and stack loss method. Initial assumptions are t~at payback requirements. the burner will perform at LEA levels and that the flame is sized correctly for the furnace... charac ter istics of your boiler, you can estimate ef ficiency increases based on boiler(burner tuning and burner replacement; the full rewards of LEA firing, however, are unattainable without suit able controls. Unlike most equipment, LEA control...

  17. Compressed Air Audits using AIRMaster 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, G. M.; McGill, R. D.; Bessey, E. G.; Vischer, K.

    1997-01-01

    and recommended at each of the seven plants audited material costs, and typically includes only minor except for the metal fabrication plant that already capital cost. The Payback period is the total used unloading controls. Savings for unloading... Shutdown Timer Separate Compressor for Sand Transport System 1. Bakery 1. Bakery 1. Bakery, 2. Sawmill, 3. Millwork 4. Metal Fabrication 4. Metal Fabrication 4. Metal Fabrication 4. Metal Fabrication 4. Metal Fabrication 5. Foundry 1 * Measure...

  18. Economic analysis of the daylight-linked lighting control system in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, In-Ho; Nam, Eun-Ji [Department of Architectural Engineering, College of Engineering, Dongguk University, 26-3, Pil-dong, Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    The objective of this study is to perform an economic analysis of the daylight-linked automatic on/off lighting control system installed for the purpose of energy savings in office buildings. For this, a building was chosen as a typical example, and the energy cost was calculated by using the daylight and building energy analysis simulation. When the lighting control was utilized, an economic analysis was performed using a payback period that was calculated by comparing the initial cost of installing the lighting control system with the annual energy cost which was reduced thanks to the application of the lighting control. The results showed that the lighting energy consumption, when the lighting control was applied, was reduced by an average of 30.5% compared with the case that there was not lighting control applied. Also, the result for total energy consumption showed that, when lighting control was applied, this was reduced by 8.5% when the glazing ratio was 100%, 8.2% for 80%, and 7.6% for 60% when compared to non-application. The payback period was analyzed in terms of the number of floors in a building; 10 floors, 20 floors, 30 floors, and 40 floors. Hence, the building with 40 floors and glazing ratio 100% resulted in the shortest payback period of 8.8 years, the building with 10 floors and glazing ratio 60% resulted in the longest period of 12.7 years. In other words, the larger the glazing ratio and the number of building floors are, the shorter the payback period is. (author)

  19. Recovering Energy From Ventilation and Process Airstreams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheney, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    high efficiency filter to strip contaminant from the air so cleaned air can be recirculated. This requires air cleaners that have high effi ciency removal or particulate in the respir able fraction range (electrostatic or HEPA filters... significantly reducing the relative humidity in the sol vent-drying oven. The difference in profit between oper ating a condensing system and an after burner to meet pollution codes is often several thousand dollars per day. Payback of a condenser...

  20. Monitored performance of residential geothermal heat pumps in central Texas and Southern Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, W.N.

    1997-11-01

    This report summarizes measured performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHP`s) that were installed in family housing units at Ft. Hood, Texas and at Selfridge Air National Guard base in Michigan. These units were built as part of a joint Department of Defense/Department of Energy program to evaluate the energy savings potential of GHP`s installed at military facilities. At the Ft. Hood site, the GHP performance was compared to conventional forced air electric air conditioning and natural gas heating. At Selfridge, the homes under test were originally equipped with electric baseboard heat and no air conditioning. Installation of the GHP systems at both sites was straightforward but more problems and costs were incurred at Selfridge because of the need to install ductwork in the homes. The GHP`s at both sites produced impressive energy savings. These savings approached 40% for most of the homes tested. The low cost of energy on these bases relative to the incremental cost of the GHP conversions precludes rapid payback of the GHP`s from energy savings alone. Estimates based on simple payback (no inflation and no interest on capital) indicated payback times from 15 to 20 years at both sites. These payback times may be reduced by considering the additional savings possible due to reduced maintenance costs. Results are summarized in terms of 15 minute, hourly, monthly, and annual performance parameters. The results indicate that all the systems were working properly but several design shortcomings were identified. Recommendations are made for improvements in future installations at both sites.

  1. The Pinch Explosion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, A. P.; Boland, D.

    1988-01-01

    or electrical energy than "stand alone" furnaces or boilers with imported electricity. This, in turn, strongly influences savings and paybacks that can be obtained by reducing process energy usage through modifications to heat exchanger networks... analysis of heat exchanger network design problems; resiliency tests; batch processing; and "appropriate placement" procedures for heat pumps, distillation columns, evaporators and heat engines. Users of the technology include process operating...

  2. Rome folio, Georgia-Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, C. W. (Charles Willard), 1859-1916.

    1902-01-01

    Consultant Director, corporate Energy Department Energy ~1anager Manager of Energy Conservation Director of Energy Conservation Manager, corporate Energy Conservation Corporate Energy Coordinator RESULTS During the early part of the study..., Georgia, achieved a payback of less than five months on a system to measure and control allotted natural gas usage (10). With close metering BFG uses less expensive natural gas right up to the allotted supply before switching over to propane...

  3. Computer Room Fresh Air Cooling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenger, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    payback and must not compromise re1 iabil i ty. POSS IB ILITIES FOR REDUCING ENERGY CONSUMPTION To offer reduced energy consumption during periods of 1 ow wbi ent temperature, computer room air handlers can be fitted with economizer coils to precool... the air using fluid from a sensible, or for lower fluid temperatures, an evaporative heat rejector (Figure 1). As the ambient temperature rises close to the required supply air temperature, operation of the economizer coil is limited...

  4. Assessment of energy-efficiency improvements for paint spray booths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to inform industry and industrial associations of the economic and technical benefits achievable through spray booth control. A discussion of the energy use and potential for conservation in spray booths is presented. Descriptions, costs, and payback potentials of several spray booth control system concepts are provided. In addition, the technological barriers and the R and D needs to overcome these barriers are identified and discussed.

  5. Process simulation, integration and optimization of blending of petrodiesel with biodiesel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ting

    2009-05-15

    of payback period (PP) for the three options????????100 5.15 Comparison of net CO2 life-cycle emissions for petroleum diesel and biodiesel blends???????...????????????.102 5.16 Net CO2 emission vs. blend price of biodiesel blend... quantities significantly rely on enhanced hydrotreating technology, which is the major method to produce ULSD at this time (EIA, 2001). 4 Conventional hydrotreating is a commercially proven refining process that inputs feedstock together with hydrogen...

  6. HVDC power transmission technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauth, R.L.; Tatro, P.J.; Railing, B.D.; Johnson, B.K.; Stewart, J.R.; Fink, J.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an assessment of the national utility system`s needs for electric transmission during the period 1995-2020 that could be met by future reduced-cost HVDC systems. The assessment was to include an economic evaluation of HVDC as a means for meeting those needs as well as a comparison with competing technologies such as ac transmission with and without Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) controllers. The role of force commutated dc converters was to be assumed where appropriate. The assessment begins by identifying the general needs for transmission in the U.S. in the context of a future deregulated power industry. The possible roles for direct current transmission are then postulated in terms of representative scenarios. A few of the scenarios are illustrated with the help of actual U.S. system examples. non-traditional applications as well as traditional applications such as long lines and asynchronous interconnections are discussed. The classical ``break-even distance`` concept for comparing HVDC and ac lines is used to assess the selected scenarios. The impact of reduced-cost converters is reflected in terms of the break-even distance. This report presents a comprehensive review of the functional benefits of HVDC transmission and updated cost data for both ac and dc system components. It also provides some provocative thoughts on how direct current transmission might be applied to better utilize and expand our nation`s increasingly stressed transmission assets.

  7. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Walkway Lighting at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center, in Atlantic City, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2008-03-18

    This report documents the results of a collaborative project to demonstrate a solid state lighting (SSL) general illumination product in an outdoor area walkway application. In the project, six light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were installed to replace six existing high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires mounted on 14-foot poles on a set of exterior walkways and stairs at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, during December, 2007. The effort was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Technology Gateway Demonstration that involved a collaborative teaming agreement between DOE, FAA and Ruud Lighting (and their wholly owned division, Beta LED). Pre- and post-installation power and illumination measurements were taken and used in calculations of energy savings and related economic payback, while personnel impacted by the new lights were provided questionnaires to gauge their perceptions and feedback. The SSL product demonstrated energy savings of over 25% while maintaining illuminance levels and improving illuminance uniformity. PNNL's economic analysis yielded a variety of potential payback results depending on the assumptions used. In the best case, replacing HPS with the LED luminaire can yield a payback as low as 3 years. The new lamps were quite popular with the affected personnel, who gave the lighting an average score of 4.46 out of 5 for improvement.

  8. Energy analysis of facade-integrated photovoltaic systems applied to UAE commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhi, Hassan

    2010-12-15

    Developments in the design and manufacture of photovoltaic cells have recently been a growing concern in the UAE. At present, the embodied energy pay-back time (EPBT) is the criterion used for comparing the viability of such technology against other forms. However, the impact of PV technology on the thermal performance of buildings is not considered at the time of EPBT estimation. If additional energy savings gained over the PV system life are also included, the total EPBT could be shorter. This paper explores the variation of the total energy of building integrated photovoltaic systems (BiPV) as a wall cladding system applied to the UAE commercial sector and shows that the ratio between PV output and saving in energy due to PV panels is within the range of 1:3-1:4. The result indicates that for the southern and western facades in the UAE, the embodied energy pay-back time for photovoltaic system is within the range of 12-13 years. When reductions in operational energy are considered, the pay-back time is reduced to 3.0-3.2 years. This study comes to the conclusion that the reduction in operational energy due to PV panels represents an important factor in the estimation of EPBT. (author)

  9. Not-In-Kind Technologies for Residential and Commercial Unitary Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.K.

    2001-01-11

    This project was initiated by the Department of Energy in response to a request from the HVAC industry for consolidated information about alternative heating and cooling cycles and for objective comparisons of those cycles in space conditioning applications. Twenty-seven different heat pumping technologies are compared on energy use and operating costs using consistent operating conditions and assumptions about component efficiencies for all of them. This report provides a concise summary of the underlying principals of each technology, its advantages and disadvantages, obstacles to commercial development, and economic feasibility. Both positive and negative results in this study are valuable; the fact that many of the cycles investigated are not attractive for space conditioning avoids any additional investment of time or resources in evaluating them for this application. In other cases, negative results in terms of the cost of materials or in cycle efficiencies identify where significant progress needs to be made in order for a cycle to become commercially attractive. Specific conclusions are listed for many of the technologies being promoted as alternatives to electrically-driven vapor compression heat pumps using fluorocarbon refrigerants. Although reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps using hydrocarbons have similar energy use to conventional electric-driven heat pumps, there are no significant energy savings due to the minor differences in estimated steady-state performance; higher costs would be required to accommodate the use of a flammable refrigerant. Magnetic and compressor-driven metal hydride heat pumps may be able to achieve efficiencies comparable to reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps, but they are likely to have much higher life cycle costs because of high costs for materials and peripheral equipment. Both thermoacoustic and thermionic heat pumps could have lower life cycle costs than conventional electric heat pumps because of reduced equipment and maintenance costs although energy use would be higher. There are strong opportunities for gas-fired heat pumps to reduce both energy use and operating costs outside of the high cooling climates in the southeast, south central states, and the southwest. Diesel and IC (Otto) engine-driven heat pumps are commercially available and should be able to increase their market share relative to gas furnaces on a life cycle cost basis; the cost premiums associated with these products, however, make it difficult to achieve three or five year paybacks which adversely affects their use in the U.S. Stirling engine-driven and duplex Stirling heat pumps have been investigated in the past as potential gas-fired appliances that would have longer lives and lower maintenance costs than diesel and IC engine-driven heat pumps at slightly lower efficiencies. These potential advantages have not been demonstrated and there has been a low level of interest in Stirling engine-driven heat pumps since the late 1980's. GAX absorption heat pumps have high heating efficiencies relative to conventional gas furnaces and are viable alternatives to furnace/air conditioner combinations in all parts of the country outside of the southeast, south central states, and desert southwest. Adsorption heat pumps may be competitive with the GAX absorption system at a higher degree of mechanical complexity; insufficient information is available to be more precise in that assessment.

  10. A Preliminary Analysis of the Economics of Using Distributed Energy as a Source of Reactive Power Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fangxing; Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom; King, Thomas F

    2006-04-01

    A major blackout affecting 50 million people in the Northeast United States, where insufficient reactive power supply was an issue, and an increased number of filings made to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by generators for reactive power has led to a closer look at reactive power supply and compensation. The Northeastern Massachusetts region is one such area where there is an insufficiency in reactive power compensation. Distributed energy due to its close proximity to loads seems to be a viable option for solving any present or future reactive power shortage problems. Industry experts believe that supplying reactive power from synchronized distributed energy sources can be 2 to 3 times more effective than providing reactive support in bulk from longer distances at the transmission or generation level. Several technology options are available to supply reactive power from distributed energy sources such as small generators, synchronous condensers, fuel cells or microturbines. In addition, simple payback analysis indicates that investments in DG to provide reactive power can be recouped in less than 5 years when capacity payments for providing reactive power are larger than $5,000/kVAR and the DG capital and installation costs are lower than $30/kVAR. However, the current institutional arrangements for reactive power compensation present a significant barrier to wider adoption of distributed energy as a source of reactive power. Furthermore, there is a significant difference between how generators and transmission owners/providers are compensated for reactive power supplied. The situation for distributed energy sources is even more difficult, as there are no arrangements to compensate independent DE owners interested in supplying reactive power to the grid other than those for very large IPPs. There are comparable functionality barriers as well, as these smaller devices do not have the control and communications requirements necessary for automatic operation in response to local or system operators. There are no known distributed energy asset owners currently receiving compensation for reactive power supply or capability. However, there are some cases where small generators on the generation and transmission side of electricity supply have been tested and have installed the capability to be dispatched for reactive power support. Several concerns need to be met for distributed energy to become widely integrated as a reactive power resource. The overall costs of retrofitting distributed energy devices to absorb or produce reactive power need to be reduced. There needs to be a mechanism in place for ISOs/RTOs to procure reactive power from the customer side of the meter where distributed energy resides. Novel compensation methods should be introduced to encourage the dispatch of dynamic resources close to areas with critical voltage issues. The next phase of this research will investigate in detail how different options of reactive power producing DE can compare both economically and functionally with shunt capacitor banks. Shunt capacitor banks, which are typically used for compensating reactive power consumption of loads on distribution systems, are very commonly used because they are very cost effective in terms of capital costs. However, capacitor banks can require extensive maintenance especially due to their exposure to lightning at the top of utility poles. Also, it can be problematic to find failed capacitor banks and their maintenance can be expensive, requiring crews and bucket trucks which often requires total replacement. Another shortcoming of capacitor banks is the fact that they usually have one size at a location (typically sized as 300, 600, 900 or 1200kVAr) and thus don't have variable range as do reactive power producing DE, and cannot respond to dynamic reactive power needs. Additional future work is to find a detailed methodology to identify the hidden benefit of DE for providing reactive power and the best way to allocate the benefit among customers, utilities, transmission companies or RTOs.

  11. Stockbridge Munsee Community Health and Wellness Center and the Mohican Family Center Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRocher, Andy [Stockbridge-Munsee Health and Wellness Center, Bowler, WI (United States); Barrnett, Michael [Stockbridge-Munsee Health and Wellness Center, Bowler, WI (United States)

    2014-03-14

    The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Health and Wellness Center (HWC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the HWC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the HWC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the HWC performs in the lowest 8 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with paybacks of less than five years to yield an estimated 25-percent decrease in annual energyconsumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $26,800 per year with an implementation cost of just $4,650 (0.2 year payback). For the Mohican Family Center document: The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Mohican Family Center (MFC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the MFC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the MFC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the MFC performs better than 80 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with short term paybacks to yield an estimated 13-percent decrease in energy consumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $3,100 per year with an implementation cost of under $20,000.

  12. Iron production maintenance effectiveness system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augstman, J.J. [Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

  13. Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

  14. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  15. Production of ultradense deuterium: A compact future fusion fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badiei, Shahriar; Andersson, Patrik U.; Holmlid, Leif [Department of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2010-03-22

    Ultradense deuterium as a nuclear fuel in laser-ignited inertial confinement fusion appears to have many advantages. The density of ultradense deuterium D(-1) is as high as 140 kg cm{sup -3} or 10{sup 29} cm{sup -3}. This means that D(-1) will be very useful as a target fuel, circumventing the complex and unstable laser compression stage. We show that the material is stable apart from the oscillation between two forms, and can exist for days in the laboratory environment. We also demonstrate that an amount of D(-1) corresponding to tens of kilojoules is produced in each experiment. This may be sufficient for break-even.

  16. Feasibility analysis/business plan for proposed residential balancing venture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-24

    To assess the feasibility of a residential balancing venture, Charles Rial and Associates determined the market potential for such a service, reviewed the efforts of the Chicago Energy Savers Fund, and interviewed engineering firms and heating and boiler contractors. Based on our findings, it was determined that a stand-alone venture that offers balancing as its only service will not reach a broad enough market to support a break-even operation, and therefore, does not represent a feasible venture opportunity. A more feasible approach would involve a joint-venture between an established heating/boiler contractor and a cbo. A summary of the findings that led to this conclusion are included.

  17. Energy conservation business opportunities in multifamily housing: Feasibility analysis/business plan for proposed residential balancing venture: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-24

    The City of Chicago's Department of Planning and the Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT) engaged Charles Rial and Associates (CRA) to assess the initial feasibility of an independent residential balancing service as a venture opportunity for a community-based organization (cbo). This document represents CRA's final report on the feasibility of the proposed venture. To assess the feasibility of a residential balancing venture, CRA determined the market potential for such a service, reviewed the efforts of the Chicago Energy Savers Fund, and interviewed engineering firms and heating and boiler contractors. It was determined that a stand-alone venture that offers balancing as its service will not reach a broad enough market to support a break-even operation and therefore, does not represent a feasible venture opportunity. A more feasible approach would involve a joint-venture between an established heating/boiler contractor and a cbo. A summary of the findings that led to this conclusion is provided.

  18. Instability Control in a Staged Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank J. WESSEL

    2011-04-22

    A \\Staged Z-Pinchā?¯ is a fusion-energy concept in which stored-electric energy is first converted into plasma-liner-kinetic energy, and then transferred to a coaxialtarget plasma [H. U. Rahman, F. J. Wessel, and N. Rostoker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, p. 714(1996)]. Proper choice of the liner and target materials, and their initial radii and mass densities, leads to dynamic stabilization, current amplification, and shock heating of the target. Simulations suggest that this configuration has merit as a alternative inertial-confinement-fusion concept, and may provide an energy release exceeding thermonuclear break-even, if tested on one of many newer pulsed power systems, for example those located at Sandia National Laboratories.

  19. Cost reductions in absorption chillers. Final report, June 1984-May 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Absorption chillers have great difficulty competing with the electric-driven compression alternative, due in part to modest operating efficiencies and largely to high first costs. This project is an assessment of the possibility of lowering the costs of absorption chillers dramatically by the use of low material intensity in the design of a new generation of these machines. Breakeven costs for absorption chillers, their heat exchangers and heat exchanger materials were established which will allow commercial success. Polymeric and metallic materials appropriate to particular components and which meet the cost goals were identified. A subset of these materials were tested and ordered by success in tolerating conditions and materials found in absorption chiller applications. Conceptual designs which indicate the practicality of the low material intensity approach were developed. The work reported here indicates that there is a high probability that this apporach will be successful.

  20. Preliminary Neutronic Study of D2O-cooled High Conversion PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled high-conversion PWRs loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects.

  1. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  2. CAlorimetric observation of excess heat during electrochemical insertion of deuterium into palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guer, T.M.; Schreiber, M.; Huggins, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    In order to address the energy break-even issue, the thermal behavior of the Pd-D system was studied during electrolysis of heavy water in a thermodynamically closed cell. A specially designed isoperibolic calorimeter was developed for this purpose and was fully characterized. Eleven pretreated, fresh Pd cathodes were individually tested in identically designed calorimeters and their thermal behavior were monitored starting from time zero. In two of the cases, excess power was observed in which the overall energy balance became positive after a relatively short period, leading to the generation of significant amounts of excess energy. In one case, excess power was maintained over a period of ten days, and produced over 23 MJ of excess energy per mole of palladium.

  3. THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

    2003-07-01

    This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

  4. Development/Demonstration of an Advanced Oxy-Fuel Front-End System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mighton, Steven, J.

    2007-08-06

    Owens Corning and other glass manufacturers have used oxy-fuel combustion technology successfully in furnaces to reduce emissions, increase throughput, reduce fuel consumption and, depending on the costs of oxygen and fuel, reduce energy costs. The front end of a fiberglass furnace is the refractory channel system that delivers glass from the melter to the forming process. After the melter, it is the second largest user of energy in a fiberglass plant. A consortium of glass companies and suppliers, led by Owens Corning, was formed to develop and demonstrate oxy/fuel combustion technology for the front end of a fiberglass melter, to demonstrate the viability of this energy saving technology to the U.S. glass industry, as a D.O.E. sponsored project. The project goals were to reduce natural gas consumption and CO2 green house gas emissions by 65 to 70% and create net cost savings after the purchase of oxygen to achieve a project payback of less than 2 years. Project results in Jackson, TN included achieving a 56% reduction in gas consumption and CO2 emissions. A subsequent installation in Guelph ON, not impacted by unrelated operational changes in Jackson, achieved a 64% reduction. Using the more accurate 64% reduction in the payback calculation yielded a 2.2 year payback in Jackson. The installation of the demonstration combustion system saves 77,000 DT/yr of natural gas or 77 trillion Btu/yr and eliminates 4500 tons/yr of CO2 emissions. This combustion system is one of several energy and green house gas reduction technologies being adopted by Owens Corning to achieve aggressive goals relating to the company’s global facility environmental footprint.

  5. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  6. Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Single Family Residences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhotra, M.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, B.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

    2007-01-01

    -Electric square4 Energy Factor raised from 0.86 to 0.95 12 INDIVIDUAL MEASURES 2. Solar Domestic Water Heater (Electric/Gas & All-Electric) IN TR O D UC TI O N BA SE CA SE R ES UL TS CO N CL US IO N EE M ?S Solar DHW Characteristics... System Measures for Electric / Gas Building RESULTS Energy Savings square4 Tankless ? 9.3% square4 Solar Water Heater ? 15.2% square4 Removal of Pilot Light ? 5.5% Payback Period square4 Tankless Water Heater ? 13.7 ? 47.5 years square4 Solar...

  7. The Results of More Than 250 Industrial Assessments for Manufacturing by the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center for the Past Ten Years 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozman, T.; Lee, J.

    2010-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-10-05-11A.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4438 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-10-05-11A.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Industrial.../plant/yr.) ? ~41% of the total number of recommendations ? ~26% of the dollar value of recommendations Recommended Savings Implementation rate by recommendation type Implementation by Industry type Overall Implementation savings Lessons Learned ? Short payback...

  8. Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-03-04

    The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

  9. Techni-Cast: Foundry Saves Energy with Compressed Air System Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-03-01

    In 2002, Techni-Cast improved its compressed air system at its foundry in Southgate, California. The project allowed the foundry to reduce its compressor capacity by 50%, which greatly reduced the foundry's energy and maintenance costs. The annual energy and maintenance savings from the project implementation are 242,000 kWh and $24,200, and the project's cost was $38,000. Because the plant received a $10,000 incentive payment from the California Public Utilities Commission, the total project cost was reduced to $28,000, yielding a 14-month simple payback.

  10. Unusual ASD Motor Conversions in a Carpet Yarn Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M.; Meffert, W.

    2006-01-01

    ,000 operating hours per year yields an energy cost savings of $2,374/year. With an estimated installation cost of $7,675/motor for a VSD controller or $15,350 per two motor twister, the simple payback for this application is 6.5 years. In industrial... screw forcing polymeric material through a die is not a pump, an AC motor is generally more efficient than a DC thus there should be some amount of energy saved even if it is small. Furthermore, ASD control of synchronous motors should offer some...

  11. HP Steam Trap Monitoring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascone, S.

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IC-11-10-61.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2024 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IC-11-10-61.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 STEAM MONITORING HP... Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real...

  12. Cost-Effective Energy Efficiency Measures for Above Code (ASHRAE 90.1-2001 and 2007) Restaurant Buildings in the City of Arlington 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    of the improvement, #1; simple payback calculations, and #1; emissions savings. 2 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Methodology 3 #1; ESL simulation model based on the DOE-2.2 of ASHRAE 90.1- 2001 and 2007 code-compliant, restaurant building for Tarrant County #1; A... for unoccupied periods 70F Heating 75 F Cooling Setback during unoccupied hours. Optimal start control one hour before occupied hours. 65F Heating 80 F Cooling ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Methodology 5 #1; 5,500 ft2, one- story, building – Dining space modeled (4...

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 281 Solar Hot Water Application Assessment for U.S. Army IMCOM-Southeast Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Chvala, William D.

    2010-09-30

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires installations (EISA) to install solar systems of sufficient capacity to provide 30% of service hot water in new construction and renovations where cost-effective. However, installations are struggling with how to implement solar hot water, and while several installations are installing solar hot water on a limited basis, paybacks remain long. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to address this issue to help determine how best to implement solar hot water projects. This documents discusses the results of that project.

  14. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-27

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Office Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  15. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ColZoque C4, suppZ6ment au nOIO, Tome 42, octobre 1981 page C4-1155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -1155 INDUSTRIALIZATION OF a - S i SOLAR CELLS Y. Kuwano and M. Ohnishi Research Center, SANYO Electric Co., Ltd, 1 applications. The t h e o r e t i c a l l i m i t efficiency and t h e energy payback period of p-i-n a- S i t s a prospective outlook on t h e f u t u r e of t h i s s o l a r c e l l production. 2. MANUFACTURING PROCESS

  16. Lehigh Southwest Cement Company: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    In 2001, Lehigh Southwest Cement Company improved the compressed air system at its cement plant in Tehachapi, California. Consequently, the system was able to operate more efficiently with less compressor capacity and at a lower system pressure. The project yielded total annual savings of 895,000 kWh and $199,000. The initial project cost was $417,000, but Southern California Edison provided a $90,000 incentive payment to reduce the cost to $327,000. Simple payback was about 20 months.

  17. Reliability Improvement Programs in Steam Distribution and Power Generation Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    , and the paybacks associated with instituting a program of planned and systematic maintenance manage ment of that system. Energy costs can be reduced by 10% and maintenance costs by 20%, while achieving other tan gible improvements in the reliability...-up; and 6)'software and data base management. Several case studies, in which the concept has been success fully applied, will be presented. INTRODUCTION Energy costs have been on the rise for the last 10 years and have now leveled off due to global...

  18. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  19. Cooling season study and economic analysis of a desiccant cooling system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, James Howard

    1992-01-01

    10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Gas Cost (3/GJ) Figure 4. 4 Gas Price vs DINC Cycle Payback Period at Various Electricity Prices SEER = 12 35 20 18 16 ~ 14 ~ 12 D o 10 8 6 o 4 $0. 06/Kwh $0. 09/Kwh $0. 12/Kwh $0. 15/Kwh $0. 'I 8/Kwh 10 20... IV ECONOMIC ANALYSIS V CONCLUSIONS 28 36 NOMENCLATURE 39 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A - HOUSE CONSTRUCTION DATA . . APPENDIX B - SECOND LAW COMPARISON 48 53 APPENDIX C - COOLING SEASON AND DINC CYCLE PROGRAM LISTING 72 APPENDIX D - ECONOMIC...

  20. Estimating Energy Efficiency Impacts Using Climate Wise "Wise Rules" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milmoe, P. H.; Winkelman, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    COMPRESSOR AIR PREssURE ... ~.~.~~.~~.~~p.!:~!:.P.!:~!:~ }.~.p.~~..~.p.~L~.~~~~.~!~!.!: . 0.4% of facility energy use $2,900 (4 mo. payback) ELIMINATE !REDUCE COMPRESSED AIR USE Eliminate/reduce some uses of air 0.6% of facility energy use $7,050 (6 mo... National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1998 Measure Recommend ationRate .. , -- .. 21% 14% 4% 1% 26% 3% 23% 67% 7% Boilers Steam Systems Furnaces & Ovens Process Heatin2 Heat Recovery...

  1. Geothermal Retrofit of Illinois National Guard's State headquarters Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Mark

    2015-04-27

    The goal of this project was to assess the feasibility of utilizing mine water as a heat sink for a geothermal heat pump system to heat and cool the 74,000 sq. ft. Illinois National Guard State Headquarters’ building in Springfield Illinois. If successful, this type of system would be less expensive to install than a traditional closed loop geothermal (ground source) heat pump system by significantly reducing the size of the well field, thus shortening or eliminate the payback period compared to a conventional system. In the end, a conventional ground loop was used for the project.

  2. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    the defUlition given above. It can be a corporate strategic tool in the newly competitive electric business. It can be part of an offensive strategy to capture new retail markets. It can be used to optimize support of a capacity-stretched distribution... system. It can be used defensively to retain existing customers. Example strategies include: Meet existing customers' growing local peak demands without adding long-payback T&D upgrades and/or new central station generation investments. Serve new...

  3. Chapter 16: Retrocommissioning Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiessen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Retrocommissioning (RCx) is a systematic process for optimizing energy performance in existing buildings. It specifically focuses on improving the control of energy-using equipment (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment and lighting) and typically does not involve equipment replacement. Field results have shown proper RCx can achieve energy savings ranging from 5% to 20%, with a typical payback of 2 years or less. A study conducted on behalf of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory analyzed data from 11 utilities operating RCx programs across the United States. The dataset included 122 RCx projects and more than 950 RCx measures.

  4. Improving Motor and Drive System Performance – A Sourcebook for Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    This sourcebook outlines opportunities to improve motor and drive systems performance. The sourcebook is divided into four main sections: (1) Motor and Drive System Basics: Summarizes important terms, relationships, and system design considerations relating to motor and drive systems. (2) Performance Opportunity Road Map: Details the key components of well-functioning motor and drive systems and opportunities for energy performance opportunities. (3) Motor System Economics: Offers recommendations on how to propose improvement projects based on corporate priorities, efficiency gains, and financial payback periods. (4) Where to Find Help: Provides a directory of organizations associated with motors and drives, as well as resources for additional information, tools, software, videos, and training opportunities.

  5. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  6. NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 10 | FEBRUARY 2014 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 81 String and sealing wax --although probably

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    and sealing wax -- although probably no longer physicists' preferred ingredients for their experiments

  7. Strategy Guideline: Proper Water Heater Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; German, A.; Staller, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-08-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Cheryn.Metzger@nrel.gov for further information.

  8. BRILLIANT Researchers from the University of Illinois, Northwestern University, the Institute of High

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Lightbulbs? August 21, 2009 | 7 comments Brighter Idea: Next-Generation Inorganic LEDs Promise Longer Lives

  9. Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2013-05-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Michael.Gestwick@nrel.gov for further information.

  10. Laboratory Evaluation of Energy Recovery Ventilators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosar, D.

    2013-05-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Stacey.Rothgeb@nrel.gov for further information.

  11. Assembling a "Best Copy" Archival Journal Collection: Case Study of the University of California IEEE Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heyer-Gray, Bob; McKenzie, Jean; Ngo, Lisa; Andrews, Karen; Stambaugh, Emily

    2009-01-01

    shipping schedules, budgets, and storage quotas would take longer but offered the best chance for sustainability

  12. Inducing Self-Selected Human Engagement in Robotic Locomotion Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Steven H.

    to a human therapist, such as electromyographic activity; they can endure longer, more intense, and more

  13. Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

    2012-11-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Michael.Gestwick@nrel.gov for further information.

  14. Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2010 - 2011 Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon, C.; Parker, D.

    2013-03-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Stacey.Rothgeb@nrel.gov for further information.

  15. ST Development Path The ST is a cost effective element of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tritium consumption and longer term self-sufficiency (Pfusion ~ 70 - 250 MW) ­ Minimize cost and optimize

  16. Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report - Austin, Texas: February 29 - March 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-05-01

    This document is no longer available. Please contact Cheryn.Metzger@nrel.gov for further information.

  17. Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

    2013-01-01

    Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

  18. Energy-conservation-investment decision making in developing countries: A review of project implementation in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Despite recent efforts in a number of developing countries to promote energy conservation (EC) and efficiency, only a fraction of EC potential has been captured, especially for projects that require significant investments. The document analyzes EC efforts in 11 countries where energy audit and/or feasibility study programs have been carried out (Bangladesh, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Pakistan, Panama, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka), covering some 1,500 EC projects involving 242 industrial companies. Cost and length of payback seem to be the determining factors for companies considering EC measures; no-cost or low-cost projects with paybacks of less than a year (such as power factor improvement projects) had the highest rate of implementation, while expensive, complicated projects (e.g., cogeneration or fuel substitution projects) were most often rejected. The document concludes, however, that the rate of implementation of EC programs has been quite high, and recommends that inexpensive, short-term projects be featured in future EC programs and increased levels of TA and financial assistance be made available to companies implementing long-term EC measures.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

    2006-03-01

    This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

  20. An easy-to-fabricate low-temperature TiO{sub 2} electron collection layer for high efficiency planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conings, B.; Baeten, L.; Jacobs, T.; Dera, R.; D’Haen, J.; Manca, J.; Boyen, H.-G.

    2014-08-01

    Organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells arguably represent the most auspicious new photovoltaic technology so far, as they possess an astonishing combination of properties. The impressive and brisk advances achieved so far bring forth highly efficient and solution processable solar cells, holding great promise to grow into a mature technology that is ready to be embedded on a large scale. However, the vast majority of state-of-the-art perovskite solar cells contains a dense TiO{sub 2} electron collection layer that requires a high temperature treatment (>450?°C), which obstructs the road towards roll-to-roll processing on flexible foils that can withstand no more than ?150?°C. Furthermore, this high temperature treatment leads to an overall increased energy payback time and cumulative energy demand for this emerging photovoltaic technology. Here we present the implementation of an alternative TiO{sub 2} layer formed from an easily prepared nanoparticle dispersion, with annealing needs well within reach of roll-to-roll processing, making this technology also appealing from the energy payback aspect. Chemical and morphological analysis allows to understand and optimize the processing conditions of the TiO{sub 2} layer, finally resulting in a maximum obtained efficiency of 13.6% for a planar heterojunction solar cell within an ITO/TiO{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3-x}Cl{sub x}poly(3-hexylthiophene)/Ag architecture.

  1. Demonstration of Datacenter Automation Software and Hardware (DASH) at the California Franchise Tax Board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Federspiel, Clifford

    2009-12-18

    Control software and wireless sensors designed for closed-loop, monitoring and control of IT equipment's inlet air temperatures in datacenters were evaluated and tested while other datacenter cooling best practices were implemented. The controls software and hardware along with each best practice were installed sequentially and evaluated using a measurement and verification procedure between each measure. The results show that the overall project eliminates 475,239 kWh per year, which is 21.3percent of the baseline energy consumption of the data center. The total project, including the best practices will save $42,772 per year and cost $134,057 yielding a simple payback of 3.1 years. However, the control system alone eliminates 59.6percent of the baseline energy used to move air in the datacenter and 13.6percent of the baseline cooling energy, which is 15.2percent of the baseline energy consumption (see Project Approach, Task 1, below, for additional information) while keeping temperatures substantially within the limits recommended by ASHRAE. Savings attributed to the control system are $30,564 per year with a cost $56,824 for a simple payback of 1.9 years.

  2. Thermostatic Radiator Valve (TRV) Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This research measured the energy savings associated with installing thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) on one-pipe low-pressure steam systems in New York City multifamily buildings. There were three primary objectives: to determine whether fuel consumption was lower in buildings using TRVs; to determine if occupants would accept the TRVs; and to determine if overheating in apartments could be eliminated using TRVs. Eight buildings, ranging in size from 15 to 26 apartments, were monitored for three years. Each building was audited to determine fuel history and quick-payback energy conservation measures. The project covered three phases; phase-1 consisted of installing low-cost energy conservation measures such as pipe insulation, air vents and burner tune-tips; determining each building`s baseline energy use, and recording baseline apartment temperatures. TRV installations occurred in phases 2 and 3. In phase-2, TRVs were installed in half the apartments in four buildings. In phase-3, TRVs were installed in the remainder of the apartments. Experimental results were conclusive. Buildings with overheated apartments achieved energy savings through the installation of TRVs. The authors research shows an average reduction of 9.45% in space heating energy use occurred with partial installation of TRVs, and savings of 15.5% were achieved after full installation. Buildings with the highest average apartment temperatures during the base year showed the greatest energy savings. Simple payback, based on an installed price of $50 per TRV, averaged 3.1 years.

  3. Productivity genefits from new energy technology: A case study of a paint manufacturing company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghunathan, P.; Capehart, B.L.

    1997-06-01

    In many cases, implementing new energy efficiency technologies not only helps facilities reduce their energy costs, but it also creates greater profits by increasing productivity. These added benefits from productivity improvements can sometimes be greater than the energy cost savings, and can result in an attractive overall payback period for implementing the new technology. This paper presents a case study of productivity improvement at a paint manufacturing company as a result of implementing new energy efficiency technology. During an industrial energy assessment, it was noted that the company had experienced frequent failures of motor belts and sheaves on five paint mixers resulting in significant replacement costs and labor costs. In addition, a bigger loss was being suffered due to lost potential profit associated with the frequent work stoppages. The IAC recommendation was to install motor soft starters (also known as motor voltage controllers) on the five mixing machines. Installation of soft starters would have the following benefits: lower energy costs, lower replacement costs for transmission components, lower labor costs, and higher production levels and increased profits. The total annual benefits were estimated at $122,659, of which the benefits from increased productivity were nearly $67,000. The overall simple payback period for installing the soft starters was less than 2 months.

  4. Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01

    This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores are identified by evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of keff, mass balance, and void coefficient. The effect of advanced iron alloy cladding (i.e., FeCrAl) on the performance of Pu conversion in MOX fueled cores is studied instead of using standard stainless-steel cladding. Variations in clad thickness and coolant-to-fuel volume ratio are also exercised. The use of FeCrAl instead of SS as a cladding alloy reduces the required Pu enrichment and improves the Pu conversion rate primarily due to the absence of nickel in the cladding alloy that results in the reduction of the neutron absorption. Also the difference in void coefficients between SS and FeCrAl alloys is nearly 500 pcm over the entire burnup range. The report also shows sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in order to characterize D2O cooled HCPWRs from different aspects. The uncertainties of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected reactor cores are evaluated at different burnup points in order to find similarities and trends respect to D2O-HCPWR.

  5. An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2011-12-01

    In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

  6. The contribution of tympanic transmission to fine temporal signal evaluation in an ultrasonic moth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, R. L.; Schul, J.; Cocroft, R. B.; Greenfield, Michael D.

    2005-11-01

    In lesser waxmoths Achroia grisella, pair formation and female mate choice involve very fine discrimination of male ultrasonic signals. Female A. grisella prefer male signals with longer pulses and longer 'asynchrony ...

  7. Geographic variations in access and utilization of cancer screening services: examining disparities among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towne, Samuel D; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-06-09

    and rurality, areas with higher levels of AIAN individuals were more likely to see disparities with regard to health care services related to mammograms (p???.05; longer distance, lower screening) and colonoscopies (p???.05; longer distance, lower screening...

  8. Investigation of Noise and Durability Performance Trends for Asphaltic Pavement Surface Types: Three-Year Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing; Kohler, Erwin R.; Harvey, John T; Ongel, Aybike

    2009-01-01

    retain its permeability longer. Old concrete surfaces withretain its permeability longer. Old concrete surfaces withconcrete, decibel (dB), noise, absorption, macrotexture, microtexture, open-graded, gap-graded, dense- graded, onboard sound intensity, permeability,

  9. Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    renewables can provide price certainty over longer terms. In6 This additiona l level of price discovery in longer-datedreplicate the long-term price stability that renewables can

  10. Quantum Information Science: Emerging No More

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlton M. Caves

    2013-04-28

    Short history of quantum information science. The chief message is that the field is no longer emerging. It has arrived.

  11. PRE-EMPLOYMENT SCREENING AND IMMUNIZATION DOCUMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , otherwise the Graduate Medical Education (GME) will be notified that you are no longer fit for duty

  12. Inside this issue: Area Events 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    ! This is UAlbany's eco-friendly way of spring cleaning, giving your clothes a longer life. Bring in unwanted

  13. Delegation Order No. 0204-56 to the Governor of the State of Maine

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 – The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  14. SGA Meeting Minutes August 10, 2010 5:30pm; Conference Room, 6th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    student concern that was voiced includes the need for longer Starbucks hours and better variety in vending

  15. Delegation Order No. 0204-60 to the Governor of the State of Kentucky

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 – The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  16. Delegation Order No. 0204-40 to the Government of the State of Arizona

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 – The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  17. Delegation Order No. 0204-59 to the Governor of the State of Wisconsin

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 – The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  18. Early Detection Saves Lives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Former Department of Energy (DOE) workers tell how medical screening helped them lead healthier and longer lives.

  19. May 15, 2002 The Physical Properties of a Flaring Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    slow (i.e., the timescale for transport orthogonal to the field is much longer than other rele­ vant

  20. Delegation Order No. 0204-58 to the Governor of the State of South Carolina

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-03

    Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 – The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

  1. SOUTHEASTERN NATURALIST2002 1(3):205-216 THE STRUCTURE OF LARVAL ODONATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    strong tibial exten- sions for burrowing or a longer abdomen that acts as a respiratory siphon; claspers

  2. As quaggas spread... Populations of the invasive quagga mussel are expanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    instead of requiring hard surfaces. Quaggas also have a longer siphon, the body part that sucks in water

  3. THE DECLINE OF PUBLIC CONCERN OVER THE ATOM BOMB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowther, Mary P.

    1973-04-01

    sufficient preformulated opinions about nuclear technology to be complacent, and that nuc lear technology is no longer an issue....

  4. Essays on International Finance and Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2009-01-01

    The exogeneity assumption on oil prices may no longer beassumption that the structural breaks in the relations between oil

  5. From "Special Period" Aesthetics to Global Relevance in Cuban Art: Tania Bruguera, Carlos Garaicoa, and Los Carpinteros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Beth Tamar

    2013-01-01

    attention. Garaicoa’s refurbishment of the items revealedno longer in need of refurbishment and varied from Garaicoa’

  6. Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Summary. To study the transport and recovery of injected SiO2 nanoparticles through a longer flow path.

  7. The Study of Climate on Alien Worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heng, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing atmospheres beyond the Solar System is an endeavor no longer confined to the realm of science fiction.

  8. Renewable Energy Grant Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is no longer accepting applications. See the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. '''''

  9. EXPERIMENTAL TESTS OF A LARGE NONCIRCULAR RFP (Poster presented at 1987 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    not sustained, the magnetic equilibria decay time was longer than ideal HHO instabil1ty tlmesoales, and detailed

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C8, Suppl6ment au no 12, Tome 49, d6cembre 1988

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    consistent and reliable re- sults. The quality and efficiencyof ZnO films decreases with longer sputtering

  11. Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01

    Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  12. BIOINFORMATICS APPLICATIONS NOTE Vol. 20 no. 9 2004, pages 14681469

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Zhiping

    . It finally prints a table showing the species, chromosome number, coordinates and strand for each site the longer sequence. (3) Align the longer sequence to the genome. (4) Transfer the coordinates of the site within the longer sequence to coordinates within the genome. This procedure is quite tedious and can go

  13. Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparrow, F.T.

    1983-06-01

    Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

  14. Low-Cost Phase Change Material for Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2015-08-06

    A low-cost PCM process consisting of conversion of fats and oils to PCM-range paraffins, and subsequent “encapsulation” of the paraffin using conventional plastic compounding/pelletizing equipment was demonstrated. The PCM pellets produced were field-tested in a building envelope application. This involved combining the PCM pellets with cellulose insulation, whereby 33% reduction in peak heat flux and 12% reduction in heat gain was observed (average summertime performance). The selling price of the PCM pellets produced according to this low-cost process is expected to be in the $1.50-$3.00/lb range, compared to current encapsulated PCM price of about $7.00/lb. Whole-building simulations using corresponding PCM thermal analysis data suggest a payback time of 8 to 16 years (at current energy prices) for an attic insulation retrofit project in the Phoenix climate area.

  15. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  16. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-11-26

    Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

  17. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce its peak day heat transfer by almost 85 percent of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibits attic air temperatures that do not exceed the maximum daily outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the roof deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to gauge the cost of energy savings and potential payback.

  18. Development of technology in the production of fertilizers in ammoniation-granulation plants. Progress report No. 12, September 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Work conducted to demonstrate procedures and equipment to conserve about 83% of fuel oil used for drying and generating steam in the ammoniation-granulation plants is reported. The general mechanism of granulation is examined. Conventional ammoniation-granulation plants are described and the new pipe-cross reactor system is described and schematics of their design are presented. Results of some demonstration tests reveal that an average of 785,000 Btu's per ton of production is eliminated with the installation of the TVA pipe-cross reactor process. It also reduces atmospheric emissions. Data on investment cost and payback period of the installation of a pipe-cross reactor in an existing TVA granulation fertilizer plant are presented.

  19. Dual fuel Russian urban transit buses: Economical reduced emissions. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This study, conducted by Caterpillar, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The scope of this project was to examine the financial and environmental aspects of introducing new alternative fuel engines to the buses of Russia`s public transportation system. The report consists of the following: (1) executive summary; (2) background/overview; (3) 3306 design, development, test; (4) electronic governed engines; (5) Moscow bus testing; (6) conclusions; (7) appendices. The appendices include: (1) Caterpillar emissions lab report; (2) dyno tests -- dual fuel data sheets; (3) 3360 horizontal engine lub tilt test; (4) 1000 hour endurance test -- engine operator sheets; (5) 1000 hour endurance test -- 250 hour check; (6) Caterpillar dual fuel electronic engines; (7) product description -- dual fuel electronic governed engines; (8) California Environmental Protection Agency -- certification of caterpillar electronic governed engines; (9) annual payback data.

  20. DOE clarifies position on shared-savers' grants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, M.

    1984-09-03

    Proposed amendments to the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) regulations would change the current restrictions on the use of shared savings and other types of savings-based deals to make up the 50% contribution schools and hospitals must make on a matching grant conservation project. DOE also proposed changes to narrow acceptable payback periods and to deny coverage of certain types of equipment or alternatives to energy audits. The requirement that users take title to equipment installed is a problem for energy service companies and investors who want the tax benefits of ownership. It is also difficult to meet the requirement to state final savings at the start of a project. DOE seeks comments on savings-based financing.

  1. Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Energy and Innovative Technologies; NEC Laboratories America Inc.; Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Bozchalui, Mohammed C.; Sharma, Ratnesh; Marnay, Chris; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

    2013-10-27

    The large scale penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) will introduce technical challenges to the distribution grid, but also carries the potential for vehicle-to-grid services. Namely, if available in large enough numbers, EVs can be used as a distributed energy resource (DER) and their presence can influence optimal DER investment and scheduling decisions in microgrids. In this work, a novel EV fleet aggregator model is introduced in a stochastic formulation of DER-CAM [1], an optimization tool used to address DER investment and scheduling problems. This is used to assess the impact of EV interconnections on optimal DER solutions considering uncertainty in EV driving schedules. Optimization results indicate that EVs can have a significant impact on DER investments, particularly if considering short payback periods. Furthermore, results suggest that uncertainty in driving schedules carries little significance to total energy costs, which is corroborated by results obtained using the stochastic formulation of the problem.

  2. Calculating the Financial Benefits of an Energy Efficiency Project: The Building Owner's and Invester's Perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    investor who pas the company's line of credit with its bank. the capital, plus an energy services company ~hat , I PROJECT ECONOMICS Initial Annual Simple Energy Conservation Opportunities Cost SaVings Payback .j ECO-1 Replacement Boiler Plant $850...,000 $290,000 2.9 yr ECO-2 Condensing Economizer $375,000 $190,000 2.0 yr ECO-3 Top Felt System $225,000 $ 80,000 2.8 yr ECO-4 Dryer Heat Recovery $325,000 $130,000 2.5 yr ECO-5 Closed Hood System $375,000 $130,000 2.9 yr ECO-6 Oil Tank Insulation $ 40...

  3. Black Bear Prep plant replaces high-frequency screens with fine wire sieves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, C.J.; Nottingham, J.

    2007-12-15

    At the Black Bear prep plant (near Wharncliffe, WV, USA) the clean coal from the spirals traditionally reported to high-frequency screens, which removed high-ash clay fines. Screens have inherent inefficiencies that allow clean coal to report to the screen underflow. The goal of this project was to capture the maximum amount of spiral clean coal while still removing the high-ash clay material found in the spiral product. The reduction of the circulating load and plant downtime for unscheduled maintenance were projected as additional benefits. After the plant upgrade, the maintenance related to the high frequency screens was eliminated and an additional 2.27 tons per hour (tph) of fine coal was recovered, which resulted in a payback period of less than one year. The article was adapted from a paper presented at Coal Prep 2007 in April 2007, Lexington, KY, USA. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Economic, efficiency, and environmental comparison of alternative vehicular fuels: 1982 update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-05

    At an operating cost of only 4 cents/mile, methane vehicles are cheaper than gasoline, propane, or electric ones, claims the American Gas Association. The payback period for the natural gas - CNG (compressed natural gas) or LNG - vehicle would be 1-3.4 years depending on the location, conversion and station costs, fleet size, fuel cost, and mileage. The typical cost of converting a 100-vehicle fleet could be $1550/vehicle; a slow-fill station is a $100,000-200,000 investment. Widespread use of gas-powered cars would lower traffic emissions while increasing the use of pipeline capacity. It would not place a strain on gas supplies because vehicle demand is projected at 0.4-1.9 trillion CF by the year 2000, only 2-6% of expected supplies.

  5. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 5.1:Expand the Number of Faculty Working in Wind Energy: Wind Energy Supply Chain and Logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Wind as a source of energy has gained a significant amount of attention because it is free and green. Construction of a wind farm involves considerable investment, which includes the cost of turbines, nacelles, and towers as well as logistical costs such as transportation of oversized parts and installation costs such as crane-rental costs. The terrain effects at the project site exert considerable influence on the turbine assembly rate and the project duration, which increases the overall installation cost. For higher capacity wind turbines (>3MW), the rental cost of the cranes is significant. In this study, the impact of interest rate, sales price of electricity, terrain effects and availability of cranes on the duration of installation and payback period for the project is analyzed. Optimization of the logistic activities involved during the construction phase of a wind farm contributes to the reduction of the project duration and also increases electricity generation during the construction phase.

  6. Solarnorth '81 by Tymura Solardesigns: diverse residential, commercial and industrial projects at and above the 48th parallel in Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tymura, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Solar Energy Heating Applications are On the Rise in and above the Northwestern City of Thunder Bay, on the northern shore of Lake Superior. Unique in their diversifications, the architectural commissions range from pure passive residential design thru hybrid systems; residential Greenhouse-Solarium active swimming pool and commercial hotel pool to inexpensive hybrid system for Canada's First Commercial Solar Lumber Drying Kiln; as well as combined earth sheltered with solar system design for a dormitory complex and shopping center. By May 1981, 7 buildings designed by Tymura Solardesigns in the Thunder Bay area will have been subjected to the Extreme Canadian climate (10,500/sup 0/F degree days, yearly temperature maximums from -41/sup 0/F to 90/sup 0/F, and solar fractions vary from 50% to 75%, with economic payback periods ranging between 7 and 10 years.

  7. Energy savings and economics of advanced control strategies for packaged air conditioners with gas heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the potential energy savings from adding advanced control to existing packaged air conditioners. Advanced control options include air-side economizer, multi-speed fan control, demand control ventilation and staged cooling. The energy and cost savings from the different control strategies individually and in combination are estimated using the EnergyPlus detailed energy simulation program for four building types, namely, a small office building, a stand-alone retail building, a strip mall building and a supermarket building. For each of the four building types, the simulation was run for 16 locations covering all 15 climate zones in the U.S. The maximum installed cost of a replacement controller that provides acceptable payback periods to owners is estimated.

  8. Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived Value of Solar Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2011-10-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed by several types of market participants, ranging from residential customers to large-scale project developers and utilities. Each type of market participant frequently uses a different economic performance metric to characterize PV value because they are looking for different types of returns from a PV investment. This report finds that different economic performance metrics frequently show different price thresholds for when a PV investment becomes profitable or attractive. Several project parameters, such as financing terms, can have a significant impact on some metrics [e.g., internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and benefit-to-cost (B/C) ratio] while having a minimal impact on other metrics (e.g., simple payback time). As such, the choice of economic performance metric by different customer types can significantly shape each customer's perception of PV investment value and ultimately their adoption decision.

  9. Natural gas powered rotary water chiller development. Phase 1. Final report, September 1991-June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanborn, D.F.; Lakowske, R.L.; Byars, M.

    1993-06-01

    Objectives of the project were to evaluate performance and marketability of a rotary engine driven screw compressor for water chiller applications. Choice of a rotary engine was aimed at rotary compressor. Initial testing done with modified stock 13B rotary engine and experimental open compressor. Engine torque not sufficient for 70 ton compressor. Analysis concluded 50 ton best match for air cooled applications and 60 ton best for water cooled to get highest gas COP. Market analysis covered total water chiller market assuming relative costs of power would lead to gas cooling sales. Allowable cost premium for 3 yr payback determined for areas of country. Premium cost of 100 ton air cooled unit estimated and compared to market allowable premiums. Concluded product acceptance will be primarily in niche markets with high local electric power demand charges.

  10. Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-09-01

    A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of $6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities. This publication details specifications of the parabolic trough solar system and highlights 5 years of measured performance data.

  11. Trigeneration Possibilities of Implementation at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühnl-Kinel, J

    1999-01-01

    Optimum distribution of energy supply systems can result in large savings in industrial facilities and production devices. Identifying the configuration of existing equipment and its loading, in order to minimize total energy consumption and at the same time satisfy given load demands, has very high payback potential. This paper presents the principle of trigeneration, the technology that can offer a highly efficient way of converting primary fuel (gas, oil) into useful energy as electricity, heat and chilled water simultaneously. It explains different factors that must be considered for such systems to be economically feasible. Some examples of industrial trigeneration systems are analysed and discussed to illustrate the application. Also the possibility of implementation of trigeneration at CERN is discussed, taking into account the existing cogeneration system, power supply structure, secondary energy demands, as well as future developments in our energy policy.

  12. Scenario analysis of hybrid class 3-7 heavy vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, F.; Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Eberhardt, J. J.

    1999-12-23

    The effects of hybridization on heavy-duty vehicles are not well understood. Heavy vehicles represent a broader range of applications than light-duty vehicles, resulting in a wide variety of chassis and engine combinations, as well as diverse driving conditions. Thus, the strategies, incremental costs, and energy/emission benefits associated with hybridizing heavy vehicles could differ significantly from those for passenger cars. Using a modal energy and emissions model, they quantify the potential energy savings of hybridizing commercial Class 3-7 heavy vehicles, analyze hybrid configuration scenarios, and estimate the associated investment cost and payback time. From the analysis, they conclude that (1) hybridization can significantly reduce energy consumption of Class 3-7 heavy vehicles under urban driving conditions; (2) the grid-independent, conventional vehicle (CV)-like hybrid is more cost-effective than the grid-dependent, electric vehicle (EV)-like hybrid, and the parallel configuration is more cost-effective than the series configuration; (3) for CV-like hybridization, the on-board engine can be significantly downsized, with a gasoline or diesel engine used for SUVs perhaps being a good candidate for an on-board engine; (4) over the long term, the incremental cost of a CV-like, parallel-configured Class 3-4 hybrid heavy vehicle is about %5,800 in the year 2005 and $3,000 in 2020, while for a Class 6-7 truck, it is about $7,100 in 2005 and $3,300 in 2020; and (5) investment payback time, which depends on the specific type and application of the vehicle, averages about 6 years under urban driving conditions in 2005 and 2--3 years in 2020.

  13. Need for Systematic Retrofit Analysis in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Multifamily housing offers high potential for energy savings through retrofits. A comprehensive energy audit with systematic evaluation of alternative energy measures is one of the key steps to realizing the full energy savings potential. However, this potential often remains unrealized when the selection of measures is (1) based on a one-size-fits-all approach originating from accustomed practices, (2) intended merely to meet code-compliance requirements, and/or (3) influenced by owner renter split incentive. In such cases, the benefits of comprehensive energy auditing are disregarded in view of the apparent difficulty in diagnosing multifamily buildings, evaluating alternative measures, and installing customized sets of measures. This paper highlights some of the barriers encountered in a multifamily housing retrofit project in Georgia and demonstrates the merits of systematic retrofit analysis by identifying opportunities for higher energy savings and improved comfort and indoor air quality that were missed in this project. The study uses a whole-building energy analysis conducted for a 10-unit, low-rise, multifamily building of a 110-unit apartment complex. The analysis projected a 24% energy savings from the measures installed in the building with a payback period of 10 years. Further analysis with a systematic evaluation of alternative measures showed that without compromising on the objectives of durability, livability, and appearance of the building, energy savings of up to 34% were achievable with a payback period of 7 years. The paper concludes by outlining recommendations that may benefit future retrofit projects by improving the audit process, streamlining tasks, and achieving higher energy savings.

  14. Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

  15. Transesterification process to manufacture ethyl ester of rape oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korus, R.A.; Hoffman, D.S.; Bam, N.; Peterson, C.L.; Drown, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    A process for the production of the ethyl ester of winter rape [EEWR] for use as a biodiesel fuel has been studied. The essential part of the process is the transesterification of rape oil with ethanol, in the presence of a catalyst, to yield the ethyl ester of rape oil as a product and glycerin as a by-product. Experiments have been performed to determine the optimum conditions for the preparation of EEWR. The process variables were: (1) temperature, (2) catalyst, (3) rate of agitation, (4) water content of the alcohol used, and (5) the amount of excess alcohol used. The optimum conditions were: (1) room temperature, (2) 0.5% sodium methoxide or 1% potassium hydroxide catalyst by weight of rapeseed oil, (3) extremely vigorous agitation with some splashing during the initial phase of the reaction and agitation was not necessary after the reaction mixture became homogeneous, (4) absolute ethanol was necessary for high conversion, and (5) 50% excess ethanol with NaOCH{sub 3} or 100% excess with KOH gave a maximum conversion. Viscosity, cloud point and pour point of the EEWR were measured. A preliminary break-even cost for the commercial production of EEWR was found to be $0.55/liter [$2.08/US gallon].

  16. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  17. Assessment of research directions for high-voltage direct-current power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, W F

    1982-09-01

    High voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission continues to be an emerging technology nearly thirty years after its introduction into modern power systems. To date its use has been restricted to either specialized applications having identifiable economic advantages (e.g., breakeven distance) or, rarely, applications where decoupling is needed. Only recently have the operational advantages (e.g., power modulation) of HVDC been realized on operating systems. A research project whose objective was to identify hardware developments and, where appropriate, system applications which can exemplify cost and operational advantages of integrated ac/dc power systems is discussed. The three principal tasks undertaken were: assessment of equipment developments; quantification of operational advantages; and interaction with system planners. Interest in HVDC power transmission has increased markedly over the past several years, and many new systems are now being investigated. The dissemination of information about HVDC, including specifically the symposium undertaken for Task 3, is a critical factor in fostering an understanding of this important adjunct to ac power transmission.

  18. Advancements in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Robert [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Yang Yang; Miley, G.H. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-- Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mead, F.B. [AFRL/PRSP, 10 E. Saturn Blvd., Edwards AFB CA 93524-7680 (United States)

    2005-02-06

    The development of a dense plasma focus (DPF) propulsion device using p-11B is described. A propulsion system of this type is attractive because of its high thrust-to-weight ratio capabilities at high specific impulses. From a fuel standpoint, p-11B is advantageous because of the aneutronic nature of the reaction, which is favorable for the production of thrust since the charged particles can be channeled by a magnetic field. Different fusion mechanisms are investigated and their implication to the p-11B reaction is explored. Three main requirements must be satisfied to reach breakeven for DPF fusion: a high Ti/Te ratio ({approx}20), an order of magnitude higher pinch lifetime, and the reflection and absorption of at least 50% radiation. Moreover, a power re-circulation method with high efficiency must be available for the relatively low Q value of the DPF fusion reactor. A possible direct energy conversion scheme using magnetic field compression is discussed. DPF parameters are estimated for thrust levels of 1000 kN and 500 kN, and possible propulsion applications are discussed, along with developmental issues.

  19. Modeling, image processing and attitude estimation of high speed star sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katake, Anup Bharat

    2009-05-15

    Plate 350nm or longer MgF2 115nm or longer Borosilicate Glass 300nm or longer detector. The transmittance of the material is also dependent on the wavelength of the incident radiation. Table II lists some of the available materials and their spectral... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 a. Visual and Apparent Magnitudes . . . . . . . . . 168 2. Spectral Classification of Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 3. Stars as Blackbody Radiators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 C. Generation of On-board Star Catalogs...

  20. Installing and Operating an Efficient Swimming Pool Pump | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    or vacuum. Furthermore, longer circulation doesn't necessarily reduce the growth of algae. Instead, using chemicals in the water and scrubbing the walls are the best methods....

  1. Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce Site's Nuclear Footprint (Alpha 5 and 9720-38 No Longer Designated as Nuclear Facilities) | National Nuclear Security...

  2. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    longer-run management of greenhouse gas emis- sions; thatthe California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Severinthe California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Severin

  3. Forecasting Dangerous Inmate Misconduct: An Applications of Ensemble Statistical Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A. Berk; Brian Kriegler; Jong-Ho Baek

    2011-01-01

    inmates with longer criminal records, but especially thoseindividuals with long criminal records, active participantsbetween 5 and 10 years. Criminal record has its greatest

  4. Promising Technology: High Bay Light-Emitting Diodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High bay LEDs offer several advantages over conventional high intensity discharge (HID) luminaires including longer lifetimes, reduced maintenance costs, and lower energy consumption.

  5. Machine Learning Techniques Applied to Sensor Data Correction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sensor's mean value, but took substantially longer to more train. less Authors: Smith, Matt K 1 ; Castello, Charles C 1 ; New, Joshua Ryan 1 + Show Author...

  6. 7AC Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    batteries stores twice as much electricity at high charge and discharge rates as current lithium-ion batteries, and creates increased battery capacity and a longer cycle life....

  7. Teknikem, A Division of RockinBoat LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    batteries stores twice as much electricity at high charge and discharge rates as current lithium-ion batteries, and creates increased battery capacity and a longer cycle life....

  8. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    longer, and could lead to feeling satisfied after smaller portions, lowering overall food intake, which could help treat obesity. Knowing the mechanism of action for TPP II...

  9. workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lafayette's airport (Purdue University Airport) is no longer active. There is a shuttle bus ... The name of the company is Express Air Coach, tel. 765-743-3120

  10. NIPSCO- Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: NIPSCO is no longer accepting Participation Request Forms for Phase II. Interconnection Applications are now being accepted for all technologies except Intermediate Solar.  Details regarding...

  11. Overview of DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Derived Renewable Liquids LONGER TERM: Centralized Production Biomass Gasification Nuclear Projected* High High-Temp. Thermochemical Cycle Central Wind Electrolysis Coal Gasification with Sequestration $0 $1 $2

  12. EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    preventing contamination from reaching it, and cocooning or demolishing hundreds of structures no longer in use, including former reactors along the river that helped create...

  13. On earthquake predictability measurement: Information score and error diagram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagan, Yan Y.

    2007-01-01

    and time-independent earthquake forecast models for southernand precursor motifs in earthquake networks, Physica A ,has been since the last earthquake, the longer the expected

  14. 2013 PDSF User Meering Minutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of various PDSF interactive nodes Upcoming Downtimes January: Possible project outage December 16: Eliza 3, 8, 9 will no longer be accessible Other Issues New Mendel rack...

  15. NEET12-Matls-CrossCut-2013.pptx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    thermal efficiency, longer lifetimes), safety margins, and design flexibility. 200 mm Dia. 593.3C 32 MPa 320C 50% Ferritic Steels Have Outstanding Properties for...

  16. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    longer depending on the waste form). Construction effects, ventilation, and the thermal pulse will lead to clay dehydration and deformation, confined to an excavation disturbed...

  17. Secretary Chu, Governor Patrick Announce $25 Million for Massachusetts...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More research and development into longer blades will quicken the creation of large-scale offshore wind power facilities. The facility will attract companies to design,...

  18. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    International Energy Agency (IEA). (2008). Energy Technologyand U.S. fleet average (IEA 2008b) Because fuel is a majorwinglets and longer wingspans) (IEA 2008, Schäfer 2009) and

  19. Microsoft Word - 6 LANL Comm. Ldrs Report 201.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    them extending and entering longer term leases. * They did not prepare for gross receipts taxes. How can they expect profit? There is no fiscal responsibility. They have no...

  20. This paper has been downloaded from the website of the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (http://www.hvac.okstate.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term and longer-term responses. The model labeled "GeoStar" is part of the GeoStar software package. (Cui, et al

  1. Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Offices DOE's Energy Storage Program is funding research to develop longer-lifetime, lower-cost Li-ion batteries. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are...

  2. ALCC program announces 24 projects at ALCF | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    received 72 million core-hours for "Toward a Longer-Life Core: Thermal-Hydraulic CFD Simulations of Deformed Fuel Assemblies." Joe Olson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  3. UGIES Midstream Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to local markets; Wilkes Barre and Scranton markets no longer dependent upon Natural gas from the Gulf of Mexico Locational volatility and spreads UGI Energy Services, LLC 8...

  4. PSH-13-0078 - In the Matter of Personnel Security | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Specifically, the Hearing Officer concluded that the individual had demonstrated rehabilitation from Alcohol Use Disorder NOS, and that she was no longer a user of alcohol...

  5. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 17: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    activities. Many of these records have continuing historical value after they are no longer of use to the Department. This records schedule covers only disposable records...

  6. Mr. Carl Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Notification that GS01 is no longer an RFLMA Point of Compliance (POC) Reference: Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) Attachment 2, Section 5.1, "Monitoring...

  7. Independent Mexican cinema and the dream of a national cinema in 1970s Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez Vargas, Erika Michelle

    2011-01-01

    with the production of documentary films from the archivalof the longer documentary film. The resulting film became Eland how this documentary and experimental film works in

  8. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    publicly owned utility power purchase agreement Productionhave signed or proposed power purchase agreements with termsbe seeking longer- term power purchase contracts in order to

  9. Placing Civilization: Progressive Colonialism in Health & Education From America to the Philippines, 1899-1920

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Michael Allen

    2009-01-01

    nurse argued, that “costs less and lasts longer” among Filipina mothers as Americans considered their little or no knowledge of pediatric

  10. Action Codes Table | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    W, Z I - Inventory difference explanation data *Historical - Reporting no longer used na J - Receiver's interim data reporting material in transit or project receipts W M -...

  11. Basic Research Needs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    identify priority research directions for longer term energy planning. The BES Reports web page contains a listing of and links to BES and BESAC (Basic Energy Sciences Advisory...

  12. U.S. Aims for Zero-Energy: Support for PV on New Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    mortgage and, with rebates or other financial incentives,offer standard consumer rebates, usually on a first-comeand MTC both offer longer rebate reservation periods (the

  13. Encouraging PV Adoption in New Market-Rate Residential Construction: A Critical Review of Program Experiences to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    mortgage and, with rebates or other financial incentives,offer standard consumer rebates, usually on a first-comeand MTC both offer longer rebate reservation periods (the

  14. Understanding Drooping Light Emitting Diodes CEEM | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Impact Understanding "droop" may result in cheaper, more efficient LEDs; LEDs are more energy efficient, smaller, and longer-lived than incandescent lamps or fluorescent...

  15. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seeks to remember that and becomes inactive." Newer battery chemistries like the lithium-ion battery, which currently dominates the rechargeable battery market, no longer have the...

  16. DOE Deputy Secretary Memo on Conference-Related Activities and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    except with regard to formal classroom training. * New Exception to Definition. Formal classroom training is no longer subject to the conference management approval and...

  17. Manhattan Project Historical Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    include The Manhattan Project, which provides a brief overview, and the longer, at 100 pages including the 35 page "Photo Gallery," The Manhattan Project: Making of the Atomic...

  18. Magnetostrophic balance as the optimal state for turbulent magnetoconvection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, EM; Aurnou, JM

    2015-01-01

    that the magnetostrophic balance is no longer attained (Magnetostrophic balance as the optimal state for turbulentLorentz and Coriolis forces balance. One can estimate the

  19. The Prisoners' (Plea Bargain) Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Gill, Oren; Ben-Shahar, Omri

    2007-01-01

    of a significantly longer prison term may affect individualbe a socially destructive prisoner’s dilemma game. ” 8 Pleatime served in the same prison – making a binding commitment

  20. Promising Technology: Parking Lot Light-Emitting Diodes with Controls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEDs offer several advantages over conventional high intensity discharge (HID) luminaires. LEDs have longer life times, reduced maintenance and operating costs, superior color rendition, and lower energy consumption.

  1. Infections and allergy --helminths, hygiene and host immune Rick M Maizels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mediated inflammatory diseases, involving, in the case of allergic asthma, eosinophil infiltration tissue damage and remodelling which causes longer-term compromise of airway function. Therapies based

  2. Bradley J. Lucier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I no longer intervene directly in the graduate application process in either Mathematics or Computer Science. I have no direct support for graduate students

  3. Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Science Foundation (NSF) to no longer support the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) has obvious impact on Fermilab's plans for the Long...

  4. A Lost Generation: The Trafficking of China’s Left-Behind Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellmann, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    in July 2014, promises to offer an urban hukou to 45% of theno longer obligated to offer access to education. Beijing

  5. Hidden Rotational Symmetries in Magnetic Domain Patterns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a patterned structure on a longer mesoscopic length scale. One way for this pattern to emerge from building blocks that are nominally random and disordered is through hidden...

  6. Bandwidth Study on Energy Use and Potential Energy Saving Opportunitie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    require longer reheat times and this increases the energy consumption of the process. Heat treatments and controlled processing may sometimes be performed during the hot...

  7. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power densities with expected longer cyclic life. Direct deposition of nanorods on a current collector will also translate into simple and lower cost manufacturing. In one study,...

  8. 2011-12-0015 DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    campus or remotely through the Internet, no longer requiring direct connections to hardware to access information. From a broader perspective, it's IT infrastructure convergence...

  9. Thermostats | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    surrounding environment more slowly. The lower the interior temperature, the slower the heat loss. So the longer your house remains at the lower temperature, the more energy you...

  10. COMBINING DIVERSE DATA SOURCES FOR CEDSS, AN AGENT-BASED MODEL OF DOMESTIC ENERGY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotts, Nicholas Mark; Polhill, Gary; Craig, Tony; Galan-Diaz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    and in the case of gas and oil, by whether the boiler was astandard or condensing boiler (standard boilers are no longer available after the second

  11. Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    customer needs. Renewable energy cost reductions, combinedthe likely cost of renewable energy in the longer term.Renewable Energy Credits (RECs)38 5.2 Geothermal Cost

  12. Poroelastic Backus averaging for anisotropic layered fluid- and gas ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Gelinsky, S. A. Shapiro

    1997-11-26

    is needed, seismic waves with longer wavelengths are applied. The wavelength ranges from ... for vertical seismic profiles (VSP) (1–10 m) and surface seis-.

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    year that a qualifying system functions. Under H.B. 1234, renewable energy systems installed after December 31, 2014 are no longer eligible for a prope... Eligibility:...

  14. Application of a Turbulent Metal Foil Substrate for a PGM optimized DOC on a U.S. HD Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lower platinum-metal group catalysts can be used to save money while offering equivalent or better hydrocarbon performanc and longer life and durability.

  15. Deployment Barriers to Distributed Wind Energy: Workshop Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    could be created or modified to better support the development of a distributed wind power market. Ideas included longer- term extensions of existing tax credits and an effort...

  16. Electronic Structure Theory for Radicaloid Systems and Intermolecular Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurlancheek, Westin

    2011-01-01

    3.3.4 1,3-Butadiene and Longerof 1,3-butadiene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .several radical species 1,3-Butadiene and Longer Polyenes

  17. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR MOLEUCLAR STRUCTURE DETERMINATION: THEORY AND TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    considering two separate cases, butadiene and benzene. andone longer bond. In butadiene there are two short bondscan be picked to fit butadiene. of linear polyenes increase

  18. Small Business Financing Options for Clean Energy Projects |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to revolving loan funds for direct lending andor credit enhancements to existing lenders to help reduce program risk. That should result in improved loan pricing and longer...

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. This task is a standard maintenance activity to remove chemical and hazardous materials located in the Process Buildings that are no longer required...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    planet occurrence rates by providing astrometrically determined upper mass limits on potential super-Jupiter companions at orbits of two years and longer. As part of a...

  1. Archiving EERE Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You should archive an Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) website or application when it no longer serves a purpose. Follow these guidelines for archiving.

  2. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  3. Searching for the Optimal Mix of Solar and Efficiency in Zero Net Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Anderson, R.

    2008-01-01

    Zero net energy (ZNE) buildings employ efficiency to reduce energy consumption and solar technologies to produce as much energy on site as is consumed on an annual basis. Such buildings leverage utility grids and net-metering agreements to reduce solar system costs and maintenance requirements relative to off-grid photovoltaic (PV)-powered buildings with batteries. The BEopt software was developed to efficiently identify cost-optimal building designs using detailed hour-by-hour energy simulation programs to evaluate the user-selected options. A search technique identifies optimal and near-optimal building designs (based on energy-related costs) at various levels of energy savings along the path from a reference building to a ZNE design. In this paper, we describe results based on use of the BEopt software to develop cost-optimal paths to ZNE for various climates. Comparing the different cases shows optimal building design characteristics, percent energy savings and cash flows at key points along the path, including the point at which investments shift from building improvements to purchasing PV, and PV array sizes required to achieve ZNE. From optimizations using the BEopt software for a 2,000-ft{sup 2} house in 4 climates, we conclude that, relative to a code-compliant (IECC 2006) reference house, the following are achievable: (1) minimum cost point: 22 to 38% source energy savings and 15 to 24% annual cash flow savings; (2) PV start point: 40 to 49% source energy savings at 10 to 12% annual cash flow savings; (3) break-even point: 43 to 53% source energy savings at 0% annual cash flow savings; and (4) ZNE point: 100% source energy savings with 4.5 to 8.1 kW{sub DC} PV arrays and 76 to 169% increase in cash flow.

  4. Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

  5. Life Cycle Energy and Environmental Assessment of Aluminum-Intensive Vehicle Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Advanced lightweight materials are increasingly being incorporated into new vehicle designs by automakers to enhance performance and assist in complying with increasing requirements of corporate average fuel economy standards. To assess the primary energy and carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) implications of vehicle designs utilizing these materials, this study examines the potential life cycle impacts of two lightweight material alternative vehicle designs, i.e., steel and aluminum of a typical passenger vehicle operated today in North America. LCA for three common alternative lightweight vehicle designs are evaluated: current production ( Baseline ), an advanced high strength steel and aluminum design ( LWSV ), and an aluminum-intensive design (AIV). This study focuses on body-in-white and closures since these are the largest automotive systems by weight accounting for approximately 40% of total curb weight of a typical passenger vehicle. Secondary mass savings resulting from body lightweighting are considered for the vehicles engine, driveline and suspension. A cradle-to-cradle life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for these three vehicle material alternatives. LCA methodology for this study included material production, mill semi-fabrication, vehicle use phase operation, and end-of-life recycling. This study followed international standards ISO 14040:2006 [1] and ISO 14044:2006 [2], consistent with the automotive LCA guidance document currently being developed [3]. Vehicle use phase mass reduction was found to account for over 90% of total vehicle life cycle energy and CO2e emissions. The AIV design achieved mass reduction of 25% (versus baseline) resulting in reductions in total life cycle primary energy consumption by 20% and CO2e emissions by 17%. Overall, the AIV design showed the best breakeven vehicle mileage from both primary energy consumption and climate change perspectives.

  6. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  7. ENGINEERING EVALUATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION WITH SULFUR RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.W. ROBERTS; J.W. PORTZER; S.C. KOZUP; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-05-31

    Engineering evaluations and economic comparisons of two hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) processes with elemental sulfur recovery, being developed by Research Triangle Institute, are presented. In the first process, known as the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), the SO{sub 2} tail gas from air regeneration of zinc-based HGD sorbent is catalytically reduced to elemental sulfur with high selectivity using a small slipstream of coal gas. DSRP is a highly efficient first-generation process, promising sulfur recoveries as high as 99% in a single reaction stage. In the second process, known as the Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP), the zinc-based HGD sorbent is modified with iron so that the iron portion of the sorbent can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} . This is followed by air regeneration to fully regenerate the sorbent and provide the required SO{sub 2} for iron regeneration. This second-generation process uses less coal gas than DSRP. Commercial embodiments of both processes were developed. Process simulations with mass and energy balances were conducted using ASPEN Plus. Results show that AHGP is a more complex process to operate and may require more labor cost than the DSRP. Also capital costs for the AHGP are higher than those for the DSRP. However, annual operating costs for the AHGP appear to be considerably less than those for the DSRP with a potential break-even point between the two processes after just 2 years of operation for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant using 3 to 5 wt% sulfur coal. Thus, despite its complexity, the potential savings with the AHGP encourage further development and scaleup of this advanced process.

  8. Essential Power Systems Workshop - OEM Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Gouse

    2001-12-12

    In California, idling is largely done for climate control. This suggests that climate control devices alone could be used to reduce idling. Line-haul truck drivers surveyed require an average of 4-6 kW of power for a stereo, CB radio, light, refrigerator, and climate control found in the average truck. More power may likely be necessary for peak power demands. The amount of time line-haul trucks reported to have stopped is between 25 and 30 hours per week. It was not possible to accurately determine from the pilot survey the location, purpose, and duration of idling. Consulting driver logs or electronically monitoring trucks could yield more accurate data, including seasonal and geographic differences. Truck drivers were receptive to idling alternatives. Two-thirds of truck drivers surveyed support a program to reduce idling. Two-thirds of drivers reported they would purchase idling reduction technologies if the technology yielded a payback period of two years or less. Willingness to purchase auxiliary power units appears to be higher for owner-operators than for company drivers. With a 2-year payback period, 82% of owner- operators would be willing to buy an idle- reducing device, while 63% of company drivers thought their company would do the same. Contact with companies is necessary to discern whether this difference between owner- operators and companies is true or simply due to the perception of the company drivers. Truck stops appear to be a much more attractive option for electrification than rest areas by a 48% to 21% margin. Much of this discrepancy may be due to perceived safety problems with rest areas. This survey did not properly differentiate between using these areas for breaks or overnight. The next, full survey will quantify where the truck drivers are staying overnight, where they go for breaks, and the duration of time they spend at each place. The nationwide survey, which is in progress, will indicate how applicable the results are to the US in general. In addition to the survey, we believe data loggers and focus groups will be necessary to collect the idling duration and location data necessary to compare auxiliary power units to truck stop electrification. Focus groups are recommended to better understand the driver response to APUs and electrification. The appearance and perception of the new systems will need further clarification, which could be accomplished with a demonstration for truck drivers.

  9. Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles A.; Satchwell, Andrew

    2012-05-08

    The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private sector business model where energy savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. This study was conceived as a snapshot of the ESCO industry prior to the economic slowdown and the introduction of federal stimulus funding mandated by enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This study utilizes two parallel analytic approaches to characterize ESCO industry and market trends in the U.S.: (1) a “top-down” approach involving a survey of individual ESCOs to estimate aggregate industry activity and (2) a “bottom-up” analysis of a database of -3,265 projects (representing over $8B in project investment) that reports market trends including installed EE retrofit strategies, project installation costs and savings, project payback times, and benefit-cost ratios over time. Despite the onset of an economic recession, the U.S. ESCO industry managed to grow at about 7% per year between 2006 and 2008. ESCO industry revenues are relatively small compared to total U.S. energy expenditures (about $4.1 billion in 2008), but ESCOs anticipated accelerated growth through 2011 (25% per year). We found that 2,484 ESCO projects in our database generated -$4.0 billion ($2009) in net, direct economic benefits to their customers. We estimate that the ESCO project database includes about 20% of all U.S. ESCO market activity from 1990-2008. Assuming the net benefits per project are comparable for ESCO projects that are not included in the LBNL database, this would suggest that the ESCO industry has generated -$23 billion in net direct economic benefits for customers at projects installed between 1990 and 2008. We found that nearly 85% of all public and institutional projects met or exceeded the guaranteed level of savings. We estimated that a typical ESCO project generated $1.5 dollars of direct benefits for every dollar of customer investment. There is empirical evidence confirming that the industry is responding to customer demand by installing more comprehensive and complex measures—including onsite generation and measures to address deferred maintenance—but this evolution has significant implications for customer project economics, especially at K-12 schools. We found that the median simple payback time has increased from 1.9 to 3.2 years in private sector projects since the early-to-mid 1990s and from 5.2 to 10.5 years in public sector projects for the same time period.

  10. U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Satchwell, Andrew

    2012-08-21

    The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private sector business model where energy savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. This study was conceived as a snapshot of the ESCO industry prior to the economic slowdown and the introduction of federal stimulus funding mandated by enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This study utilizes two parallel analytic approaches to characterize ESCO industry and market trends in the U.S.: (1) a ?top-down? approach involving a survey of individual ESCOs to estimate aggregate industry activity and (2) a ?bottom-up? analysis of a database of ~;;3,250 projects (representing over $8B in project investment) that reports market trends including installed EE retrofit strategies, project installation costs and savings, project payback times, and benefit-cost ratios over time. Despite the onset of a severe economic recession, the U.S. ESCO industry managed to grow at about 7percent per year between 2006 and 2008. ESCO industry revenues were about $4.1 billion in 2008 and ESCOs anticipate accelerated growth through 2011 (25percent per year). We found that 2,484 ESCO projects in our database generated ~;;$4.0 billion ($2009) in net, direct economic benefits to their customers. We estimate that the ESCO project database includes about 20percent of all U.S. ESCO market activity from 1990-2008. Assuming the net benefits per project are comparable for ESCO projects that are not included in the LBNL database, this would suggest that the ESCO industry has generated ~;;$23 billion in net direct economic benefits for customers at projects installed between 1990 and 2008. There is empirical evidence confirming that the industry is evolving by installing more comprehensive and complex measures?including onsite generation and measures to address deferred maintenance?but this evolution has significant implications for customer project economics, especially at K-12 schools. We found that the median simple payback time has increased from 1.9 to 3.2 years in private sector projects since the early-to-mid 1990s and from 5.2 to 10.5 years in public sector projects for the same time period.

  11. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

    2012-06-29

    A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration luminaires, a networked control system was installed for additional evaluation and demonstration purposes. The capability of control system to measure luminaire input power was explored in this study. A more exhaustive demonstration and evaluation of the control system will be the subject of future GATEWAY report(s).

  12. Energy and economic assessment of desiccant cooling systems coupled with single glazed air and hybrid PV/thermal solar collectors for applications in hot and humid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beccali, Marco; Finocchiaro, Pietro; Nocke, Bettina

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the energy and economic performance of desiccant cooling systems (DEC) equipped with both single glazed standard air and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/t) collectors for applications in hot and humid climates. The use of 'solar cogeneration' by means of PV/t hybrid collectors enables the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, which can be directly used by desiccant air handling units, thereby making it possible to achieve very energy savings. The present work shows the results of detailed simulations conducted for a set of desiccant cooling systems operating without any heat storage. System performance was investigated through hourly simulations for different systems and load combinations. Three configurations of DEC systems were considered: standard DEC, DEC with an integrated heat pump and DEC with an enthalpy wheel. Two kinds of building occupations were considered: office and lecture room. Moreover, three configurations of solar-assisted air handling units (AHU) equipped with desiccant wheels were considered and compared with standard AHUs, focusing on achievable primary energy savings. The relationship between the solar collector's area and the specific primary energy consumption for different system configurations and building occupation patterns is described. For both occupation patterns, sensitivity analysis on system performance was performed for different solar collector areas. Also, this work presents an economic assessment of the systems. The cost of conserved energy and the payback time were calculated, with and without public incentives for solar cooling systems. It is worth noting that the use of photovoltaics, and thus the exploitation of related available incentives in many European countries, could positively influence the spread of solar air cooling technologies (SAC). An outcome of this work is that SAC systems equipped with PV/t collectors are shown to have better performance in terms of primary energy saving than conventional systems fed by vapour compression chillers and coupled with PV cells. All SAC systems present good figures for primary energy consumption. The best performances are seen in systems with integrated heat pumps and small solar collector areas. The economics of these SAC systems at current equipment costs and energy prices are acceptable. They become more interesting in the case of public incentives of up to 30% of the investment cost (Simple Payback Time from 5 to 10 years) and doubled energy prices. (author)

  13. HARVARD UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF THE PROVOST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) has downgraded its alert from Level 3 to Level 2 for Liberia, Harvard-sponsored travel to Liberia no longer requires approval of the Provost, and Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) no longer requires screenings for travelers to campus from Liberia have ended. Anyone considering

  14. Ritual elements : a cemetery in Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefers, Kathleen Marie

    1995-01-01

    "As pines keep the shape of the wind even when the wind has fled and is no longer there So walls guard the shape of man even when man has fled and is no longer there. " -- George Seferis. The walls we make are the culmination ...

  15. Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for BBA -Bioenergetics Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The mitochondrial respiratory chain plays a crucial role in energy metabolism and its dysfunction is implicated removed from table 1. - The introduction of the proton gradient in the rate equation was no longer of the proton gradient in the rate equation was no longer approached in the paper and the corresponding parts

  16. March 30, 2010 Seismic Refraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    along the critical path (horizontal in the lower layer) hitting the lower layer at the critical angle will no longer be a straight line, as the ray path between any two points will no longer be a straight line, thus: The critical distance is t

  17. Orphan Prefixes and the Grammaticalization of Aspect in South Slavic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickey, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    preposition iz is no longer used in the spatial meaning ‘out of.’ The most extreme case is Bulgarian po-, which no longer shares the spatial meaning of SURFACE CONTACT with the preposition po to any significant degree. Another important case is the hybrid...

  18. Records Inventory Department: Library Records Management Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Keep 20 years after material no longer being used or new form received Rm 5.084.File A, drawer 4 (electronic) Library Materials Control Records. 454 US Keep each record in database until it is no longer Exhibit Materials Library Materials - N/A (not a state record) AV Keep as long as valuable Rm 2

  19. Notes on the PMC Journal List CSV file This CSV file, available from the Journal List page on the PMC site, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Notes on the PMC Journal List CSV file This CSV file, available from the Journal List page on the PMC site, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ journals/, is a list of journals that currently deposit in PMC. It includes journals that are no longer in publication or no longer deposit material in PMC

  20. Nonequilibrium Statistics of a Reduced Model for Energy Transfer in Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabak, Esteban G.

    Nonequilibrium Statistics of a Reduced Model for Energy Transfer in Waves R. E. LEE DEVILLE Courant, with the subsequent dynamics transferring the energy to longer scales. The main dissipation mechanism is wave breaking, which usually acts on much longer (gravity) waves that intermittently remove energy from the wave system

  1. Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

  2. Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.

    2012-01-01

    This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific data recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of operating wind turbines. This report is intended to help develop a basic understanding of the data needed for reliability analysis from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and analysis and reporting needs. The 'Motivation' section of this report provides a rationale for collecting and analyzing field data for reliability analysis. The benefits of this type of effort can include increased energy delivered, decreased operating costs, enhanced preventive maintenance schedules, solutions to issues with the largest payback, and identification of early failure indicators.

  3. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  4. Waste minimization in an autobody repair shop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baria, D.N.; Dorland, D.; Bergeron, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    This work was done to document the waste minimization incorporated in a new autobody repair facility in Hermantown, Minnesota. Humes Collision Center incorporated new waste reduction techniques when it expanded its old facilities in 1992 and it was able to achieve the benefits of cost reduction and waste reduction. Humes Collision Center repairs an average of 500 cars annually and is a very small quantity generator (VSQG) of hazardous waste, as defined by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The hazardous waste consists of antifreeze, batteries, paint sludge, refrigerants, and used oil, while the nonhazardous waste consists of cardboard, glass, paint filters, plastic, sanding dust, scrap metal, and wastewater. The hazardous and nonhazardous waste output were decreased by 72%. In addition, there was a 63% reduction in the operating costs. The waste minimization includes antifreeze recovery and recycling, reduction in unused waste paint, reduction, recovery and recycle of waste lacquer thinner for cleaning spray guns and paint cups, elimination of used plastic car bags, recovery and recycle of refrigerant, reduction in waste sandpaper and elimination of sanding dust, and elimination of waste paint filters. The rate of return on the investment in waste minimization equipment is estimated from 37% per year for the distillation unit, 80% for vacuum sanding, 146% for computerized paint mixing, 211% for the refrigerant recycler, to 588% per year for the gun washer. The corresponding payback time varies from 3 years to 2 months.

  5. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

  6. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Small Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Lane, Michael D.; Liu, Bing

    2010-04-30

    The Technical Support Document (TSD) for 50% energy savings in small office buildings documents the analysis and results for a recommended package of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) referred to as the advanced EEMs. These are changes to a building design that will reduce energy usage. The package of advanced EEMs achieves a minimum of 50% energy savings and a construction area weighted average energy savings of 56.6% over the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 for 16 cities which represent the full range of climate zones in the United States. The 50% goal is for site energy usage reduction. The weighted average is based on data on the building area of construction in the various climate locations. Cost-effectiveness of the EEMs is determined showing an average simple payback of 6.7 years for all 16 climate locations. An alternative set of results is provided which includes a variable air volume HVAC system that achieves at least 50% energy savings in 7 of the 16 climate zones with a construction area weighted average savings of 48.5%. Other packages of EEMs may also achieve 50% energy savings; this report does not consider all alternatives but rather presents at least one way to reach the goal. Design teams using this TSD should follow an integrated design approach and utilize additional analysis to evaluate the specific conditions of a project.

  7. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  8. Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-30

    This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

  9. The Cost-Effectiveness of Investments to Meet the Guiding Principles for High-Performance Sustainable Buildings on the PNNL Campus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Judd, Kathleen S.

    2014-08-29

    As part its campus sustainability efforts, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has invested in eight new and existing buildings to ensure they meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s requirements for high performance sustainable buildings (HPSB) at DOE sites. These investments are expected to benefit PNNL by reducing the total life-cycle cost of facilities, improving energy efficiency and water conservation, and making buildings safer and healthier for the occupants. This study examines the cost-effectiveness of the implementing measures that meet the criteria for HPSBs in 3 different types of buildings on the PNNL campus: offices, scientific laboratories, and data centers. In each of the three case studies examined the investments made to achieve HPSB status demonstrated a high return on the HPSB investments that have taken place in these varied environments. Simple paybacks for total investments in the three case study buildings ranged from just 2 to 5 years; savings-to-investment ratios all exceeded the desirable threshold of 1; and the net present values associated with these investments were all positive.

  10. Energy efficient low-income housing demonstration with Houston Habitat for Humanity. Final status report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-30

    Using DOE grant funds, the Alliance to Save Energy developed and managed an award-winning low-income housing demonstration in cooperation with Houston Habitat for Humanity at the 1996 and 1997 annual NAHB Builders Show in Houston, Texas. Using a unique group of over 30 national, state and local partners, the energy design of Houston Habitat houses was permanently upgraded to the Energy Star Homes Program threshold. Meeting Energy Star Homes Program criteria, the partner design team increased the level of efficiency approximately 30% over the 1992 Model Energy Code. This innovative design using commercially available materials added approximately $1,400 in cost-effective energy upgrades with an estimated payback of less than 8 years. The 30 public-private partners successfully demonstrated energy and resource efficient housing techniques to the 65,000 NAHB home show attendees and the over 3,000 Habitat affiliates. This project resulted in the Houston Habitat affiliate becoming the nation`s first low-income Energy Star Homes Program home builder. By the year 2000, Houston Habitat anticipates building over 500 homes to this new level of efficiency as well as set an example for other Habitat affiliates nationwide to follow. The 1997 demonstration house utilized an all-women volunteer builders team to construct a 3 bedroom home in Houston Habitat`s Woodglen Subdivision. Energy consumption was remotely metered by Texas A and M.

  11. Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home Program Certification of Production Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.; Loomis, H.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor; 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense(R) Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  12. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, P.; Podorson, D.; Varshney, K.

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques -- manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  13. Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

  14. Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Podorson, D.; Alaigh, K.

    2014-06-01

    Over one million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

  15. Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home Program Certification of Production Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.; Loomis, H.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three cold climate production builders in three U.S. cities and worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Also, BSC provided support through performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor; and increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense® Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  16. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2013-06-02

    In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

  17. Field evaluation of advanced controls for the retrofit of packaged air conditioners and heat pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2015-09-01

    This paper documents the magnitude of energy savings achievable in the field by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop units (RTUs) with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for RTUs. A total of 66 RTUs on 8 different buildings were retrofitted with a commercially available advanced controller for improving RTU operational efficiency. The controller features enhanced air-side economizer control, multi-speed fan control, and demand controlled ventilation. Of the 66 RTUs, 18 are packaged heat pumps and the rest are packaged air conditioners with gas heat. The eight buildings cover four building types and four climate conditions. Based on the data collected for about a whole year, the advanced controller reduced the normalized annual RTU energy consumption between 22% and 90%, with an average of 57% for all RTUs. The average fractional savings uncertainty was 12% at 95% confidence level. Normalized annual electricity savings were in the range between 0.47 kWh/h (kWh per hour of RTU operation) and 7.21 kWh/h, with an average of 2.39 kWh/h. RTUs greater than 53 kW and runtime greater than 14 hours per day had payback periods less than 3 years even at $0.05/kWh.

  18. New Mexico State University Campus geothermal demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuniff, R.A.; Fisher, K.P.; Chintawongvanich, P.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents the design, construction highlights, and performance of the New Mexico State University Campus Geothermal Demonstration Project at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Construction started in July 1981, first system use was January 1982, and the system was dedicated on April 21, 1982. Included herein are summary observations after two years of use. The geothermal hot water from New Mexico State University wells is used to heat potable water, which in turn provides 83 percent of the domestic hot water on the New Mexico State University campus, as well as space heat to two buildings, and for two heated swimming pools. The original system is providing service to 30 total buildings, with two additional buildings (150,000 square feet) in process of geothermal conversion.) The system overall performance has been excellent, except for geothermal well pump problems. In terms of operating efficiency, the system has exceeded the design parameters. In spite of abnormally high costs for well and pump repairs, the system has shown a positive cost avoidance of more than $118,000 for the first year of operation. For the first two full years of operation, the system has produced a net positive cost avoidance of more than $200,000. Payback on the total investment of $1,670,000 is projected to be 6 to 10 years, depending on the future prices of natural gas and electricity.

  19. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

    2013-05-01

    Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

  20. Transformation of California's Residential Photovoltaics Market Through Third-Party Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Miller, M.; Macal, C. M.; Graziano, D. J.; Heimiller, D.; Ozik, J.; Perry, T. D.

    2012-03-01

    Third-party photovoltaics (PV) ownership is a rapidly growing market trend, where commercial companies own and operate customer-sited PV systems and lease PV equipment or sell PV electricity to the building occupant. Third-party PV companies can reduce or eliminate up-front adoption costs, reduce technology risk and complexity by monitoring system performance, and can repackage the PV value proposition by showing cost savings in the first month of ownership rather than payback times on the order of a decade. We find that the entrance of third-party business models in southern California residential PV markets has enticed a new demographic to adopt PV systems that is more highly correlated to younger, less affluent, and less educated populations than the demographics correlated to purchasing PV systems. By enticing new demographics to adopt PV, we find that third-party PV products are likely increasing total PV demand rather than gaining market share entirely at the expense of existing customer owned PV demand. We also find that mean population demographics are good predictors of third-party and customer owned PV adoption, and mean voting trends on California carbon policy (Proposition 23) are poor predictors of PV adoption.

  1. Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Angelini, Tana; Masanet, Eric

    2010-07-27

    In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy consumption are available, and this Energy Guide discusses energy-efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be applied over a broad spectrum of companies. Strategies in the guide address hot water and steam, compressed air, pumps, motors, fans, lighting, refrigeration, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. This guide includes descriptions of expected energy and cost savings, based on real-world applications, typical payback periods, and references to more detailed information. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers achieve cost-effective energy reductions while maintaining product quality. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  2. Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, M; Burnham, A.

    2014-08-31

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) effort to deploy transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported petroleum, this study examines five school districts, one in Virginia and four in Texas, successful use of propane school buses. These school districts used school buses equipped with the newly developed liquid propane injection system that improves vehicle performance. Some of the school districts in this study saved nearly 50% on a cost per mile basis for fuel and maintenance relative to diesel. Using Argonne National Laboratory’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool developed for the DOE’s Clean Cities program to help Clean Cities stakeholders estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions and cost of ownership of light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles, the results showed payback period ranges from 3—8 years, recouping the incremental cost of the vehicles and infrastructure. Overall, fuel economy for these propane vehicles is close to that of displaced diesel vehicles, on an energy-equivalent basis. In addition, the 110 propane buses examined demonstrated petroleum displacement, 212,000 diesel gallon equivalents per year, and GHG benefits of 770 tons per year.

  3. Recovery of chemical values from waste gypsum. Final report, December 1989-August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.A.; Litt, R.D.

    1992-10-15

    A two-stage, two reactor process is being developed to recover sulfur or sulfuric acid and lime from waste gypsum. Waste gypsum is produced by a variety of industries including chemical, fertilizer and electric utilities. Current environmental regulations are increasing the landfill disposal cost to $30/ton or more depending on specific local conditions. These costs are expected to increase and the quantity of waste gypsum is also expected to increase. The two-stage gypsum recovery process uses two separate fluidized bed reactors to (1) reduce the gypsum to calcium sulfide (CaS) and then (2) roast the sulfide with air producing a SO2-rich gas and regenerated CaO. Fluidization and elutriation problems in the first stage were overcome to achieve up to 85 percent conversion of gypsum to CaS. Reducing gas composition, temperature, and solids residence time were shown to be the primary parameters affecting the reactions. Additional work is needed to achieve even greater conversion and to demonstrate the integrated 2-stage operation. A preliminary economic evaluation indicated a 3-year payback could be achieved for a 1000 ton/day plant. The capital cost was estimated to be $8.5 million. Operating cost savings were based on reduced disposal cost, use/sale of sulfuric acid and use/sale of lime.

  4. Building America Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification, Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor. 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  5. Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  6. Measured heating system efficiency retrofits in eight manufactured (HUD-code) homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, J.; Davis, B.; Francisco, P.; Palmiter, L.

    1998-07-01

    This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency performed on eight all-electric manufactured homes sited in the Pacific Northwest with forced-air distribution systems. These homes, like more than four million existing manufactured homes in the US, were constructed to thermal specifications that were mandated by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1976. The test protocol compares real-time measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during periods when zonal heaters heat the homes to the same internal temperature. By alternating between the furnace and zonal heaters on 2 hour cycles, a short-term coheat test is performed. Additional measurements, including blower door and duct tightness tests, are conducted to measure and characterize the home's tightness and duct leakage so that coheat test results might be linked to other measures of building performance. The testing was done at each home before and after an extensive duct sealing retrofit was performed. The average pre-retrofit system efficiency for these homes was 69%. After the retrofit, the average system efficiency increased to 83%. The average simple payback period for the retrofits ranges from 1 to 5 years in Western Oregon and 1 to 3 years in colder Eastern Oregon.

  7. Deterrents to energy conservation investment in public housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, E.; Ritschard, R.L.; Goldman, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    In an effort to reduce rising energy costs, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has strongly urged local public housing authorities (PHAs) to improve the energy efficiency of their building stock. In this study, the authors examine the relative impact on HUD and PHAs of four retrofit financing strategies used by two local housing authorities. They find that the existing Performance Funding System (PFS) regulations tend to discourage PHAs from actively pursuing cost-effective investments that improve the energy efficiency of their housing projects. The authors' results indicate that HUD policies distribute the dollar savings from conservation retrofits in such a way that HUD receives substantial benefits, while local public housing authorities get few benefits. In fact, PHAs can lose money, even in cases where there are significant energy savings and payback periods of less than three years. The authors tested several alternatives to the current regulations and found that the best way to encourage PHAs to conserve is for HUD to reimburse them for new maintenance and capital costs of the conservation retrofits.

  8. Economic penalties of problems and errors in solar energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, K.; Sparkes, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Experience with a large number of installed solar energy systems in the HUD Solar Program has shown that a variety of problems and design/installation errors have occurred in many solar systems, sometimes resulting in substantial additional costs for repair and/or replacement. In this paper, the effect of problems and errors on the economics of solar energy systems is examined. A method is outlined for doing this in terms of selected economic indicators. The method is illustrated by a simple example of a residential solar DHW system. An example of an installed, instrumented solar energy system in the HUD Solar Program is then discussed. Detailed results are given for the effects of the problems and errors on the cash flow, cost of delivered heat, discounted payback period, and life-cycle cost of the solar energy system. Conclusions are drawn regarding the most suitable economic indicators for showing the effects of problems and errors in solar energy systems. A method is outlined for deciding on the maximum justifiable expenditure for maintenance on a solar energy system with problems or errors.

  9. Lubricant oil production: The proper marriage of process and catalyst technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, G.L.; Suchanek, A.

    1996-12-01

    As the industry moves into the next millennium, higher product quality demands to meet the higher performance needs of modern engine technology and rising costs of traditional good quality lube crudes are driving lubricant base oil manufacturers to select hydroprocessing options versus traditional solvent refining techniques. This paper discusses how to properly select the best economic hydroprocessing technology necessary to produce high quality lubricant base oils and waxes. The economic success of such operations depends on the proper combination of process and catalyst technologies that maximizes yields of high quality products with minimum consumption of hydrogen resources and process utilities. This is particular true on the extreme end of the quality spectrum, namely, Very High Viscosity Index (VHVI) base oils and food grade white oils and waxes where there is no room for marginal product quality. Multiplicity of operations is also becoming more important as refiners try to upgrade their facilities with as little capital expense as possible, while at the same time, broaden their high valued product slate to recoup these expenses in the shortest possible payback period. Lyondell Licensing and Criterion Catalyst have put together an effective alliance based on years of development and commercial experience in both the process and catalyst areas to assist lubricant oil manufacturers in meeting these future challenges using as much existing equipment and infrastructure as is practical. Their experience will permit the proper fitting of the chemistry of hydroprocessing to make lubricant base oils to existing or new operations.

  10. Demonstration of energy conservation for multi-deck board dryers. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-08

    A study was made to determine the feasibility of recover and reuse of low level heat from the exhausts of multi-deck dryers used to dry boards in the building materials industry. There are approximately 1000 dryers of this type in the USA, with no heat recovery equipment. These dryers are used in the manufacture of: roof insulation board, ceiling tile and panel stock, wood fiber sheathing, gypsum board, and veneer plywood. Pilot scale tests and analyses show that heat recovery designs utilizing several types of heat exchange equipment are feasible. These include the following: indirect contact air-to-air heat exchangers for preheating combustion air for the dryer furnaces; direct contact air-to-water heat exchangers using water sprays to heat process water; and indirect contact air-to-liquid heat exchangers to heat recirculating liquid in a plant building heating system. The systems recommended for design and installation at the Rockdale plant include all three of the types of heat exchangers. The preliminary estimate for the installed cost for these systems at the Rockdale plant is $565,000 (1979 dllars). Annual heat recovery of 186,000 million Btu is projected with a value of $545,000 using gas costs of $3.00 per million Btu. Payback based on a discounted cash flow analysis using ten year depreciation is about two years.

  11. Cogeneration: Economics and politics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prince, R.G.H.; Poole, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    Cogeneration is a well established process for supplying heat and electricity from a single fuel source. Its feasibility and implementation in any particular case depend on technical, economic and internal and external {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors, including government policies. This paper describes the current status of small scale industrial cogeneration in Australia. A model has been developed to analyse the technical and economic aspects of retrofitting gas turbine cogeneration in the size range 3 to 30MW to industrial sites. The model demonstrates that for typical Australian energy cost data, the payback and the size of the optimized cogeneration plant depend strongly on electricity buyback prices. Also reviewed are some of the {open_quotes}cultural{close_quotes} factors which often militate against an otherwise economic installation, and government policies which may retard cogeneration by concern about local air emissions or favor it as increasing efficiency of energy use and reducing greenhouse emissions. A case study of a small gas turbine plant in Australia is outlined. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Usage possibilities of diesel aggregate for room heating and electric energy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kegl, K.; Vor Ic, J.

    1998-07-01

    Article shows reasons for introduction of cogeneration generally. The present manner of heating and electricity connection at the Faculty of electrical engineering and computer science in Maribor is described. The idea is to build in the cogeneration complex in heating room next to the existent boilers. Gathered data of electricity and heat demand are presented. Paper deals with question of electrical, heat and fuel connections. Comparison between two types of cogeneration (motor and turbine) helps to make a decision: cogeneration with motor. Depending to the daily electricity demands diagram and arranged heating diagram the authors focused to the small cogeneration (around 200 kWe). Availability of natural gas at the placement of the cogeneration leads us to the gas motor but leaves the diesel engine possibility opened. A brief economical estimation includes common investment costs regarding to the savings of energy and fuel expenses. Payback time calculation gives precedence to the gas motor if diesel is used with motor instead of fuel oil. Except the energy savings there are greater benefits of the cogeneration: it can be good study case for students of electrotechnics as well as future mechanical engineers.

  13. Evaluation of the heating operation and transmission district: Feasibility of cogeneration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cable, J.H.; Gilday, L.T.; Moss, M.E.

    1995-11-01

    The General Services Administration, through its National Capital Region, operates a district heating system - called the Heating Operation and Transmission District - that provides steam to approximately 100 government buildings in Washington, D.C. HOTD is examining a host of options that will improve its ability to provide reliable, environmentally sound, and cost-effective service to its customers. This report evaluates one of those options - cogeneration, a technology that would enable HOTD to produce steam and electricity simultaneously. The study concluded that, under current regulations, cogeneration is not attractive economically because the payback period (15 years) exceeds Federal return-on-investment guidelines. However, if the regulatory environment changes to allow wheeling (transmission of power by a non-utility power producer to another user), cogeneration would be attractive; HOTD would save anywhere from $38 million to $118 million and the investment would pay back in 7 to 10 years. Although incorporating cogeneration into the HOTD system has no strong benefit at this time, the report recommends that GSA reevaluate cogeneration in one or two years because Federal regulations regarding wheeling are under review. It also recommends that GSA work with the District of Columbia government to develop standards for cogeneration.

  14. COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

    2003-09-01

    Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  17. Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

    1999-06-29

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

  18. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  19. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  1. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; Thompson, Lisa; Letschert, Virginie

    2010-11-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a rulemaking process in which it amended the existing energy efficiency standards for residential water heaters. A key factor in DOE?s consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers. Determining such impacts requires a comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This paper describes the method used to conduct the life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period analysis for gas and electric storage water heaters. It presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment, including heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters, for a representative sample of U.S. homes. The study included a detailed accounting of installation costs for the considered design options, with a focus on approaches for accommodating the larger dimensions of more efficient water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also considered airflow requirements, venting issues, and the impact of these products on the indoor environment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design reduces the LCC in the majority of homes for both gas and electric storage water heaters, and heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters provide a lower LCC for homes with large rated volume water heaters.

  2. Geothermal non-power application: The PNOC experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chua, S.E.; Abito, G.F.; Berbano, M.C. [Philippine National Oil Company, Quezon City (Philippines)

    1996-12-31

    A 1 MWth multi-crop dehydration plant using waste geothermal energy is being operated by the Philippine National Oil Company-Energy Development Corporation (PNOC-EDC) at one of the reinjection pads at the Southern Negros Geothermal Project (SNGP). The facility is composed of two heat exchange systems, seven modular dryers of three different designs, a processing and storage area, a laboratory for quality control tests and an office for general administration and other services. Products from the plant include copra (dried coconut meat), dried fruits, fish and squid, and other agricultural products. Pilot demonstration runs showed the techno-economic: viability of the drying plant. Calculated IRR for production of copra and fruits is 19.3 %, giving a payback period on capital investment of 4.2 years. Sustainability of the operation of the plant requires detailed logistical, production, and marketing plans for the assumed production mix. The facility, which is from a grant from the United Nations Development Programme, is proposed to be {open_quotes}turned over{close_quotes} to a PNOC-formed consortium of farmers cooperatives and associations for its continuous operation and management as a profitable business venture for the community.

  3. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Gilligan, Donald; Singer, Terry

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the issue of non-energy benefits within the context of the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry?a growing industry comprised of companies that provide energy savings and other benefits to customers through the use of performance-based contracting. Recent analysis has found that ESCO projects in the public/institutional sector, especially at K-12 schools, are using performance-based contracting, at the behest of the customers, to partially -- but not fully -- offset substantial accumulated deferred maintenance needs (e.g., asbestos removal, wiring) and measures that have very long paybacks (roof replacement). This trend is affecting the traditional economic measures policymakers use to evaluate success on a benefit to cost basis. Moreover, the value of non-energy benefits which can offset some or all of the cost of the non-energy measures -- including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoided capital costs, and tradable pollution emissions allowances-- are not always incorporated into a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of ESCO projects. Nonenergy benefits are clearly important to customers, but state and federal laws that govern the acceptance of these types of benefits for ESCO projects vary widely (i.e., 0-100percent of allowable savings can come from one or more non-energy categories). Clear and consistent guidance on what types of savings are recognized in Energy Savings agreements under performance contracts is necessary, particularly where customers are searching for deep energy efficiency gains in the building sector.

  4. Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland - Second Year of Data Collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

    2013-08-01

    Steam heated buildings often suffer from uneven heating as a result of poor control of the amount of steam entering each radiator. In order to satisfy the heating load to the coldest units, other units are overheated. As a result, some tenants complain of being too hot and open their windows in the middle of winter, while others complain of being too cold and are compelled to use supplemental heat sources. Building on previous research, CNT Energy identified 10 test buildings in Chicago and conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam system balancing. A package of common steam balancing measures was assembled and data were collected on the buildings before and after these retrofits were installed to investigate the process, challenges, and the cost effectiveness of improving steam systems through improved venting and control systems. The test buildings that received venting upgrades and new control systems showed 10.2% savings on their natural gas heating load, with a simple payback of 5.1 years. The methodologies for and findings from this study are presented in detail in this report. This report has been updated from a version published in August 2012 to include natural gas usage information from the 2012 heating season and updated natural gas savings calculations.

  5. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  6. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

    2013-07-01

    Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

  7. Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  8. Amplifying Real Estate Value through Energy&WaterManagement: From ESCO to 'Energy Services Partner'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2004-06-08

    The energy service company (ESCO) business model could become significantly more effective by integrating the energy-efficiency purveyor and their capital into the underlying building ownership and operation partnership, rather than the current model in which the ESCO remains an outsider with higher transaction costs and limited interest and participation in the value created by the cost savings. Resource conservation advocates rarely use the language of real estate to articulate the cost effectiveness of capital improvements aimed at reducing utility costs in commercial and residential income properties. Conventional methods that rely on rarefied academic notions of simple payback time or a narrow definition of return on investment fail to capture a significant component of the true market value created by virtue of reduced operating expenses. Improvements in energy and water efficiency can increase the fundamental profitability of real estate investments by raising Net Operating Income (NOI), and hence returns during the holding period, and, ultimately, proceeds at time of sale. We introduce the concept of an Energy Services Partner, who takes an equity interest in a real estate partnership in exchange for providing the expertise and capital required to reduce utility operating costs. Profit to all partners increases considerably as a result. This approach would also help to address a crisis facing ESCOs today stemming from their considerable liabilities (through guaranteed savings) and negligible offsetting assets.

  9. Review of U.S. ESCO industry market trends: An empirical analysis of project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Osborn, Julie G.; Singer, Terry E.

    2003-03-01

    This article summarizes a comprehensive empirical analysis of U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) industry trends and performance. We employ two parallel analytical approaches: a comprehensive survey of firms to estimate total industry size and a database of {approx}1500 ESCO projects, from which we report target markets and typical project characteristics, energy savings and customer economics. We estimate that industry investment for energy-efficiency related services reached US $2 billion in 2000 following a decade of strong growth. ESCO activity is concentrated in states with high economic activity and strong policy support. Typical projects save 150-200 MJ/m2/year and are cost-effective with median benefit/cost ratios of 1.6 and 2.1 for institutional and private sector projects. The median simple payback time is 7 years among institutional customers; 3 years is typical in the private sector. Reliance on DSM incentives has decreased since 1995. Preliminary evidence suggests that state enabling policies have boosted the industry in medium-sized states. ESCOs have proven resilient in the face of restructuring and will probably shift toward selling ''energy solutions,'' with energy efficiency part of a package. We conclude that a private sector energy-efficiency services industry that targets large commercial and industrial customers is viable and self-sustaining with appropriate policy support both financial and non-financial.

  10. A comprehensive energy management program for commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehadi, M.T.

    1982-06-01

    The property management industry wants to be on the frontier of energy management programs. A program instituted by Charles E. Smith Management company is outlined in this paper. A standard of 65000 BTU's of energy per square foot per year is established as a guideline to measure energy use. Energy use patterns are determined in commercial and residential buildings (pie diagrams are given). The Utility Trend and Analysis Chart was established to keep a historic record of use. A detailed energy audit was performed, in which the energy auditor performs a late-night walk through to determine base load. A list of various conservation opportunities is drawn up. The list is then prioritized, economic justifications arrived at by payback method, net present value method, or internal rate of return method. Implementation of cost effective measures means keeping up with the latest technology. Building science, the study of thermal characteristics of building materials, is employed. A helicopter survey utilizing thermographic equipment was made of major complexes to show heat loss on videotape. A central computer system was installed to monitor usage twenty four hours a day.

  11. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  12. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, Joyce

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  13. Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, J.

    2011-04-01

    More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

  14. Discussion of long-range weather prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-09-10

    A group of scientists at Los Alamos have held a series of discussions of the issues in and prospects for improvements in Long-range Weather Predictions Enabled by Proving of the Atmosphere at High Space-Time Resolution. The group contained the requisite skills for a full evaluation, although this report presents only an informal discussion of the main technical issues. The group discussed all aspects of the proposal, which are grouped below into the headings: (1) predictability; (2) sensors and satellites, (3) DIAL and atmospheric sensing; (4) localized transponders; and (5) summary and integration. Briefly, the group agreed that the relative paucity of observations of the state of the atmosphere severely inhibits the accuracy of weather forecasts, and any program that leads to a more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather Predictions, the pay-back of accurate long-range forecasts should more than justify the expenditure associated with improved observations and forecast models required. The essential step is to show that the needed technologies are available for field test and space qualification.

  15. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

    1998-03-01

    Economics and/or political intervention may one day dictate the conversion from oil or natural gas to coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn oil or gas. In recognition of this future possibility the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technical Center (DOE-FETC) supported a program led by ABB Power Plant Laboratories with support from the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University with the goal of demonstrating the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of the overall goal the following specific objectives were targeted: develop a coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical and operational requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; maintain boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb NO{sub 2} per million Btu; achieve combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and determine economic payback periods as a function of key variables.

  16. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, Parker; Podorson, David; Varshney, Kapil

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques, manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder are two story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  17. Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan; Conlin, Francis; Podorson, David; Alaigh, Kunal

    2014-06-01

    More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 public housing authorities (PHAs) across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low-cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two PHAs to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation 10 ten housing units. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6%-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of units per year nationally.

  18. Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xing [Lamar University] [Lamar University; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

  19. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  20. D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George H.

    2012-10-24

    Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the 'converter-foil' which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra 'bonus' energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for 'hot spot' ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10% - meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in CA within a year. This will usher in the technology development Phase of ICF after years of research aimed at achieving breakeven experiment. Methods to achieve the high energy gain needed for a competitive power plant will then be a key developmental issue, and our D-cluster target for Fast Ignition (FI) is expected to meet that need.

  1. Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-06-01

    Unminable coal beds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this report is to provide a final topical report on enhanced coal bed methane recovery and CO2 sequestration to the U.S. Department of Energy in fulfillment of a Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership milestone. This report summarizes work done at Idaho National Laboratory in support of Phase II of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. Research that elucidates the interaction of CO2 and coal is discussed with work centering on the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Sorption-induced strain, also referred to as coal swelling/shrinkage, was investigated. A new method of obtaining sorption-induced strain was developed that greatly decreases the time necessary for data collection and increases the reliability of the strain data. As coal permeability is a strong function of sorption-induced strain, common permeability models were used to fit measured permeability data, but were found inadequate. A new permeability model was developed that can be directly applied to coal permeability data obtained under laboratory stress conditions, which are different than field stress conditions. The coal permeability model can be used to obtain critical coal parameters that can be applied in field models. An economic feasibility study of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming was done. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 Mg) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin, they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

  2. Comparing Perception of Real and Virtual Architectural Space Using Video Game Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spross, Matthew

    2011-04-25

    source is an interview with 20th century Egyptian Architect Hassan Fathy. In it he states: The architecture of steel or aluminium [sic] and glass has little human reference. This is no longer architecture but engineering. Engineering has taken...

  3. 4.1.1.50 High Level Techno-Economic Analysis of Innovative Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    no longer needed. BETO did however, have a need for a way to put error bars around TEA results. Hence, scope was changed to introduce a Monte Carlo type uncertainty...

  4. The effects of length, content, and repetition on television commercial effectiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Surendra N.; Cole, Catherine A.

    1993-02-01

    Many advertisers have argued that 15-second television commercials should be used only to reinforce effects created by longer commercials. However, this recommendation is based on studies that have several weaknesses, ...

  5. TI-I~ FOR~ST~R FOR~STRY CLUB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ton Dodge stake-body truck, capable of moving 24 men without too much difficulty. No longer will you was a high light of the summer camp program. The Woods Industries Scho

  6. McGill, Homer's physics 21 November, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    of the complexity of the problem, environmental skep4cism was once tenable. No longer. It is 4me to flip from skep4cism to ac4vism." -Michael Shermer, editor

  7. TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .......................................................................................................... 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    : BRANCH-SUPPORTED MEETINGS, FISCAL YEAR 2004 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 2007: BRANCH PUBLICATIONS, FISCAL YEAR 2004 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 2007.................................................................. APPENDICES-10 The information in this document is no longer current. It is intended for reference only. #12

  8. Pandas are actually pretty gregarious, study finds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -program) Long, and Chuan Chuan were captured, given the collars and released back into the wild where spend long periods of time together throughout the year. The male panda Chuan Chuan traveled longer

  9. Damn the city, dam the suburbs : redefining the single family home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desmond, Marissa Grace

    2010-01-01

    Today, we no longer realize public perception of home ownership in the United States is primarily shaped by government sponsored programs. In the 1940's, however, it was these programs that created a change in the options ...

  10. BULGARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES PROBLEMS OF ENGINEERING CYBERNETICS AND ROBOTICS, 64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    , usage at cruise ports, nursing homes or assisted living facilities, and many other miscellaneous To alert if the cart is no longer within the required distance of operator; · Prefabricated cart: o

  11. Structural blast design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kieval, Tamar S. (Tamar Shoshana), 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Blast design is a necessary part of design for more buildings in the United States. Blast design is no longer limited to underground shelters and sensitive military sites, buildings used by the general public daily must ...

  12. I Have Seen the Light and It's Green...or Pink, or Blue, or Purple...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    last much longer than fluorescents. Some of the ones I like maintain 70% of their initial light output after 40,000 or 50,000 hours. LED Lesson 3: LEDs are expensive, although...

  13. Procurement Services Announcements 1. Fiscal Year 2012 YearEnd Deadlines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    no longer require the use of the State of Texas travel card in order to process advances for prepaid System until the FY13 budgets are loaded. Once the FY13 budgets are available, advances for prepaid

  14. PREPAID PARKING COUPON INSTRUCTIONS PTS reserves the right to limit the quantities that a department can request/purchase.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    PREPAID PARKING COUPON INSTRUCTIONS PTS reserves the right to limit the quantities means that your department has prepaid for parking for your visitors. If the visitor parks for longer

  15. Design and implementation of a reliable reconfigurable real-time operating system (R3TOS) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iturbe, Xabier

    2013-07-01

    Twenty-first century Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are no longer used for implementing simple “glue logic” functions. They have become complex arrays of reconfigurable logic resources and memories as well as ...

  16. Harboring chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey Arthur)

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane shelters have become the unknown point of last resort for many coastal communities. Harboring displaced populations during a hurricane and it's chaotic aftermath are no longer seen as a need in a coastal communities ...

  17. Experimental and computational studies of electric thruster plasma radiation emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ēelik, Murat Alp

    2007-01-01

    Electric thrusters are being developed for in-space propulsion needs of spacecraft as their higher specific impulse enables a significant reduction in the required propellant mass and allows longer duration missions. Over ...

  18. Segmentation strategies for managing retail supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Catherine G. (Catherine Gloria)

    2011-01-01

    High-technology manufacturing companies often face rapid price decline and capacity constraints. Especially in the retail side of the business where the supply chain is much longer and revenue is sometimes not recognized ...

  19. Scrapping Old Cars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    fleet has been aging, in part because cars just last longer.households today own more cars than they did thirty yearsInstead of trading in an old car for a new one, they are now

  20. Fact #845 November 3, 2014 From 1970 to 2013 the Share of Older...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 2013 the Share of Older Vehicles in Operation has Increased In 1970 only 3% of the cars in operation were 15 years old or older. With cars lasting much longer today, 19% of...