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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Energy Payback for Energy Systems Ensembles During Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During periods of growth, the energy payback performance of new energy generating technologies deviates substantially from the usual static measures of energy return on investment (EROI), and time to breakeven (tB) for ...

Gutowski, Timothy G.

2

Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

3

Breakeven Prices for Photovoltaics on Supermarkets in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photovoltaic (PV) breakeven price is the PV system price at which the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. This point is also called 'grid parity' and can be expressed as dollars per watt ($/W) of installed PV system capacity. Achieving the PV breakeven price depends on many factors, including the solar resource, local electricity prices, customer load profile, PV incentives, and financing. In the United States, where these factors vary substantially across regions, breakeven prices vary substantially across regions as well. In this study, we estimate current and future breakeven prices for PV systems installed on supermarkets in the United States. We also evaluate key drivers of current and future commercial PV breakeven prices by region. The results suggest that breakeven prices for PV systems installed on supermarkets vary significantly across the United States. Non-technical factors -- including electricity rates, rate structures, incentives, and the availability of system financing -- drive break-even prices more than technical factors like solar resource or system orientation. In 2020 (where we assume higher electricity prices and lower PV incentives), under base-case assumptions, we estimate that about 17% of supermarkets will be in utility territories where breakeven conditions exist at a PV system price of $3/W; this increases to 79% at $1.25/W (the DOE SunShot Initiative's commercial PV price target for 2020). These percentages increase to 26% and 91%, respectively, when rate structures favorable to PV are used.

Ong, S.; Clark, N.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

PV vs. Solar Water Heating- Simple Solar Payback  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Solar energy systems hang their hats on payback. Financial payback is as tangible as money in your bank account, while other types of payback—like environmental externalities—are not usually calculated in dollars. There’s no doubt that photovoltaic (PV) and solar hot water (SHW) systems will pay you back. Maybe not as quickly as you’d like, but all systems will significantly offset their cost over their lifetimes. Here we’ll try to answer: Which system will give the quickest return on investment (ROI)?

5

Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

"Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

ENERGY PAYBACK OPTIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC POWER GENERATOR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the thermoelectric module should be performed. Active cooling and the design of the heat sink are customized to findENERGY PAYBACK OPTIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC POWER GENERATOR SYSTEMS Kazuaki Yazawa Dept model for optimizing thermoelectric power generation system is developed and utilized for parametric

8

Community Wind Handbook/Calculate Simple Payback | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan,Information FeedColombia:|Calculate Simple Payback

9

Simple Payback: The Wrong Tool for Energy Project Analysis?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will want to know the risk of losing their investment, or at least the risk of failing to invest in more valuable alternatives. Here?s how payback measures can frustrate energy management efforts. The greater the investor?s concern with investment loss..., or paying the cost to avoid it. The energy at-risk concept is depicted here: Figure 1: Energy At-Risk Annual energy use, current application in-place Annual energy use, energy-efficient alternative Energy consumption avoided...

Russell, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use the Acceptable Crop Price worksheet to determine breakeven prices for your crops. ACCEPTABLE PRICE WORKSHEET Prepared by: David Bau - Regional Extension Educator, Agricultural Business Management (August 2012) CROP INCOME EXAMPLE YOUR FARM EXAMPLE YOUR FARM (A) Crop Acres 400 400 176 46 (C) Price

Netoff, Theoden

11

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Scientific Breakeven for Fusion Energy For the past 40 years, the IFE fusion research community has adopted: achieving a fusion gain of 1 as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scientific breakeven." E. Moses, Status of the NIF Project, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Report: "Laser fusion experiments, facilities, and diagnostics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory", by H of 1 defines scientific breakeven. (This is therefore a Livermore definition!) The recent National

13

LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A light-emitting diode (LED) is a solid-state lighting source that switches on instantly, is readilyLED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis light fixtures in existing or new buildings across campus. Scope of Work On August 27, 2012, the six

Johnston, Daniel

14

No longer available splash screen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddy Archeological Site Stocktonis no longer

15

Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic or nitride Th fuels relative to the U counterpart fuels. (authors)

Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results show how the savings vary among customers facing different electricity prices and other conditions. At 11.5 EER, at least 80% of the users achieve a positive LCC savings. At 12.0 EER, the maximum efficiency analyzed, mean LCC savings are lower but still positive. For the {ge} $65,000 Btu/h to <135,000 Btu/h equipment class, 59% of users achieve a positive LCC savings. For the $135,000 Btu/h to <240,000 Btu/h equipment class, 91% of users achieve a positive LCC savings.

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Progress in Photovoltaics Research and Applications, 14:179-190, 2006 Energy Pay-Back and Life Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle CO2 Emissions of the BOS in an Optimized 3.5 MW PV Installation J.M. Mason1 , V.M. Fthenakis2 , T-cycle greenhouse gas emissions are 29 kg CO2-eq. /m2 . From field measurements, the energy payback time (EPT, energy payback, greenhouse gas emissions #12;INTRODUCTION This study is a life-cycle analysis

18

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY performance, energy rating, c-Si, cost reduction 1 INTRODUCTION Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) is a framework PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE Vasilis Fthenakis1,2 , Rick Betita2 , Mark Shields3 , Rob

19

Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

Johnston, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Net Energy Payback and CO{sub 2} Emissions from Three Midwestern Wind Farms: An Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper updates a life-cycle net energy analysis and carbon dioxide emissions analysis of three Midwestern utility-scale wind systems. Both the Energy Payback Ratio (EPR) and CO{sub 2} analysis results provide useful data for policy discussions regarding an efficient and low-carbon energy mix. The EPR is the amount of electrical energy produced for the lifetime of the power plant divided by the total amount of energy required to procure and transport the materials, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The CO{sub 2} analysis for each power plant was calculated from the life-cycle energy input data.A previous study also analyzed coal and nuclear fission power plants. At the time of that study, two of the three wind systems had less than a full year of generation data to project the life-cycle energy production. This study updates the analysis of three wind systems with an additional four to eight years of operating data.The EPR for the utility-scale wind systems ranges from a low of 11 for a two-turbine system in Wisconsin to 28 for a 143-turbine system in southwestern Minnesota. The EPR is 11 for coal, 25 for fission with gas centrifuge enriched uranium and 7 for gaseous diffusion enriched uranium. The normalized CO{sub 2} emissions, in tonnes of CO{sub 2} per GW{sub e}h, ranges from 14 to 33 for the wind systems, 974 for coal, and 10 and 34 for nuclear fission using gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion enriched uranium, respectively.

White, Scott W. [University of Kansas, Kansas Geological Survey (United States)], E-mail: whites@kgs.ku.edu

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Integrated Design: Because Nothing Lasts Longer Than Bad Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Design: Because Nothing Lasts Longer Than Bad Design Paul Westbrook Sustainable Development Manager, LEED AP Texas Instruments Facilities Senior Fellow, US State Department Energy & Climate Partnership for the Americas (ECPA) ESL-KT-14...

Westbrook, P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

PURDUE EXTENSION Estimating Breakeven Sales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, based on price and sales forecasts? · How low must fixed costs be to break even? · How sensitive, packaging, and energy costs (fuel, electricity, natural gas) associated with #12;2 Purdue Extension and special offers) by the number of units you expect to sell. If you have created a sales forecast as part

24

Single molecule imaging with longer x-ray laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In serial femtosecond crystallography, x-ray laser pulses do not need to outrun all radiation damage processes because Bragg diffraction exceeds the damage-induced background scattering for longer pulses ($\\sim$ 50--100 fs). This is due to a "self-gating pulse" effect whereby damage terminates Bragg diffraction prior to the pulse completing its passage through the sample, as if that diffraction were produced by a shorter pulse of equal fluence. We show here that a similar gating effect applies to single molecule diffraction with respect to spatially uncorrelated damage processes like ionization and ion diffusion. The effect is clearly seen in calculations of the diffraction contrast, by calculating the diffraction of average structure separately to the diffraction from statistical fluctuations of the structure due to damage ("damage noise"). Our results suggest that sub-nanometer single molecule imaging with longer pulses, like those produced at currently operating facilities, should not yet be ruled out. The...

Martin, Andrew V; Caleman, Carl; Quiney, Harry M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Duke Health Briefs: Positive Outlook Linked to Longer Life in Heart Patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duke Health Briefs: Positive Outlook Linked to Longer Life in Heart Patients keywords : CardiologyMinute. Here's some health advice to take to heart: if you want to live longer, stay happy. A recent Duke study of more than 800 heart patients found that those who reported experiencing more positive emotions

Hunter, David

26

Living Longer on Less THe neW economic (in)securiTy of seniors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Living Longer on Less THe neW economic (in)securiTy of seniors INSTITUTE ON ASSETS & SOCIAL POLICY to measuring economic security applied in this report builds on previous work on middle class economic security for Social Policy and Manage- ment at Brandeis University, is dedicated to the economic well-being and social

Snider, Barry B.

27

Modification of the GS LT Paired-end Library Protocol for Constructing Longer Insert Size Libraries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paired-end library sequencing has been proven useful in scaffold construction during de novo assembly of genomic sequences. The ability of generating mate pairs with 8 Kb or greater insert sizes is especially important for genomes containing long repeats. While the current 454 GS LT Paired-end library preparation protocol can successfully construct libraries with 3 Kb insert size, it fails to generate longer insert sizes because the protocol is optimized to purify shorter fragments. We have made several changes in the protocol in order to increase the fragment length. These changes include the use of Promega column to increase the yield of large size DNA fragments, two gel purification steps to remove contaminated short fragments, and a large reaction volume in the circularization step to decrease the formation of chimeras. We have also made additional changes in the protocol to increase the overall quality of the libraries. The quality of the libraries are measured by a set of metrics, which include levels of redundant reads, linker positive, linker negative, half linker reads, and driver DNA contamination, and read length distribution, were used to measure the primary quality of these libraries. We have also assessed the quality of the resulted mate pairs including levels of chimera, distribution of insert sizes, and genome coverage after the assemblies are completed. Our data indicated that all these changes have improved the quality of the longer insert size libraries.

Peng, Ze; Peng, Ze; Hamilton, Matthew; Ting, Sara; Tu, Hank; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Residential GSHPs: Efficiency With Short Payback Periods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for residential application as an alternative to conventional HVAC systems. A listing of current space heating energy sources are presented which are then followed by a technology overview as advances have made GSHPs more efficient. The article concludes with potential energy savings offered by GSHPs and a brief market overview.

Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-lived Surface Caps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; (c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

Piet, S. J.; Breckenridge, R. P.; Burns, D. E.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-Lived Surface Caps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone’s back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Burns, Douglas Edward

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

Bender, Edward T. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Color No Longer A Sign of Bondage: Race, Identity and the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment (1862-1865)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Color No Longer A Sign of Bondage" is an account of the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment from its earliest days in 1862 to the regiment's triumphant return to Kansas in November 1865. This work encompasses ...

Ringquist, John Paul

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Improving performance and rotordynamic characteristics of injection compressors via much longer balance-piston and division-wall seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictions are presented for a selected compressor using longer hole-pattern seals with L/D ratios from 0.5 to 2.5. Results were obtained for back-to-back and in-line compressors with the seal located at mid-span and at 82% of rotor span...

Rodrigues Rodrigues, Margarita

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Break-even Costs for Cow/Calf Producers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of calf by sub- *Professor, Extension Beef Cattle Specialist and Research Sci- entist; The Texas A&M University System. L-5220 9/98 Texas Agricultural Extension Service? Chester P. Fehlis, Deputy Director ? The Texas A&M University System ? College Station... per cow calf weight ($)180 200 220 240 260 280 300 320 340 360 380 400 350 lbs. .............................................. impossible, unless costs are below $175 per cow ........................................... 450 lbs. 80 89 98 >100...

Sprott, L. R.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Carbon and energy payback of variable renewable generation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The continued drive to reduce Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions in order to mitigate climate change has led to an increase in demand for low-carbon energy sources, and the development of new technologies to harness the ...

Thomson, Rachel Camilla

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Effective Steam Trap Selection/Maintenance - Its Payback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In oil refineries and petrochemical plants large number of steam traps are used to discharge condensate from steam mains, tracers and process equipment. Early efforts on steam traps focused almost exclusively on their selection and sizing...

Garcia, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Payback enormous for variable-frequency motor drives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City Utilities of Springfield's (Mo) 200-MW Southwest power station is a 200-MW plant anchored around a single coal-fired steam generator and its major support systems, including an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and two wet limestone scrubbers. In the late 1980s, engineers at Southwest began evaluating the feasibility of installing variable-frequency drives (VFD) to reduce the plant's parasitic load and boost overall performance. This article reports on VFDs installed to control the induced draft (i-d) and forced-draft (f-d) fan motors at the plant. The devices have surpassed the utility's expectations by reducing parasitic load, improving combustion control, and increasing overall plant reliability. Virtually every major plant component--including the ESPs and scrubbers--performs better as a result of the retrofit.

Collins, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ceramic tube seals cut heat loss, achieve six month payback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methane reformer at the Celanese Chemical Company's Bishop, TX plant operates at approximately 1900/sup 0/F. The reformer has 32 tubes (9'' diameter) that pass through the firebox. Openings around the tubes measure 11'' in diameter to accommodate horizontal and vertical thermal expansion and movement as well as to facilitate tube removal. The gaps around the tubes permitted cool air to be drawn into the firebox (caused by slight negative pressure) and also allowed radiant heat to escape causing the reformer to operate at a lower than desired level of thermal efficiency. Celanese contracted to retrofit the old rigid firebrick roof in the methane reformer with a 10'' thick ceramic fiber module lining. The gaps around the tubes were sealed by using a special tube seal made from Nextel woven ceramic fiber fabric, a 1984 CHEMICAL PROCESSING Vaaler Award winner (Mid-November 1984, p.52). The Nextel fabric used in this application is a heat resistant textile that has a continuous use temperature of 2200/sup 0/F - well above the 1900/sup 0/F operating temperature of the reformer. The tube seals have been working exactly as intended, verified by observation through inspection ports. Temperatures in the penthouse area above the roof dropped from 240/sup 0/F to 150/sup 0/F. The reduction in heat losses has been attributed to the elimination of the gaps around each tube by the seals and to the improved K-factor of the ceramic module lining. The tube seals have paid for themselves within six months of installation. At that time, the seal boots were inspected and showed no signs of wear. With these results, the improved efficiency of the methane reformer promises to yield additional economic benefits.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Estimating the Payback Period of Additional Insulation | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, Safety and Health Assessments

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PV modules, with a life measured in decades, will typically be in place longer than the outdoor unit of a HVAC system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unit of a HVAC system. When the performance of an HVAC system deteriorates, it is usually inspected remain installed on the roof even after the system is no longer being used. Although HVAC units have only jumpers and screws effectively bond all parts of the listed device together. HVAC components are typically

Johnson, Eric E.

42

Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions -Vehicle idling gets zero miles per gallon; unnecessary idling wastes fuel and pollutes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions - Vehicle idling gets zero miles per, no University vehicle or piece of equipment is to be idled in a non-emergency situation. The operator of the vehicle/equipment is to turn-off the unit and the keys are to be removed from the ignition. EXEMPTIONS

Powers, Robert

43

Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A BreakEven Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Break­Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Efficiency # Michele Co, Dee A demonstrated that a better branch pre­ dictor can increase the energy­efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval­ uating the tradeoff between processor energy­efficiency and branch

Co, Michele

45

Children's Brain Development Benefits from Longer Gestation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping of the Human Brain. NeuroImage, Sendai, Japan.2005). Regional deficits in brain volume in schizophrenia: areso- nance imaging of brain development in premature and

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov PCCPxantheascover Imagine a cell phone battery that lasted a whole week on a single charge. A car battery that worked...

47

'Thirsty' Metals Key to Longer Battery Lifetimes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrinceton Plasma

48

Sleepless in Seattle No Longer Joshua Reich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ a significant waste of both energy and money. Indeed, potential savings can amount to millions of dollars per have been proposed, few have been evaluated via real deployments. We have built and deployed a light lightweight approach effected significant energy savings by allowing user machines to sleep (most sleeping

Narasayya, Vivek

49

Payback Analysis for Ground Source Heat Pump Retrofits Using eQuest Modeling Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There has been much research and analysis done on the performance and potential energy savings related to installing a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system. Much of this research has been dedicated to the new construction industry, and focused on a...

Wahlers, Drake

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Energy Conservation Recommendations, Implementation Costs, and Projected Paybacks for Georgia's Targeted Schools and Hospitals Conservation Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the past year the Georgia Tech Research Institute performed technical assistance studies on over 100 school and hospital buildings under a program funded by the Governor's Office of Energy Resources. This program is known as the Targeted...

Brown, M. L.; Moore, D. M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

QUANTIFYING RESIDENTIAL PV ECONOMICS IN THE US PAYBACK vs. CASH FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plains, NY, in the greater New York City metro area. Without any incentives such a system should cost ENERGY VALUE Richard Perez ASRC, The University at Albany 251 Fuller Road Albany, NY 12203 perez parallel, the paper addresses another aspect of economic feasibility: the value of energy produced

Perez, Richard R.

52

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baseline Efficient Air Conditioners . . . . . . 28 AverageEfficient Air Conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Btu/h Commercial Air Conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

'Autonomic Materials for Smarter, Safer, Longer-Lasting Batteries' was submitted by the Center for Electrical Energy Storage (CEES) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CEES, an EFRC directed by Michael Thackery at Argonne National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from three institutions: ANL (lead), Northwestern University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Electrical Energy Storage is 'to acquire a fundamental understanding of interfacial phenomena controlling electrochemical processes that will enable dramatic improvements in the properties and performance of energy storage devices, notable Li ion batteries.' Research topics are: electrical energy storage, batteries, battery electrodes, electrolytes, adaptive materials, interfacial characterization, matter by design; novel materials synthesis, charge transport, and defect tolerant materials.

Thackeray, Michael (Director, Center for Electrical Energy Storage); CEES Staff

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Break-Even Investment in a Wind Energy Conversion System for an Irrigated Farm on the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of using a wind energy system for irrigation. The value of wind energy was estimated on both a static basis (where the annual value of wind power was assumed to be constant over the life...

Hardin, D. C.; Lacewell, R. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Break-Even Formulation for Evaluating Branch Predictor Energy Michele Co, Dee A.B. Weikle, and Kevin Skadron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrated that a better branch pre- dictor can increase the energy-efficiency of the system, even if the new a simple, effective metric for eval- uating the tradeoff between processor energy-efficiency and branch and an energy-efficiency target, we are able to evaluate the energy-efficiency of several existing branch

Co, Michele

56

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Energy Association WindPower 2002 Conference, 3-5 JunePRESENTED AT GLOBAL WINDPOWER 2004 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS W IND EModel, prepared by Bergey Windpower Co. for the National

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers ApplyResistant: ABreak-even Cost for Residential Solar

58

Nissan: Automaker improves energy performance 7.2% with a four-month payback using Superior Energy Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy Advanced Framing -

59

Effect of lower feedstock prices on economics of MTBE complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economic evaluation of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) complex was carried out starting from n-butane and by captive production of methanol from natural gas. The processing steps consist of isomerization of n-butane to isobutane, dehydrogenation of isobutane to make isobutene, and finally, the reaction of isobutene with methanol to produce MTBE. Two different plant sizes were considered, and the effect of 30% lower feedback prices on profitability was studied. It was found that the raw materials cost is a dominant component, composing about 55% of the total production cost. An internal rate of return of 19% could be realized for 500,000 tons per annum MTBE complex based on economic data in mid-1993. The payback period estimated at this capacity was 3.8 years, and the break-even capacity was 36.6%.

Rahman, F.; Hamid, S.H.; Ali, M.A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

West Virginian No Longer Worried About Family's Safety | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

mountain winters hit for the last 12 years, Michael Shepard and his family had only a wood stove in their house for heat, plus a few kerosene heaters when the stove didn't do the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Longer life for glyco-based stationary engine coolants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large, stationary diesel engines used to compress natural gas that is to be transported down pipelines generate a great deal of heat. Unless this heat is dissipated efficiently, it will eventually cause an expensive breakdown. Whether the coolant uses ethylene glycol or propylene glycol, the two major causes of glycol degradation are heat and oxidation. The paper discusses inhibitors that enhance coolant service life and presents a comprehensive list of do`s and don`ts for users to gain a 20-year coolant life.

Hohlfeld, R. [Dow Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Longer Life Lithium Ion Batteries with Silicon Anodes - Energy Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,Local CorrelationsConditions. |

63

Sandia National Laboratories: capture more wind with longer rotors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wavearc-faultbest paperbiomarineblendingthe

64

APPLYING A PV GRID-TIED SYSTEM IN INDUSTRIAL SECTOR WITH PAYBACK REDUCTION: A CASE STUDY IN K.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The key to creating clean energy is to use renewable energy sources. Saudi Arabia has an abundance of solar radiation due to its geographical location;… (more)

Oweedha, Wayel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Energy payback and CO{sub 2} gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

Kulcinski, G.L.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Mixing Appropriations and Private Financing to Meet Federal Energy Management Goals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares several strategies for mixing appropriations and private financing in a typical federal agency that has identified $100 million in required energy conservation measures (ECMs) at its facilities. The analysis shows that in order to maximize savings and minimize overall life-cycle cost, the best strategy for the agency is to use private financing to fund as many of the ECMs as possible within the statutory maximum 25-year project term, beginning with the ECMs with the shortest paybacks. Available appropriations should either be applied to a privately financed project as a one-time payment from savings (i.e., as a buydown ) or used to directly fund longer-payback ECMs that cannot be included in the privately financed project.

Shonder, John A [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

allowing a longer period of infection within an individual host and by facilitating re-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T cells and neutralizing antibodies. It augments viral load and thus accelerates the destruc- tion of CD4, dis- cussing genetic differences among hosts in theirimmuneresponsesandimmunemem- ory profiles Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. Martin Nowak is at the Institute

Cai, Long

68

adiposity offaster longer-distanced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

separated by a coiled 1 km optical fiber, with a total loss of 8.9 dB (87%). A. J. Bennet; D. A. Evans; D. J. Saunders; C. Branciard; E. G. Cavalcanti; H. M. Wiseman; G. J....

69

22 APPLIED NEUROLOGY April 2006 www.appneurology.com and to have a much longer half-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than ROS.13 Thus, acrolein may be a key factor in perpetuat- ing oxidative stress, and it may represent an effective target for therapeutic treatments. This review presents evidence that acrolein toxicity occurs present preliminary data suggesting that an acrolein-trapping agent may significantly enhance viability

Shi, Riyi

70

Saccadic suppression during reading activity : is the spill-over effect weaker after a longer saccade?   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although it has generally thought that the duration of saccades should be subtracted from the reading time in eye movement research, Irwin (1998) has demonstrated that lexical processing such as word recognition is not ...

Yatabe, Kiyomi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - air longer life Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State University Collection: Engineering 12 Darwinian Definition of Life Self-sustaining and reproducing Summary: Evolution 12;Darwinian Definition of Life...

72

Destroy thIs repon when no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory foe. AOORESS (City, Stlltt', lind liP Cod~) 7b. ADDRESS (CIty, 511ltt'. lind lIP Cod~) PO Box 631.NTlFICATlQN NUM8ER ORGANIZATION Of .ppiic.b/~) US Army Corps of Engineers DAEN-CW 8e. ADDRESS (CIty, SIIItt'. lind Macrophyte Growth and Sediment Nutrient Availability 12. PERSONAL AUTtiOR(S) Barko, John w.; Smart, R

US Army Corps of Engineers

73

Florida Current transport variability: An analysis of annual and longer-period signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

n f o Article history: Received 23 June 2009 Received in revised form 9 December 2009 Accepted 7 scale variability given the strong higher frequency energy present. The annual cycle represents less variability. Comparison of the Florida Current, NAO and wind stress curl records shows that a recently

74

1982 Annual Energy Review. [1960 to 1982; in some cases for a longer period  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total energy consumption in the United States equaled 70.9 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1982, a decline of 4.1% compared to 1981. Depressed economic activity was a major factor in reducing total energy demand. However, conservation also played a role as energy consumption per dollar of GNP continued to fall. Most of the decline in energy use involved petroleum and natural gas. Reduced petroleum demand translated into a 21.7% reduction in net petroleum imports. Natural gas demand and production fell, prompted by reduced economic activity and a substantial increase in prices. Crude oil prices fell for the first time in more than a decade. Weakened market conditions adversely affected the rate of domestic oil and gas exploration and development activities. Nonetheless, domestic crude oil production rose 1.2%. International activities were highlighted by a decline in crude oil production, especially by members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), a decrease in crude oil prices, and a substantial increase in electricity production by nuclear-powered utility plants in non-Communist countries. Energy production in the United States in 1982 remained essentially unchanged from that of 1981, as small gains in hydroelectric power and nuclear power production were offset by losses in natural gas production. For the third straight year, energy consumption in the United States declined. Whereas declines in 1980 and 1981 resulted primarily from consumer response to higher prices and conservation, the 1982 decline reflected primarily an economic slowdown, especially in industry. Annual per capita consumption fell to 306 million Btu, the lowest level since 1967. Changes in energy prices in 1982 were mixed. Whereas most petroleum prices declined, prices of natural gas, coal, and electricity rose.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

ARCHIVED MATERIAL This page is no longer being reviewed/updated.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specific measures for cases of non-compliance, such as the Nuclear Weapons Free Zone (NWFZ) treaties, such as with the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the U.N. is the depository of the treaty. In the Millennium Declaration. Article 12 in the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) indicates procedures to be followed in case of non

Sussex, University of

76

High Speed Pumps Are No Longer Limited to Low Flow Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, the high-speed centrifugal pump was developed prior to World War II for rocket engine fuel pump applications for its advantages of light weight, compactness and dry running capability. Industrial derivatives were introduced in the 60’s...

Burke, P. Y.

77

Breaking Up (Hydrogen) No Longer As Hard To Do | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFApril 2015CommerceDepartmentBlowerBreaking Up

78

Fact #656: January 3, 2011 Consumers Hold onto Vehicles Longer | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 20112: July 19, 2010Energy 5: December

79

U.S. No Longer Building Any Nuclear Weapons | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration go on moon walk at U.S.TimelineTruman

80

The economics of photovoltaics in the commercial, institutional and industrical sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the application of a model which computes system break-even capital costs, array break-even capital costs and profits from photovoltaic investments in the industrial, commercial and institutional ...

Cox, Alan J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to the high crude oil price and also owing toin terms of Breakeven Crude Oil Price (BCOP) in $/bbl whichrespectively. Breakeven Crude Oil Price, $/bbl BCOP CERT-2

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

An Analysis of the Retail and Lifecycle Cost of Battery-Powered Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the retail cost and break-even gasoline price, becauseof the retail cost and the break-even gasoline price, foreven gasoline prices at least double, and initial retail

Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

There are more than 45,000 industrial and commercial boilers larger than 10 MMBtu/hr in the United States with a total fuel input capacity of 2.7 million MMBtu/hr. Efficiency of existing boilers can be improved in three ways; replacement with new boilers, replacement of the burner, or installation of a combustion control system. While installation of a new boiler or replacement of the burner can lead to the greatest efficiency gains, the higher costs associated with these measures typically leads to longer payback periods than combustion control systems.

84

11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to estimate fuel cost savings, capital investment, and payback. Checklists for assessing opportunities

85

Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HVAC retrofits. In contrast, median payback time for lighting only Breakdown of industry revenues by market

Goldman, Charles A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AFLEET Tool allows fleets to calculate payback periods and emissions benefits of alternative fuel vehicles.

87

The feasibility of applying geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study concludes that direct use technologies, especially desalinated water production, can contribute significantly to the value added process and the overall economic viability in developing a geopressured resource. Although agriculture and aquaculture applications are marginal projects when they are the only use of a geopressured well, the small margin of profitability can contribute to improving the overall economics of the direct use development. The added complexity from a technical and management aspect may add to the overall risk and unpredictability of the project. Six combination of direct uses received economic evaluation that resulted in 15% discounted payback periods ranging from 4 to over 10 years. Many other combinations are possible depending on the resource and market variables. Selection of appropriate technologies and sizes of applications will be established by the developer that engages in geopressured resource utilization. Currently, many areas of the country where geopressured resources are located also have surplus electrical capacity and generation, thus power utilities have been selling power for less than 2 cents per kWH, well below a reasonable breakeven value for geopressured produced electricity. However, when the energy demand of the integrated geopressured facility is large enough to install power generation equipment, operating expenses can be reduced by not paying the 10 to 12 cents per kWH utility rate. The study includes an analysis of a geothermal turbine unit installed with a desalination and an agriculture/aquaculture facility, taking advantage of the cascading energy values. Results suggest that this scenario becomes profitable only where the market price for electricity exceeds five cents per kWH.

Lunis, B.C.; Negus-de Wys, J.; Plum, M.M. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Lienau, P.J. (Oregon Inst. of Tech., Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center); Spencer, F.J. (International Management Services (United States)); Nitschke, G.F. (Nitschke (George F.) (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The information in this document is no longer current. It is intended for reference only. TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ..........................................................................................................27 DOWN SYNDROME .....................................................................................................26 WILLIAMS SYNDROME (WMS

Rau, Don C.

89

Education no longer deferred: the possibilities of educating urban african american males in a single gender school.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to investigate the emerging school culture of Excel Academy for Boys [Pseudonym] located in the Southwestern region of the United States, and how it contributes to the social and academic development of urban African...

James, Marlon C.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Time-Variant Probabilistic Model for Predicting the Longer-Term Performance of GFRP Reinforcing Bars Embedded in Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) has many potential advantages as reinforcement in concrete structures, the loss in tensile strength of the GFRP reinforcing bar can be significant when exposed to the high alkali environments. Much...

Kim, Jeongjoo

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

The nature of biodiversity has long been a central focus in biology. This may not seem the case any longer,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restricted set of organisms--the house mouse (Mus musculus), the fruit fly (Drosophila spp.), the nematode of diversity is, in a sense, provided by"adaptation"to an "ecological niche." Adaptation results from the force of selection; and the notion of the ecological niche,to which the organism adapts,remains obscure and poorly

92

2 MARCH 2007 VOL 315 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org1224 he world may no longer face a serious  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(4). India and Pakistan, for instance, have previously tested nuclear weapons and are now thought of global nuclear warfare, but regional conflicts continue. Within this milieu, acquiring nuclear weapons). Eight nations are known to have nuclear weapons. In addition, North Korea may have a small, but growing

Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

93

SMALL, ABOUT 5/S" OR SHORTER MEDIUM TO LARGE, LONGER THAN 5/S INCH IPRONOTUM WITH PRONOTUIII ABSENT,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEARLY ALL OF ABDOMEN PRONOTUM OF ABDOMEN OR EXTENDING ORIENTAL COCKROACH WOOD ROACH ABOUT 1/4 INCH WIDE CON~CUOUS BROWN-BANDED COCKROACH (s..IIt1 .","cfilium) I I iWOOD ROACH PRONOTUM SOLI) DARK COLOR

94

The information in this document is no longer current. It is intended for reference only. TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON CHILD HEALTH CAFFEINE INTAKE, SPONTANEOUS ABORTION, AND REDUCED FETAL GROWTH).....................................................................17 PREVENTING PROBLEM BEHAVIOR AMONG MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS (GOING PLACES)..................17

Rau, Don C.

95

Impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Incorporated under the Energy $avings Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This impact evaluation of a refrigeration control system (RCS) recently installed at Vitamilk Dairy, Inc. (Vitamilk) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The RCS installation at Vitamilk uses microcomputer- based controls to automate refrigeration equipment previously controlled manually. This impact evaluation assessed how much electricity is being saved at Vitamilk as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. On a unit savings basis, this project will save 9.7 kWh/tonne (8-8 kWh/ton) of milk and ice cream produced, based on the product mix for June 1992 through May 1993, representing a 28% reduction in energy consumption. The project was installed in 1992 for a total cost of $129,330, and Vitamilk received payment of $62,974 from Bonneville in 1993 for the acquisition of energy savings. The real levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville is 8.5 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars) over the project`s assumed 15-year life, and the real levelized cost to the region is 17.9 mills/kWh (in 1993 dollars), not including transmission and distribution effects. Based on the expected project installation costs and energy savings benefits, the RCS would not have been implemented by Vitamilk without the E$P acquisition payment. The expected acquisition payment reduced the estimated payback period from 7.0 to 2.8 years. Although Vitamilk would generally require an energy conservation project to have a payback period of two years or less, the slightly longer payback period was accepted in this case.

Brown, D.R.; Dixon, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Economic Implications of Alternative Cotton Production Strategies in the Lower Rio Grand Valley of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiment Station, Neville P. Clarke, Director The Texas A&M University System, College Station, Texas Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 1 Characteristics of Cotton Production 2 Conventional Cotton 2 Short-Season Cotton 2 Study Area 3 Objectives 3 Review... 12 Management Effect 12 Economic Implications 12 Per-Acre Net Returns 13 Breakeven Analysis 13 Breakeven Yields 14 Breakeven Prices 15 Conclusions 15 Limitations of the Study 16 REFERENCES 17 APPENDIX: BUDGETS OF SHORT-SEASON AND CONVENTIONAL...

Shaunak, R. K.; Lacewell, R. D.; Norman, John

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analysis of Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Truck Technologies Using Diesel, LNG, Electricity, and Hydrogen, as the Fuel for Various Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various powertrains and alternative fuel options have beenthe corresponding breakeven alternative fuel price needed totruck, hybridization, alternative, fuel cell, fuel economy,

Zhao, Hengbing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the gasoline-equivalent fuel retail price, excluding exciseprice is the full retail price of gasoline, including allon the retail cost and break-even gasoline price, because

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Waste to Energy and Absorption Chiller: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All measured performance characteristics corresponded well to manufacturer's specifications or were within the expected range for this type of incinerator. The simplified economic analysis showed a payback of period 4.5 years. An optimized payback...

Wolpert, J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Financial Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The first step in financing a street lighting retrofit is a detailed financial analysis. Because street lighting systems are designed to last ten or twenty years, or even longer, all aspects of first costs, ongoing expenses, and long-term savings are important. While a preliminary or first-level analysis can be used to determine such things as simple payback, rate of return, and cost of light, the results may neglect a number of important economic considerations, such as the time value of money, additional savings and expenses and their relative timing, and future energy price escalations. Hence a first-level analysis does not typically provide the end user with sufficient details to make a fully informed decision. For this reason, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) recommends a full life cycle cost/benefit analysis (LCCBA).

106

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

"This work has been submitted to the IEEE for possible publication. Copyright may be transferred without notice, after which this version may no longer be accessible."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as in the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) system. The interconnection of different control areas can of the whole system. The two famous WECC cases in the summers of 1996 and 2000 were both associated with poorly

108

Tell Barack Obama the Truth The Whole Truth Embers of election night elation will glow longer than any prior election. Glowing even  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and will be gone within 50 years if CO2 emissions continue to increase. This threatens the fresh water supply, including heavy rains, storms and floods on the one hand, and droughts and fires on the other

Hansen, James E.

109

"This work has been submitted to the IEEE for possible publication. Copyright may be transferred without notice, after which this version may no longer be accessible."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Some electric utility companies realize the importance of the power qual- ity problem, and they invest- lems due to voltage sags. Computer, industrial con- trol systems, and adjustable speed drives are espe, McGranaghan, and Mehta [3] presented the effect of voltage sags on motors and drives. When a single

111

Mapping molecular flexibility of spin labeled proteins on the nanosecond and longer time scales via CW lineshape analysis and osmolyte-perturbation EPR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unfolded proteins and protein folding studied by NMR. Chem.resonance as a probe for protein folding/unfolding of the C-and implications for protein folding. Nat. Struc. Biol. 5:

López, Carlos Javier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

1. Are you aware of manure sampling and testing procedures? 2. Do you store livestock waste for longer than 90 days on your property?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Manure Storage and Treatment Facilities B.L. Harris, D.W. Hoffman and F.J. Mazac, Jr.* B-6030 ¥ Zerle L. Carpenter, Director ¥ The Texas A&M University System ¥ College Station, Texas TEX5A5Syst Rural and wastewater) should be stored in an environmentally sound manner until they can be applied to land

Mukhtar, Saqib

113

Mapping molecular flexibility of spin labeled proteins on the nanosecond and longer time scales via CW lineshape analysis and osmolyte-perturbation EPR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nanometer range by pulse EPR. Chem. Phys. Chem. 3:927-Augusto, O. and Vaz, S.M 2007. EPR spin-trapping of proteinWeber, R.T. 2010. Quantitative EPR. Springer- Verlag/Wien.

López, Carlos Javier

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Tripos Questions in Optimization IB (198598) Parts of some of these questions are no longer relevant to the syllabus. You should not be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; : : : ; S n g, and that the demands at the ports fD 1 ; : : : ; Dm g are given by d 1 ; : : : ; dm , where s 1 the rate of energy dissipation, given by I(f) = 1 2 X i;j2S a \\Gamma1 ij f 2 ij : Here S denotes the finite to m ports. Assume that there are quantities s 1 ; : : : ; s n of the goods at depots fS 1

Weber, Richard

115

Sermon for Corporate Communion, Trinity Term 2014 And now I am no longer in the world, but they are in the world, and I am  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that their energy and life have long since left them, often even if that relationship is quite seriously toxic best-selling book reflecting on his years of counselling, The Examined Life ­ tells the story of his

Capdeboscq, Yves

116

Solar Power Purchase Agreements  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Power Purchase Agreements Brian Millberg | Energy Manager, City of Minneapolis Direct Ownership * Financial: Even at 3kW installed cost, simple payback is 18 years (initial...

117

Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complete an in-depth energy audit and analysis to baselineof measures identified in the energy audit with a payback ofon energy management, energy audits and analysis, routines

McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Establishing the value of advanced glazings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrochromic window would yield a simple payback of six years, based on recovery of annual operating costs alone, if its price

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHP enabled fuel cell adoption, demonstrating how sensitive the results are to investment costs,costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Cradle to Grave Framework for Environmental Assessment of Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts and costs of photovoltaic systems: Current state ofEnergy Payback Time for Photovoltaic Modules,” ProceedingsLife-cycle assessment of photovoltaic modules: Comparison of

Zhang, Teresa; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tennessee: U.S. Automaker Improves Plant's Performance, Saves...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

by payback periods of one to three years, which is the general standard across the automobile industry. By carefully ranking and selecting potential measures and projects, Nissan...

122

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have lower operational costs per kWh produced. There is alsoper kWh of energy, the energy payback time (EPBT), the cost

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Leveraging Manufacturing for a Sustainable Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

payback time Carbon footprint Efficiency improvement (forin embedded energy, carbon footprint, etc. ) would be moreenergy consumption or carbon footprint in operation of the “

Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Saccrifical Protective Coating Materials that can be Regenerated...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in flux Complete flux recovery from dead end to cross flow mode Developed economic model for proposed process Payback period: 2 yrs * Build pilot scale...

125

2002 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

payback period of just three months, LLNL's project effectively conserves water, prevents pollution, and reduces maintenance costs. Photo of Goodfellow Air Force Base Team (l to...

126

Ir. Charles Mussche 8 Spruce St, New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Electricity Assessments, Biogas Plant Feasibility Assessments and Investment Payback, PV for the construction of a biogas plant resulting in a 74% reduction in electricity needs

127

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

confirmed that installation of renewable energy generating projects (wind and large scale solar photovoltaic) is not financially viable as payback realization would take greater...

128

Evaluating the costs and benefits of increased funding for public transportation in Chicago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) off-peak ridership, is at or slightly below break-even with respect to net benefits if the CTA cost structure and tax source of subsidy remains unchanged. In order to justify any significant additional long-term ...

Schofield, Mark L., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

147 Lifecycle cost (break-even gasoline price): base-casegrease. 37B part: Fuel Gasoline, for the conventional ICEVs.BTU-from-battery to mi/BTU-gasoline. C OST SUMMARY (F ORD T

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Market Research Berkeley FIRST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between home size and energy use 3 Total Market potential in the next 3 years3.Total Market potential;4 Purchase factors (211 responses) In the recent past, when you have been offered services by solar electric for other reasons (please specify) 22.5% 45 Comments: Poor paybackComments: Poor payback Trees shades my

Kammen, Daniel M.

132

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for FALL 2012 The Registrar's Office previously notified you regarding continuous probation informing you that you're no longer eligible to enroll classes through regular university.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for FALL 2012 The Registrar's Office previously through regular university. Please follow the checklist below to guide you through the procedures that you and need to follow the procedures below: Improve both my SFSU and Overall GPAs to the minimum 2

133

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for Spring 2014 The Registrar's Office previously notified you regarding continuous probation informing you that you're no longer eligible to enroll classes through regular university.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for Spring 2014 The Registrar's Office classes through regular university. Please follow the checklist below to guide you through the procedures and need to follow the procedures below: Improve both my SFSU and Overall GPAs to the minimum 2

134

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for SPRING 2013 The Registrar's Office previously notified you regarding continuous probation informing you that you're no longer eligible to enroll classes through regular university.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for SPRING 2013 The Registrar's Office classes through regular university. Please follow the checklist below to guide you through the procedures and need to follow the procedures below: Improve both my SFSU and Overall GPAs to the minimum 2

135

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for Fall 2013 The Registrar's Office previously notified you regarding continuous probation informing you that you're no longer eligible to enroll classes through regular university.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for Fall 2013 The Registrar's Office previously through regular university. Please follow the checklist below to guide you through the procedures that you and need to follow the procedures below: Improve both my SFSU and Overall GPAs to the minimum 2

136

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for Fall 2014 The Registrar's Office previously notified you regarding continuous probation informing you that you're no longer eligible to enroll classes through regular university.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures for Students with a Probation Lock Hold for Fall 2014 The Registrar's Office previously through regular university. Please follow the checklist below to guide you through the procedures that you and need to follow the procedures below: Improve both my SFSU and Overall GPAs to the minimum 2

137

SPECIFIC AIMS: The Maxwell M. Wintrobe Research Building has served as a central research building for the University of Utah School of Medicine for nearly 30 years. However, the current facilities no longer meet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Neurobiology & Anatomy. Aim 2 - To design and create a sustainable research environment that is energy the University of Utah's goals for sustainable design and energy efficiency. The second step is to fully remodelSPECIFIC AIMS: The Maxwell M. Wintrobe Research Building has served as a central research building

Marc, Robert E.

138

FRONTISPIECE. Three-striped Warblers (Basileuterus tristriatus) were studied in the northern Andes of Venezuela. Temperate and tropical parulids differ strongly in life histories. Three-striped Warblers have smaller clutches, longer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Venezuela. Temperate and tropical parulids differ strongly in life histories. Three-striped Warblers have(4):667­678, 2009 BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE THREE-STRIPED WARBLER IN VENEZUELA: A CONTRAST BETWEEN TROPICAL traits of the Three-striped Warbler (Basileuterus tristriatus) from 146 nests in Venezuela and compare

Martin, Thomas E.

139

A Retrofit Tool for Improving Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing buildings will dominate energy use in commercial buildings in the United States for three decades or longer and even in China for the about two decades. Retrofitting these buildings to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use is thus critical to achieving the target of reducing energy use in the buildings sector. However there are few evaluation tools that can quickly identify and evaluate energy savings and cost effectiveness of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for retrofits, especially for buildings in China. This paper discusses methods used to develop such a tool and demonstrates an application of the tool for a retrofit analysis. The tool builds on a building performance database with pre-calculated energy consumption of ECMs for selected commercial prototype buildings using the EnergyPlus program. The tool allows users to evaluate individual ECMs or a package of ECMs. It covers building envelope, lighting and daylighting, HVAC, plug loads, service hot water, and renewable energy. The prototype building can be customized to represent an actual building with some limitations. Energy consumption from utility bills can be entered into the tool to compare and calibrate the energy use of the prototype building. The tool currently can evaluate energy savings and payback of ECMs for shopping malls in China. We have used the tool to assess energy and cost savings for retrofit of the prototype shopping mall in Shanghai. Future work on the tool will simplify its use and expand it to cover other commercial building types and other countries.

Levine, Mark; Feng, Wei; Ke, Jing; Hong, Tianzhen; Zhou, Nan

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

140

Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative technologies. As the technology gains a foothold in its target markets and demand increases, the costs will decline in response to improved manufacturing efficiencies, similar to trends seen with other technologies. Transparency Market Research forecasts suggest that the CHP-FCS market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of greater than 27 percent over the next 5 years. These production level increases, coupled with the expected low price of natural gas, indicate the economic payback period will move to less than 5 years over the course of the next 5 years. To better understand the benefits of micro-CHP-FCSs, The U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe fuel cells in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is evaluating these systems in terms of economics, operations, and their environmental impact in real-world applications. As expected, the economic analysis has indicated that the high capital cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs results in a longer payback period than typically is acceptable for all but early-adopter market segments. However, a payback period of less than 3 years may be expected as increased production brings system cost down, and CHP incentives are maintained or improved.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as shown in equation (2), (2) ) NR is the net revenue ($ per acre), TR is the total revenue ($ per acre), TVC is the total variable cost ($ per acre), and TFC is the total fixed cost ($ per acre). 21 3.1.2 Calculation of Breakeven Carbon Price (BCP...) The Breakeven Carbon price (BCP) is calculated according to equation (3). (3) BCPQGHGPDC =?? )( or (4) BCPQGHGQGHG NR base base = ? ? ) The GHG quantity in the denominator of equation (3) is the amount of net GHGE stored or emitted by each alternative...

Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Priority Questions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

condensing vs. non-condensing furnaces. That is, consumers who have good payback economics for condensing furnaces are actually less likely to be affected by a rule than those...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - asphalt technology development Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

...7 Kicking the Asphalt Around: Foamed Asphalt... Co-Products and Bio Oil The Payback of Green Warm-Mix Asphalt at MnROAD Video of several Source:...

144

Electric Power Reliability in Chemical Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The biggest limiting factor to solving the actual problems is the dollar cost associated with that solution. Each solution must have a payback period that meets the economic criteria for return on investment for either the industry or the utility....

Cross, M. B.

145

A Louisiana Refinery Success Story  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manager, operations manager and production manager. From 2004 through 2006, the team presented a series of ESG seminars at the refinery site. The numerous models demonstrated quantitative savings with 3- to 12-mo paybacks. For a complete SSI turnkey...

Kacsur, D.

146

Rank Project Name Directorate,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1 NATIONAL LABORATORY FY02 Funded Pollution Prevention Projects 0.4 Years (~5 months) #12;

147

IRS Parking Facility Lighting Retrofit Reduces Annual Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in Kansas City, Missouri. The retrofit resulted in annual energy savings of 2 million kWh, annual cost savings of over 122,000, and a simple payback of 2.5 years....

148

General Assembly Meeting: February 10, 2013 Disclaimer: Meeting minutes are not official until approved by the General Assembly. While every attempt is made  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fund? 1. Andrew Trexler: Hopefully more money from donors. Also, the savings from green projects would a financial payback. ii. Sam Usdan: Help me out with solar panels! f. OEAC i. ITC #12;ii. Martin Malabanan

Royer, Dana

149

Engineering, Financial and Net Energy Performance, and Risk Analysis for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrating solar power plant. A set of engineering performance, financial and net energy models were developed as tools to predict a plant’s engineering performance, cost and energy payback. The models were validated by comparing the predicted results...

Luo, Jun

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy Information: The Key to Cost-Effective Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyzes the cost-effectiveness- simple payback, Net Present Value (NPV) and Return on Investment (ROI) -of permanently installed energy consumption monitoring equipment used as the basis for applying value-added engineering services...

McBride, J. R.; Flanagan, D. E.

151

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by batterybattery minimum state of charge, dimensionless EV battery charging efficiency, dimensionless EV battery discharging efficiency, dimensionless electricity storage

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

As a result of the energy audit, the following work will be performed; Replace 10 HVAC roof top units at city hall (payback estimated at 6.93 years)- preparation of a bid...

153

Techno-Economic Design Tools Used in Selecting Industrial Energy Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's design, performance, and initial installed cost. A flexible investment analyses is procedure forms the basis of the economic evaluation; payback period (in years) and percent of return on investment are calculated for competing alternative heat recovery...

Hanus, N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

sodium lighting fixtures to T-5HO fluorescent lights. The installation of 580 light-emitting diode taxiway lights will result in a one-year payback and significant maintenance...

155

PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. 2006; 14:275280  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. 2006; 14 COMMUNICATION: ACCELERATED PUBLICATION Photovoltaics Energy Payback Times, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and External University, The Netherlands Life cycle assessments and external cost estimates of photovoltaics have been

156

Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Quick-Service Restaurants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Document describing PNNL's project to develop a package of energy efficiency measures that demonstrate the feasibility of achieving a 50% energy savings for quick-service restaurants with a simple payback of 5 years or less.

Zhang, Jian; Schrock, D. W.; Fisher, D. R.; Livchak, A.; Zabrowski, D. A.; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

With a total implementation cost of 16,000, the project yielded a simple payback of 5.4 years. Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station Through Pump...

158

Better Buildings Alliance, Advanced Rooftop Unit Campaign: Rooftop Unit Measurement and Verification (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides facility managers and building owners an introduction to measurement and verification (M&V) methods to estimate energy and cost savings of rooftop units replacement or retrofit projects to estimate paybacks or to justify future projects.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

Boisvert, Jeff

160

What is a business plan? A business plan is a tool used to organize a business idea, resources, management and clients. The tool is meant to plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at by investors very carefully. It should detail costs, expenses, capital, break-even analysis, estimated cash1 What is a business plan? A business plan is a tool used to organize a business idea, resources do you get the product to your client(s)? What are the costs to make the product? What should

Johnson, Eric E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Contents lists available at ScienceDirect journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011 Keywords: Wind power Offshore wind power Levelized cost of energy Breakeven priceQ1 a b s t r a c that drive these costs, we develop a pro-forma cash flow model to calculate two results: the levelized cost other new renewable energy technologies, though it is more costly than land-based wind power and most

Firestone, Jeremy

162

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost and the marginal fuel savings (assuming a base case of ten cents per kWhper kWh, which would bring it in line with the break-even costcost per mile: electricity vs. gasoline PRICE OF ELECTRICITY ($/kWh)

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Households are also directly Along with the direct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is nationally widespread and there are historical shortages of all crops, grain prices are at record or near the historical yield times the pre-drought corn price. For Iowa farmers to break-even given the pre-drought yield record levels. High grain prices will offset portions of the losses for many producers. A demonstration

Chen, Tsing-Chang "Mike"

164

MagnetoInertial Fusion Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009). The key point here is that breakeven-class MIF driver facilities, which already exist (e.g., ATLAS or Z/Z-Beamlet), cost US$200M compared to the multi-US$B ITER and NIF. For this reason alone, MIF introduced seed magnetic fields into the center of targets at the OMEGA laser facility, and compressed those

165

Forest Products Supply Chain --Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Products Supply Chain -- Availability of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production or wood waste biomass · Map Indiana's wood waste for each potential bioenergy supply chain · Develop break-even analyses for transportation logistics of wood waste biomass Isaac S. Slaven Abstract: The purpose

166

nature physics | VOL 4 | JANUARY 2008 | www.nature.com/naturephysics books & arts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?' and `what is my breakeven?' He also encourages risk managers to use the tools of bayesian analysis, decision PLIGHT OF THE FORTUNE TELLERS: WHY WE NEED TO MANAGE FINANCIAL RISK DIFFERENTLY bY RICCARDO REb when first approached. We in financial risk management were, and remain, very busy given the current

Loss, Daniel

167

An integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specific economic analysis of breakeven prices of bioenergy crop production to assess the biophysical and economicAn integrated biogeochemical and economic analysis of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United potential of biofuel production in the Midwestern United States. The bioenergy crops considered

Jain, Atul K.

168

LED traffic lights: New technology signals major energy savings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using light-emitting diode technology to replace incandescent lamps in traffic signals promises energy savings upwards of 60 percent for each of the estimated quarter of a million controlled intersections in the United States. LED units use only 9 to 25 watts instead of the 67 to 150 watts used by each incandescent lamp. Though their first cost is relatively high, energy savings result in paybacks of 1 to 5 years. LED retrofit kits are available for red signal disks and arrows, and installations in several states have proven successful, although minor improvements are addressing concerns about varying light output and controller circuitry. Retrofitting green lamps is not yet feasible, because color standards of the Institute of Traffic Engineers cannot be met with existing LED technology. Yellow lamps have such low duty factors (they`re on only 3 percent of the time) that retrofitting with LED signals is not cost-effective. LEDs last much longer than incandescents, allowing municipalities to not only reduce their electricity bills, but to save on maintenance costs as well. As further incentive, some utilities are beginning to implement rebate programs for LED traffic signal retrofits. Full approval of LED units is still awaited from the Institute of Traffic Engineers (ITE), the standard-setting body for traffic safety devices. Local and state governments ultimately decide what specifications to require for traffic lights, and the growing body of successful field experience with LEDs appears to be raising their comfort level with the technology. The California Department of Transportation is developing an LED traffic light specification, and two California utilities, Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas and Electric, have provided rebates for some pilot installations.

Houghton, D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fuel-based lighting are substantial given the paltry levels of lighting service provided to users, leading to a great opportunity for GHG mitigation byencouraging the switch from fuel-based to rechargeable LED lighting. However, as with most new energy technology, switching to efficient lighting requires an up-front investment of energy(and GHGs) embedded in the manufacture of replacement components. We studied a population of off-grid lighting users in 2008-2009 in Kenya who were given the opportunity to adopt LEDlighting. Based on their use patterns with the LED lights and the levels of kerosene offset we observed, we found that the embodied energy of the LED lamp was"paid for" in only one month for grid charged products and two months for solar charged products. Furthermore, the energyreturn-on investment-ratio (energy produced or offset over the product's service life divided by energy embedded) for off-grid LED lighting ranges from 12 to 24, which is on par with on-gridsolar and large-scale wind energy. We also found that the energy embodied in the manufacture of a typical hurricane lantern is about one-half to one-sixth of that embodied in the particular LEDlights that we evaluated, indicating that the energy payback time would be moderately faster if LEDs ultimately displace the production of kerosene lanterns. As LED products improve, weanticipate longer service lives and more successful displacement of kerosene lighting, both of which will speed the already rapid recovery of embodied energy in these products. Our studyprovides a detailed appendix with embodied energy values for a variety of components used to construct off-grid LED lighting, which can be used to analyze other products.

Alstone, Peter; Mills, Evan; Jacobson, Arne

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

Here is the list of names of people from the class of 1982 for whom we have no contact details. We are aware that sadly some of these people will no longer be alive, but we have not yet had this confirmed. We would be grateful if  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Van Barthold Pascale Bigley Sian Birch Gillian Ruth Blake Suzanne Janet Carne Kamjin Chan Richard Lesley Williamson Gary Michael Willrad A T Wilson June Anne Wright Parvin Yavari Karen Joy Young #12 Ancient History and Classical Civilisation Paul Gregory Ayres Kim Blake David Neil Cato Kathryn Mary Cole

Li, Yi

171

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

LoanSTAR Energy Auditing: Update and Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that more lucrative, shorter payback projects were most often selected for accomplishment in the early days. AUDIT RESULTS During the recent five-month period between July 31 and December 31, 1991, 15 detailed audit reports covering 10.9 million square... $ Annual Savings, million $/yr Payback, yrs ECRMs 46.1 13.7 3.4 M&Os negligible 0.2 0.1 Combined 46.1 13.9 3.3 A total of 58 LoanSTAR detailed audit reports covering 28.3 million square feet and 425 buildings have been accepted. The total includes...

Heffington, W. M.; Athar, A.; Britton, A. J.; Nutter, D. W.; Stuewe, C.

173

Partnerships for Industrial Productivity Through Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of myself as a gold miner. Some 75% to 85% of my studies and efforts ended in failure. The remaining 15% was worth the gold mine, and HAVE produced such savings as: A An average of 15% to 18% of the total energy usage of all the facilities surveyed..., with a 2 year payback or less. If the payback period could have been 3 to 4 years the average would have been between 25% and 35% B. Over 4.0 megawatts oC demand in one year C. Over S8OO,OOO per year in one facility D. Over 55% of the energy...

Johnston, W. E.

174

Wind system value analysis for electric utilities: a comparison of four methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been several studies of how much Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) are worth to electric utilities. When attempting to compare the different results of these studies, questions arose concerning the effect of the different methodologies and models on the determined WECS values. This paper will report on the only known effort that used more than a single methodology for the value analysis of WECS to a specific utility. This paper will present and compare the WECS utility value analysis methodologies of Aerospace Corp., JBF Scientific Corp., and the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). Results of the application of these three methodologies were found for two large utilities. Breakeven values (the amount a utility can pay for a wind turbine over its lifetime and still breakeven economically) were found to be from $1600 to $2400 per kW of wind capacity in 1980 dollars. The reasons for variation in the results are discussed.

Harper, J.; Percival, D.; Flaim, T.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Design, Fabrication, and Operation of Innovative Microalgae Culture Experiments for the Purpose of Producing Fuels: Final Report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design was developed for a 1000-acre (water surface) algae culture facility for the production of fuels. The system is modeled after the shallow raceway system with mixing foils that is now being operated at the University of Hawaii. A computer economic model was created to calculate the discounted breakeven price of algae or fuels produced by the culture facility. A sensitivity analysis was done to estimate the impact of changes in important biological, engineering, and financial parameters on product price.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

U.S. Energy Situation, Ethanol, and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 1 U.S. Energy Situation, Ethanol, and Energy Policy Wally Tyner #12;Slide 2 Breakeven Corn Corn ($/bu) Crude($/bbl) Energy basis Price premium for octane/oxygen With subsidy and price premium.25 2.5 2.75 3 3.25 3.5 3.75 4 4.25 4.5 4.75 5 Corn ($/bu) Crude($/bbl) Energy basis Price premium

177

Impact of demand-enhancing farm policy on the agricultural sector: a firm level simulation of ethanol production subsidies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experienced before. To simulate the ethanol industry, operating budgets are produced for three sizes of ethanol plants. High and low cost budgets are developed for each category to accomplish model construction. Table 3. 1 shows categories of costs... 38 42 3. 3 Per Gallon Corn Prices and By-Product Values 45 3. 4 Operating Costs of Plants Observed (Excluding Corn Costs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 3. 5 Representative Plant Operating Budgets (Excluding Corn Costs) 47 4. 1 Breakeven...

Wasson, Leta Susanne

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

An evaluation of crew-share payments in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery: assessing the impacts of modifications in a profit sharing technique upon the firm and labor in a rising cost structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compensation package (sharing arrangement) performs. Variability in harvests and the ex- vessel price preclude accurate projections of labor income. Costs also are variable, but the rate of change is less difficult to project. The analysis of the profit...]ections of fuel cost. Labor costs (shares) were computed at breakeven cashflow positions for each of the 12-month intervals. The percentage change in crew-shares was then compared with the cumulative percentage changes in the Consumer Price Index for all items...

Haby, Michael George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the U.S.: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged on the U.S. market. These units have the potential to provide homeowners significant cost and energy savings. However, actual in use performance of a HPWH will vary significantly with climate, installation location, HVAC equipment, and hot water use. To determine what actual in use energy consumption of a HPWH may be in different regions of the U.S., annual simulations of both 50 and 80 gallon HPWHs as well as a standard electric water heater were performed for over 900 locations across the U.S. The simulations included a benchmark home to take into account interactions between the space conditioning equipment and the HPWH and a realistic hot water draw profile. It was found that the HPWH will always save some source energy when compared to a standard electric resistance water heater, although savings varies widely with location. In addition to looking at source energy savings, the breakeven cost (the net installed cost a HPWH would have to have to be a cost neutral replacement for a standard water heater) was also examined. The highest breakeven costs were seen in cases with high energy savings, such as the southeastern U.S., or high energy costs, such as New England and California. While the breakeven cost is higher for 80 gallon units than 50 gallon units, the higher net installed costs of an 80 gallon unit lead to the 50 gallon HPWHs being more likely to be cost effective.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High Efficiency Integrated Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ? 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873K and 83 CRI. As such, the package’s performance exceeds DOE’s warm-white phosphor LED efficacy target for 2013. At the end of the program, we assembled an A19 sized demonstration bulb housing the integrated package which met Energy Star intensity variation requirements. With further development to reduce overall component cost, we anticipate that an integrated remote converter package such as developed during this program will find application in compact, high-efficacy LED-based lamps, particularly those requiring omnidirectional emission.

Ibbetson, James

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Introduction Mining is based on the minerals on or buried  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Mining involves large risks, while requiring heavy capital investment with relatively long payback, such as the length of time and the cost not only to obtain the necessary permits, but also for the actual development that there is no compre- hensive projection of the possible relevant variables, one is therefore obliged to estimate

Boisvert, Jeff

183

2012 Site Environmental Report Brookhaven National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Waste Generation #12;Chapter 2 ­ Energy Management & Conservation 2012 Statistics 278 million kilowatt lbs. of industrial, sanitary, hazardous, and rad waste Funds invested in FY 2012 = $13,500 8 proposals submitted, 3 funded Annual cost savings ~ $179,000 from new projects Average payback ~ 1 month

Johnson, Peter D.

184

Proposition 39 Guideline Revisions Below is a summary of the major changes to the Proposition 39 Guidelines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: · 85% of planning funds may be used for screening and energy audits · 15% for Proposition 39 as they choose from the four approved activity categories: 1) Energy Audit/Energy Surveys/Data Analytics 2: · Each energy measure must have a simple payback either within the remaining period of the "lease

185

Assessment and enhancement of decision-making models used for the pre-development stages of office developments in turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development decisions using some kind of a procedure in the pre-development stage. However low occupancy rates and long payback periods that are being faced, even by the most recently completed Class A office projects in Turkey, show that there are serious...

Civan, Isilay

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

ACEEE International Journal on Electrical and Power Engineering, Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan 2010 2010 ACEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACEEE DOI: 01.ijepe.01.01.01 Energy Audit And Management Of Induction Motor Using Field Test And Genetic for conducting onsite energy audit of motors in order to project cost savings and payback and to support a confidence decision regarding the investment in higher efficiency motors. Index Terms-energy audit, field

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

Energy efficient HVAC system features thermal storage and heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a HVAC system designed to efficiently condition a medical center. The topics of the article include energy efficient design of the HVAC system, incentive rebate program by the local utility, indoor air quality, innovative design features, operations and maintenance, payback and life cycle cost analysis results, and energy consumption.

Bard, E.M. (Bard, Rao + Athanas Consulting Engineering Inc., Boston, MA (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Moving Towards Net-Zero Energy of Existing Building in Hot Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5% of the building consumption. The second phase yields further reduction of the building energy consumption by about 55.4%. The average payback period of most energy conservation measures is about half year. In the third phase, approximately 27% of the total energy...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

nature photonics | VOL 3 | JUNE 2009 | www.nature.com/naturephotonics 325 progress article  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for narrowband performance1,2 . In solar energy conversion3 , however, the Sun's broad spectrum (Fig. 1a.5 reference irradi ance conditions (see Table 1) from 32% to 49%. The benefits of matching a solar cell to these perform ance records have several practical disadvantages: high materials cost, high energy payback time

190

ENGINEERINGNEWS B Y M I K E V A R G O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a modest-sized all-electric home with a full array of solar roof panels and related gear can cost around $50,000. Although one then begins to save money by getting free electricity from sunlight, the payback8 ENGINEERINGNEWS B Y M I K E V A R G O Solar for Everyone Erik Ydstie has a vision. This past

McGaughey, Alan

191

Performance Optimization of a Fan System- Overcoming Impacts of Modified Design Criteria Due to Regulatory Requirements and Changed Operating Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that was applied to address fan inefficiency. Energy savings from optimizing the system are estimated to be 338 kW, nearly half of the original measured input power of 678 kW. The project is currently being implemented and will have a payback period of less than 8...

Wroblewski, R. G.; Preis, F.; Smith, R.

192

Use of VFDs on Asphalt Plant Induced Draft Fans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paybacks were 3-5 years before utility incentives. In the 10 plants evaluated, the ID fans accounted for as much as 30% of the total plant electrical consumption. In the majority of these plants the outlet dampers were typically 50%-60% closed. Fan motors...

Anderson, G. R.; Case, P. L.; Lowery, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Research and development of energy-efficient appliance motor-compressors. Final report. Volume II: market evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exploratory experiment asked consumers to verbalize how they chose among a set of hypothetical refrigerators with different initial prices and operating costs. From these verbalizations it was determined that many consumers used a payback criterion whereby they would choose the energy efficient appliance if the increase in initial price was recouped in future operating cost savings within an acceptable period of time. This acceptable period of time is called a payback period. Based on these preliminary results, a field study of 337 respndents was undertaken to estimate the distribution of acceptable payback periods for two energy consuming appliances, air conditioners and refrigerator-freezers. The payback distributions were then used to estimte the percent of consumers (i.e., market shares) who would select the energy efficient appliances for a range of price increases and operating cost savings. Following the field study, 123 consumers participated in a simulated shopping experiment to (a) see if the results of the field survey would hold in a more realistic shopping environment and (b) determine the effects of several market variables on the demand for energy efficiency.

Staelin, R.; Redinger, R.P.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Industrial Insulation: Protects the Environment, Improves Efficiency and Saves More Money Than You Can Imagine!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Fuel Inflation Rate 6.0% alum. Annual Hours of Operation 8320 hrs. Wind Speed 0 mph Emittance of Existing Surface 0.80 Reference Thickness for Payback Calculations 0.0 in. Insulation Material ASTM C547-95 Type II 158 ESL-IE-98...

Brayman, W. J.

195

MEASURED WINTER PERFORMANCE OF STORM WINDOWS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problem. From existing data (U. S. Department of Energy 2002) one can estimate that 90% of the present payback of energy savings. Certainly, given the present spectrum of available products, it is difficult. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation. Introduction Over the past

196

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program November 2008 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs and campus square footage. For the fourth quarter of FY08 the campus consumed 42.36 kbtu/sq ft Program for four energy projects. 1) AHU VFD Project ­ Estimated cost of $600,000 with a payback of 2Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program November 2008 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings

Gelfond, Michael

197

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2009 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the previous year normalized to current energy costs and campus square footage. For the first Program for four energy projects. 1) AHU VFD Project ­ Final cost of $558,904 with a payback of 5.2 yearsTexas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2009 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update

Zhuang, Yu

198

Financing of Industrial Energy Efficiency Through State Energy Offices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.26 million. Almost half the projects have involved process modifications that yielded the largest share of the savings from all loans in the sector. The average payback for projects involving process modifications was 5.7 years, and the average cost...

Elliott, R. N.; Weidenbaum, A.

199

The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics Economics of wind power depends mainly on the wind speeds and the turbine make and model. Definition: Simple Payback The "Simple period of a small wind power project. All the figures are per turbine, so it can be used for a one, two

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

200

The GLOBE Sustainability Toolbox is a "starter kit" that provides you with sector-specific examples of simple and low-cost improvements that you, as a social housing provider, can make to increase the efficiency of your operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainability SECTION 1 SUSTAINABILITY: AN OVERVIEW SECTION 2 YOUR BUILDING AS A SYSTEM SECTION 3 THE GREEN in Sustainability Simple Payback: A Real Life Example Government and Utility Incentives SECTION 2 YOUR BUILDINGThe GLOBE Sustainability Toolbox is a "starter kit" that provides you with sector-specific examples

Keinan, Alon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 2, Fluorescent lamp ballasts, television sets, room air conditioners, and kitchen ranges and ovens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is divided into ``volumes`` B through E, dealing with individual classes of consumer products. Chapters in each present engineering analysis, base case forecasts, projected national impacts of standards, life-cycle costs and payback periods, impacts on manufacturers, impacts of standards on electric utilities, and environmental effects. Supporting appendices are included.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Climate change -a drying up of hydropower investment? Dr Gareth Harrison and Professor Bert Whittington  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change - a drying up of hydropower investment? Dr Gareth Harrison and Professor Bert capital may not favour hydropower given that hydro capital costs are relatively high and payback periods financial return than the public sector, traditionally the main source of funds for hydropower development

Harrison, Gareth

203

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2007 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program July 2007 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings Update Performance Contract - $560,000 with a 6 year payback. c. Perform a minimum of 1 detailed energy audit per Agencies. Energy numbers come from the Energy Report filed with SECO semi-annually. Texas Tech may

Gelfond, Michael

204

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2007 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program October 2007 Update The Texas Tech Energy Savings,000 with a 6 year payback. b. Perform a minimum of 1 detailed energy audit per month beginning with the largest consumers of energy. 1) To date we have completed 10 detailed audits. 2. Fleet Management a. The Texas Tech

Gelfond, Michael

205

Application of motor capacitors to improve facility power usage in the industrial setting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and duty cycle???????.. 40 16 Payback as a function of capacitor size and cost per KWH?????? 41 17 Constant vs. irregular loading conditions????????????? 46 18 Measurement point, where only load supplied??...????????. 47 19 Project survey... LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Basic power parameters??...??????????????..?? 1 2 Line resistance values[6]??????????..??.??????. 17 3 Circuit resistance for Condenser Fan 1????.?????????. 27 4 Total harmonic current...

Hillhouse, William Jeffrey

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

In the July 2011 PE magazine article "Why We Need Rational Selection of Energy Projects," the author stated that "photovoltaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle of a solar system (see Figure 1). Their energy payback times (EPBT)--the time it takes to produce on the location/solar irradiation and the technology. And with expected life times of 30 years, their ERRs. The silica in the quartz sand is reduced in an arc furnace to metallurgical-grade silicon, which must

207

Evaluation of Northern Illinois Residential Retrofit Delivery Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a detailed BEopt analysis, PARR has developed packages of measures following a 'loading order' appropriate for cold climates at increasing levels of savings. Packages of measures to provide 'good, better, best' energy savings were determined based on predicted source energy savings, safety issues, program costs and simple payback for customers.

Rowley, P.; Kerr, R.; Brand, L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

3DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total cost (quality level 2) $32.41 million Payback 0.7 years Quality level 1 buy-up estimate $203DEP in Oregon by the Numbers Expected annual benefits (quality level 2) $45.73 million Estimated resource management; forest resources management; water supply and quality; infrastructure and construction

Torgersen, Christian

209

Heat Recovery Boilers for Process Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the use of heat recovery due primarily to process considerations. On the other hand, cost and payback are main considerations in the case of gas turbine and incineration plants, where large quantities of gases are exhausted at temperatures varying from 800...

Ganapathy, V.; Rentz, J.; Flanagan, D.

210

Analysis of the Double Window in Saving Energy and Economical Efficiency in Nanjing in the Winter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steel window can save energy by 37.68% is reached. As part of the economical efficiency analysis, an investment payback period is analyzed using the methods of static state and dynamic state. The analysis shows that by using single frame-double plastic...

Zhang, Y.; He, J.; Gao, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Bridging the Gap Between Commissioning Measures and Large Scale Retrofits in Existing Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the systems installed in the building to reach the same goal. The purpose of the investigations presented here is to find energy-saving measures which economically fall between the retro-commissioning measures which typically have very short paybacks...

Bynum, J.; Jones, A.; Claridge, D.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Bridging the Gap Between Commissioning Measures and Large Scale Retrofits in Existing Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

installed in the building to reach the same goal. The purpose of the investigations presented here is to find energy-saving measures which economically fall between the retro-commissioning measures which typically have very short paybacks and the large scale...

Bynum, J.; Jones, A.; Claridge, D. E.

213

Alternative Heat Recovery Options for Single-Stage Spray Dryers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

describes an analysis performed at a milk products plant, where a spray dryer is used to produce powdered milk. Discussed approaches include air-to-air and air-liquid-air recuperates. Key issues include heat recovery potential, capital costs, overall payback...

Wagner, J. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Creating and Organizing an Energy Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presentations I have shown the how-to of an audit and the details of tracking the “finished product”, the findings. The methods I have developed have allowed me to maintain an 11% of energy spending annual savings average with one-year payback opportunities...

Theising, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Last January, two weeks into his UNH career after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of New Hampshire goes top tier . . . 3 Spheres The Sound of Science Shooting the forests from into the role of UNH's InterimVice President for Research and Public Service, it's payback time. "If I didn president for research and public service? An odd coupling it would seem but, Aber notes, it's just one more

216

1ERIN E. MOORE CURRICULUM VITAE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model for Calculating Greenhouse Gas Payback Time for Building System Upgrades. Sustainable Structures and Judson Taylor, eds., Building Enclosure Sustainability Symposium (BESS)-Sustainable Buildings (SB) 13 Goggles and Other Tools for Viewing Building Materials for Design. In Dermody, Robert J. and Andrzej

217

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

218

LoanSTAR Energy Conservation Audits: January 1989 - August 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost is $5,566,000 for an overall simple payback of 3.0 years. The ECRMs and M&Os have been categorized as well as the types of buildings involved. The cost for auditing the 5.2 million square feet was $0.054 per square foot. Problems associated...

Nutter, D. W.; Britton, A. J.; Muraya, N. K.; Heffington, W. M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Research of PV Application on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that conforms to the MN Building code definition of a "townhouse". Single house prototype of the UMore Park stage, possible form of energy infrastructure in the future, attitude of developers and future dwellers-off, incentives and payback of PV, issues of shading effects and solution; (3) Case study of single solar house

Netoff, Theoden

220

Thermal Storage Systems at IBM Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 ton hours. Through reduced chiller plant capacity and annual operating cost savings in primarily electric demand charges the payback will be approximately 3 1/2 years. The water is stored in multiple, insulated tanks, located above the ground. A...

Koch, G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Devalver High Energy Nuclear Physics, CAD (M. Van Essendelft) $953 $4,000.00 0.24 20 cylinders (haz waste,000 $830.00 7.23 6 liters of industrial waste 8 Disposal of #6 Fuel Oil * EENS (Yousif Celebi $500 $4Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1

222

Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste 2 Motion Lights Energy Sciences & Technology, EENS (Dave Elling) $3,200 $7,000.00 0.46 Energy Light Source, NSLS (John Aloi) $1,500 $5,200.00 0.29 200 gallons corrosive waste 6 Electronic RecyclingRank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1

223

A Study of Adjustable Speed Drive Applications for Pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Chart C or E) 2200 /600/tOOO /600 /600 2800Total Retrofit Cost, $ 7800 3400 5Z00 5~OO Retrofit Payback (years) /.64.5 /.9 4.$ 3.2 4$00Valve Cost (Chart D) 4500 45004$00 4500 (,0 (,0lIDO <0<'0Total New Cost, $ 0.6 <. 0./ <0./ <. 0./ <'0./ New...

Triezenberg, D. M.; Lakhavani, S. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Steam System Efficiency Optimized After J.R. Simplot Fertilizer Plant Receives Energy Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study describes how the J.R. Simplot company's Don Plant in Pocatello, Idaho, achieved annual savings of $335,000 and 75,000 MMBtu, with a simple payback of 6.5 months, after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment.

Not Available

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lighting energy efficiency opportunities at Cheyenne Mountain Air Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CMAS is an intensive user of electricity for lighting because of its size, lack of daylight, and 24-hour operating schedule. Argonne National Laboratory recently conducted a lighting energy conservation evaluation at CMAS. The evaluation included inspection and characterization of existing lighting systems, analysis of energy-efficient retrofit options, and investigation of the environmental effects that these lighting system retrofits could have when they are ready to be disposed of as waste. Argonne devised three retrofit options for the existing lighting systems at various buildings: (1) minimal retrofit--limited fixture replacement; (2) moderate retrofit--more extensive fixture replacement and limited application of motion detectors; and (3) advanced retrofit--fixture replacement, reduction in the number of lamps, expansion of task lighting, and more extensive application of motion detectors. Argonne used data on electricity consumption to analyze the economic and energy effects of these three retrofit options. It performed a cost analysis for each retrofit option in terms of payback. The analysis showed that lighting retrofits result in savings because they reduce electricity consumption, cooling load, and maintenance costs. The payback period for all retrofit options was found to be less than 2 years, with the payback period decreasing for more aggressive retrofits. These short payback periods derived largely from the intensive (24-hours-per-day) use of electric lighting at the facility. Maintenance savings accounted for more than half of the annual energy-related savings under the minimal and moderate retrofit options and slightly less than half of these savings under the advanced retrofit option. Even if maintenance savings were excluded, the payback periods would still be impressive: about 4.4 years for the minimal retrofit option and 2 years for the advanced option. The local and regional environmental impacts of the three retrofit options were minimal.

Molburg, J.C.; Rozo, A.J.; Sarles, J.K.; Haffenden, R.A.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Cavallo, J.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Geothermal loan guaranty cash flow model: description and users' manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the users guide for the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Cash Flow Model (GCFM). GCFM is a Fortran code which designs and costs geothermal fields and electric power plants. It contains a financial analysis module which performs life cycle costing analysis taking into account various types of taxes, costs and financial structures. The financial module includes a discounted cash flow feature which calculates a levelized breakeven price for each run. The user's guide contains descriptions of the data requirements and instructions for using the model.

Keimig, M.A.; Rosenberg, J.I.; Entingh, D.J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Progress in inertial fusion research at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Paper No. IAEA-CN-38/B-2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Inertial Confinement Fusion Program is reviewed. Experiments using the Helios CO/sub 2/ laser system delivering up to 6 kJ on target are described. Because breakeven energy estimates for laser drivers of 1 ..mu..m and above have risen and there is a need for CO/sub 2/ experiments in the tens-of-kilojoule regime as soon as practical, a first phase of Antares construction is now directed toward completion of two of the six original modules in 1983. These modules are designed to deliver 40 kJ of CO/sub 2/ laser light on target.

Perkins, R.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been reversed. The 36 different plots that are given in each Fig. 6 through 8 are for 36 different combinations PB (yr) 1.0 1.1 0.8 0.9 1.0 P F 2 ./ 0.5 -+/::.......----------------'1':7 0.5 PFl 1.0 Dr ? ZIZ Itw. DfB? zz,zzz kWh. B... ? $z,zzz. D ? $zz/kVAR. Figure 3. Payback period contours; upper triangle 1.0 PFI 0.5 ~....L---------------------t-0.5 0.9 '0.8 1.0 P F 2 / ./ 1.0 1.1 PB (yr) Figure 4. Payback period contours; lower triangle 811 ESL-IE-86...

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

229

Plant Wide Assessment for SIFCO Industries, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sifco Industries carreid out a plant wide energy assessment under a collaborative program with the U.S. Department of Energy during October 2004 to September 2005. During the year, personnel from EIS, E3M, DPS, BuyCastings.Com, and Sifco plant facilities and maintenance personnel, as a team collected energy use, construction, process, equipment and operational information about the plant. Based on this information, the team identified 13 energy savings opportunities. Near term savings opportunities have a total potential savings of about $1,329,000 per year and a combined simple payback of about 11 months. Implementation of these recommendations would reduce CO2 emissions by about 16,000,000 pounds per year, which would reduce overall plant CO2 emissions by about 45%. These totals do not include another $830,000 per year in potential savings with an estimated 9-month payback, from converting the forging hammers from steam to compressed air.

Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi et. al.

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

Guide for the selection of supermarket refrigeration systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an evaluation of supermarket refrigeration involving the use of conventional and multiplex compressor systems. Computer simulations of these systems were performed for six representative sites. The performance predictions generated in this fashion were tabulated to allow hand calculation of electric costs for any prevailing electric rate schedule. A methodology was also developed to allow economic assessment of the conventional and multiplex systems and of various enhancements employed with the multiplex system. The results of the evaluation showed the multiplex refrigeration system produced a reasonable payback for all sites examined, depending upon the enhancements employed. System features that had the greatest impact on payback were heat reclaim, hot gas defrost, and floating head pressure. 25 figs., 28 tabs.

Walker, D.H.; Tsaros, T.L.; Deming, G.I. (Foster-Miller, Inc., Waltham, MA (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Automatic Continuous Commissioning of Measurement Instruments in Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by International Energy Agency (IEA) and widely studied in the research projects of Annex 40[2] and Annex 47[3]. An open publication [4] found a media payback period of 4.8 years for commissioning of new buildings in United States. Additionally, commissioning... w Chilled water fanr Return air fan val Valve rtn Return air exh Exhaust air fans Supply air fan coil Cooling coil REFERENCES [1] Buildings Rese Lawrence Be [2] IEA ECBCS...

Xiao, F.; Wang, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Process Improvement at Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recommendations are for the Fill and Press line where most of the Level I focused LESSONS LEARNED On completion of the project, the researchers assessed the results and some of the 198 ESL-IE-97-04-31 Proceedings from the Nineteenth Industrial Energy.... Finally, the energy issues included initiate an energy team; install energy efficient lighting; and decommission unused steam lines. After the first cost, savings, and simple payback time was calculated for all of the proposed improvements, a...

Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

233

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Electrical Analysis Tool Suite for Inductrial Energy Audits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20-23, 2014 AGENDA Current Available Tools Analysis Tools Demand Visualization Weather Disaggregation Demand Aberrations Photovoltaic Optimization Demand Scheduling Automatic Report Generation Demonstration ESL-IE-14-05-39 Proceedings of the Thrity... Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Photovoltaic Optimization Solar Tracking TMY3 Surface Radiation Data Radiative Power Model Cost Optimization Photovoltaic Array Size PV Array Cost Expected Power Savings Payback Period ESL-IE-14-05-39 Proceedings...

Morelli, F.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Agricultural capital project analysis system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis. Three specific objectives were established: (1) To select the most suitable procedures for economic and finan- cial evaluation of agricultural projects in developing countries, in- cluding the incorporation of an appropriate sensitivity..., Mercedes and Segismundo Lopez. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION General Objectives Procedure Page 1 1 3 4 LITERATURE REVIEW Evaluation Financial Evaluation Payback Period Accounting Rate of Return Net Present Value Internal Rate of Return...

Lopez, Ramon Antonio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Impact of Control System Technologies on Industrial Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modify temperature and pressure setpoints to meet requirements while optimizing energy use CHILLER ROOM TB Static Pressure Setpoint Reset Thermostatic Temperature Setpoint ESL-IE-14-05-40 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology... Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 1. HVAC: Seasonal Temperature Resets I. SETPOINT ADJUSTMENT Low payback, high savings! Image: http://www.ncelectriccooperatives.com/electricity/homeEnergy/thermostats_intro.htm Average Savings: $10,000 per year...

Parikh, P.; Pasmussen, B. P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Texas Tech University Energy Savings Program January 2009 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costs and campus square footage. For the first quarter of FY09 the campus consumed 42.07 kbtu/sq ft,500 Total 45.69 42.07 Down 7.9% $ 348,000 Page 1 of 4 January 2009 Energy Report #12;Since RP 49 first went Purchase Program for four energy projects. 1) AHU VFD Project ­ Estimated cost of $600,000 with a payback

Gelfond, Michael

238

Monitored performance of residential geothermal heat pumps in central Texas and Southern Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes measured performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHP`s) that were installed in family housing units at Ft. Hood, Texas and at Selfridge Air National Guard base in Michigan. These units were built as part of a joint Department of Defense/Department of Energy program to evaluate the energy savings potential of GHP`s installed at military facilities. At the Ft. Hood site, the GHP performance was compared to conventional forced air electric air conditioning and natural gas heating. At Selfridge, the homes under test were originally equipped with electric baseboard heat and no air conditioning. Installation of the GHP systems at both sites was straightforward but more problems and costs were incurred at Selfridge because of the need to install ductwork in the homes. The GHP`s at both sites produced impressive energy savings. These savings approached 40% for most of the homes tested. The low cost of energy on these bases relative to the incremental cost of the GHP conversions precludes rapid payback of the GHP`s from energy savings alone. Estimates based on simple payback (no inflation and no interest on capital) indicated payback times from 15 to 20 years at both sites. These payback times may be reduced by considering the additional savings possible due to reduced maintenance costs. Results are summarized in terms of 15 minute, hourly, monthly, and annual performance parameters. The results indicate that all the systems were working properly but several design shortcomings were identified. Recommendations are made for improvements in future installations at both sites.

Sullivan, W.N.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Compressed Air Systems Audits - Why? And How?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the compressed air costs, most with little or no capital investment. Almost always, in the event of a capital outlay, energy savings alone afford less than one-year payback. Many energy utility companies energetically support these efforts, and some.... Secondly, join us in the definition of compressed air as a system, the totality of which is comprised of the Supply Side and the Demand Side. The Supply Side is the compressors and their controls, receivers (primary storage tanks), aftercoolers, filters...

Kemp, H. L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermal Energy Storage for Vacuum Precoolers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radically creating high peak demands and low load factors. An ice bank thermal energy storage (TES) and ice water vapor condenser were installed. The existing equipment and TES system were computer monitored to determine energy consumption and potential... efficiency at night. The ice bank thermal energy storage system has a 4.4 year simple payback. While building ice, the refrigeration system operated at a 6.26 Coefficient of Performance (COP). The refrigeration system operated more efficiently at night...

Nugent, D. M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Replacing Motors Counting Savings: Results from a 100 Motor Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPLACING MOTORS, COUNTING SAVINGS: RESULTS FROM A 100 MOTOR STUDY Nicole M. Kaufman Motor Systems Engineer Advanced Energy Raleigh, NC ABSTRACT Software tools such as MotorMaster+ aid facility personnel in conducting payback... analyses for replacing motors. These tools make assumptions on the motors’ operational efficiency in their calculations. By observing 100 pre-EPCA (Energy Policy & Conservation Act) motors in operation, removing them from service and conducting IEEE...

Kaufman, N. M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solar Cells in 2009 and Beyond Mike McGehee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

size. · Get energy payback within two years so that we generate more power than we use. #12;The grid Corporation, May (2006) New World Record: 41.6% under 346 suns! 1.7-1.9 eV 1.3-1.4 eV 0.67 eV The cells/m2 Price ($/W) Module $3.00 Inverter $0.50 Retro fit installation $4.00 TOTAL $7.50 Average cost

McGehee, Michael

243

Using Pinch Technology to Explore Trade-Offs Between Energy Cost, Capital Cost, Process Modifications, and Utility Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING PINCH TECHNOLOGY TO EXPLORE TRADE-OFFS BETWEEN ENERGY COST, CAPITAL COST, PROCESS MODIFICATIONS, AND UTILITY SELECTION A.S. McMullan, Consultant and H.D. Spriggs, President Linnhoff March, Inc., Leesburg, Virginia ABSTRACT Process... (3), predict payback targets in retrofit situations (4), and design flexible heat exchanger networks (5). The most recent developments enable the process designer to explore the interactions and trade-offs between design variables, prior...

McMullan, A. S.

244

HP Steam Trap Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEAM MONITORING HP Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption... Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real-time monitoring for high-pressure critical traps (>15 PSIG) ? Average total system cost $25K - $50K ? Web-Based or Modbus/BMS Integration Basic Installation Wireless Signal Transmitter Receiver Repeater...

Pascone, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Behind the scenes of a livestock exposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were entered into the shell. The computer then calculated all paybacks including breed champion, reserve champion and class placings. Overall, 6096 of entry fees were paid back in the form of premiums. The remaining 4096 went to the Expo Center... to cover expenses such as judging fees and awards. Premiums were paid back within breeds. Ten percent of the premium money went to the champion and 596 went to the reserve. The remaining 8596 was distributed among the class winners. Premiums were...

Lamb, Bucky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Cab Heating and Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

Damman, Dennis

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Energy analysis of facade-integrated photovoltaic systems applied to UAE commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developments in the design and manufacture of photovoltaic cells have recently been a growing concern in the UAE. At present, the embodied energy pay-back time (EPBT) is the criterion used for comparing the viability of such technology against other forms. However, the impact of PV technology on the thermal performance of buildings is not considered at the time of EPBT estimation. If additional energy savings gained over the PV system life are also included, the total EPBT could be shorter. This paper explores the variation of the total energy of building integrated photovoltaic systems (BiPV) as a wall cladding system applied to the UAE commercial sector and shows that the ratio between PV output and saving in energy due to PV panels is within the range of 1:3-1:4. The result indicates that for the southern and western facades in the UAE, the embodied energy pay-back time for photovoltaic system is within the range of 12-13 years. When reductions in operational energy are considered, the pay-back time is reduced to 3.0-3.2 years. This study comes to the conclusion that the reduction in operational energy due to PV panels represents an important factor in the estimation of EPBT. (author)

Radhi, Hassan [Architectural Engineering Department, UAE University, Al-ain (United Arab Emirates)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Walkway Lighting at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center, in Atlantic City, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a collaborative project to demonstrate a solid state lighting (SSL) general illumination product in an outdoor area walkway application. In the project, six light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were installed to replace six existing high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires mounted on 14-foot poles on a set of exterior walkways and stairs at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, during December, 2007. The effort was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Technology Gateway Demonstration that involved a collaborative teaming agreement between DOE, FAA and Ruud Lighting (and their wholly owned division, Beta LED). Pre- and post-installation power and illumination measurements were taken and used in calculations of energy savings and related economic payback, while personnel impacted by the new lights were provided questionnaires to gauge their perceptions and feedback. The SSL product demonstrated energy savings of over 25% while maintaining illuminance levels and improving illuminance uniformity. PNNL's economic analysis yielded a variety of potential payback results depending on the assumptions used. In the best case, replacing HPS with the LED luminaire can yield a payback as low as 3 years. The new lamps were quite popular with the affected personnel, who gave the lighting an average score of 4.46 out of 5 for improvement.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

Production costs and supply of biomass by U.S. Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Biofuels Feedstock Development Program has attempted to estimate the cost of producing dedicated energy crops for several regions of the United States. Switchgrass and hybrid poplar have been chosen as representative herbaceous and woody crop species for the estimation. A full economic cost accounting approach is used. This means that not only are out-of-pocket cash expenses (e.g. fertilizers, chemicals, seeds, fuel, repairs) estimated, but fixed costs (e.g., overhead, taxes) and the costs of owned resources (e.g., producer`s own labor, equipment depreciation, land values) are also estimated as part of the cost of producing dedicated energy crops. The costs are estimated as enterprise budgets which means that costs of producing energy crops are estimated as separate entities, and not estimated in context of the entire farm management structure. Competitiveness of energy crops with conventional crops vary by region. Breakeven prices are regional averages. Breakeven prices for poplar are higher than for switchgrass in all regions, in large part due to the higher cost of producing poplars.

Walsh, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

HVDC power transmission technology assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop an assessment of the national utility system`s needs for electric transmission during the period 1995-2020 that could be met by future reduced-cost HVDC systems. The assessment was to include an economic evaluation of HVDC as a means for meeting those needs as well as a comparison with competing technologies such as ac transmission with and without Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) controllers. The role of force commutated dc converters was to be assumed where appropriate. The assessment begins by identifying the general needs for transmission in the U.S. in the context of a future deregulated power industry. The possible roles for direct current transmission are then postulated in terms of representative scenarios. A few of the scenarios are illustrated with the help of actual U.S. system examples. non-traditional applications as well as traditional applications such as long lines and asynchronous interconnections are discussed. The classical ``break-even distance`` concept for comparing HVDC and ac lines is used to assess the selected scenarios. The impact of reduced-cost converters is reflected in terms of the break-even distance. This report presents a comprehensive review of the functional benefits of HVDC transmission and updated cost data for both ac and dc system components. It also provides some provocative thoughts on how direct current transmission might be applied to better utilize and expand our nation`s increasingly stressed transmission assets.

Hauth, R.L.; Tatro, P.J.; Railing, B.D. [New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States); Johnson, B.K.; Stewart, J.R. [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States); Fink, J.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparative analysis of thorium and uranium fuel for transuranic recycle in a sodium cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper compares the reactor physics and transmutation performance of sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (FRs) for TRansUranic (TRU) burning with thorium (Th) or uranium (U) as fertile materials. The 1000 MWt Toshiba-Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) conceptual core has been used as benchmark for the comparison. Both burner and breakeven configurations sustained or started with a TRU supply, and assuming full actinide homogeneous recycle strategy, have been developed. State-of-the-art core physics tools have been employed to establish fuel inventory and reactor physics performances for equilibrium and transition cycles. Results show that Th fosters large improvements in the reactivity coefficients associated with coolant expansion and voiding, which enhances safety margins and, for a burner design, can be traded for maximizing the TRU burning rate. A trade-off of Th compared to U is the significantly larger fuel inventory required to achieve a breakeven design, which entails additional blankets at the detriment of core compactness as well as fuel manufacturing and separation requirements. The gamma field generated by the progeny of U-232 in the U bred from Th challenges fuel handling and manufacturing, but in case of full recycle, the high contents of Am and Cm in the transmutation fuel impose remote fuel operations regardless of the presence of U-232.

C. Fiorina; N. E. Stauff; F. Franceschini; M. T. Wenner; A. Stanculescu; T. K. Kim; A. Cammi; M. E. Ricotti; R. N. Hill; T. A. Taiwo; M. Salvatores

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Not-In-Kind Technologies for Residential and Commercial Unitary Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was initiated by the Department of Energy in response to a request from the HVAC industry for consolidated information about alternative heating and cooling cycles and for objective comparisons of those cycles in space conditioning applications. Twenty-seven different heat pumping technologies are compared on energy use and operating costs using consistent operating conditions and assumptions about component efficiencies for all of them. This report provides a concise summary of the underlying principals of each technology, its advantages and disadvantages, obstacles to commercial development, and economic feasibility. Both positive and negative results in this study are valuable; the fact that many of the cycles investigated are not attractive for space conditioning avoids any additional investment of time or resources in evaluating them for this application. In other cases, negative results in terms of the cost of materials or in cycle efficiencies identify where significant progress needs to be made in order for a cycle to become commercially attractive. Specific conclusions are listed for many of the technologies being promoted as alternatives to electrically-driven vapor compression heat pumps using fluorocarbon refrigerants. Although reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps using hydrocarbons have similar energy use to conventional electric-driven heat pumps, there are no significant energy savings due to the minor differences in estimated steady-state performance; higher costs would be required to accommodate the use of a flammable refrigerant. Magnetic and compressor-driven metal hydride heat pumps may be able to achieve efficiencies comparable to reverse Rankine cycle heat pumps, but they are likely to have much higher life cycle costs because of high costs for materials and peripheral equipment. Both thermoacoustic and thermionic heat pumps could have lower life cycle costs than conventional electric heat pumps because of reduced equipment and maintenance costs although energy use would be higher. There are strong opportunities for gas-fired heat pumps to reduce both energy use and operating costs outside of the high cooling climates in the southeast, south central states, and the southwest. Diesel and IC (Otto) engine-driven heat pumps are commercially available and should be able to increase their market share relative to gas furnaces on a life cycle cost basis; the cost premiums associated with these products, however, make it difficult to achieve three or five year paybacks which adversely affects their use in the U.S. Stirling engine-driven and duplex Stirling heat pumps have been investigated in the past as potential gas-fired appliances that would have longer lives and lower maintenance costs than diesel and IC engine-driven heat pumps at slightly lower efficiencies. These potential advantages have not been demonstrated and there has been a low level of interest in Stirling engine-driven heat pumps since the late 1980's. GAX absorption heat pumps have high heating efficiencies relative to conventional gas furnaces and are viable alternatives to furnace/air conditioner combinations in all parts of the country outside of the southeast, south central states, and desert southwest. Adsorption heat pumps may be competitive with the GAX absorption system at a higher degree of mechanical complexity; insufficient information is available to be more precise in that assessment.

Fischer, S.K.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Preliminary Analysis of the Economics of Using Distributed Energy as a Source of Reactive Power Supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major blackout affecting 50 million people in the Northeast United States, where insufficient reactive power supply was an issue, and an increased number of filings made to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by generators for reactive power has led to a closer look at reactive power supply and compensation. The Northeastern Massachusetts region is one such area where there is an insufficiency in reactive power compensation. Distributed energy due to its close proximity to loads seems to be a viable option for solving any present or future reactive power shortage problems. Industry experts believe that supplying reactive power from synchronized distributed energy sources can be 2 to 3 times more effective than providing reactive support in bulk from longer distances at the transmission or generation level. Several technology options are available to supply reactive power from distributed energy sources such as small generators, synchronous condensers, fuel cells or microturbines. In addition, simple payback analysis indicates that investments in DG to provide reactive power can be recouped in less than 5 years when capacity payments for providing reactive power are larger than $5,000/kVAR and the DG capital and installation costs are lower than $30/kVAR. However, the current institutional arrangements for reactive power compensation present a significant barrier to wider adoption of distributed energy as a source of reactive power. Furthermore, there is a significant difference between how generators and transmission owners/providers are compensated for reactive power supplied. The situation for distributed energy sources is even more difficult, as there are no arrangements to compensate independent DE owners interested in supplying reactive power to the grid other than those for very large IPPs. There are comparable functionality barriers as well, as these smaller devices do not have the control and communications requirements necessary for automatic operation in response to local or system operators. There are no known distributed energy asset owners currently receiving compensation for reactive power supply or capability. However, there are some cases where small generators on the generation and transmission side of electricity supply have been tested and have installed the capability to be dispatched for reactive power support. Several concerns need to be met for distributed energy to become widely integrated as a reactive power resource. The overall costs of retrofitting distributed energy devices to absorb or produce reactive power need to be reduced. There needs to be a mechanism in place for ISOs/RTOs to procure reactive power from the customer side of the meter where distributed energy resides. Novel compensation methods should be introduced to encourage the dispatch of dynamic resources close to areas with critical voltage issues. The next phase of this research will investigate in detail how different options of reactive power producing DE can compare both economically and functionally with shunt capacitor banks. Shunt capacitor banks, which are typically used for compensating reactive power consumption of loads on distribution systems, are very commonly used because they are very cost effective in terms of capital costs. However, capacitor banks can require extensive maintenance especially due to their exposure to lightning at the top of utility poles. Also, it can be problematic to find failed capacitor banks and their maintenance can be expensive, requiring crews and bucket trucks which often requires total replacement. Another shortcoming of capacitor banks is the fact that they usually have one size at a location (typically sized as 300, 600, 900 or 1200kVAr) and thus don't have variable range as do reactive power producing DE, and cannot respond to dynamic reactive power needs. Additional future work is to find a detailed methodology to identify the hidden benefit of DE for providing reactive power and the best way to allocate the benefit among customers, utilities, transmission companies or RTOs.

Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; King, Thomas F [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study. . Health and Wellness Center; and the: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study. Stockbridge Munsee Community. Mohican Family Center.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Health and Wellness Center (HWC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the HWC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the HWC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the HWC performs in the lowest 8 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with paybacks of less than five years to yield an estimated 25?percent decrease in annual energy consumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $26,800 per year with an implementation cost of just $4,650 (0.2 year payback). For the Mohican Family Center document: The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Mohican Family Center (MFC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the MFC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the MFC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the MFC performs better than 80 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with short term paybacks to yield an estimated 13?percent decrease in energy consumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $3,100 per year with an implementation cost of under $20,000.

DeRocher, Andy; Barrnett, Michael

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

255

Quality In-Plant Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ventilated air during the heating season. This requi~e? merlt by itself would increase total ene~gy use by 20%. This seemS cont~adictory to the co~po~ate goal of 2% actual energy ~eduction pe~ year, for the period of 1985 th~ough 1990. Howeve...~, integration of several concepts and utilizing waste energy f~om available sou~ces provides the oppor tunity to meet and exceed both goals in a cost effective manner, with an excellent payback. The presentation quantifies the excess ene~gy available...

Petzold, M. A.

256

Fuel Cells on Bio-Gas (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Fuel cells operating on bio-gas offer a pathway to renewable electricity generation; (2) With federal incentives of $3,500/kW or 30% of the project costs, reasonable payback periods of less than five years can be achieved; (3) Tri-generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen offers an alternative route to solving the H{sub 2} infrastructure problem facing fuel cell vehicle deployment; and (4) DOE will be promoting bio-gas fuel cells in the future under its Market Transformation Programs.

Remick, R. J.

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

257

Recovering Energy From Ventilation and Process Airstreams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper I will touch on condensa tion and electrostatic precipitation as methods that can be used to collect and reuse in some form, hydrocarbons from process stacks. HEAT EXCHANGERS Plate-~ype, air-to-air heat exchangers move hot, dirty exhaust... in this situation can be less than 6 months. Where payback is based on . solvent recovery alone, it is normally in the 12 to 24 month range. Another method of energy savings occurs when a two-stage electrostatic precipitator is added in process stacks. If thes...

Cheney, W. A.

258

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chapter 1.19: Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaic Thin Film: CdTe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chapter reviews the history, development, and present processes used to fabricate thin-film, CdTe-based photovoltaic (PV) devices. It is intended for readers who are generally familiar with the operation and material aspects of PV devices but desire a deeper understanding of the process sequences used in CdTe PV technology. The discussion identifies why certain processes may have commercial production advantages and how the various process steps can interact with each other to affect device performance and reliability. The chapter concludes with a discussion of considerations of large-area CdTe PV deployment including issues related to material availability and energy-payback time.

Gessert, T. A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy Conservation Through Industrial Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

illustrates potential savings. Assume that we have a business with a given thermal requirement. Assume further that it is possible to fill this requirement by recovering exhaust heat from a gas turbine which also powers an electric generator. Fuel....021 - 0.013 = 0.008 kWh ? Annual Saving/Kilowatt Installed = $72/kW CD Simple Payback: 266 --;- 72 = 3. 69 years @ Rate of Return = 15% Conclusion Solar has used gas turbine engines to provide site-generated electric power in almost every...

Solt, J. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 281 Solar Hot Water Application Assessment for U.S. Army IMCOM-Southeast Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires installations (EISA) to install solar systems of sufficient capacity to provide 30% of service hot water in new construction and renovations where cost-effective. However, installations are struggling with how to implement solar hot water, and while several installations are installing solar hot water on a limited basis, paybacks remain long. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to address this issue to help determine how best to implement solar hot water projects. This documents discusses the results of that project.

Russo, Bryan J.; Chvala, William D.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Chapter 16: Retrocommissioning Evaluation Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Retrocommissioning (RCx) is a systematic process for optimizing energy performance in existing buildings. It specifically focuses on improving the control of energy-using equipment (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment and lighting) and typically does not involve equipment replacement. Field results have shown proper RCx can achieve energy savings ranging from 5% to 20%, with a typical payback of 2 years or less. A study conducted on behalf of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory analyzed data from 11 utilities operating RCx programs across the United States. The dataset included 122 RCx projects and more than 950 RCx measures.

Tiessen, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Office Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

LoneSTAR Program: Maximizing Energy Efficiency while Protecting the Envrionment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment Report (EAR) ? Utility Assessment Report (UAR) ? Systems Commissioning Report (in the case where the commissioning meets LoanSTAR payback requirements) ESL-KT-14-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18...Maximiz ing Energy Eff ic iency whi le Protect ing the Envi ronment LoanSTAR PROGRAM ESL-KT-14-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 ? Executed 240 loans totaling $407,923,762.32 ? 93 loans to publ...

Trevino, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Residential Buildings in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Savings (lbs/year) Combined Estimated Cost ($) Simple Estimated Payback (yrs) 0.025 11.1 30.1- Combined Ozone Season Period NOx Emissions Savings (lbs/day) 28.5-16.3 6.7 - 34.9 ESL-TR-07-08-02 Energy Systems Laboratory - August 2007 7... individual measures above for specific savings * Energy Cost: Electricity cost = $0.15/kWh Natural gas cost = $1.00/therm 4. Savings depend on fuel mix used. See detailed writeup (Building Description) * Building type: Residential * Gross area: 2...

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

267

Development of Methodology for Determination of Energy efficient and Cost effective Measures in Existing Single-family Residential Buildings using Easy-to-use Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by estimating the 1 Corresponding author. Tel.: +82-10-4642-6290; Email address: keehankim@outlook.com (K.H. Kim) ESL-PA-14-07-02 2 energy savings and cost effectiveness of each measure [2... of the potential ECMs, which includes a calculation of annual energy savings and pay-back period of the potential ECMs. At first, in order to model a standard house that is compliant with the 2009 IECC using the DDP, the performance path alternative provided...

Kim, K.H; Haberl, J.S.

268

EMS control chosen instead of refrigeration, HVAC upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Wisconsin supermarket decided on the basis of costs to install an energy management system (EMS) to improve the store's energy efficiency rather than invest in new refrigerating equipment at this time. When the next remodeling occurs in two years, the store will purchase new equipment using energy savings from the EMS to help defray the costs. The store selected an EMS with distributed processing that can expand to control new equipment. It expects a 22% drop in energy bills and a two-year payback of the $50,000 investment. Details of the system's functions describe some of the 53 control points.

Watson, F.

1984-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Development and Testing of a Screw Compressor Supermarket Refrigeration System: Phase II, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory prototype screw compressor refrigeration system was designed, fabricated and tested under various evaporator and ambient conditions. The design is based on a Dunham-Bush vertical hermetic screw compressor and other standard refrigeration components. Results indicate that a screw compressor rack with vapor injection can increase the thermodynamic efficiency of low temperature refrigeration in supermarkets by 20 to 28% compared to multiple reciprocating compressor racks. The payback period of the screw compressor refrigeration system relative to multiple reciprocating compressor systems is 1.1 to 1.5 years and the net present value savings range from 15 to 22 thousand dollars.

Borhanian, H. Hamed; Toscano, William M.; Lee, Kang P.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

New compressor systems seen paring refrigeration costs 15%  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manufacturers claim that a parallel arrangement of three to five compressors of varying capacities can lower a store's refrigerating costs over 15%. The energy savings come from the more-precise matching of compressor capacity with refrigeration demand. The 500 stores that have installed uneven compressor systems are achieving a payback in under a year. Because it is important for controls to match a system for maximum efficiency, manufacturers are introducing tailor-made microprocessor controllers. A table summarizes three supermarket case histories. (DCK)

Barber, J.

1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

Iron production maintenance effectiveness system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

Augstman, J.J. [Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind PowerUnder Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for evaluation of investments in small-scale wind power under uncertainty. It is assumed that the price of electricity is uncertain and that an owner of a property with wind resources has a deferrable opportunity to invest in one wind power turbine within a capacity range. The model evaluates investment in a set of projects with different capacity. It is assumed that the owner substitutes own electricity load with electricity from the wind mill and sells excess electricity back to the grid on an hourly basis. The problem for the owner is to find the price levels at which it is optimal to invest, and in which capacity to invest. The results suggests it is optimal to wait for significantly higher prices than the net present value break-even. Optimal scale and timing depend on the expected price growth rate and the uncertainty in the future prices.

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Status of the NIF Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground was broken for the National Ignition Facility, a stadium-sized complex, in 1997. When complete, the project will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt laser system adjoining a 10-meter-diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF's beams will compress and heat small capsules containing a mixture of hydrogen isotopes of deuterium and tritium. These targets will undergo nuclear fusion, producing more energy than the energy in the laser pulse and achieving scientific breakeven. NIF experiments will allow scientists to study physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million degrees Kelvin and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure--conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapon detonations.

Moses, E

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

274

Preliminary Neutronic Study of D2O-cooled High Conversion PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled high-conversion PWRs loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

Thomas Mason

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

277

A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cost reductions in absorption chillers. Final report, June 1984-May 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absorption chillers have great difficulty competing with the electric-driven compression alternative, due in part to modest operating efficiencies and largely to high first costs. This project is an assessment of the possibility of lowering the costs of absorption chillers dramatically by the use of low material intensity in the design of a new generation of these machines. Breakeven costs for absorption chillers, their heat exchangers and heat exchanger materials were established which will allow commercial success. Polymeric and metallic materials appropriate to particular components and which meet the cost goals were identified. A subset of these materials were tested and ordered by success in tolerating conditions and materials found in absorption chiller applications. Conceptual designs which indicate the practicality of the low material intensity approach were developed. The work reported here indicates that there is a high probability that this apporach will be successful.

Leigh, R.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Distributed practice in verbal recall tasks: A review and quantitative synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

size magnitude: lag (longer ISIs increased effect size),episodes are presented, the ISIs may be equal (“fixed”),She concluded that longer ISIs facilitate learning of verbal

Nicholas, Cepda; Pashler, Harold; Vul, Ed; Wixted, John; Rohrer, Douglas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analysis of IECC2003 Chiller Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating Requirement for New York State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state of New York asked the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the requirement for Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating that exists in the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code to determine whether this requirement should be adopted into the New York State Energy Code. A typical hotel application that would trigger this requirement was examined using whole building simulation software to generate baseline annual chiller and service hot water loads, and a spreadsheet was used to examine the energy savings potential for heat recovery using hourly load files from the simulation. An example application meeting the code requirement was developed, and the energy savings, energy cost savings, and first costs for the heat recovery installation were developed. The calculated payback for this application was 6.3 years using 2002 New York state average energy costs. This payback met the minimum requirements for cost effectiveness established for the state of New York for updating the commercial energy conservation code.

Winiarski, David W.

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69% more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44% less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration. 8 refs.

Pesaran, A.A. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Wipke, K. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An easy-to-fabricate low-temperature TiO{sub 2} electron collection layer for high efficiency planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells arguably represent the most auspicious new photovoltaic technology so far, as they possess an astonishing combination of properties. The impressive and brisk advances achieved so far bring forth highly efficient and solution processable solar cells, holding great promise to grow into a mature technology that is ready to be embedded on a large scale. However, the vast majority of state-of-the-art perovskite solar cells contains a dense TiO{sub 2} electron collection layer that requires a high temperature treatment (>450?°C), which obstructs the road towards roll-to-roll processing on flexible foils that can withstand no more than ?150?°C. Furthermore, this high temperature treatment leads to an overall increased energy payback time and cumulative energy demand for this emerging photovoltaic technology. Here we present the implementation of an alternative TiO{sub 2} layer formed from an easily prepared nanoparticle dispersion, with annealing needs well within reach of roll-to-roll processing, making this technology also appealing from the energy payback aspect. Chemical and morphological analysis allows to understand and optimize the processing conditions of the TiO{sub 2} layer, finally resulting in a maximum obtained efficiency of 13.6% for a planar heterojunction solar cell within an ITO/TiO{sub 2}/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3-x}Cl{sub x}poly(3-hexylthiophene)/Ag architecture.

Conings, B.; Baeten, L.; Jacobs, T.; Dera, R.; D’Haen, J.; Manca, J.; Boyen, H.-G. [Instituut voor Materiaalonderzoek, Universiteit Hasselt, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is no longer available. Please contact Michael.Gestwick@nrel.gov for further information.

Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Strategy Guideline: Proper Water Heater Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is no longer available. Please contact Cheryn.Metzger@nrel.gov for further information.

Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; German, A.; Staller, J.; Zhang, Y.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2010 - 2011 Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is no longer available. Please contact Stacey.Rothgeb@nrel.gov for further information.

Colon, C.; Parker, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Synthesis of fluorescein labeled 7-methylguanosinemonophosphate Amarnath Natarajan,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phosphoramidate chemistry. Since tetrazole is no longer commercially available we successfully used pyridine

292

Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report - Austin, Texas: February 29 - March 2, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is no longer available. Please contact Cheryn.Metzger@nrel.gov for further information.

Not Available

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Complementarity And Firewalls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper has been withdrawn because the author no longer believes the firewall argument is correct.

Leonard Susskind

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

Laboratory Evaluation of Energy Recovery Ventilators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is no longer available. Please contact Stacey.Rothgeb@nrel.gov for further information.

Kosar, D.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is no longer available. Please contact Michael.Gestwick@nrel.gov for further information.

Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCARâ??s test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of imported oil, that much less air pollution, and an equivalent reduction in the trade deficit, which is expected to lower the inflation rate.

N.B. Elsner; J.C. Bass; S. Ghamaty; D. Krommenhoek; A. Kushch; D. Snowden; S. Marchetti

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores are identified by evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of keff, mass balance, and void coefficient. The effect of advanced iron alloy cladding (i.e., FeCrAl) on the performance of Pu conversion in MOX fueled cores is studied instead of using standard stainless-steel cladding. Variations in clad thickness and coolant-to-fuel volume ratio are also exercised. The use of FeCrAl instead of SS as a cladding alloy reduces the required Pu enrichment and improves the Pu conversion rate primarily due to the absence of nickel in the cladding alloy that results in the reduction of the neutron absorption. Also the difference in void coefficients between SS and FeCrAl alloys is nearly 500 pcm over the entire burnup range. The report also shows sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in order to characterize D2O cooled HCPWRs from different aspects. The uncertainties of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected reactor cores are evaluated at different burnup points in order to find similarities and trends respect to D2O-HCPWR.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

An economic analysis of mobile pyrolysis for northern New Mexico forests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the interest of providing an economically sensible use for the copious small-diameter wood in Northern New Mexico, an economic study is performed focused on mobile pyrolysis. Mobile pyrolysis was selected for the study because transportation costs limit the viability of a dedicated pyrolysis plant, and the relative simplicity of pyrolysis compared to other technology solutions lends itself to mobile reactor design. A bench-scale pyrolysis system was used to study the wood pyrolysis process and to obtain performance data that was otherwise unavailable under conditions theorized to be optimal given the regional problem. Pyrolysis can convert wood to three main products: fixed gases, liquid pyrolysis oil and char. The fixed gases are useful as low-quality fuel, and may have sufficient chemical energy to power a mobile system, eliminating the need for an external power source. The majority of the energy content of the pyrolysis gas is associated with carbon monoxide, followed by light hydrocarbons. The liquids are well characterized in the historical literature, and have slightly lower heating values comparable to the feedstock. They consist of water and a mix of hundreds of hydrocarbons, and are acidic. They are also unstable, increasing in viscosity with time stored. Up to 60% of the biomass in bench-scale testing was converted to liquids. Lower ({approx}550 C) furnace temperatures are preferred because of the decreased propensity for deposits and the high liquid yields. A mobile pyrolysis system would be designed with low maintenance requirements, should be able to access wilderness areas, and should not require more than one or two people to operate the system. The techno-economic analysis assesses fixed and variable costs. It suggests that the economy of scale is an important factor, as higher throughput directly leads to improved system economic viability. Labor and capital equipment are the driving factors in the viability of the system. The break-even selling price for the baseline assumption is about $11/GJ, however it may be possible to reduce this value by 20-30% depending on other factors evaluated in the non-baseline scenarios. Assuming a value for the char co-product improves the analysis. Significantly lower break-even costs are possible in an international setting, as labor is the dominant production cost.

Brady, Patrick D.; Brown, Alexander L.; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development of technology in the production of fertilizers in ammoniation-granulation plants. Progress report No. 12, September 1980. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work conducted to demonstrate procedures and equipment to conserve about 83% of fuel oil used for drying and generating steam in the ammoniation-granulation plants is reported. The general mechanism of granulation is examined. Conventional ammoniation-granulation plants are described and the new pipe-cross reactor system is described and schematics of their design are presented. Results of some demonstration tests reveal that an average of 785,000 Btu's per ton of production is eliminated with the installation of the TVA pipe-cross reactor process. It also reduces atmospheric emissions. Data on investment cost and payback period of the installation of a pipe-cross reactor in an existing TVA granulation fertilizer plant are presented.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Zinc extraction from EAF dust with EZINEX{reg_sign} process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Italian company Engitec Impianti has developed a new electrochemical technology for the treatment of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) flue dust generated in steel mini-mills. This process is based on a new and completely different concept from the Waeltz technology applied at present and allows, due to its modular nature, for an erection on the steel producer`s site. Engitec Impianti spent US $700.000 constructing a 500 t/y throughput pilot plant at Pittini Group`s Ferriere Nord mini-mill in Osoppo, Italy in order to demonstrate the process capabilities and obtain the data for a commercial plant design. The paper describes the pilot plant performances and the engineering criteria for a commercial unit of 10.000 t/y throughput. The feasibility study demonstrates a pay-back period of 3--4 years for the commercial plant.

Olper, M. [Engitec Impianti S.p.A., Milan (Italy)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

Sparrow, F.T.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The large scale penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) will introduce technical challenges to the distribution grid, but also carries the potential for vehicle-to-grid services. Namely, if available in large enough numbers, EVs can be used as a distributed energy resource (DER) and their presence can influence optimal DER investment and scheduling decisions in microgrids. In this work, a novel EV fleet aggregator model is introduced in a stochastic formulation of DER-CAM [1], an optimization tool used to address DER investment and scheduling problems. This is used to assess the impact of EV interconnections on optimal DER solutions considering uncertainty in EV driving schedules. Optimization results indicate that EVs can have a significant impact on DER investments, particularly if considering short payback periods. Furthermore, results suggest that uncertainty in driving schedules carries little significance to total energy costs, which is corroborated by results obtained using the stochastic formulation of the problem.

Center for Energy and Innovative Technologies; NEC Laboratories America Inc.; Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Bozchalui, Mohammed C.; Sharma, Ratnesh; Marnay, Chris; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

2013-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Case Study of Two MBCx Projects: Using M&V to Track Energy Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operation • Re-establish supply air temperature set point reset control in AHU1 • Other measures • Approximately 483,000 kWh (10%), 2.7M lbs/yr steam (51%) #0;? Estimated using DOE 2 analysis • Cost reduction $84,000 (14%), Payback 0.7 years 13 Soda Hall... 006 3/ 24/ 2 006 3/ 26/ 2 00 6 3/ 28/ 2 00 6 3/ 3 0/ 2 006 Date kW h 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 De g F AHU 1 Daily kWh AHU 3 Daily kWh AHU 4 Daily kWh OAT Daily Average AHU 1 supply fan malf. begins here. Same date as economizer fix. 17 M...

Jump, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Research Opportunities in Reliability of Photovoltaic Modules (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for an increased scope and a more proactive effort in reliability research of photovoltaic modules and systems includes reducing the levelized cost of energy and gaining better confidence in the energy and financial payback for photovoltaic systems. This increased reliability and confidence will lead to greater penetration of photovoltaics in the energy portfolio and greater employment in photovoltaics and related industries. Present research needs include the fundamental degradation mechanisms of polymers, connectors and other module components, mapping of failure mechanisms observed in the field to those in accelerated lifetime tests, determining the acceleration factors, and improving standards for modules such that tests can appropriately be assigned to evaluate their long term durability. Specific mechanisms discussed are corrosion in module components, metastability in thin-film active layers, delamination and loss of elastic properties in module polymeric materials, and inverter failure. Presently, there is hiring of reliability scientists and engineers at many levels of the value chain for photovoltaics.

Hacke, P.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A CRITICAL REVIEW OF SIMULATION TECHNIQUES FOR DAYLIGHT RESPONSIVE SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* corresponding author Application of lighting control technologies has increased the public interest. Although these technologies have been promoted during the last years their successful use in buildings has been accomplished in a small percentage of new projects. One reason is the difficulty in quantifying the energy savings and thus the subsequent payback period. The majority of existing simulation tools (which are embedded in building energy codes) –needed during initial design- are based on the estimation of the potential energy savings due to daylight. The paper focus on the limitations of current simulation approaches comparing their results, in order to assess their accuracy. For this, special test cases have been developed exploiting their domain of validity.

L. Doulos; A. Tsangrassoulis; F. Topalis

306

Continuous Commissioning®  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 08 Jan -0 9 M ar -0 9 M ay -0 9 Ju l-0 9 S ep -0 9 C um ul at iv e S av in gs ChW Elect Gas Example ? Austin City Hall ? CC? Results Post-CC? $ 112K Implementation Phase 17% Energy Savings Payback ~ 2 years $0... $20,000 $40,000 $60,000 $80,000 $100,000 $120,000 M ay -0 8 Ju l-0 8 S ep -0 8 No v- 08 Jan -0 9 M ar -0 9 M ay -0 9 Ju l-0 9 S ep -0 9 C um ul at iv e S av in gs ChW Elect Gas Example ? Austin City...

Culp, C.; Claridge, D. E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Barriers and opportunities: A review of selected successful energy-efficiency programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In industry, barriers may exist at various points in the decision making process, and in the implementation and management of measures to improve energy efficiency. Barriers may take many forms, and are determined by the business environment and include decision-making processes, energy prices, lack of information, a lack of confidence in the information, or high transaction costs for obtaining reliable information, as well as limited capital availability. Other barriers are the ''invisibility'' of energy efficiency measures and the difficulty of quantifying the impacts, and slow diffusion of innovative technology into markets while firms typically under-invest in R and D, despite the high pay-backs. Various programs try to reduce the barriers to improve the uptake of innovative technologies. A wide array of policies has been used and tested in the industrial sector in industrialized countries, with varying success rates. We review some new approaches to industrial energy efficiency improvement in industrialized countries, focusing on voluntary agreements.

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy-conservation opportunities in lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies and techniques which can be employed by your existing personnel - without the need for consultants - to reduce your lighting costs by as much as 70% are discussed. Four basic steps to reduce energy costs and improve the effectiveness of the lighting system discussed are: get acquainted with some of the basic terminology and energy efficient lamps and fixtures which are on the market; conduct a survey of the building to determine where and how much energy and money can be saved in the process; implement the simple, low-cost or no-cost measures immediately; and calculate the payback period for capital investment modifications, and implement those which make economic sense. Case studies are used to illustrate the recommendations. (MCW)

None

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived Value of Solar Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed by several types of market participants, ranging from residential customers to large-scale project developers and utilities. Each type of market participant frequently uses a different economic performance metric to characterize PV value because they are looking for different types of returns from a PV investment. This report finds that different economic performance metrics frequently show different price thresholds for when a PV investment becomes profitable or attractive. Several project parameters, such as financing terms, can have a significant impact on some metrics [e.g., internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and benefit-to-cost (B/C) ratio] while having a minimal impact on other metrics (e.g., simple payback time). As such, the choice of economic performance metric by different customer types can significantly shape each customer's perception of PV investment value and ultimately their adoption decision.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Comparative analysis of net energy balance for satellite power systems (SPS) and other energy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The net energy balance of seven electric energy systems is assessed: two coal-based, one nuclear, two terrestrial solar, and two solar power satellites, with principal emphasis on the latter two systems. Solar energy systems require much less operating energy per unit of electrical output. However, on the basis of the analysis used here, coal and nuclear systems are two to five times more efficient at extracting useful energy from the primary resource base than are the solar energy systems. The payback period for all systems is less than 1.5 years, except for the terrestrial photovoltaic (19.8 yr) and the solar power satellite system (6.4 yr), both of which rely on energy-intensive silicon cells.

Cirillo, R.R.; Cho, B.S.; Monarch, M.R.; Levine, E.P.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy savings and economics of advanced control strategies for packaged air conditioners with gas heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation of the potential energy savings from adding advanced control to existing packaged air conditioners. Advanced control options include air-side economizer, multi-speed fan control, demand control ventilation and staged cooling. The energy and cost savings from the different control strategies individually and in combination are estimated using the EnergyPlus detailed energy simulation program for four building types, namely, a small office building, a stand-alone retail building, a strip mall building and a supermarket building. For each of the four building types, the simulation was run for 16 locations covering all 15 climate zones in the U.S. The maximum installed cost of a replacement controller that provides acceptable payback periods to owners is estimated.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Huang, Yunzhi; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Black Bear Prep plant replaces high-frequency screens with fine wire sieves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Black Bear prep plant (near Wharncliffe, WV, USA) the clean coal from the spirals traditionally reported to high-frequency screens, which removed high-ash clay fines. Screens have inherent inefficiencies that allow clean coal to report to the screen underflow. The goal of this project was to capture the maximum amount of spiral clean coal while still removing the high-ash clay material found in the spiral product. The reduction of the circulating load and plant downtime for unscheduled maintenance were projected as additional benefits. After the plant upgrade, the maintenance related to the high frequency screens was eliminated and an additional 2.27 tons per hour (tph) of fine coal was recovered, which resulted in a payback period of less than one year. The article was adapted from a paper presented at Coal Prep 2007 in April 2007, Lexington, KY, USA. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Barbee, C.J.; Nottingham, J.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evaluation of the near-term commercial potential of technologies being developed by the Office of Building Technologies Volune II - Survey Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of the results from each Equipment and Practice Form completed by the program managers and principal investigators. Information collected from the Equipment and Practice Form include the following: name and description of the technology; energy characteristics; when the technology will be ready for commercialization; estimated payback period; market sectors that would benefit; important commercialization barriers to overcome; energy-related benefits; and non-energy benefits of the technology to customers. Some of these technologies include: heat pumps, heat exchangers, insulation lighting systems; cooling systems, ventilation systems, burners, leak detection systems, retrofit procedure, operating and maintenance procedures, wall systems, windows, sampling equipment, measuring methods and instruments, thermal analysis methods, and computer codes.

Weijo, R.O. (Portland General Electric Co., OR (USA)); Nicholls, A.K.; Weakley, S.A.; Eckert, R.L.; Shankle, D.L.; Anderson, M.R.; Anderson, A.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Field development of a desiccant-based space-conditioning system for supermarket applications. Annual report, February 1982-January 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of gas-regenerated desiccant dehumidification systems to provide space-conditioning for supermarkets was investigated. A silica gel-based dehumidification system and related components were installed in a Jewel supermarket as an adjunct to the conventional vapor-compression air-conditioning system. Instrumentation was installed to monitor this hybrid system and to allow performance comparisons with the conventional vapor-compression system operating alone. Data collected were used to develop load models for the building and to correlate indoor and ambient conditions to the energy consumption by the air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. The expected reduction in refrigeration energy consumption with decreasing store humidities was verified. The load models were used in conjunction with system characteristics to obtain cooling season cost projections for both systems operating under different conditions. Initial estimates indicate that payback periods of the hybrid system could be under 1 year.

Cohen, B.M.; Levine, A.H.; Arora, R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Cogeneration for supermarkets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Research Institute's supermarket dehumidification project and assessments of commercial cogeneration found that retail supermarkets represent an opportunity for packaged gas-fueled cogeneration systems. Although not currently large thermal users, supermarkets have several electrical loads that can be replaced with heat-driven absorption and adsorption if the cogeneration package is designed specifically for their needs. Field testing should verify the preliminary estimates of attractive paybacks combined with reliability and ease of operation that are required by supermarket operators. The system under examination provides all of the low and medium temperature refrigeration, most of the space heating, all of the water heating, and some of the electricity for lighting. 4 figures, 2 tables.

Walker, D.; Hynek, S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Carlos R. Montalto Cruz' Old Web Page  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I am no longer at Purdue University, I am now working at the University of Washington in Seattle. The link to my new webpage is HERE. I will no longer support ...

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - anterior motor evoked Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

motor strip (labeled M1) and a more anterior, premotor strip (PM... stimulation trains to motor cortex, Huang longer movement evoked by the longer train. Why then et al....

319

Scenario analysis of hybrid class 3-7 heavy vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of hybridization on heavy-duty vehicles are not well understood. Heavy vehicles represent a broader range of applications than light-duty vehicles, resulting in a wide variety of chassis and engine combinations, as well as diverse driving conditions. Thus, the strategies, incremental costs, and energy/emission benefits associated with hybridizing heavy vehicles could differ significantly from those for passenger cars. Using a modal energy and emissions model, they quantify the potential energy savings of hybridizing commercial Class 3-7 heavy vehicles, analyze hybrid configuration scenarios, and estimate the associated investment cost and payback time. From the analysis, they conclude that (1) hybridization can significantly reduce energy consumption of Class 3-7 heavy vehicles under urban driving conditions; (2) the grid-independent, conventional vehicle (CV)-like hybrid is more cost-effective than the grid-dependent, electric vehicle (EV)-like hybrid, and the parallel configuration is more cost-effective than the series configuration; (3) for CV-like hybridization, the on-board engine can be significantly downsized, with a gasoline or diesel engine used for SUVs perhaps being a good candidate for an on-board engine; (4) over the long term, the incremental cost of a CV-like, parallel-configured Class 3-4 hybrid heavy vehicle is about %5,800 in the year 2005 and $3,000 in 2020, while for a Class 6-7 truck, it is about $7,100 in 2005 and $3,300 in 2020; and (5) investment payback time, which depends on the specific type and application of the vehicle, averages about 6 years under urban driving conditions in 2005 and 2--3 years in 2020.

An, F.; Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Eberhardt, J. J.

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

EXERGY ANALYSIS AND ENTROPY GENERATION MINIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FOR ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy recovery from waste heat is attracting more and more attention. All electronic systems consume electricity but only a fraction of it is used for information processing and for human interfaces, such as displays. Lots of energy is dissipated as heat. There are some discussions on waste heat recovery from the electronic systems such as laptop computers. However the efficiency of energy conversion for such utilization is not very attractive due to the maximum allowable temperature of the heat source devices. This leads to very low limits of Carnot efficiency. In contrast to thermodynamic heat engines, Brayton cycle, free piston Stirling engines, etc., authors previously reported that thermoelectric (TE) can be a cost-effective device if the TE and the heat sink are co-optimized, and if some parasitic effects could be reduced. Since the heat already exists and it is free, the additional cost and energy payback time are the key measures to evaluate the value of the energy recovery system. In this report, we will start with the optimum model of the TE power generation system. Then, theoretical maximum output, cost impact and energy payback are evaluated in the examples of electronics system. Entropy Generation Minimization (EGM) is a method already familiar in thermal management of electronics. The optimum thermoelectric waste heat recovery design is compared with the EGM approach. Exergy analysis evaluates the useful energy flow in the optimum TE system. This comprehensive analysis is used to predict the potential future impact of the TE material development, as the dimensionless figure-ofmerit (ZT) is improved.

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Resource engineering and economic studies for direct application of geothermal energy. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy at a selected plant in New York State was studied. Existing oil and gas records suggests that geothermal fluid is available in the target area and based on this potential. Friendship Dairies, Inc., Friendship, NY, was selected as a potential user of geothermal energy. Currently natural gas and electricity are used as its primary energy sources. Six geothermal system configurations were analyzed based on replacement of gas or oil-fired systems for producing process heat. Each system was evaluated in terms of Internal Rate of Return on Investment (IRR), and simple payback. Six system configurations and two replaced fuels, representative of a range of situations found in the state, are analyzed. Based on the potential geothermal reserves at Friendship, each of the six system configurations are shown to be economically viable, compared to continued gas or oil-firing. The Computed IRR's are all far in excess of projected average interest rates for long term borrowings: approximately 15% for guarantee backed loans or as high as 20% for conventional financing. IRR is computed based on the total investment (equity plus debt) and cash flows before financing costs, i.e., before interest expense, but after the tax benefit of the interest deduction. The base case application for the Friendship analysis is case B/20 yr-gas which produces an IRR of 28.5% and payback of 3.4 years. Even better returns could be realized in the cases of oil-avoidance and where greater use of geothermal energy can be made as shown in the other cases considered.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Need for Systematic Retrofit Analysis in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multifamily housing offers high potential for energy savings through retrofits. A comprehensive energy audit with systematic evaluation of alternative energy measures is one of the key steps to realizing the full energy savings potential. However, this potential often remains unrealized when the selection of measures is (1) based on a one-size-fits-all approach originating from accustomed practices, (2) intended merely to meet code-compliance requirements, and/or (3) influenced by owner renter split incentive. In such cases, the benefits of comprehensive energy auditing are disregarded in view of the apparent difficulty in diagnosing multifamily buildings, evaluating alternative measures, and installing customized sets of measures. This paper highlights some of the barriers encountered in a multifamily housing retrofit project in Georgia and demonstrates the merits of systematic retrofit analysis by identifying opportunities for higher energy savings and improved comfort and indoor air quality that were missed in this project. The study uses a whole-building energy analysis conducted for a 10-unit, low-rise, multifamily building of a 110-unit apartment complex. The analysis projected a 24% energy savings from the measures installed in the building with a payback period of 10 years. Further analysis with a systematic evaluation of alternative measures showed that without compromising on the objectives of durability, livability, and appearance of the building, energy savings of up to 34% were achievable with a payback period of 7 years. The paper concludes by outlining recommendations that may benefit future retrofit projects by improving the audit process, streamlining tasks, and achieving higher energy savings.

Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report Number 8, 1 July, 1993--30 September, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 1, the preparation of catalyst materials, is proceeding actively. At WVU, catalysts based on Mo are being prepared using a variety of approaches to alter the oxidation state and environment of the Mo. At UCC and P, copper-based zinc chromite spinel catalysts will be prepared and tested. The modeling of the alcohol-synthesis reaction in a membrane reactor is proceeding actively. Under standard conditions, pressure drop in the membrane reactor has been shown to be negligible. In Task 2, base case designs had previously been completed with a Texaco gasifier. Now, similar designs have been completed using the Shell gasifier. A comparison of the payback periods or production cost of these plants shows significant differences among the base cases. However, a natural gas only design, prepared for comparison purposes, gives a lower payback period or production cost. Since the alcohol synthesis portion of the above processes is the same, the best way to make coal-derived higher alcohols more attractive economically than natural gas-derived higher alcohols is by making coal-derived syngas less expensive than natural gas-derived syngas. The maximum economically feasible capacity for a higher alcohol plant from coal-derived syngas appears to be 32 MM bbl/yr. This is based on consideration of regional coal supply in the eastern US, coal transportation, and regional product demand. The benefits of economics of scale are illustrated for the base case designs. A value for higher alcohol blends has been determined by appropriate combination of RVP, octane number, and oxygen content, using MTBE as a reference. This analysis suggests that the high RVP of methanol in combination with its higher water solubility make higher alcohols more valuable than methanol.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Supplement to the ``determination analysis`` (ORNL-6847) and analysis of the NEMA efficiency standard for distribution transformers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains additional information for use by the US Department of Energy in making a determination on proposing energy conservation standards for distribution transformers as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. An earlier determination study by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory determined that cost-effective, technically feasible energy savings could be achieved by distribution transformer standards and that these savings are significant relative to other product conservation standards. This study was documented in a final report, ``Determination Analysis of Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers`` (ORNL-6847, July 1996). The energy conservation options analyzed in this study were estimated to save 5.2 to 13.7 quads from 2000--2030. The energy savings for the determination study cases have been revised downward for a number of reasons. The transformer market, both present and future, was overestimated in the previous study, particularly for dry-type transformers, which have the greatest energy-saving potential. Moreover, a revision downwards of the effective annual loads for utility owned transformers also results in lower energy savings. The present study assesses four of the five conservation cases from the earlier determination study as well as the National Electrical Manufacturers Association energy efficiency standard NEMA TP 1-1996 using the updated data and a more accurate disaggregated analysis model. According to these new estimates, the savings ranged from 2.5 to 10.7 quads of primary energy for the 30-year period 2004 to 2034. For the TP-1 case, data were available to calculate the payback period required to recover the extra cost from the value of the energy saved. The average payback period based on the average national cost of electricity is 2.76 years. 15 figs., 23 tabs.

Barnes, P.R.; Das, S.; McConnell, B.W.; Van Dyke, J.W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Study of Climate on Alien Worlds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing atmospheres beyond the Solar System is an endeavor no longer confined to the realm of science fiction.

Heng, Kevin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Intrusion Tolerance 18 PublishedbytheieeeComPutersoCiety1540-7993/08/$25.002008ieeeieeeseCurity&PrivaCy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- structures such as power, water, gas, oil, and trans- portation. Therefore, the threat is no longer against

Neves, Nuno

327

Process Control Security 44 PublishedbytheieeeComPutersoCiety1540-7993/08/$25.002008ieeeieeeseCurity&PrivaCy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- structures such as power, water, gas, oil, and trans- portation. Therefore, the threat is no longer against

Correia, Miguel

328

EXPERIMENTAL TESTS OF A LARGE NONCIRCULAR RFP (Poster presented at 1987 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not sustained, the magnetic equilibria decay time was longer than ideal HHO instabil1ty tlmesoales, and detailed

Sprott, Julien Clinton

329

Car Parking Permit Eligibility 1. Eligible Groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Site Security Staff on arrival and allow parking in loading areas when longer than one hour is required

Martin, Ralph R.

330

Ghosts of El Salvador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

poisoning the fish, along with their domestic animals—and they were no longer allowed to grow their own food

Kerr, Dara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that have the potential to solve or provide longer-term treatment of the phosphorous eutrophication problem

332

Energy-aware Cross-layer Burst Buffering for Wireless Communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy-efficient hardware and batteries in the longer run, we believe there is still a need for carefully

334

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Summary. To study the transport and recovery of injected SiO2 nanoparticles through a longer flow path.

335

Impact of Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures on interannual and decadal variations of GRACE land water storage in tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stress, i.e. , the ground water storage [Toomey et al. ,and longer time scales, as ground water storage multidecadal

de Linage, Caroline; Kim, Hyungjun; Famiglietti, James S; Yu, Jin-Yi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Effects of hemi-joint culture on biomechanical and biochemical properties of articular cartilage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

However, with prolonged cold storage longer than ~7 days,significant improvement over cold storage conditions used in

Rone, Rebecca J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Ethics of Coexistence: Can I Learn to Stop Worrying and Love the Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]; attackers switch to phishing and keylogging to steal pass- words, attacks that can no longer be detected

Aycock, John

338

City of Detroit- SmartBuildings Detroit Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''Note: This program is no longer accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations.'''''...

339

City of Detroit- SmartBuildings Detroit Green Fund Loan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''Note: This program is no longer accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future solicitations.'''''...

340

Delegation Order No. 0204-60 to the Governor of the State of Kentucky  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Rescinded by: 57 FR 23932, effective June 3, 1992 – The statutory bases for this regulation no longer exist.

1992-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Renewable Energy Grant Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''Note: This program is no longer accepting applications. See the program web site for information regarding future solicitations. '''''

342

Case study evaluating the potential for small wind energy conversion systems (SWECS) as an integral part of the generating mix of a regional utility. Final report, ICFAR Project 05-3-7001-0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Average annual measured wind speeds in Indiana extrapolated to 30m vary from approximately 4.5 to 6.5 m/s. Stronger winds are observed in the northern part of the state than in the southern, with the central region exhibiting intermediate values. The annual array capacity factors of the three selected wind turbines operating in an Indianapolis wind regime at height 30m varied from 0.243 for the machine with rated power density (P/sub rd/) 244 W/m/sup 2/ to 0.462 for the machine with P/sub rd/ = 93 W/m/sup 2/ - a difference in power output of nearly a factor of 2. These results strongly suggest that wind turbines with low rated power densities are best suited for Indiana's wind regimes. The economic analyses of WECS break-even costs show that, given the assumptions of the analysis, a wind turbine with P/sub rd/ = 244 W/m/sup 2/ would be economically competitive with conventional generating sources were the capital cost not to exceed about $750 per rated kW (1989 dollars). This figure for a machine with P/sub rd/ = 93 W/m/sup 2/ is nearly $2000/kW. Brought back to 1980 dollars by an inflation factor of (1.08)/sup 9/ = 2.00, these values reckon to $375/kW and $1000/kW, respectively.

Brown, M.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Results of gas-fired flash-smelting tests. Phase 1-3. Topical technical report, November 1987-April 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A natural gas-fired burner for the HRD FLAME REACTOR Process was designed and successfully tested on over 450 tons of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) dust, and over a wide range of operating conditions. The coal/coke-fired FLAME REACTOR Process has already been demonstrated as an efficient and economic means of recovering zinc from EAF dust as a salable oxide product, and a salable nonhazardous, iron-rich slag product. The results of the work indicate that the natural gas-fired process has a higher zinc capacity for a given reactor size, with zinc recoveries 5-10 percentage points higher than coal/coke processing at high throughputs. Gas-fired capital costs are about 15% less than coal for a 20,000 STPY EAF dust plant. Smaller plants show even higher break-even costs. Net processing costs are about $100/ton of EAF dust, which is extremely competitive with land-filling and other recycling options.

Pusateri, J.F.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy implications of glass-container recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Accelerator breeders: will they replace liquid metal fast breeders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of accelerator breeders at Brookhaven National Laboratory indicate that the AB-LWR fuel cycle is economically competitive with the LMFBR fuel cycle. The same can be said about the accelerator breeder-High Temperature Gas Reactor symbiosis. This system appears to be very competitive with the added real advantage of superior safety and proliferation resistance. This discussion would be incomplete if the real competitor to accelerator breeding was not mentioned, namely Fusion Hybrid Breeding (FHB). Fusion Hybrid Breeding is a nearer option than pure fusion, as the breakeven Q value requirements are much more modest. Fusion Hybrid Breeding, if successful and practical, has the potential for highly efficient fissile fuel breeding, leading to cheaper fuel. The system, however, has yet to be demonstrated scientifically and to be shown commercially feasible. This is in contrast with the AB system which is an extension of proven, state-of-the-art technology with implementation possible within twenty years. 25 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

Grand, P.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Takahashi, H.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Economic Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Powder River Basin Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unminable coalbeds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this paper is to study the economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 tonne) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

Eric P. Robertson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs. However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration luminaires, a networked control system was installed for additional evaluation and demonstration purposes. The capability of control system to measure luminaire input power was explored in this study. A more exhaustive demonstration and evaluation of the control system will be the subject of future GATEWAY report(s).

Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

DOE/AHAM advanced refrigerator technology development project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the effort to improve residential energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse emissions from power plants, several design options were investigated for improving the energy efficiency of a conventionally designed domestic refrigerator-freezer. The program goal was to reduce the energy consumption of a 20-ft{sup 3} (570-L) top-mount refrigerator-freeze to 1.00 kWh/d, a 50% reduction from the 1993 National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) standard. The options--such as improved cabinet and door insulation, a high-efficiency compressor, a low-wattage fan, a large counterflow evaporator, and adaptive defrost control--were incorporated into prototype refrigerator-freezer cabinets and refrigeration systems. The refrigerant HFC-134a was used as a replacement for CFC-12. The baseline energy performance of the production refrigerator-freezers, along with cabinet heat load and compressor calorimeter test results, were extensively documented to provide a firm basis for experimentally measured energy savings. The project consisted of three main phases: (1) an evaluation of energy-efficient design options using computer simulation models and experimental testing, (2) design and testing of an initial prototype unit, and (3) energy and economic analyses of a final prototype. The final prototype achieved an energy consumption level of 0.93 kWh/d--an improvement of 45% over the baseline unit and 54% over the 1993 NAECA standard for 20-fg{sup 3} (570-L) units. The manufacturer`s cost for those improvements was estimated at $134; assuming that cost is doubled for the consumer, it would take about 11.4 years to pay for the design changes. Since the payback period was thought to be unfeasible, a second, more cost-effective design was also tested. Its energy consumption level was 1.16 kWh/d, a 42% energy savings, at a manufacturer`s cost increase of $53. Again assuming a 100% markup, the payback for this unit would be 6.6 years.

Vineyard, E.A.; Sand, J.R.; Rice, C.K.; Linkous, R.L.; Hardin, C.V.; Bohman, R.H.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reliable, Economic, Efficient CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater for North America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adoption of heat pump water heating technology for commercial hot water could save up to 0.4 quads of energy and 5 million metric tons of CO2 production annually in North America, but industry perception is that this technology does not offer adequate performance or reliability and comes at too high of a cost. Development and demonstration of a CO2 heat pump water heater is proposed to reduce these barriers to adoption. Three major themes are addressed: market analysis to understand barriers to adoption, use of advanced reliability models to design optimum qualification test plans, and field testing of two phases of water heater prototypes. Market experts claim that beyond good performance, market adoption requires 'drop and forget' system reliability and a six month payback of first costs. Performance, reliability and cost targets are determined and reliability models are developed to evaluate the minimum testing required to meet reliability targets. Three phase 1 prototypes are designed and installed in the field. Based on results from these trials a product specification is developed and a second phase of five field trial units are built and installed. These eight units accumulate 11 unit-years of service including 15,650 hours and 25,242 cycles of compressor operation. Performance targets can be met. An availability of 60% is achieved and the capability to achieve >90% is demonstrated, but overall reliability is below target, with an average of 3.6 failures/unit-year on the phase 2 demonstration. Most reliability issues are shown to be common to new HVAC products, giving high confidence in mature product reliability, but the need for further work to minimize leaks and ensure reliability of the electronic expansion valve is clear. First cost is projected to be above target, leading to an expectation of 8-24 month payback when substituted for an electric water heater. Despite not meeting all targets, arguments are made that an industry leader could sufficiently develop this technology to impact the water heater market in the near term.

Radcliff, Thomas D; Sienel, Tobias; Huff, Hans-Joachim; Thompson, Adrian; Sadegh, Payman; Olsommer, Benoit; Park, Young

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Essential Power Systems Workshop - OEM Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In California, idling is largely done for climate control. This suggests that climate control devices alone could be used to reduce idling. Line-haul truck drivers surveyed require an average of 4-6 kW of power for a stereo, CB radio, light, refrigerator, and climate control found in the average truck. More power may likely be necessary for peak power demands. The amount of time line-haul trucks reported to have stopped is between 25 and 30 hours per week. It was not possible to accurately determine from the pilot survey the location, purpose, and duration of idling. Consulting driver logs or electronically monitoring trucks could yield more accurate data, including seasonal and geographic differences. Truck drivers were receptive to idling alternatives. Two-thirds of truck drivers surveyed support a program to reduce idling. Two-thirds of drivers reported they would purchase idling reduction technologies if the technology yielded a payback period of two years or less. Willingness to purchase auxiliary power units appears to be higher for owner-operators than for company drivers. With a 2-year payback period, 82% of owner- operators would be willing to buy an idle- reducing device, while 63% of company drivers thought their company would do the same. Contact with companies is necessary to discern whether this difference between owner- operators and companies is true or simply due to the perception of the company drivers. Truck stops appear to be a much more attractive option for electrification than rest areas by a 48% to 21% margin. Much of this discrepancy may be due to perceived safety problems with rest areas. This survey did not properly differentiate between using these areas for breaks or overnight. The next, full survey will quantify where the truck drivers are staying overnight, where they go for breaks, and the duration of time they spend at each place. The nationwide survey, which is in progress, will indicate how applicable the results are to the US in general. In addition to the survey, we believe data loggers and focus groups will be necessary to collect the idling duration and location data necessary to compare auxiliary power units to truck stop electrification. Focus groups are recommended to better understand the driver response to APUs and electrification. The appearance and perception of the new systems will need further clarification, which could be accomplished with a demonstration for truck drivers.

Bill Gouse

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. energy service company (ESCO) industry is an example of a private sector business model where energy savings are delivered to customers primarily through the use of performance-based contracts. This study was conceived as a snapshot of the ESCO industry prior to the economic slowdown and the introduction of federal stimulus funding mandated by enactment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This study utilizes two parallel analytic approaches to characterize ESCO industry and market trends in the U.S.: (1) a ?top-down? approach involving a survey of individual ESCOs to estimate aggregate industry activity and (2) a ?bottom-up? analysis of a database of ~;;3,250 projects (representing over $8B in project investment) that reports market trends including installed EE retrofit strategies, project installation costs and savings, project payback times, and benefit-cost ratios over time. Despite the onset of a severe economic recession, the U.S. ESCO industry managed to grow at about 7percent per year between 2006 and 2008. ESCO industry revenues were about $4.1 billion in 2008 and ESCOs anticipate accelerated growth through 2011 (25percent per year). We found that 2,484 ESCO projects in our database generated ~;;$4.0 billion ($2009) in net, direct economic benefits to their customers. We estimate that the ESCO project database includes about 20percent of all U.S. ESCO market activity from 1990-2008. Assuming the net benefits per project are comparable for ESCO projects that are not included in the LBNL database, this would suggest that the ESCO industry has generated ~;;$23 billion in net direct economic benefits for customers at projects installed between 1990 and 2008. There is empirical evidence confirming that the industry is evolving by installing more comprehensive and complex measures?including onsite generation and measures to address deferred maintenance?but this evolution has significant implications for customer project economics, especially at K-12 schools. We found that the median simple payback time has increased from 1.9 to 3.2 years in private sector projects since the early-to-mid 1990s and from 5.2 to 10.5 years in public sector projects for the same time period.

Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Satchwell, Andrew

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Market trends in the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the NAESCO database project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective information and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects-the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry. We estimate that the ESCO industry completed $1.8-2.1B of projects in 2000. The industry has grown rapidly over the last decade with revenues increasing at a 24% annualized rate. We summarize and compare project characteristics and costs and analyze energy savings, including the relationship between predicted and actual savings. ESCOs typically invested about $2.30/ft{sup 2} per project in various energy efficiency improvements, although there is large variation in project costs within and across market segments. We find that lighting-only projects report median electricity savings of 47% of targeted equipment consumption; the median for lighting-&-non-lighting projects is 23% of the total electric bill baseline. We examine project economics, including project net benefits, benefit/cost ratio and simple payback time. Median simple payback time is seven years for institutional sector projects and three years in the private sector. We estimate direct economic benefits of $1.62 billion for the 1080 projects in our database with both cost and savings data. The median benefit/cost ratio is 2.1 for 309 private sector projects and 1.6 for 771 institutional sector projects. We discuss the role of policies and programs adopted by state/federal legislatures and agencies that have played an important role in stimulating ESCO activity in various markets. Finally, we estimate the overall size and growth of the energy-efficiency services industry over the last ten years based on a survey of 63 ESCOs.

Goldman, Charles A.; Osborn, Julie G.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Singer, Terry E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A feasibility study of solar ponds for Wisconsin industrial process heat applications -- Impact of lining material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economic feasibility study of a salinity gradient solar pond for providing industrial process heat (IPH) in the state of Wisconsin is presented. A survey of current low temperature energy load demands of several companies within Wisconsin was completed. The data obtained was analyzed using a microcomputer based program to assess feasibility. Economic feasibility and thermal performance depends upon area. The area of the pond would determine the corresponding quantities of excavation, salt and lining material required to establish a salinity gradient solar pond (SGSP). The cost of the lining material also has a large impact upon the economic feasibility of a SGSP. The results of the economic feasibility study of a SGSP based on the selection of four types of liners is presented. These liners are a high density polyethylene (HDPE) liner, two forms of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and a chemical and weather resistant polymer coated polyester fabric liner (XR-5). For a load of 10,000 GJ/month on an annual operating schedule for the most favorable economic performance resulted from a geosynthetic clay liner with a high density polyethylene backing. For a 10,000 m{sup 2} pond a payback of 8.4 years can be obtained with a unit cost of $43.20/m{sup 2}. It was also determined that if a larger load was demanded and the corresponding optimal area was provided the economic feasibility of a SGSP increased greatly. For a load of 100,000 GJ/Month on an annual operating schedule, using the same lining material, the optimal pond area was found to be 35,800 m{sup 2}, with a discounted payback of 3.8 years and a unit cost of $35.40/ms{sup 2}. Similar results were obtained for the other materials. From these findings it appears that a SGSP using a geosynthetic clay liner with HDPE backing will be economically feasible for a load of 10,000 GJ/month. The economic feasibility improves with increased thermal load and the corresponding optimal pond area.

Henning, M.A.; Reid, R.L. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of a Low Cost Heat Pump Water Heater - First Prototype  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until now the heat pump water heater (HPWH) has been a technical success but a market failure because of its high initial cost. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to examine commercially available HPWH product technology and manufacturing processes for cost saving opportunities. ORNL was also tasked to verify the technical feasibility of the cost saving opportunities where necessary and appropriate. The objective was to retain most of the HPWH s energy saving performance while reducing cost and simple payback period to approximately three years in a residential application. Several cost saving opportunities were found. Immersing the HPWH condenser directly into the tank allowed the water-circulating pump to be eliminated and a standard electric resistance storage water heater to be used. In addition, designs could be based on refrigerator compressors. Standard water heaters and refrigerator compressors are both reliable, mass produced, and low cost. To verify the feasibility of these cost saving measures, ORNL completed a conceptual design for an HPWH based on an immersed condenser coil that could be directly inserted into a standard water heater tank through a sleeve affixed to one of the standard penetrations at the top of the tank. The sleeve contour causes the bayonet-style condenser to helix while being pushed into the tank, enabling a condenser of sufficient heat transfer surface area to be inserted. Based on this design, ORNL fabricated the first laboratory prototype and completed preliminary laboratory tests in accordance with the DOE Simulated Use Test Procedure. Hardening during double-wall condenser fabrication was not overcome, so the prototype is single-walled with a liner. The prototype unit was found to have an energy factor of 2.02, verifying that the low-cost design retains most of the HPWH s energy saving performance. Industry involvement is being sought to resolve the fabrication issue and quantify progress on reducing cost and simple payback period to approximately three years in a residential application. This report provides information on the design, prototype construction, laboratory test data, and analyses of this HPWH.

Mei, V. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired); Tomlinson, J. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Aerospace Applications for OLED Lighting  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2015 Boeing. All rights reserved. Export Controlled ECCN: 9E991 NLR Aerospace economics drive long development cycles and even longer product lifecycles * Development of a...

359

The NATO-Russia Council - a Success?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??After the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, NATO and Russia concluded that «they no longer regarded… (more)

Tresselt, Line

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Why Russia and NATO fail to reach a normative partnership : An analysis of the post-Cold War period.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the Russian Federation both stated that ‘we no longer… (more)

Sletmoen, Signe Lill

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

atlas beam pick-up: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of magnitude longer beam pulses, the new sensor is operated in current mode. The transformers drive transresistance amplifiers (TRA), converting transformer currents into...

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - asset management Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of asset management suffer. Without accurate, complete, reliable data from... asset management tools, a service desk takes longer to handle service requests and resolve...

363

Muziek bij de Wayana, Trio, Kari'na en Lokono. Een analyse van de muziek en de daarbij behorende instrumenten van de Surinaamse Indianen.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??It is always difficult to interpret archaeological objects, especially when the original users do not longer exist. The Museum Volkenkunde in Leiden thought of a… (more)

Luijendijk, Jasper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Integrating environmental considerations in technology selections under uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Competition requires companies to make decisions that satisfy multiple criteria. Considering profitability alone is no longer sufficient. Ignoring environmental considerations will not only expose a company to potential ...

Chen, Yue (Yue Nina)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Analysis And Design Of A Hypersonic Scramjet Engine With A Starting Mach Number Of 4.00.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wilson, Donald When pressures and temperatures become so high in supersonic flight that it is no longer efficient to slow the oncoming flow to subsonic… (more)

Roberts, Kristen Nicole

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Department of Energy Awards More Than $175 Million for Advanced...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

longer-lasting and cheaper electric vehicle batteries and components, more efficient engine technologies, and more. This comprehensive approach to vehicle efficiency research and...

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic hydrogen generated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to greenhouse gas emissions: 1... generation or the transportation sector 18-20. 3. Hydrogen costs by electrolysis A case study... is needed, due to longer periods without...

368

First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

nanoparticles. On schedule; (PDF and NMR data collected analysis ongoing) * Use solid-state NMR and diffraction based methods to characterize short, intermediate and longer-range...

369

E-Print Network 3.0 - auditory meatus vestibular Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, and invertebrates for still longer. The vestibular system is designed to ... Source: Harris, Laurence R. - Departments of Biology & Psychology, York University (Toronto)...

370

EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and alfalfa processing facilities. After careful review of this proposed biopower gasification project, DOE has determined that it will no longer participate in the cooperative...

371

Syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper should be on the topic Mathematics in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. The second is a longer paper of 10 pages (without bibliography) which is due ...

372

aging accommodating phakic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

longer latent period, and slowed near Glasser, Adrian 3 Phakic Intraocular Lenses, ICL & PRL : silmnsisiset piilolinssit ja niiden tuottamat tulokset. Open Access Theses and...

373

Semiotics and Advanced Vehicles: What Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) Mean and Why it Matters to Consumers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

haul merchandise, but he no longer played a role in the business, and the truck’s 20 MPG fuel economy

Heffner, Reid R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Fraunhofer Center for Sustainabl...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

work and at home. By installing electric vehicle charging stations at their Albuquerque solar test laboratory, employees who now drive longer distances to work can consider the use...

375

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technologies Market Report, technical and design innovation allowing for larger wind turbines with longer, lighter blades has steadily improved wind turbine performance and has...

376

carbon capture rd index | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compared to existing technologies. In collaboration with university partners, NETL is examining all three classes of technologies to better address both near and longer term...

377

Acreage response before and after the deregulation of the South African maize industry : the role of SAFEX in price discovery and price risk managment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. The withdwal of the Maize Board in 1996 meant that farmers could no longer rely on their pre-planting price or "voorskat" for price… (more)

Behar, Alexander.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

MIRPLib - A library of maritime inventory routing problem instances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 28, 2013 ... This class involves vessel travel times between ports that are significantly longer than the time spent in port and require inventory levels at all ...

Dimitri Papageorgiou

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenazo iii na Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Phototriggerable Diplasmalogen Liposomes Summary: a (Bchl), Arsenazo III (AIII), NaCl, CaCl2, human fibrinogen (93% clottable), tissue transglutaminase... + was no longer detected...

380

About the cover  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

done on the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE-Arctic) and Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) projects, but over the longer term could be generalized and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Characterisation of Virtual Power Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The growing number of micro generation devices in the electrical network is leadingmany to consider that these devices can no longer be considered as fit… (more)

Newman, Guy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer,...

383

Structural and Electrochemical Investigation of Li(Ni0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4)O2 Cathode Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand for less expensive batteries with longer life timescommercial use in L i - ion batteries since their inceptionas a cathode for lithium-ion batteries especially for hybrid

Rumble, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

EWEB- Solar Electric Program (Rebate)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''Note: EWEB is no longer accepting applications for 2012 incentives. Information regarding 2013 incentives will be available in late December 2012 on the program web site. '''''...

385

ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Chemistry  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

software, coupled with user-friendly graphical user interfaces, access to high performance computing is becoming available to a much broader community of users. In the longer...

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult pit-tag detection Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for adult... longer transmission ranges than PIT tags, so radio receivers can detect fish as they move over much... salmonid research and monitoring. Although both ... Source:...

387

Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs Funded Under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for buildings energy efficiency by market sector Lessregulatory and market environment with more diverse energywith longer term market transformation and energy savings

Goldman, Charles A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Green Communities Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Note: The Green Communities Grant Program is no longer accepting applications. The deadline to receive official designation as a Green Community was October 30, 2012. For designated communities,...

389

Mechanical energy dissipation using carbon fiber polymermatrix structural composites with filler incorporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for almost any structure, particularly aircraft, satellites, spacecraft, cars, trains, boats, wind turbines in numerous benefits, including noise reduction, less maintenance, longer life, better control of operations

Chung, Deborah D.L.

390

Chemistry Controls Material's Nanostructure | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

selenium and sulfur precursors. The more strongly bound the selenium or sulfur is to phosphorous in the precursor, the lower the reactivity. The lower the reactivity, the longer...

391

University of Utah Green Living Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and last longer than lCd monitors. Choose an energy-efficient computer. ePeat Gold certified computers meet

Feschotte, Cedric

392

Idaho National Laboratory Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

General Information In 2013 the Research Library moved to the INL campus and can no longer accommodate visits by the general public. Materials may still be requested via...

393

US DRIVE Highlights of Technical Accomplishments 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for longer-lasting and more cost-effective electric drive vehicle batteries. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Advanced energy storage devices, such as lithium- based...

394

ACCESS Magazine Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

school buses as well as hybrid cars and light rail; we canhybrid technology; in the medium or longer term, either fuel cells or the all-electric car,

Hall, Sir Peter; Kammen, Daniel M.; Landis, John; Morris, Eric; Nemet, Gregory F.; Shoup, Donald

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

would primarily be standard cable tool, auger, cone penetrometer, sonic drilling, or rotary drilling technologies. When the wells are no longer necessary, they would be...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving workplace equality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Group Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 47 Employee and Organizational Development E-Learning Substitutions that will be RETIRED (no longer...

397

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

light bulbs, which use 75 percent less energy and last ten times longer than incandescent bulbs, (2) window installation kits, which would improve heat instillation in the...

398

2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10,000 hours) than incandescent lamps (usually estimated atcurrent plus several future incandescent lamp purchases. Themany times longer than incandescent lamps, maintenance costs

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan, Gregory K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) VoluntaryLabeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10,000 hours) than incandescent lamps (usually estimated atcurrent plus several future incandescent lamp purchases. Themany times longer than incandescent lamps, maintenance costs

Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan, Gregory K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10,000 hours) than incandescent lamps (usually estimated atcurrent plus several future incandescent lamp purchases. Themany times longer than incandescent lamps, maintenance costs

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative medicinecam fiscal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Beyond Alan J. Auerbach and William G. Gale Summary: III discusses the alternative ten- year projections. Section IV considers the longer-term fiscal... The Economic Crisis...

402

Privatization's Progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

things, traditional service contracts are costly to monitor;we no longer need service contracts to mask the bitter tastethat the traditional service contract is not a perfect

Michaels, Jon D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Full Issue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

things, traditional service contracts are costly to monitor;we no longer need service contracts to mask the bitter tastethat the traditional service contract is not a perfect

UCLA, Law School

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

animal use alternatives: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

may someday allow surgeons to rehearse procedures in a patient-specific operating environment. Replacing animals with simulators in medical training is limited no longer by...

405

ammonoids crioceratitinae hauterivian: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

magnification. However, there is a lower limit of scale measurements below which the fractal behavior of the curve no longer holds, and the perimeter lengthstep size...

406

Understanding Drooping Light Emitting Diodes CEEM | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Impact Understanding "droop" may result in cheaper, more efficient LEDs; LEDs are more energy efficient, smaller, and longer-lived than incandescent lamps or fluorescent...

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult critical care Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine. Today, people are living longer than ever... for as a long as possible; provide health care and education for older adults who are self- managing multiple... chronic...

408

Oak Ridge Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

they no longer have access to occupational medicine physicians at the workplace; primary care health providers often lack information on work-related disease leading to incomplete...

409

Investigation of the Feasibility of a Small Scale Transmutation Device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

130 7.5. Americium-241 …………………………………………………………….. 132by neutron capture of Americium The thermal energy neutronsmagnitude longer. 7.5 Americium-241 As explained in Chapter

Sit, Roger Carson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

E-Print Network 3.0 - asdex upgrade invited Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

200910 EURATOMCCFE Fusion Association Summary: will remain operational until at least 2014, and probably longer. ASDEX-Upgrade (Germany) was ranked second... and must know how...

411

Action Codes Table | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

acknowledgement W, Z E - Receiver's independent measurement or determination W, Z I - Inventory difference explanation data *Historical - Reporting no longer used na J -...

412

Artificial Geothermal Energy Potential of Steam-flooded Heavy Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study presents an investigation of the concept of harvesting geothermal energy that remains in heavy oil reservoirs after abandonment when steamflooding is no longer… (more)

Limpasurat, Akkharachai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Celebrating Two Years of Building America's Clean Energy Manufacturing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1.8 million in funding to address the challenges of transporting larger wind turbine blades (longer than 60 meters), which can capture more power from wind resources....

414

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents graves susceptibles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BETWEEN TRAIN LENGTH AND ACCIDENT CAUSES AND RATES Summary: accidents than shorter trains. This is because longer trains are more susceptible to car... THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN...

415

Statement by U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on EPA...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

sources, cleaner, more efficient combustion engines, and over the longer term, hydrogen fuel cells to help change the way we fuel our vehicles. "Looking toward the future, we...

416

In her RAS Presidential Address for 2005, Kathryn A Whaler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the magnetic field source is sferics associated with thunderstorms; at longer periods, solar activity equipment loaned from the Nat- ural Environment Research Council's Geophys- ical Equipment Facility

417

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas collection for energy production. Some landfills areflared or used for energy production Page | 13 Landfills areand is not longer usable for energy production. Substantial

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Extreme winds and sea-surges in climate models.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis deals with the problem of how to estimate values of meteorological parameters that correspond to return periods that are considerably longer than the… (more)

Brink, H.W. (Hendrik Willem) van den

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Expression of P-Responsive Genes is Related to Root Hair Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation of longer root hairs which has been well studied,resulting in enhanced root hair length elicited by the lackpattern along the root hair differentiation stages. Results

Bremer, Melanie; Schenk, Manfred K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Performance Characteristics of Lithium-ion Batteries of Various Chemistries for Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

initial and life cycle costs of the battery. This paper hasbattery chemistries have the potential for longer cycle life which on a life cycle cost

Burke, Andrew; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Life Cycle Energy and Environmental Assessment of Aluminum-Intensive Vehicle Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced lightweight materials are increasingly being incorporated into new vehicle designs by automakers to enhance performance and assist in complying with increasing requirements of corporate average fuel economy standards. To assess the primary energy and carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) implications of vehicle designs utilizing these materials, this study examines the potential life cycle impacts of two lightweight material alternative vehicle designs, i.e., steel and aluminum of a typical passenger vehicle operated today in North America. LCA for three common alternative lightweight vehicle designs are evaluated: current production ( Baseline ), an advanced high strength steel and aluminum design ( LWSV ), and an aluminum-intensive design (AIV). This study focuses on body-in-white and closures since these are the largest automotive systems by weight accounting for approximately 40% of total curb weight of a typical passenger vehicle. Secondary mass savings resulting from body lightweighting are considered for the vehicles engine, driveline and suspension. A cradle-to-cradle life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted for these three vehicle material alternatives. LCA methodology for this study included material production, mill semi-fabrication, vehicle use phase operation, and end-of-life recycling. This study followed international standards ISO 14040:2006 [1] and ISO 14044:2006 [2], consistent with the automotive LCA guidance document currently being developed [3]. Vehicle use phase mass reduction was found to account for over 90% of total vehicle life cycle energy and CO2e emissions. The AIV design achieved mass reduction of 25% (versus baseline) resulting in reductions in total life cycle primary energy consumption by 20% and CO2e emissions by 17%. Overall, the AIV design showed the best breakeven vehicle mileage from both primary energy consumption and climate change perspectives.

Das, Sujit [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Preliminary neutronic study of D{sub 2}O-Cooled high conversion PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D{sub 2}O-cooled high-conversion pressurised water reactors (HPWR) loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 code has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The analyses showed that the relative Pu mass balance was effectively increased by the addition of the axial blanket. The addition of only 4 cm of blanket resulted in the 4000 pcm increase in the void coefficient. Thus, the presence of the axial blanket made the void coefficient hardly negative. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (k{sub eff} and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects. The uncertainty analysis of k{sub eff} showed that its breakup contributions for D{sub 2}O-HPWR were very similar to other fast systems (SFR and H{sub 2}O-HPWR) such that the key contributors were {sup 238}U inelastic and {sup 239}Pu ?-bar. However, breakup uncertainties of void coefficients showed that while those of D{sub 2}O-HPWR resembled to H{sub 2}O-HPWR, Na elastic became the significant contributor of the void coefficient uncertainty of SFR. Also sensitivity profiles of {sup 238}U inelastic and {sup 239}Pu ?-bar to the void coefficient revealed that those of SFR were quite dissimilar to both HPWRs. The study also found that while the absolute values of void coefficient uncertainty for D{sub 2}O-HPWR were invariant through the burnup, its percentage uncertainty was significantly increased.

Hiruta, Hikaru; Youinou, G. [Idaho National Laboratory: 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Searching for the Optimal Mix of Solar and Efficiency in Zero Net Energy Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zero net energy (ZNE) buildings employ efficiency to reduce energy consumption and solar technologies to produce as much energy on site as is consumed on an annual basis. Such buildings leverage utility grids and net-metering agreements to reduce solar system costs and maintenance requirements relative to off-grid photovoltaic (PV)-powered buildings with batteries. The BEopt software was developed to efficiently identify cost-optimal building designs using detailed hour-by-hour energy simulation programs to evaluate the user-selected options. A search technique identifies optimal and near-optimal building designs (based on energy-related costs) at various levels of energy savings along the path from a reference building to a ZNE design. In this paper, we describe results based on use of the BEopt software to develop cost-optimal paths to ZNE for various climates. Comparing the different cases shows optimal building design characteristics, percent energy savings and cash flows at key points along the path, including the point at which investments shift from building improvements to purchasing PV, and PV array sizes required to achieve ZNE. From optimizations using the BEopt software for a 2,000-ft{sup 2} house in 4 climates, we conclude that, relative to a code-compliant (IECC 2006) reference house, the following are achievable: (1) minimum cost point: 22 to 38% source energy savings and 15 to 24% annual cash flow savings; (2) PV start point: 40 to 49% source energy savings at 10 to 12% annual cash flow savings; (3) break-even point: 43 to 53% source energy savings at 0% annual cash flow savings; and (4) ZNE point: 100% source energy savings with 4.5 to 8.1 kW{sub DC} PV arrays and 76 to 169% increase in cash flow.

Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Anderson, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Physics of advanced tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant reductions in the size and cost of a fusion power plant core can be realized if simultaneous improvements in the energy replacement time, {tau}{sub E}, and the plasma pressure or beta, {beta}{sub T} = 2 {micro}{sub 0}

/B{sup 2} can be achieved in steady-state conditions with high self-driven, bootstrap current fraction. Significant recent progress has been made in experimentally achieving these high performance regimes and in developing a theoretical understanding of the underlying physics. Three operational scenarios have demonstrated potential for steady state high performance, the radiative improved (RI) mode, the high internal inductance or high {ell}{sub i} scenario, and the negative central magnetic shear, NCS (or reversed shear, RS) scenario. In a large number of tokamaks, reduced ion thermal transport to near neoclassical values, and reduced particle transport have been observed in the region of negative or very low magnetic shear: the transport reduction is consistent with stabilization of microturbulence by sheared E x B flow. There is strong temporal and spatial correlation between the increased sheared E x B flow, the reduction in the measured turbulence, and the reduction in transport. The DIII-D tokamak, the JET tokamak and the JT-60U tokamak have all observed significant increases in plasma performance in the NCS operational regime. Strong plasma shaping and broad pressure profiles, provided by the H-mode edge, allow high beta operation, consistent with theoretical predictions; and normalized beta values up to {beta}{sub T}/(I/aB) {equivalent_to} {beta}{sub N} {approximately} 4.5%-m-T/MA simultaneously with confinement enhancement over L-mode scaling, H = {tau}/{tau}{sub ITER-89P} {approximately} 4, have been achieved in the DIII-D tokamak. In the JT-60U tokamak, deuterium discharges with negative central magnetic shear, NCS, have reached equivalent break-even conditions, Q{sub DT} (equiv) = 1.

Taylor, T.S.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Preliminary analysis of surface mining options for Naval Oil Shale Reserve 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study was undertaken to determine the economic viability of surface mining to exploit the reserves. It is based on resource information already developed for NOSR 1 and conceptual designs of mining systems compatible with this resource. Environmental considerations as they relate to surface mining have been addressed qualitatively. The conclusions on economic viability were based primarily on mining costs projected from other industries using surface mining. An analysis of surface mining for the NOSR 1 resource was performed based on its particular overburden thickness, oil shale thickness, oil shale grade, and topography. This evaluation considered reclamation of the surface as part of its design and cost estimate. The capital costs for mining 25 GPT and 30 GPT shale and the operating costs for mining 25 GPT, 30 GPT, and 35 GPT shale are presented. The relationship between operating cost and stripping ratio, and the break-even stripping ratio (BESR) for surface mining to be competitive with room-and-pillar mining, are shown. Identification of potential environmental impacts shows that environmental control procedures for surface mining are more difficult to implement than those for underground mining. The following three areas are of prime concern: maintenance of air quality standards by disruption, movement, and placement of large quantities of overburden; disruption or cutting of aquifers during the mining process which affect area water supplies; and potential mineral leaching from spent shales into the aquifers. Although it is an operational benefit to place spent shale in the open pit, leaching of the spent shales and contamination of the water is detrimental. It is therefore concluded that surface mining on NOSR 1 currently is neither economically desirable nor environmentally safe. Stringent mitigation measures would have to be implemented to overcome some of the potential environmental hazards.

Not Available

1981-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland, E-mail: Roland.Hischier@empa.ch; Hilty, Lorenz M.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Retrofit of existing 400 horsepower air compressor motor with steam turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is on the completion of a retrofit project to replace an existing 400 Horsepower air compressor motor with a steam turbine. The discussion includes visuals to show the process involved in carrying out this project. There will be in three parts. The first part of the presentation will cover the planning and construction. Planning included defining a scope, collecting data to support this scope, determining engineering feasibility, and calculating an economic payback. Construction will include the preparations for the retrofit including details of upgrades to existing systems and components, and installation of new systems and components. This will be followed by details on the actual removal of the motor, installation of the turbine, and the revision of the controls. Startup of the air compressor on steam is then discussed including necessary preparation of steam systems. Next to be presented will be some of the problems and their solutions experienced during this project. Specifically discussed will be regulatory concerns, noise of operation, insurance, and fluctuations in plant process steam demand. The conclusion of the presentation will focus on present operating status, savings demonstrated, and maintenance required.

Sanders, S.F.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Transformation of California's Residential Photovoltaics Market Through Third-Party Ownership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Third-party photovoltaics (PV) ownership is a rapidly growing market trend, where commercial companies own and operate customer-sited PV systems and lease PV equipment or sell PV electricity to the building occupant. Third-party PV companies can reduce or eliminate up-front adoption costs, reduce technology risk and complexity by monitoring system performance, and can repackage the PV value proposition by showing cost savings in the first month of ownership rather than payback times on the order of a decade. We find that the entrance of third-party business models in southern California residential PV markets has enticed a new demographic to adopt PV systems that is more highly correlated to younger, less affluent, and less educated populations than the demographics correlated to purchasing PV systems. By enticing new demographics to adopt PV, we find that third-party PV products are likely increasing total PV demand rather than gaining market share entirely at the expense of existing customer owned PV demand. We also find that mean population demographics are good predictors of third-party and customer owned PV adoption, and mean voting trends on California carbon policy (Proposition 23) are poor predictors of PV adoption.

Drury, E.; Miller, M.; Macal, C. M.; Graziano, D. J.; Heimiller, D.; Ozik, J.; Perry, T. D.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Small Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Technical Support Document (TSD) for 50% energy savings in small office buildings documents the analysis and results for a recommended package of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) referred to as the advanced EEMs. These are changes to a building design that will reduce energy usage. The package of advanced EEMs achieves a minimum of 50% energy savings and a construction area weighted average energy savings of 56.6% over the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 for 16 cities which represent the full range of climate zones in the United States. The 50% goal is for site energy usage reduction. The weighted average is based on data on the building area of construction in the various climate locations. Cost-effectiveness of the EEMs is determined showing an average simple payback of 6.7 years for all 16 climate locations. An alternative set of results is provided which includes a variable air volume HVAC system that achieves at least 50% energy savings in 7 of the 16 climate zones with a construction area weighted average savings of 48.5%. Other packages of EEMs may also achieve 50% energy savings; this report does not consider all alternatives but rather presents at least one way to reach the goal. Design teams using this TSD should follow an integrated design approach and utilize additional analysis to evaluate the specific conditions of a project.

Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Lane, Michael D.; Liu, Bing

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

433

Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

1981-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

Steam systems in industry: Energy use and energy efficiency improvement potentials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam systems are a part of almost every major industrial process today. Thirty-seven percent of the fossil fuel burned in US industry is burned to produce steam. In this paper we will establish baseline energy consumption for steam systems. Based on a detailed analysis of boiler energy use we estimate current energy use in boilers in U.S. industry at 6.1 Quads (6.4 EJ), emitting almost 66 MtC in CO{sub 2} emissions. We will discuss fuels used and boiler size distribution. We also describe potential savings measures, and estimate the economic energy savings potential in U.S. industry (i.e. having payback period of 3 years or less). We estimate the nationwide economic potential, based on the evaluation of 16 individual measures in steam generation and distribution. The analysis excludes the efficient use of steam and increased heat recovery. Based on the analysis we estimate the economic potential at 18-20% of total boiler energy use, resulting in energy savings approximately 1120-1190 TBtu ( 1180-1260 PJ). This results in a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions equivalent to 12-13 MtC.

Einstein, Dan; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

2001-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than half of the electricity produced in the southeastern states is fuelled by coal. Although the region produces some coal, most of the states depend heavily on coal imports. Many of the region's aging coal power facilities are planned for retirement within the next 20 years. However, estimates indicate that a 20% increase in capacity is needed over that time to meet the rapidly growing demand. The most common incentives for energy efficiency in the Southeast are loans and rebates; however, total public spending on energy efficiency is limited. The most common state-level policies to support renewable energy development are personal and corporate tax incentives and loans. The region produced 1.8% of the electricity from renewable resources other than conventional hydroelectricity in 2009, half of the national average. There is significant potential for development of a biomass market in the region, as well as use of local wind, solar, methane-to-energy, small hydro, and combined heat and power resources. Options are offered for expanding and strengthening state-level policies such as decoupling, integrated resource planning, building codes, net metering, and interconnection standards to support further clean energy development. Benefits would include energy security, job creation, insurance against price fluctuations, increased value of marginal lands, and local and global environmental paybacks.

McLaren, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Direct utilization of geothermal energy in western South Dakota agribusiness. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved the direct utilization of geothermal energy for (1) space heating of farm and ranch buildings, (2) drying grain, and (3) providing warm stock water during the winter. The site for this demonstration project was the Diamond Ring Ranch north of Midland, South Dakota. Geothermal water flowing from an existing well into the Madison Aquifer was used to heat four homes, a shop, a hospital barn for cattle, and air for a barn and grain dryer. This site is centrally located in the western region of South Dakota where geothermal water is available from the Madison Aquifer. The first year of the project involved the design of the heating systems and its construction while the following years were for operation, testing, demonstrating, and monitoring the system. Required modifications and improvements were made during this period. Operating modifications and improvements were made during this period. Operating experience showed that such application of geothermal resources is feasible and can result in substantial fuel savings. Economic analyses under a variety of assumptions generally gave payback periods of less than ten years. Numerous technical recommendations are made. The most significant being the necessity of passive protection from freezing of remote geothermal systems subject to winter shut downs caused by power or equipment failure. The primary institutional recommendation is to incorporate a use for the geothermal water such as irrigation or stock watering into agribusiness-related geothermal development.

Howard, S.M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over one million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Podorson, D.; Alaigh, K.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

Not Available

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques -- manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, P.; Podorson, D.; Varshney, K.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Cost-Effectiveness of Investments to Meet the Guiding Principles for High-Performance Sustainable Buildings on the PNNL Campus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part its campus sustainability efforts, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has invested in eight new and existing buildings to ensure they meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s requirements for high performance sustainable buildings (HPSB) at DOE sites. These investments are expected to benefit PNNL by reducing the total life-cycle cost of facilities, improving energy efficiency and water conservation, and making buildings safer and healthier for the occupants. This study examines the cost-effectiveness of the implementing measures that meet the criteria for HPSBs in 3 different types of buildings on the PNNL campus: offices, scientific laboratories, and data centers. In each of the three case studies examined the investments made to achieve HPSB status demonstrated a high return on the HPSB investments that have taken place in these varied environments. Simple paybacks for total investments in the three case study buildings ranged from just 2 to 5 years; savings-to-investment ratios all exceeded the desirable threshold of 1; and the net present values associated with these investments were all positive.

Cort, Katherine A.; Judd, Kathleen S.

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

448

Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This section of the report describes the history of the tribology program of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) in the Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT). The mission of the Office of Transportation Technology is discussed. OTT`s research objectives focus on (1) automobiles and light-duty trucks and vans and (2) heavy duty trucks and buses. Even small gains in efficiency can produce large paybacks for the tax dollar. The mission of the Office of Transportation Materials is also described. Its research objective is to enable the development and engineering of energy-efficient transportation systems that will make possible the transition of the U.S. transportation sector from dependence on petroleum to alternative fuels and electricity. The mission of the Tibology Program is to provide the base technology to enable savings in annual U.S. energy consumption through tribological advances in the transportation sector. Current task areas are in the fields of advanced lubrication, engineered tribological interfaces, advanced tribomaterials and components, and project management.

NONE

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Breweries: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annually, breweries in the United States spend over $200 million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 38 percent of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy price volatility. After a summary of the beer making process and energy use, we examine energy efficiency opportunities available for breweries. We provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies that have implemented the measures, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have also listed typical payback periods. Our findings suggest that given available technology, there are still opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the brewing industry. Brewers value highly the quality, taste and drinkability of their beer. Brewing companies have and are expected to continue to spend capital on cost-effective energy conservation measures that meet these quality, taste and drinkability requirements. For individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures, as well as their applicability to different brewing practices, is needed to assess implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Lehman, Bryan

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Innovative pollution prevention program at Air Force owned Raytheon operated facility incorporating Russian technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona is owned by the Air Force and operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. A joint Air Force/Raytheon Pollution Prevention Team operates at AFP 44 with the ultimate goal to minimize or eliminate the use of hazardous substances. The team works together to uncover new technologies and methods that will replace chemicals used in the plant's missile manufacturing facilities. The program maximizes pollution prevention by first eliminating hazardous material use, then chemical recycling, next hazardous waste reduction and finally wastewater treatment and recycling. From fiscal years 1994 through 1997, nine pollution prevention projects have been implemented, totaling $2.6 million, with a payback averaging less than two years. A unique wastewater treatment method has been demonstrated as part of this program. This is electroflotation, a Russian technology which removes dispersed particles from liquid with gas bubbles obtained during water electrolysis. A unit was built in the US which successfully removed organic emulsions from wastewater. Operational units are planned for the removal of waste from waterfall paint booths. The pollution prevention joint team continues to be very active with two projects underway in FY 98 and two more funded for FY 99.

Stallings, J.H.; Cepeda-Calderon, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home Program Certification of Production Builders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor; 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense(R) Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

Kerrigan, P.; Loomis, H.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reductions potential of the U.S. pulp and paper industry, one of the largest energy users in the U.S. manufacturing sector. We examined over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures. The measures were characterized, and then ordered on the basis of cost-effectiveness. The report indicates that there still exists significant potential for energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reduction in this industry. The cost-effective potential for energy efficiency improvement is defined as having a simple pay-back period of three years or less. Not including increased recycling the study identifies a cost-effective savings potential of 16% of the primary energy use in 1994. Including increased recycling leads to a higher potential for energy savings, i.e. a range of cost-effective savings between 16% and 24% of primary energy use. Future work is needed to further elaborate on key energy efficiency measures identified in the report including barriers and opportunities for increased recycling of waste paper.

Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Anglani, Norma; Einstein, Dan; Krushch, Marta; Price, Lynn

2001-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

2013-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

455

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland - Second Year of Data Collection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam heated buildings often suffer from uneven heating as a result of poor control of the amount of steam entering each radiator. In order to satisfy the heating load to the coldest units, other units are overheated. As a result, some tenants complain of being too hot and open their windows in the middle of winter, while others complain of being too cold and are compelled to use supplemental heat sources. Building on previous research, CNT Energy identified 10 test buildings in Chicago and conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam system balancing. A package of common steam balancing measures was assembled and data were collected on the buildings before and after these retrofits were installed to investigate the process, challenges, and the cost effectiveness of improving steam systems through improved venting and control systems. The test buildings that received venting upgrades and new control systems showed 10.2% savings on their natural gas heating load, with a simple payback of 5.1 years. The methodologies for and findings from this study are presented in detail in this report. This report has been updated from a version published in August 2012 to include natural gas usage information from the 2012 heating season and updated natural gas savings calculations.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific data recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of operating wind turbines. This report is intended to help develop a basic understanding of the data needed for reliability analysis from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and analysis and reporting needs. The 'Motivation' section of this report provides a rationale for collecting and analyzing field data for reliability analysis. The benefits of this type of effort can include increased energy delivered, decreased operating costs, enhanced preventive maintenance schedules, solutions to issues with the largest payback, and identification of early failure indicators.

Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Appraisal of the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An appraisal of the use of geothermal energy for space heating requirements for selected state-owned buildings in six communities in Colorado is presented. The appraisal addresses several components of a feasibility study for geothermal applications, including resource assessment, pipeline rights-of-way, well design and drilling program, conceptual engineering designs for retrofits of building heating systems, evaluations of economic feasibility, institutional requirements, and environmental considerations. Economic feasibility is determined from evaluation of four economic measures: a simple payback period in years; twenty-year annualized system costs (geothermal system versus conventional system); total twenty-year undiscounted energy savings; and total twenty-year present value energy savings. The results of the analyses of each feasibility component are finally ranked, using a weighting system, to arrive at an order ranking of the eleven state-owned buildings for overall feasibility. The relative total feasibility rankings and the absolute evaluations of economic competitiveness with the existing conventional-fuel heating systems show that several of the state facilities are likely candidates for conversion to geothermal hot water heating systems. The best candidate by far is the Colorado State Reformatory at Buena Vista. The geothermal resource at Buena Vista (Cottonwood Canyon and Chalk Creek) is a high quality resource with high water temperatures and a water quality adequate for direct flow through the building heating units.

Meyer, R.T.; Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.

1981-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy efficient low-income housing demonstration with Houston Habitat for Humanity. Final status report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using DOE grant funds, the Alliance to Save Energy developed and managed an award-winning low-income housing demonstration in cooperation with Houston Habitat for Humanity at the 1996 and 1997 annual NAHB Builders Show in Houston, Texas. Using a unique group of over 30 national, state and local partners, the energy design of Houston Habitat houses was permanently upgraded to the Energy Star Homes Program threshold. Meeting Energy Star Homes Program criteria, the partner design team increased the level of efficiency approximately 30% over the 1992 Model Energy Code. This innovative design using commercially available materials added approximately $1,400 in cost-effective energy upgrades with an estimated payback of less than 8 years. The 30 public-private partners successfully demonstrated energy and resource efficient housing techniques to the 65,000 NAHB home show attendees and the over 3,000 Habitat affiliates. This project resulted in the Houston Habitat affiliate becoming the nation`s first low-income Energy Star Homes Program home builder. By the year 2000, Houston Habitat anticipates building over 500 homes to this new level of efficiency as well as set an example for other Habitat affiliates nationwide to follow. The 1997 demonstration house utilized an all-women volunteer builders team to construct a 3 bedroom home in Houston Habitat`s Woodglen Subdivision. Energy consumption was remotely metered by Texas A and M.

NONE

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy consumption are available, and this Energy Guide discusses energy-efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be applied over a broad spectrum of companies. Strategies in the guide address hot water and steam, compressed air, pumps, motors, fans, lighting, refrigeration, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. This guide includes descriptions of expected energy and cost savings, based on real-world applications, typical payback periods, and references to more detailed information. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers achieve cost-effective energy reductions while maintaining product quality. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Angelini, Tana; Masanet, Eric

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

Replacing chemicals in recycle mills with mechanical alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-intensity spark fired underwater decomposes a small amount of the water into hydroxyl radicals, which are strong oxidants. These are able to oxidize contaminants such as glue and wood pitch that enter paper recycling mills as a part of the incoming furnish and cost the industry several hundred million dollars. The sparking technique is safe, inexpensive, and is capable of treating large volumes of water, which makes it attractive for mill applications. Several mill trials were run. Sparking caused a decrease in the tack of the deposits in one case. Lower bleach use occurred in two other mills; sparking reduced the degree of ink reattachment to fiber. The payback for either application is attractive. Sparking induced deposition of contaminants in another mill, which is a positive development--if it can be controlled. The technique is also able to degas water and to oxidize odor-causing sulfur compounds. Although one unit has been purchased by a mill, second-order effects caused by the technology needs to be defined further before the technology can be broadly applied.

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "longer breakeven payback" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Analysis of technology options to reduce the fuel consumption of idling trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000--3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Vyas, A.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

466

Building America Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification, Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor. 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

468

Cost Analysis of Plug-In Hybred Electric Vehicles Using GPS-Based Longitudinal Travel Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using spatial, longitudinal travel data of 415 vehicles over 3 18 months in the Seattle metropolitan area, this paper estimates the operating costs of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) of various electric ranges (10, 20, 30, and 40 miles) for 3, 5, and 10 years of payback period, considering different charging infrastructure deployment levels and gasoline prices. Some key findings were made. (1) PHEVs could help save around 60% or 40% in energy costs, compared with conventional gasoline vehicles (CGVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), respectively. However, for motorists whose daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT) is significant, HEVs may be even a better choice than PHEV40s, particularly in areas that lack a public charging infrastructure. (2) The incremental battery cost of large-battery PHEVs is difficult to justify based on the incremental savings of PHEVs operating costs unless a subsidy is offered for largebattery PHEVs. (3) When the price of gasoline increases from $4/gallon to $5/gallon, the number of drivers who benefit from a larger battery increases significantly. (4) Although quick chargers can reduce charging time, they contribute little to energy cost savings for PHEVs, as opposed to Level-II chargers.

Wu, Xing [Lamar University] [Lamar University; Dong, Jing [Iowa State University] [Iowa State University; Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A model to determine financial indicators for organic solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic solar cells are an emerging photovoltaic technology that is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, despite low efficiency and stability. A model, named TEEOS (Technical and Economic Evaluator for Organic Solar), is presented that evaluates organic solar cells for various solar energy applications in different geographic locations, in terms of two financial indicators, payback period and net present value (NPV). TEEOS uses SMARTS2 software to estimate broadband (280-4000 nm) spectral irradiance data and with the use of a cloud modification factor, predicts hourly irradiation in the absence of actual broadband irradiance data, which is scarce for most urban locations. By using the avoided cost of electricity, annual savings are calculated which produce the financial indicators. It is hoped that these financial indicators can help guide certain technical decisions regarding the direction of research for organic solar cells, for example, increasing efficiency or increasing the absorptive wavelength range. A sample calculation using solar hats is shown to be uneconomical, but a good example of large-scale organic PV production. (author)

Powell, Colin; Bender, Timothy; Lawryshyn, Yuri [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thermal insulation standards for residential building envelopes in Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project develops thermal-insulation standards for residential-building envelopes in Iran which would later serve as the groundwork for development of thermal-insulation regulations in the country. The energy performance of the opaque components of present common construction systems was studied. The results clearly indicate the need for improvement of the energy performance of building components through the application of thermal insulation. The initial cost of insulating the building varied from 2.0-3.5% of the total construction cost, depending on the climate location, form and size of the building. Discounted pay-back period ranged from two to four years. Component performance standards were developed with prescriptive recommendations to meet with the level of technical skills of the parties involved in the implementation and control of standards. The macro-economic assessment of insulation standards proves annual savings of billions of Rials on the national level and also the creation of more jobs in construction-related industries.

Eslami, H.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

COFIRING OF BIOMASS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory was completed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center to explore the potential for cofiring biomass at the University of North Dakota (UND). The results demonstrate how 25% sunflower hulls can be cofired with subbituminous coal and provide a 20% return on investment or 5-year payback for the modifications required to enable firing biomass. Significant outcomes of the study are as follows. A complete resource assessment presented all biomass options to UND within a 100-mile radius. Among the most promising options in order of preference were sunflower hulls, wood residues, and turkey manure. The firing of up to 28% sunflower hulls by weight was completed at the university's steam plant to identify plant modifications that would be necessary to enable cofiring sunflower hulls. The results indicated investments in a new equipment could be less than $408,711. Data collected from test burns, which were not optimized for biomass firing, resulted in a 15% reduction in sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions, no increase in opacity, and slightly better boiler efficiency. Fouling and clinkering potential were not evaluated; however, no noticeable detrimental effects occurred during testing. As a result of this study, UND has the potential to achieve a cost savings of approximately $100,000 per year from a $1,500,000 annual fossil fuel budget by implementing the cofiring of 25% sunflower hulls.

Phillip N. Hutton

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Selecting dry-type transformers: Getting the most energy efficiency for the dollar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dry-type transformers represent a significant and largely overlooked opportunity for energy and dollar savings. Since all electric power passes through one or more dry-type transformers on its way to lighting, motors, office equipment, or other end uses, even increasing transformer efficiency by a small margin will have a significant impact. Selection of more efficient dry-type transformers could reduce electric bills for commercial and industrial customers by 1 to 3 percent with attractive paybacks, amounting to a savings of $1 billion per year in electricity costs for US commercial and industrial power users. Unfortunately, selecting efficient dry-type transformers is not as straightforward as it first appears to be. The typical selection methods based on temperature rise or full-load efficiency are misleading in many cases. Low-temperature-rise models are not necessarily the most efficient and the average transformer in a commercial building operates at only 35 percent of rated load. A more useful approach is a multiyear cost of ownership analysis that factors in efficiency at part-load conditions. Sample calculations of the multiyear cost of ownership approach illustrate how load profiles have a profound impact on finding the most economical dry-type transformer for a given application.

Howe, B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

475

Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Cool energy savings opportunities in commercial refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consumes over 13 quads of primary energy annually. Most of this consumption (two-thirds) meets the energy needs of lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. The largest consuming group of the remaining one-third is commercial refrigeration at about one quad annually (990 trillion Btu), valued at over $7 billion per year to the commercial sector consumer. Potential energy savings are estimated to be about 266 trillion Btu, with consumer savings valued at about $2 billion. This study provides the first known estimates of these values using a bottom-up approach. The authors evaluated numerous self-contained and engineered commercial refrigeration systems in this study, such as: supermarket central systems, beverage merchandisers, ice machines, and vending machines. Typical physical characteristics of each equipment type were identified at the component level for energy consumption. This information was used to form a detailed database from which they arrived at the estimate of 990 trillion Btu energy consumption for the major equipment types used in commercial refrigeration. Based on the implementation of the most cost-effective technology improvements for the seven major equipment types, they estimated an annual potential energy savings of 266 trillion Btu. Much of the savings can be realized with the implementation of high-efficiency fan motors and compressors. In many cases, payback can be realized within three years.

Westphalen, D.; Brodrick, J.; Zogg, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Design and laboratory testing of an unequal parallel multicompressor supermarket refrigeration system with a microprocessor-based electronic control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supermarket Energy Systems Program was structured to investigate and develop new highly energy-efficient supermarket systems. A supermarket refrigeration system consisting of: unequal parallel compressors; condenser with floating head-pressure control; and micoprocessor-based electronic control system was analyzed, designed, and tested. The total system capacity is 35 hp and three compressors of 5, 10, and 20 hp capacity were determined to be the optimum number and capacity distribution. Compared to the conventional supermarket refrigeration systems, the three unequal parallel compressor systems with R-12 will demonstrate a maximum annual energy savings of 29,100 kWhr or 26% and with R-502 will demonstrate a maximum annual energy savings of 20,100 kWhr or 15%. A compressor capacity control algorithm was designed to select the optimum compressor combination for each operating condition to match compressor capacity to refrigeration load. A microprocessor system based on an Intel 8085 microprocessor was selected for system control and data acquisition. The economic analysis revealed that for a payback period of 3 years or less, an added microprocessor-based electronic controls cost between $500 to $1500 is acceptable. Testing was performed on the unequal parallel compressor system over a refrigeration load range of 78,000 to 160,000 Btu/h. For refrigerant R-12, the increase in the energy efficiency ratio (EER) for the microprocessor-based electronic control system as compared to the mechanical pressure control system ranged from 9.8 to 12.5%

Toscano, W.M.; Oven, M.J.; Walker, D.H.; Vineyard, E.A.; Cooper, W.L. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a rulemaking process in which it amended the existing energy efficiency standards for residential water heaters. A key factor in DOE?s consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers. Determining such impacts requires a comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This paper describes the method used to conduct the life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period analysis for gas and electric storage water heaters. It presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment, including heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters, for a representative sample of U.S. homes. The study included a detailed accounting of installation costs for the considered design options, with a focus on approaches for accommodating the larger dimensions of more efficient water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also considered airflow requirements, venting issues, and the impact of these products on the indoor environment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design reduces the LCC in the majority of homes for both gas and electric storage water heaters, and heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters provide a lower LCC for homes with large rated volume water heaters.

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; Thompson, Lisa; Letschert, Virginie

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development of Environmentally Benign Heat Pump Water Heaters for the US Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving energy efficiency in water heating applications is important to the nation's energy strategies. Water heating in residential and commercial buildings accounts for about 10% of U.S. buildings energy consumption. Heat pump water heating (HPWH) technology is a significant breakthrough in energy efficiency, as an alternative to electric resistance water heating. Heat pump technology has shown acceptable payback period with proper incentives and successful market penetration is emerging. However, current HPWH require the use of refrigerants with high Global Warming Potential (GWP). Furthermore, current system designs depend greatly on the backup resistance heaters when the ambient temperature is below freezing or when hot water demand increases. Finally, the performance of current HPWH technology degrades greatly as the water set point temperature exceeds 330 K. This paper presents the potential for carbon dioxide, CO2, as a natural, environmentally benign alternative refrigerant for HPWH technology. In this paper, we first describe the system design, implications and opportunities of operating a transcritical cycle. Next, a prototype CO2 HPWH design featuring flexible component evaluation capability is described. The experimental setup and results are then illustrated followed by a brief discussion on the measured system performance. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for the development of CO2 heat pump water heating technology suitable for the U.S. market.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Kai [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL; Roetker, Jack [General Electric - Appliance Park] [General Electric - Appliance Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

High Reliability R-10 Windows Using Vacuum Insulating Glass Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this effort was for EverSealed Windows (“EverSealed” or “ESW”) to design, assemble, thermally and environmentally test and demonstrate a Vacuum Insulating Glass Unit (“VIGU” or “VIG”) that would enable a whole window to meet or exceed the an R-10 insulating value (U-factor ? 0.1). To produce a VIGU that could withstand any North American environment, ESW believed it needed to design, produce and use a flexible edge seal system. This is because a rigid edge seal, used by all other know VIG producers and developers, limits the size and/or thermal environment of the VIG to where the unit is not practical for typical IG sizes and cannot withstand severe outdoor environments. The rigid-sealed VIG’s use would be limited to mild climates where it would not have a reasonable economic payback when compared to traditional double-pane or triple-pane IGs. ESW’s goals, in addition to achieving a sufficiently high R-value to enable a whole window to achieve R-10, included creating a VIG design that could be produced for a cost equal to or lower than a traditional triple-pane IG (low-e, argon filled). ESW achieved these goals. EverSealed produced, tested and demonstrated a flexible edge-seal VIG that had an R-13 insulating value and the edge-seal system durability to operate reliably for at least 40 years in the harshest climates of North America.

Stark, David

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

482

Nonequilibrium Statistics of a Reduced Model for Energy Transfer in Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonequilibrium Statistics of a Reduced Model for Energy Transfer in Waves R. E. LEE DEVILLE Courant, with the subsequent dynamics transferring the energy to longer scales. The main dissipation mechanism is wave breaking, which usually acts on much longer (gravity) waves that intermittently remove energy from the wave system

Milewski, Paul

483

ORNL 2010-G0613-jcn UT-B ID 200902238  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and longer burn-up times. This translates to more megawatts per nuclear power plant and less spent fuel the fuel to burn longer ·· Fuel will be cooler, experiencing significantly less damage and allowing higherORNL 2010-G0613-jcn UT-B ID 200902238 Composite Nuclear Fuel Pellet Technology Summary To improve

484

STATE OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR'S OFFICE of P ND RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and California's Future" last December. ate the n tive; Kurt Malchow, CalAdapt project, among other experts intense wildfires, longer droughts and sustained water shortages ­ is no longer in doubt. By working and Organizations represented: Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR); California Energy Commission; CA

485

792 IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 14, NO. 6, JUNE 2002 High Extinction Ratio And Saturation Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abraham, and John E. Bowers Abstract--An InGaAsP multiquantum-well traveling-wave electroabsorption-power high-extinction ratio and short pulses. II. DEVICE FABRICATION The epilayer used for the TWEAM is an InGaAsP. In the later longer devices have longer electroab- sorption interaction and larger absorption volume, thus

Bowers, John

486

Terrestrial Water Relations & Climate ChangeTerrestrial Water Relations & Climate Change Jeffrey M Warren, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

warmermore frequent and longer lasting in a future warmer climate" "...precipitation intensity is projected Report "...very likely that heat waves will be more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in a future carbon gain. Leaf water loss Hubbard et al. 2001 #12;9 belowground processesbelowground processes

Gray, Matthew

487

Keep the West Vibrant with a Strong Climate Change Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and local. The heavily populated coastal regions of the eastern United States will have to deal with rapid? Clearly, action is needed, but what form should it take? The longer we wait to act, the more carbon dioxide will remain in the atmosphere for decades, centuries, and longer, and the more future warming

Reiners, Peter W.

488

Automotive hydrogen storage system using cryo-adsorption on activated carbon.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated model of a sorbent-based cryogenic compressed hydrogen system is used to assess the prospect of meeting the near-term targets of 36 kg-H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric and 4.5 wt% gravimetric capacity for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The model includes the thermodynamics of H{sub 2} sorption, heat transfer during adsorption and desorption, sorption dynamics, energetics of cryogenic tank cooling, and containment of H{sub 2} in geodesically wound carbon fiber tanks. The results from the model show that recoverable hydrogen, rather than excess or absolute adsorption, is a determining measure of whether a sorbent is a good candidate material for on-board storage of H{sub 2}. A temperature swing is needed to recover >80% of the sorption capacity of the superactivated carbon sorbent at 100 K and 100 bar as the tank is depressurized to 3-8 bar. The storage pressure at which the system needs to operate in order to approach the system capacity targets has been determined and compared with the breakeven pressure above which the storage tank is more compact if H{sub 2} is stored only as a cryo-compressed gas. The amount of liquid N{sub 2} needed to cool the hydrogen dispensed to the vehicle to 100 K and to remove the heat of adsorption during refueling has been estimated. The electrical energy needed to produce the requisite liquid N{sub 2} by air liquefaction is compared with the electrical energy needed to liquefy the same amount of H{sub 2} at a central plant. The alternate option of adiabatically refueling the sorbent tank with liquid H{sub 2} has been evaluated to determine the relationship between the storage temperature and the sustainable temperature swing. Finally, simulations have been run to estimate the increase in specific surface area and bulk density of medium needed to satisfy the system capacity targets with H{sub 2} storage at 100 bar.

Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2003 to September 30, 2003. Conductivity testing between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 was performed over the period 08/20/03 through 09/05/03. Observed response in CO{sub 2} 13 production rates to changes in CO{sub 2}I No.1 injection rates are consistent with sufficient permeability between CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 for a viable CO{sub 2} flood with a sufficient Process Pore Volume Rate (PPV). Based on the permeabilities near the CO{sub 2} No.16, a 2-producing well pattern has been determined to be optimal but may be changed during the flood depending on the response observed in the CO{sub 2} No.16. Present inter-well test results indicate there is greater permeability architecture complexity than originally predicted and that a low-permeability region or barrier that restricts but does stop flow may exist between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and the CO{sub 2} No.13. Pilot area repressurization began on 09/05/03, immediately after CO{sub 2}I No.1-CO{sub 2} No.13 conductivity testing was complete, by increasing injection in the CO{sub 2}I No.1, CO{sub 2} No.10, and CO{sub 2} No.18. Adequate reservoir pressure in the portion of the pilot area needed to be above minimum miscibility pressure should be reached in November at which time initial CO{sub 2} injection could begin. It is estimated the 2-producing well, 10+-acre (4.05 ha) producing pattern will produce 18,000-21,000 BO (barrels oil; 2,880-3,360 m{sup 3}). Depending primarily on surface facilities costs, operating expenses, and the price of oil, for the predicted range of oil recovery the pilot is estimated to either break-even or be profitable from this point forward. Final arrangements and agreements for CO{sub 2} supply and delivery are being worked on and will be finalized in the next month.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in established West Texas carbon dioxide floods. The project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

491

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

492

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Water injection will continue to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

493

Illuminating the Pecking Order in Off-Grid Lighting: A Demonstration of LED Lighting for Saving Energy in the Poultry Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lumina Project and Lighting Africa conducted a full-scale field test involving a switch from kerosene to solar-LED lighting for commercial broiler chicken production at an off-grid farm in Kenya. The test achieved lower operating costs, produced substantially more light, improved the working environment, and had no adverse effect on yields. A strategy using conventional solar-fluorescent lighting also achieved comparable yields, but entailed a six-fold higher capital cost and significantly higher recurring battery replacement costs. Thanks to higher energy and optical efficiencies, the LED system provided approximately twice the illumination to the chicken-production area and yet drew less than half the power.At the study farm, 3000 chickens were grown in each of three identical houses under kerosene, fluorescent, and LED lighting configurations. Under baseline conditions, a yearly expenditure of 1,200 USD is required to illuminate the three houses with kerosene. The LED system eliminates this fuel use and expense with a corresponding simple payback time of 1.5 years, while the solar-fluorescent system has a payback time of 9.3 years. The corresponding reduction in fuel expenditure in both cases represents a 15percent increase in after-tax net income (revenues minus expenses) across the entire business operation. The differential cost-effectiveness between the LED and fluorescent systems would be substantially greater if the fluorescent system were upsized to provide the same light as the LED system. Providing light with the fluorescent or LED systems is also far more economical than connecting to the grid in this case. The estimated grid-connection cost at this facility is 1.7 million Kenya Schillings (approximately 21,250 USD), which is nearly six-times the cost of the fluorescent system and 35-times the cost of the LED system.The LED system also confers various non-energy benefits. The relative uniformity of LED lighting, compared to the fluorescent or kerosene lighting, reduced crowding which in turn created a less stressful environment for the chickens. The far higher levels of illumination also created a better environment for the workers, while eliminating the time required for obtaining fuel and maintaining kerosene lanterns. An additional advantage of the LED system relative to the solar fluorescent system was that the former does not require a skilled technician to carry out the installation. The portable LED system lighting layout is also more easily adjusted than that of the hardwired fluorescent systems. Furthermore, switching to the LED system avoids over one metric ton of carbon dioxide emissions per house on an annual basis compared to kerosene. There is high potential for replication of this particular LED lighting strategy in the developing world. In order to estimate the scale of kerosene use and the potential for savings, more information is needed on the numbers of chickens produced off-grid, as well as lighting uses for other categories of poultry production (egg layers, indigenous broilers ). Our discovery that weight gain did not slow in the solar-fluorescent house after it experienced extended lighting outages beginning on day 14 of the 35-day study suggests that conventional farming practices in Kenyan broiler operations may call for more hours of lighting than is needed to achieve least-cost production.

Tracy, Jennifer; Mills, Evan

2010-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

494

Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant Modules Designed to Integrate with Standard Unitary Rooftop Package Equipment - Final Report: Phase 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the investigation of two active desiccant module (ADM) pilot site installations initiated in 2001. Both pilot installations were retrofits at existing facilities served by conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that had encountered frequent humidity control, indoor air quality (IAQ), and other operational problems. Each installation involved combining a SEMCO, Inc., ADM (as described in Fischer and Sand 2002) with a standard packaged rooftop unit built by the Trane Company. A direct digital control (DDC) system integral to the ADM performed the dual function of controlling the ADM/rooftop combination and facilitating data collection, trending, and remote performance monitoring. The first installation involved providing preconditioned outdoor air to replace air exhausted from the large kitchen hood and bathrooms of a Hooters restaurant located in Rome, Georgia. This facility had previously added an additional rooftop unit in an attempt to achieve occupant comfort without success. The second involved conditioning the outdoor air delivered to each room of a wing of the Mountain Creek Inn at the Callaway Gardens resort. This hotel, designed in the ''motor lodge'' format with each room opening to the outdoors, is located in southwest Georgia. Controlling the space humidity always presented a serious challenge. Uncomfortable conditions and musty odors had caused many guests to request to move to other areas within the resort. This is the first field demonstration performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory where significant energy savings, operating cost savings, and dramatically improved indoor environmental conditions can all be claimed as the results of a retrofit desiccant equipment field installation. The ADM/rooftop combination installed at the restaurant resulted in a reduction of about 34% in the electricity used by the building's air-conditioning system. This represents a reduction of approximately 15% in overall electrical energy consumption and a 12.5-kW reduction in peak demand. The cost of gas used for regeneration of the desiccant wheel over this period of time is estimated to be only $740, using a gas cost of $0.50 per therm--the summer rate in 2001. The estimated net savings is $5400 annually, resulting in a 1-2 year payback. It is likely that similar energy/cost savings were realized at the Callaway Gardens hotel. In this installation, however, a central plant supplied the chilled water serving fan coil units in the hotel wing retrofitted with the ADM, so it was not metered separately. Consequently, the owner could not provide actual energy consumption data specific to the facility. The energy and operating cost savings at both sites are directly attributable to higher cooling-season thermostat settings and decreased conventional system run times. These field installations were selected as an immediate and appropriate response to correct indoor humidity and fresh air ventilation problems being experienced by building occupants and owners, so no rigorous baseline-building vs. test-building energy use/operating cost savings results can be presented. The report presents several simulated comparisons between the ADM/roof HVAC approach and other equipment combinations, where both desiccant and conventional systems are modeled to provide comparable fresh air ventilation rates and indoor humidity levels. The results obtained from these simulations demonstrate convincingly the energy and operating cost savings obtainable with this hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression technology, verifying those actually seen at the pilot installations. The ADM approach is less expensive than conventional alternatives providing similar performance and indoor air quality and provides a very favorable payback (1 year or so) compared with oversized rooftop units that cannot be operated effectively with the necessary high outdoor air percentages.

Fischer, J

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

Benchmarking of a medical device company's product development process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In todays' global economy, having a lean operation is no longer considered a competitive edge; rather has become the new necessity and norm [15]. The new source of this competitive edge is innovation [15]. What sets an ...

Zelkha, Sassan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

General Construction Company Private Development Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

administration and subcontractor management in the execution of each project. General’s current operations are very conducive to private development. However, the company can no longer rely on an oral system to relay historical processes and procedures...

Eason, Scott W.

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

497

Improving the probability of effective organizational change in the Coast Guard through the combined use of System Dynamics and Enterprise Value Stream Mapping & Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most major organizational changes never reap the benefits the original planners envisioned, they often take longer to implement than expected and in a dynamic environment that can spell disaster for a large enterprise. The ...

Johnston, Michael J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Assessment of high-burnup LWR fuel response to reactivity-initiated accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The economic advantages of longer fuel cycle, improved fuel utilization and reduced spent fuel storage have been driving the nuclear industry to pursue higher discharge burnup of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. A design ...

Liu, Wenfeng, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor to generate nuclear energy but that has been removed from the reactor as no longer...

500

Quantum reflection of Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent developments in atom optics have brought Bose-Einstein condensates within 1 pm of solid surfaces where the atom-surface interactions can no longer be ignored. At long- range, the atom-surface interaction is described ...

Pasquini, Thomas A., Jr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z