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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

One: The California Long-Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA LONG-TERM OUTLOOK Tom K. Lieser, ExecutiveThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," TheThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," The

Lieser, Tom K

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Outlook positive over long term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends established in 1987 will be very important in reestablishing some level of confidence in future price expectations. The authors expect prices to fluctuate widely in the coming year as OPEC makes and breaks various production quota agreements. Continued price instability will certainly all but negate short term marginally economic exploration and development prospects. Utilization rates will suffer accordingly. But on the positive side, the long term outlook is considerably more stable. Rock-bottom prices will increase the demand for cheap oil substantially. We're already seeing world demand figures rise. Increased demand will cause the world's (mainly OPEC's) excess production to be depleted over the next three to five years. Prices will rise slowly in parallel with the decline in excess production capacity over several years. Banking on upward price pressure, financially sound operators with solid cash flow will want to take advantage of low exploration and development costs. Utilization, then, can be expected to follow oil prices in a slow upward spiral over the next three to five years. Next year, the industry should begin to feel the effect of the beginning of that upward trend.

Not Available

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The California Economy: The Long Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1996. First, we cover the outlook for the main macroeconomicin the two economies. The outlook calls for moderate growthunderlies the macroeconomic outlook. Good jobs offer high

Kimbell, Larry J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paul Holtberg, Moderator Paul Holtberg, Moderator April 26, 2011 | Washington, D.C. Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives Speakers 2 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * John Conti, Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis, Energy Information Administration * Mark Finley, General Manager, Global Energy Markets and U.S. Economics, BP * Douglas Meade, Director of Research, INFORUM Forecasts/projections and uncertainty 3 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * Forecast or projections? * Know your analyst * Tools * Uncertainty - Basic underlying trends (e.g., population growth, economic growth, social norms) - Technology (e.g., new technologies, improved technology, breakthroughs vs. evolutionary, new applications)

5

Long-term Outlook for Oil and Other Liquid Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels, natural gas liquids, and crude oil production are key sources of increased domestic liquids supply. Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011. Gulf of Mexico.

6

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission, Enerdata, in collaboration with LEPII Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.enerdata.net/docssales/press-office-20th-world-energy-congress.pdf Cost: Free Related Tools Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) WorldScan SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook

7

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-Term Carbon Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit with a Spray Drier and Fabric Filter The intent of DOE's Phase I and II field tests was to work with industry to evaluate the most promising mercury control technologies at full-scale in a variety of configurations. Although longer-term tests were conducted, the test period was not sufficient to answer many fundamental questions about long-term consistency of mercury removal and reliability of the system when integrated with plant processes. As the technologies move towards commercial implementation, it is critical to accurately define the mercury removal performance and costs so that power companies and policy makers can make informed decisions. Therefore, the overall objective of this Phase III project is to determine the mercury removal performance, long-term emissions variability, and associated O&M costs of activated carbon injection for >90% mercury control over a 10 to 12 month period on a unit that represents the combination of coal and emission control equipment that will be used for many new and existing power plants.

8

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexico’s energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexico’s crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexico’s electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario – investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario – analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martínez; Autónoma México; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martínez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Long-term Black Carbon Dynamics in Cultivated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Black carbon (BC) is a quantitatively important C pool in the global carbon cycle due to its relative recalcitrance against decay compared with other C pools. However, how rapidly BC is oxidized and in what way the molecular structure changes during decomposition over decadal time scales, is largely unknown. In the present study, the long-term dynamics in quality and quantity of BC were investigated in cultivated soil using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. BC particles, obtained from soil samples at 8 conversion ages stretching over 100 years and from a forest soil sample from Kenya, were manually picked under a light microscope for characterization and quantification. BC contents rapidly decreased from 12.7 to 3.8 mg C g?¹ soil during the first 30 years since conversion, after which they slowly decreased to a steady state at 3.51 mg C g ?¹soil. BC-derived C losses over 100 years were estimated at 6000 kg C ha?¹ to a depth of 0.1 m. The initial rapid changes in BC stocks resulted in a mean residence time of only around 8.3 years, which was likely a function of both decomposition as well as transport processes. The molecular properties of BC changed more rapidly on surfaces than in the interior of BC particles and more rapidly during the first 30 years than during the following 70 years. The Oc/C ratios (Oc is O bound to C) and carbonyl groups (C=O) increased over time by 133 and 192 %, respectively, indicating oxidation was an important degradation process controlling BC quality. Al, Si, polysaccharides, and to a lesser extent Fe were rapidly adsorbed on BC particle surfaces within the first few years after BC deposition to soil. The protection by physical and chemical stabilization was apparently sufficient to not only minimize decomposition below detection between 30 and 100 years after deposition, but also physical export by erosion and vertical transport below 0.1 m.

Nguyen, Binh T.; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Kinyangi, James; Smernik, Ron; Riha, Susan J.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Carbonation of Calcium Silicates for Long-Term CO2 Sequestration  

Carbonation of Calcium Silicates for Long-Term CO2 Sequestration ... technology for reducing industrial CO2 emissions into the Earth’s atmosphere. Inventor PALMER, ...

11

"In terms of the long-term outlook for biomass and biofuels, the largest proportion of Business Insights industry survey respondents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"In terms of the long-term outlook for biomass and biofuels, the largest proportion of Business proportion of world fuel/demand will biofuels and biomass account for by 2017? Source: The Biofuels Market the market. However, these will clearly affect the global fuel market. · Biomass: Food or fuel? Increased

12

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHAPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J.Fabry

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

20

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids ? single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate ? to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V. J. Fabry

2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Report TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2 from flue gases Jens Kohlmann 1 #12;TKK-ENY-9 June 2002 3 Preface This volume contains the two progress reports for the project "CO2 preparation, to be submitted to a technical journal #12;TKK-ENY-9 June 2002 5 Part 1 : Progress report August

Zevenhoven, Ron

27

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing.Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050 Nan Zhou, David37 Figure 39 Carbon Emissions Outlook for Two Scenarios by

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Potential multiple steady-states in the long-term carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelers of the long term carbon cycle in Earth history have previously assumed there is only one stable climatic steady state. Here we investigate the possibility of multiple steady states. We find them in Abiotic World, lacking any biotic influence, resulting from possible variations in planetary albedo in different temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide level regimes, with the same weathering forcing balancing a volcanic source to the atmosphere, ocean pool. In Plant World modeling relevant to the Phanerozoic, we include the additional effects of biotic enhancement of weathering on land, organic carbon burial, oxidation of reduced organic carbon in terrestrial sediments and the variation of biotic productivity with temperature, finding a second stable steady state appearing between twenty and fifty degrees C. The very warm early Triassic climate may be the prime candidate for an upper temperature steady state. Given our results, the anthropogenic driven rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide could potentially...

Tennenbaum, Stephen; Schwartzman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Coal investment and long-term supply and demand outlook for coal in the Asia-Pacific Region  

SciTech Connect

The theme of this symposium to look ahead almost a quarter century to 2020 gives one the freedom to speculate more than usual in projections for coal. It is important to attempt to take a long term look into the future of coal and energy, so that one can begin to prepare for major changes on the horizon. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the crystal ball for making long term projections is accurate for 2020. Hopefully it can suggest plausible changes that have long term strategic importance to Asia`s coal sector. This paper presents the medium scenario of long term projects of coal production, consumption, imports and exports in Asia. The second part of the paper examines the two major changes in Asia that could be most important to the long term role of coal. These include: (1) the impact of strict environmental legislation on energy and technology choices in Asia, and (2) the increased role of the private sector in all aspects of coal in Asia.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Predicting Agricultural Management Influence on Long-Term Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics: Implications for Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect

Long-term field experiments (LTE) are ideal for predicting the influence of agricultural management on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and examining biofuel crop residue removal policy questions. Our objectives were (i) to simulate SOC dynamics in LTE soils under various climates, crop rotations, fertilizer or organic amendments, and crop residue managements using the CQESTR model and (ii) to predict the potential of no-tillage (NT) management to maintain SOC stocks while removing crop residue. Classical LTEs at Champaign, IL (1876), Columbia, MO (1888), Lethbridge, AB (1911), Breton, AB (1930), and Pendleton, OR (1931) were selected for their documented history of management practice and periodic soil organic matter (SOM) measurements. Management practices ranged from monoculture to 2- or 3-yr crop rotations, manure, no fertilizer or fertilizer additions, and crop residue returned, burned, or harvested. Measured and CQESTR predicted SOC stocks under diverse agronomic practices, mean annual temperature (2.1 19 C), precipitation (402 973 mm), and SOC (5.89 33.58 g SOC kg 1) at the LTE sites were significantly related (r 2 = 0.94, n = 186, P < 0.0001) with a slope not significantly different than 1. The simulation results indicated that the quantities of crop residue that can be sustainably harvested without jeopardizing SOC stocks were influenced by initial SOC stocks, crop rotation intensity, tillage practices, crop yield, and climate. Manure or a cover crop/intensified crop rotation under NT are options to mitigate loss of crop residue C, as using fertilizer alone is insufficient to overcome residue removal impact on SOC stocks

Gollany, H. T. [USDA ARS; Rickman, R. W. [USDA ARS; Albrecht, S. L. [USDA ARS; Liang, Y. [University of Arkansas; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Machado, S. [Oregon State University, Corvallis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Long-term tillage, cropping sequence, and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management practices that may increase soil organic matter (SOM) storage include conservation tillage, especially no till (NT), enhanced cropping intensity, and fertilization. My objectives were to evaluate management effects on labile [soil microbial biomass (SMB) and mineralizable, particulate organic matter (POM), and hydrolyzable SOM] and slow (mineral-associated and resistant organic) C and N pools and turnover in continuous sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.], wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], sorghum-wheat/soybean, and wheat/soybean sequences under convent ional tillage (CT) and NT with and without N fertilization. A Weswood silty clay loam (fine, mixed, thermic Fluventic Ustochepts) in southern central Texas was sampled at three depth increments to a 30-cm depth after wheat, sorghum, and soybean harvesting. Soil organic C and total N showed similar responses to tillage, cropping sequence, and N fertilization following wheat, sorghum, and soybean. Most effects were observed in surface soils. NT significantly increased SOC. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased SOC only under NT. Compared to NT or N addition, enhanced cropping intensity only slightly increased SOC. Estimates of C sequestration rates under NT indicated that SOC would reach a new equilibrium after 20 yr or less of imposition of this treatment. Labile pools were all significantly greater with NT than CT at 0 to 5 cm and decreased with depth. SMB, mineralizable C and N, POM, and hydrolyzable C were highly correlated with each other and SOC, but their slopes were significantly different, being lowest in mineralizable C and highest in hydrolyzable C. These results indicated that different methods determined various fractions of total SOC. Results from soil physical fractionation and 13C concentrations further supported these observations. Carbon turnover rates increased in the sequence: ROC < silt- and clayassociated C < microaggregate-C < POM-C. Long-term incubation showed that 4 to 5% of SOC was in active pools with mean residence time (MRT) of about 50 days, 50% of SOC was in slow pools with an average MRT of 12 years, and the remainder was in resistant pools with an assumed MRT of over 500 years.

Dou, Fugen

32

Drought legacies influence the long-term carbon balance of a freshwater marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosynthetic carbon sequestration, primarily by inhibitingof the maximum annual carbon sequestration observed over aimpact on marsh carbon sequestration. Citation: Rocha, A.

Rocha, Adrian V.; Goulden, Michael L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

SciTech Connect

As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic expansion and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both a short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as a long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study presents a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. Over the past few years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced its China End-Use Energy Model which is based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. In addition, this analysis also evaluated China's long-term domestic energy supply in order to gauge the potential challenge China may face in meeting long-term demand for energy. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not necessarily be the case because saturation in ownership of appliances, construction of residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that China's 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Outlook 2009 Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure...

35

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO.sub.2 sequestration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

Kisholoy Goswami

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

38

Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

40

Improved long-term electrical stability of pulsed high-power diodes using dense carbon fiber velvet cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of fibrous velvet cathodes on the electrical stability of a planar high-power diode powered by a {approx}230 kV, {approx}110 ns pulse has been investigated. The current density was on the order of {approx}123 A/cm{sup 2}. A combination of time-resolved electrical and optical diagnostics has been employed to study the basic phenomenology of the temporal and spatial evolution of the diode plasmas. Additionally, an impedance model was used to extract information about this plasma from voltage and current profiles. The results from the two diagnostics were compared. By comparison with commercial polymer velvet cathode, the dense carbon fiber velvet cathode showed superior long-term electrical stability as judged by the change in cathode turn-on field, ignition delays, diode impedance, and surface plasma characteristics during the voltage flattop, a promising result for applications where reliable operation at high power is required. Finally, it was shown that the interaction of the electron beam with the stainless steel anode did not lead to the formation of anode plasma. These results may be of interest to the high power microwave systems with cold cathodes.

Yang Jie; Shu Ting; Wang Hui [College of Opto-Electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Hunan 410073 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-4472E China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050 Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Michael McNeil, Nina Zheng, Jing Ke, and Mark Levine China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory April 2011 This work was supported by the China

42

Long-term effects of soil warming on labile carbon availability and microbial community respiration and composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warmed soils from the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA were analyzed as to the long-term effects. Soil warming has been going on in large 30x30m plots at the Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA) for the past in the Barre Woods of the Slab City Tract of the Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA. This is a mixed deciduous

Vallino, Joseph J.

43

Long-Term Surveillance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 LMS/ESL/S10692 ESL-RPT-2013-03 This page intentionally left blank LMS/ESL/S10692 ESL-RPT-2013-03 Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance FY 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 Doc. No. S10692 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

44

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Index (click to jump links) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Emissions from Electricity Generation Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 115. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1990-2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2002 to 2025, to 8,142 million metric tons (Figure 115). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year from 2002 to 2025. Carbon dioxide emissions in the residential sector, including emissions

45

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-585-8800. Figure Data Figure 78. World energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse

46

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2005, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 7 percent. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 72 percent. Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

47

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2007, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 17 percent. In the IEO2010 Reference case, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from non-OECD countries in 2035 are about double those from OECD countries. Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, world energy use continues to be at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2010 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions29 grow from 29.7 billion metric tons in 2007 to 33.8 billion metric tons in 2020 and 42.4 billion metric tons in 2035 (Table 18).30

48

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 110. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2003 and 2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2003 to 2025, to 8,062 million metric tons (Figure 110). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year. New carbon dioxide mitigation programs, more rapid improvements in technology, or more rapid adoption of voluntary programs could result in lower emissions levels than projected here.

49

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

50

One: The California Long-Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

housing and less real commercial and industrial volume as was built in 1986. Projected construction in 2020housing units in the state, averaging about 229,000 per year for the twenty-year period from 2000 to 2020.2020, an annual increase of 3.5%fromthe 1998 total GSP of $975 billion. Housing

Lieser, Tom K

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 107. Carbn dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2004 and 2030 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at

53

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japan Long-Term Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering EnergyResidential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 8 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2006, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 14 percent. In 2030, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 77 percent. Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 82. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel in IEO2008 and IEO2009, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (billion metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

55

Long Term Innovative Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's Hydrogen and DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, Fuel Cell Presolicitation Workshop Bryan Pivovar With Input/Feedback from Rod Borup (LANL), Debbie Myers (ANL), DOE and others as noted in presentation Lakewood, CO March 16, 2010 Long Term Innovative Technologies National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Innovative/Long Term and RELEVANT Mission of DOE Mission of EERE (Applied Program) Mission of HFCT To enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells in diverse sectors of the economy-with emphasis on applications that will most effectively strengthen the nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment-through research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies, and through diverse activities to overcome

56

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dissolution of NiO cathodes during cell operation is a limiting factor to the successful commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Lithium cobalt oxide coating onto the porous nickel electrode has been adopted to modify the conventional MCFC cathode which is believed to increase the stability of the cathodes in the carbonate melt. The material used for surface modification should possess thermodynamic stability in the molten carbonate and also should be electro catalytically active for MCFC reactions. Two approaches have been adopted to get a stable cathode material. First approach is the use of LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}, a commercially available lithium battery cathode material and the second is the use of tape cast electrodes prepared from cobalt coated nickel powders. The morphology and the structure of LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} and tape cast Co coated nickel powder electrodes were studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction studies respectively. The electrochemical performance of the two materials was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization studies. A three phase homogeneous model was developed to simulate the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell cathode. The homogeneous model is based on volume averaging of different variables in the three phases over a small volume element. The model gives a good fit to the experimental data. The model has been used to analyze MCFC cathode performance under a wide range of operating conditions.

Dr. Ralph E. White; Dr. Branko N. Popov

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dissolution of NiO cathodes during cell operation is a limiting factor to the successful commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Lithium cobalt oxide coating onto the porous nickel electrode has been adopted to modify the conventional MCFC cathode which is believed to increase the stability of the cathodes in the carbonate melt. The material used for surface modification should possess thermodynamic stability in the molten carbonate and also should be electro catalytically active for MCFC reactions. Lithium Cobalt oxide was coated on Ni cathode by a sol-gel coating. The morphology and the LiCoO{sub 2} formation of LiCoO{sub 2} coated NiO was studied using scanning electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction studies respectively. The electrochemical performance lithium cobalt oxide coated NiO cathodes were investigated with open circuit potential measurement and current-potential polarization studies. These results were compared to that of bare NiO. Dissolution of nickel into the molten carbonate melt was less in case of lithium cobalt oxide coated nickel cathodes. LiCoO{sub 2} coated on the surface prevents the dissolution of Ni in the melt and thereby stabilizes the cathode. Finally, lithium cobalt oxide coated nickel shows similar polarization characteristics as nickel oxide. Conventional theoretical models for the molten carbonate fuel cell cathode are based on the thin film agglomerate model. The principal deficiency of the agglomerate model, apart from the simplified pore structure assumed, is the lack of measured values for film thickness and agglomerate radius. Both these parameters cannot be estimated appropriately. Attempts to estimate the thickness of the film vary by two orders of magnitude. To avoid these problems a new three phase homogeneous model has been developed using the volume averaging technique. The model considers the potential and current variation in both liquid and solid phases. Using this approach, volume averaged concentrations of both gaseous and liquid phase reactants are obtained separately. The polarization characteristics of the electrode have been studied for different electrode parameters. The effect of different design parameters on the electrode performance has also been analyzed. Finally, the model has been used to analyze the impedance response of the MCFC cathode.

Dr. Ralph E. White; Dr. Branko N. Popov

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dissolution of NiO cathodes during cell operation is a limiting factor to the successful commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Microencapsulation of the NiO cathode has been adopted as a surface modification technique to increase the stability of NiO cathodes in the carbonate melt. The material used for surface modification should possess thermodynamic stability in the molten carbonate and also should be electro catalytically active for MCFC reactions. A simple first principles model was developed to understand the influence of exchange current density and conductivity of the electrode material on the polarization of MCFC cathodes. The model predictions suggest that cobalt can be used to improve the corrosion resistance of NiO cathode without affecting its performance. Cobalt was deposited on NiO cathode by electroless deposition. The morphology and thermal oxidation behavior of Co coated NiO was studied using scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis respectively. The electrochemical performance of cobalt encapsulated NiO cathodes were investigated with open circuit potential measurement and current-potential polarization studies. These results were compared to that of bare NiO. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of cobalt-coated electrodes is similar to that of the bare NiO cathode. Dissolution of nickel into the molten carbonate melt was less in case of cobalt encapsulated nickel cathodes. Co coated on the surface prevents the dissolution of Ni in the melt and thereby stabilizes the cathode. Finally, cobalt coated nickel shows similar polarization characteristics as nickel oxide. A similar surface modification technique has been used to improve the performance of the SS 304 current collectors used in MCFC cells. SS 304 was encapsulated with nanostructured layers of NiCo and NiMo by electroless deposition. The corrosion behavior of bare and surface modified SS 304 in molten carbonate under cathode gas atmosphere was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential studies, Tafel polarization, impedance analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. This study confirms that the presence of surface modification leads to the formation of complex scales with better barrier properties and electronic conductivity.

Dr. Ralph E. White

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SS 304 was encapsulated with thin layers of Co-Ni by an electroless deposition process. The corrosion behavior of SS304 and Co-Ni-SS304 was investigated in molten carbonate under cathode gas atmosphere with electrochemical and surface characterization tools. Surface modification of SS304 reduced the dissolution of chromium and nickel into the molten carbonate melt. Composition of the corrosion scale formed in case of Co-Ni-SS304 is different from SS304 and shows the presence of Co and Ni oxides while the latter shows the presence of lithium ferrite. Polarization resistance for oxygen reduction reaction and conductivity of corrosion values for the corrosion scales were obtained using impedance analysis and current-potential plots. The results indicated lower polarization resistance for oxygen reduction reaction in the case of Co-Ni-SS304 when compared to SS304. Also, the conductivity of the corrosion scales was considerably higher in case of Co-Ni-SS304 than the SS304. This study shows that modifying the current collector surface with Co-Ni coatings leads to the formation of oxide scales with improved barrier properties and electronic conductivity.

Dr. Ralph E. White

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cathode materials for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) must have low dissolution rate, high structural strength and good electrical conductivity. Currently available cathodes are made of lithiated NiO which have acceptable structural strength and conductivity. However a study carried out by Orfeld et al. and Shores et al. indicated that the nickel cathodes dissolved, then precipitated and reformed as dendrites across the electrolyte matrix. This results in a decrease in cell utilization and eventually leads to shorting of the cell. The solubility of NiO was found to depend upon the acidity/basicity of the melt (basicity is directly proportional to log P{sub CO2}), carbonate composition, H{sub 2}O partial pressure and temperature. Urushibata et al. found that the dissolution of the cathode is a primary life limiting constraint of MCFCs, particularly in pressurized operation. With currently available NiO cathodes, the goal of 40,000 hours for the lifetime of MCFC appears achievable with cell operation at atmospheric pressure. However, the cell life at 10 atm and higher cell pressures is in the range between 5,000 to 10,000 hours. The overall objective of this research is to develop a superior cathode for MCFC's with improved catalytic ability, enhanced corrosion resistance with low ohmic losses, improved electronic conductivity. We also plan to understand the corrosion processes occurring at the cathode/molten carbonate interface. The following cathode materials will be subjected to detailed electrochemical, performance, structural and corrosion studies. (i) Passivated NiO alloys using chemical treatment with yttrium ion implantation and anodic yttrium molybdate treatment; (ii) Novel composite materials based on NiO and nanosized Ce, Yt, Mo; (iii) Co doped LiNiO{sub 2} LiNiO{sub 2} doped with 10 to 20% Co (LiCo{sub 0.2}NiO{sub 2}) and NiO cathodes; and (iv) CoO as a replacement for NiO. Passivation treatments will inhibit corrosion and increase the stability of the cathode at high temperatures. Deposition of refractory metals (Mo, W, Li{sub 2}NiCrO{sub 4}) will impart stability to the cathode at high temperatures. Further it will also increase the electrocatalytic activity and corrosion resistance of the cathode. Doping with Co will decrease the alloy dissolution and increase the cycle life of the cathode. In the reporting period the oxidation behavior of Ni and Co in Li + Na carbonate eutectic was investigated under oxidizing environment using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic technique. The open circuit potential was monitored as a function of time in order to evaluate the material's reactivity in the melt.

Anand Durairajan; Bala Haran; Branko N. Popov; Ralph E. White

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused on addressing the two main problems associated with state of art Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, namely loss of cathode active material and stainless steel current collector deterioration due to corrosion. We followed a dual approach where in the first case we developed novel materials to replace the cathode and current collector currently used in molten carbonate fuel cells. In the second case we improved the performance of conventional cathode and current collectors through surface modification. States of art NiO cathode in MCFC undergo dissolution in the cathode melt thereby limiting the lifetime of the cell. To prevent this we deposited cobalt using an electroless deposition process. We also coated perovskite (La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3}) in NiO thorough a sol-gel process. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of Co and perovskites coated electrodes is similar to that of the bare NiO cathode. Co and perovskite coatings on the surface decrease the dissolution of Ni into the melt and thereby stabilize the cathode. Both, cobalt and provskites coated nickel oxide, show a higher polarization compared to that of nickel oxide, which could be due to the reduced surface area. Cobalt substituted lithium nickel oxide (LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}) and lithium cobalt oxide were also studied. LiNi{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} was synthesized by solid-state reaction procedure using lithium nitrate, nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxalate precursor. LiNi{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} showed smaller dissolution of nickel than state of art nickel oxide cathode. The performance was comparable to that of nickel oxide. The corrosion of the current collector in the cathode side was also studied. The corrosion characteristics of both SS304 and SS304 coated with Co-Ni alloy were studied. This study confirms that surface modification of SS304 leads to the formation of complex scales with better barrier properties and better electronic conductivity at 650 C. A three phase homogeneous model was developed to simulate the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell cathode and the complete fuel cell. The homogeneous model is based on volume averaging of different variables in the three phases over a small volume element. This approach can be used to model porous electrodes as it represents the real system much better than the conventional agglomerate model. Using the homogeneous model the polarization characteristics of the MCFC cathode and fuel cell were studied under different operating conditions. Both the cathode and the full cell model give good fits to the experimental data.

Hector Colonmer; Prabhu Ganesan; Nalini Subramanian; Dr. Bala Haran; Dr. Ralph E. White; Dr. Branko N. Popov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight

63

Long-term biobarriers to plant and animal intrusions of uranium tailings. [24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black, and 58% polymer  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of physical and chemical barriers designed to prevent plant and animal breachment of uranium mill tailings containment systems for an extended period of time. A polymeric carrier/biocide delivery system was developed and tested in the laboratory, greenhouse and field. A continuous flow technique was established to determine the release rates of the biocides from the PCD systems; polymeric carrier specifications were established. Studies were conducted to determine effective biocide concentrations required to produce a phytotoxic response and the relative rates of phytotoxin degradation resulting from chemical and biological breakdown in soils. The final PCD system developed was a pelletized system containing 24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black and 58% polymer. Pellets were placed in the soil at the Grand Junction U-tailings site at one in. and two in. intervals. Data obtained in the field determined that the pellets released enough herbicide to the soil layer to stop root elongation past the barrier. Physical barriers to subsurface movement of burrowing animals were investigated. Small crushed stone (1 to 1 1/2 in. diameter) placed over asphalt emulsion and multilayer soil seals proved effective as barriers to a small mammal (ground squirrels) but were not of sufficient size to stop a larger animal (the prairie dog). No penetrations were made through the asphalt emulsion or the clay layer of the multilayer soil seals by either of the two mammals tested. A literature survey was prepared and published on the burrowing habits of the animals that may be found at U-tailings sites.

Cline, J.F.; Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Gano, K.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Long-term testing  

SciTech Connect

Land-based gas turbines are significantly different from automotive gas turbines in that they are designed to operate for 50,000 h or greater (compared to 5,000--10,000 h). The primary goal of this research is to determine the long-term survivability of ceramic materials for industrial gas turbine applications. Research activities in this program focus on the evaluation of the static tensile creep and stress rupture (SR) behavior of three commercially available structural ceramics which have been identified by the gas turbine manufacturers as leading candidates for use in industrial gas turbines. For each material investigated, a minimum of three temperatures and four stresses will be used to establish the stress and temperature sensitivities of the creep and SR behavior. Because existing data for many candidate structural ceramics are limited to testing times less than 2,000 h, this program will focus on extending these data to times on the order of 10,000 h, which represents the lower limit of operating time anticipated for ceramic blades and vanes in gas turbine engines. A secondary goal of the program will be to investigate the possibility of enhancing life prediction estimates by combining interrupted tensile SR tests and tensile dynamic fatigue tests in which tensile strength is measured as a function of stressing rate. The third goal of this program will be to investigate the effects of water vapor upon the SR behavior of the three structural ceramics chosen for the static tensile studies by measuring the flexural strength as a function of stressing rate at three temperatures.

Ferber, M.; Graves, G.A. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-term Operation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Papers and Publications: Long-Term Evaluation of Activated Carbon Injection for Mercury Control Upstream of a COHPAC Fabric Filter PDF-298KB presented at Air Quality IV...

68

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Jump to: navigation,...

69

Long-Term Environmental Stewardship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Long-Term Environmental Stewardship The Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Program ensures protection of human health and the environment, following site remediations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Continuing environmental commitment Long-term stewardship activities are designed to prevent exposures to residual contamination and waste including groundwater monitoring ongoing pump-and-treatment activities maintenance of barriers and other contaminant structures periodic inspections control of site access posted signs Long-term environmental stewardship (LTES) data access DOE requires that data used to make decisions concerning LTES conditions be readily accessible to the public. To accomplish this, sample analysis data

70

Long-Term Stewardship Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Long Term Stewardship Office of Long Term Stewardship LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP STUDY Volume I - Report Prepared to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement: Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998). Final Study October 2001 - i - Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. The Study

71

Long-Term Surveillance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NRC in the referenced letter have been addressed and are reflected in this submittal. This Long Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) is intended to satisfy the requirements set forth in 10 CFR 40.28 whereby the long-term custodian must provide an LTSP to the NRC as a step in the licensing/license termination process. Please call me at (970) 248-6037 if you have questions. Sincerely, Enclosures cc w/enclosure:

Mail Stop Ta; M. Plessinger Mactec-ers

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Long Term World Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: The following pages summarize a recent EIA presentation on estimates of the world conventional oil resource base and the year when production from it will peak and then begin to decline. A version of this presentation was given by former EIA Administrator Jay Hakes to the April 18, 2000 meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in New Orleans, Louisiana. Specific information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long (gary.long@eia.doe.gov) or David Morehouse (david.morehouse@eia.doe.gov). Long Term World Oil Supply http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld001.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:23 PM] Slide 2 of 20 http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld002.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:24 PM]

73

Long-Term Surveillance Plan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AL/62350-235 AL/62350-235 REV. 1 LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE ESTES GULCH DISPOSAL SITE NEAR RIFLE, COLORADO November 1997 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (615) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Estes Gulch Disposal Site Near Rifle... http://lts1.lm.doe.gov/documents/rfl/ltsp.html 1 of 25 5/20/2009 1:38 PM Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division UMTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico

74

California’s Economic Outlook: Short-term Recovery But Longer-term Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Long-Term Demographic Outlook for California and LosCALIFORNIA’S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: SHORT-TERM RECOVERY BUTCalifornia’s short-term outlook remains one of expansion,

Hurd, Joseph; Mitchell, Daniel J.B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

An analytical framework for long term policy for commercial deployment and innovation in carbon capture and sequestration technology in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology has the potential to be a key CO2 emissions mitigation technology for the United States. Several CCS technology options are ready for immediate commercial-scale demonstration, ...

Hamilton, Michael Roberts

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Related Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 8. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1980-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Absent the application of CCS technology (which is not expected to come into use without changes in current policies that are not included in the reference case), CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption and carbon content, with coal having the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and liquid fuels in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the coal share of total energy use increases from 23 percent in 2006 to 26 percent in 2030, while the share of

77

The Long-term Outlook for Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

http://www.propublica.org/special/hydraulic-fracturing-national. Success in the Barnett prompted companies to look at other shale formations in the United States

78

Long-Term Surveillance Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~- ~- 1 .. I I . I I I ' I I I I I t I ' 1 .. ~ * -. . * * , . -. * . - l' ** ... * . DOE/Al/62350-60F ~--- - · ---,~REV. 1 CONTROLLED COPY NO. United States Department of Energy LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN fOR THE SHIPROCK DISPOSAL SITE; SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO September 1994 Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche. Number of pages in this report: 1 1 3 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (615) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce

79

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 Figure 75 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 76 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in IEO2007 and IEO2008, 2005-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

80

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 80. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 80 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 81. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Liquids Combustion by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 81 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 22 July 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance

82

Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

NETL: Gasification - Long-Term Candle Filter Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Candle Filter Tests Long-Term Candle Filter Tests National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center advancement of hot gas filtration technology provides the design for optimal, long-term evaluation of material performance for particulate control device (PCD) filter elements. Testing is performed using the commercially available Siemens PCD, due to its demonstrated excellent collection efficiency during normal operation. The PCD, located downstream of the primary gas cooler, houses up to 91 candle-type filter elements. They're currently used in the development of candle filters that can efficiently remove particulates at varying temperatures, using low-cost materials and innovative design.

85

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050. Lawrence Berkeley2009. World Energy Outlook 2009. Paris: OECD Publishing.Future Energy and Emissions Outlook Nina Zheng, Nan Zhou and

Zheng, Nina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Long-term care and the elderly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term care expenditures represent one of the largest uninsured financial risks facing the elderly. Medicaid provides incomplete insurance against these costs: unlimited nursing home benefits with a deductible equal to ...

Coe, Norma B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Outlook For NY Energy Forum October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Agenda * Winter Fuels Outlook * Drilling Productivity Report * Geopolitical...

88

Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites presents a comprehensive knowledge-set of matrix, fiber and interphase behavior under long-term aging conditions, theoretical modeling and experimental methods.This bookcovers long-term constituent ...

Kishore V. Pochiraju; Gyaneshwar P. Tandon; Gregory A. Schoeppner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Key Energy Issues to 2020 | Economic Growth | Energy Prices | Energy Consumption | Energy Intensity | Electricity Generation | Energy Production and Imports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions Key Energy Issues to 2020 Over the past year, energy markets have been extremely volatile, with high prices for oil and natural gas and concerns for energy shortages earlier in the year giving way to an economic slowdown and lower prices following the September terrorist attacks in the United States. Those events are incorporated in the short-term projections for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002), but long-term volatility in energy markets is not expected to result from their impacts or from the impacts of such future events as supply disruptions or severe weather. AEO2002 focuses on long-term events,

90

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and...

91

Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Provides a blueprint for protecting...

92

Long-term Preservation and Management of Electronic Health ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term Data Preservation and Management of Electronic Health Records. ... Long-term Data Preservation and Management of EHRs Fact Sheet.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

93

Long-Term Preservation of Digital Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-Term Preservation of Digital Material { Building an Archive to Preserve Digital Cultural Heritage from the Internet by Andreas Aschenbrenner Digital information has become seemingly ubiquitous, as technology saturates all aspects of our life. Consequently, people become increasingly dependent on digital information and the Internet as a medium for gaining and exchanging information. At the same time, the structure and content of the Internet growingly mirrors society, making it an important part of our modern cultural heritage.

Andreas Aschenbrenner

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Carbon Emission Outlook to 2050. ” Berkeley, CA:of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings2 Sectoral Outlook and

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

International Energy Outlook - Table of Contents  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook International Energy Outlook EIA Glossary International Energy Outlook 2004 Report #: DOE/EIA-0484(2004) Release date: April 2004 Next release date: July 2005 The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S.projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Table of Contents Appendixes Highlights World Energy and Economic Outlook Outlook for Primary Energy Consumption Energy End Use Outlook for Carbon Dioxide Emissions World Economic Outlook Alternative Growth Case Trends in Energy Intensity

96

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Website: sequestration.mit.edu/pdf/MichaelHamilton_thesis_dec2009.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/analytical-framework-long-term-policy Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This report addresses obstacles to commercial deployment of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and provides policy recommendations for successful

97

Long-Term Wind Power Variability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

Wan, Y. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Designing indicators of long-term energy supply security. Energy research Centre of the Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report brings out results of a pre-study commissioned by the Netherlands Environmental Assessment agency, MNP. These are due to serve as inputs in the imminent Sustainability Outlook, being prepared by MNP and CPB. The authors thank Joop Oude Lohuis, Jacco Farla, Bert de Vries, and Detlef van Vuuren and co-reader Michiel van Werven for constructive input and comments. The ECN reference number of the present research activity is 7.7551. To our knowledge, so far amazingly little research work has been undertaken to construct meaningful indicators of long-run energy supply security for a particular nation or region. Currently, in addressing energy supply security, policy makers tend to emphasise short-term supply disruptions. In contrast, this pre-study accords with the broader Sustainability Outlook in considering the long-term perspective. This report starts with taking stock, in a concise way, of the official EU energy outlook and issues related to the opportunities to administer changes in the energy mix at the level of major energy use categories. Then a brief survey of relevant literature is made on long-term strategies to ensure survival of systems- be it biological, social, etc.- in an environment largely characterised by high uncertainty and a lot of unchartered territory. We

W. G. Van Arkel; M. G. Boots Acknowledgement

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Exploratory Long-Term Exploratory Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Batteries Battery Systems Applied Battery Research Long-Term Exploratory Research Ultracapacitors Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines

100

The symbiosis of carbon-dioxide sequestration and hydrogen fuel: what is its significance for the long-term global energy system. Final progress report July 1998 - July 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examined the implications of the ''fuel decarbonization/carbon sequestration'' strategy for the world energy system.

Socolow, Robert H.; Ogden, Joan M.; Williams, Robert H.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

Lippmann, M.J.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), 2009-07-28 SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological Research Site in Colorado), 2010-12-14 ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News SUMMER 2011 T he ORNL Distrib- uted Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and services useful i n e n v i r o n m e n t a l research. The ORNL D A A C c u r r e n t l y archives and distributes greater than 900 prod- ucts categorized as Field Campaign, Land Validation, Regional and Global, or Model Archive. Please visit us online at http://daac.ornl.gov for a comprehensive description of data, and tools available from the ORNL DAAC. Archived news can be found at http://daac.ornl.gov/ news.shtml. http://www.nasa.gov * Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Subsets

103

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

104

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

105

Los Alamos National Laboratory: About the Long-Term Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Long-Term Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability Strategy Integrate, measure and enhance The value of a long-term horizon is to consider the nature of environmental...

106

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why is a long-term strategy important? PreviousNext Why is a long-term strategy important? Because we protect the environment. That is our practice today, and it is our commitment...

107

Workshop on Long-Term Preservation & Management of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop on Long-term Preservation and Management of Electronic Health Records. Purpose: The expected outcomes of the workshop include: ...

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Slag Management System for Gasification Operations · Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC Operating Conditions · Advanced ...

109

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte In this paper, the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluates the projections published in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), (1) by comparing the projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1982 through the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 with actual historical values. A set of major consumption, production, net import, price, economic, and carbon dioxide emissions variables are included in the evaluation, updating similar papers from previous years. These evaluations also present the reasons and rationales for significant differences. The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an

110

Economic efficiency, IRPs and long term contracts  

SciTech Connect

There is no market failure that warrants utility regulation of the construction of new generating plants, the supply of energy efficiency or the purchase of fuel under contract. The natural monopoly problem applies to the distribution of electricity and gas, not to generation, energy conservation, or gas purchases. Utility regulation magnifies a market failure, which is the principal agent problem. Regulatory allowance of utilities signing long term fixed price contracts and undertaking conservation measures result in costs and risks being shifted to ratepayers that would not occur under competitive market conditions. Economic efficiency would be enhanced if cost of service regulation of electric and gas utilities were replaced by a competitive market process for the construction of new power plants, utility conservation programs and contracts to purchase fuel. Conservation measures could be supplied by energy service companies. Gas merchants could provide gas and energy conservation directly to ultimate customers, if they had access to LDC pipelines. With a competitive market established to sell gas and energy services, contracts and conservation measures would not require cost-of- service regulation.

Sutherland, R.J.

1993-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Name Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Implementation, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/61 Country Zambia UN Region Eastern Africa References Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study[1] Abstract The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. Overview "The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. The

112

Long-Term Stewardship Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. Long-Term Stewardship Study More Documents & Publications EIS-0226: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0226: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report

113

Long-Term Stewardship Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. Long-Term Stewardship Study More Documents & Publications Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Chairs Meeting - April 2010

114

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-Term Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Demonstration of Sorbent Enhancement Additive Technology for Mercury Control In this project, The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center...

115

EIS-0269: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0269:...

116

Long-term Planning and Investment for Transmission and Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and generating capacity. Long-term Planning and Investment for Transmission and Generation More Documents & Publications 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review -...

117

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with our workforce, sponsors, and public. We reduce our environmental risk through legacy cleanup, pollution prevention, and long-term sustainability programs." View document >...

118

Precipitates in Long Term Aging Al 5083 Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Precipitates in Long Term Aging Al 5083 Alloy. Author(s), Gaosong Yi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Gaosong Yi. Abstract Scope, Al 5083 alloy ...

119

Probabilistic Assessment of Long-Term Vault Durability in ...  

Probabilistic Forecast (GoldSim software) Short-term effect Long-term rate Failure time Results Vault thickness Sulfate attack depth Hypothetical ...

120

NETL: Gasification - Long-Term Refractory Durability Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System - Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems System - Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Long-Term Refractory Durability Tests National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center Transport Gasifier consists of an assembly of refractory-lined pipe that includes a mixing zone, a riser, a solids separation and collection unit, and a solids recycle section. By combining the use of strategically placed, precision instrumentation and monitoring controlled solids inventory and solids circulation with the ability to operate across a wide range of flow rates and adjustable process conditions, the facility is monitoring and measuring slag/refractory interactions and testing various materials for durability. New materials research and development results, provided to manufacturers, aims to improve gasifier availability and reduce costs associated with plant shut-downs for repairs. In the most severe slagging gasifiers, refractories can require replacement every three months, where the gasifier system is shut down for one to two weeks, costing millions of dollars.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2006 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

122

One: California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: AN IMPROVED POWER SITUATIONwas sluggish. An improved outlook for consumer spending inforecast compared with the outlook of UCLA's Anderson

Lieser, Tom K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The hyperspectral irradiometer, a new instrument for long-term and unattended field spectroscopy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable time series of vegetation optical properties are needed to improve the modeling of the terrestrial carbon budget with remote sensing data. This paper describes the development of an automatic spectral system able to collect continuous long-term in-field spectral measurements of spectral down-welling and surface reflected irradiance. The paper addresses the development of the system

M. Meroni; A. Barducci; S. Cogliati; F. Castagnoli; M. Rossini; L. Busetto; M. Migliavacca; E. Cremonese; M. Galvagno; R. Colombo; U. Morra di Cella

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(83/3Q) (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

125

Developing long-term stable product line architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Product lines are usually built for the long term in order to repay the initial investment. While long-term stable software systems are already hard, if they are developed individually, it is even harder for complete product lines. At the time a new ... Keywords: AUTOSAR, multi product lines, scoping, software architecture, software product lines

Christian Tischer; Birgit Boss; Andreas Müller; Andreas Thums; Rajneesh Acharya; Klaus Schmid

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Investigating self-reporting behavior in long-term studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-reporting techniques, such as data logging or a diary, are frequently used in long-term studies, but prone to subjects' forgetfulness and other sources of inaccuracy. We conducted a six-week self-reporting study on smartphone usage in order to investigate ... Keywords: application usage, long-term study, self-reporting, survey

Andreas Möller; Matthias Kranz; Barbara Schmid; Luis Roalter; Stefan Diewald

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Long-Term Changes in the Equatorial Pacific Trade Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past work has shown that surface zonal equatorial wind stress, zonally integrated from one side of the Pacific to the other, is the key variable for estimating long-term El Niño behavior in the eastern Pacific. The long-term behavior of this key ...

Allan J. Clarke; Anna Lebedev

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Learning about the world through long-term query logs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, we demonstrate the value of long-term query logs. Most work on query logs to date considers only short-term (within-session) query information. In contrast, we show that long-term query logs can be used to learn about the world we live ... Keywords: data mining, knowledge discovery, query logs, user behavior

Matthew Richardson

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Benefits Long-Term Benefits Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages A cermet waste package may improve the long-term performance of the YM repository by two mechanisms: reducing (1) the potential for nuclear criticality in the repository and (2) the long-term release rate of radionuclides from the waste package. In the natural environment, the centers of uranium ore deposits have remained intact for very long time periods while the outer edges of the ore deposit have degraded. A cermet waste package may operate in the same way. The sacrificial, slow degradation of the waste package and the DU oxide protects the SNF uranium dioxide in the interior of the package long after the package has failed. Page 2 of 4 Follow the link below to learn more about Cermets:

130

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center WELCOME TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP RESOURCE CENTER The purpose of this web site is to provide the public and the Department of Energy's (DOE) community with a variety of information resources for long-term stewardship (LTS) responsibilities. LTS includes the physical controls, institutions, information and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites or portions of sites where DOE has completed or plans to complete "cleanup" (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, corrective actions, removal actions and facility stabilization) and where legacy contamination will remain hazardous. The DOE's Legacy Management (LM) procedures for DOE sites

131

Environmental Management Long-Term Stewardship Transition Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after the completion of facility cleanup. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. This report describes the background of long-term stewardship and gives general guidance about considerations when ownership and/or responsibility of a site should be transferred to a long-term stewardship program. This guidance document will assist the U.S. Department of Energy in: (a) ensuring that the long-term stewardship program leads transition planning with respect to facility and site areas, and (b) describing the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete.

Kristofferson, Keith

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

133

Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance  

SciTech Connect

Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energy’s (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOE’s long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOE’s cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

Kristofferson, Keith

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

THE LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF DOUBLE WHITE DWARF MERGERS  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a model for the long-term evolution of the merger of two unequal mass C/O white dwarfs (WDs). After the dynamical phase of the merger, magnetic stresses rapidly redistribute angular momentum, leading to nearly solid-body rotation on a viscous timescale of 10{sup -4}-1 yr, long before significant cooling can occur. Due to heating during the dynamical and viscous phases, the less massive WD is transformed into a hot, slowly rotating, and radially extended envelope supported by thermal pressure. Following the viscous phase of evolution, the maximum temperature near the envelope base may already be high enough to begin off-center convective carbon burning. If not, Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction of the inner region of the envelope on a thermal timescale of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} yr compresses the base of the envelope, again yielding off-center burning. As a result, the long-term evolution of the merger remnant is similar to that seen in previous calculations: the burning shell diffuses inward over {approx}10{sup 4} yr, eventually yielding a high-mass O/Ne WD or a collapse to a neutron star, rather than a Type Ia supernova. During the cooling and shell-burning phases, the merger remnant radiates near the Eddington limit. Given the double WD merger rate of a few per 1000 yr, a few dozen of these {approx}10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} sources should exist in a Milky Way type galaxy. While the end result is similar to that of previous studies, the physical picture and the dynamical state of the matter in our model differ from previous work. Furthermore, substantial remaining uncertainties related to the convective structure near the photosphere and mass loss during the thermal evolution may significantly affect our conclusions. Thus, future work within the context of the physical model presented here is required to better address the eventual fate of double WD mergers, including those for which one or both of the components is a He WD.

Shen, Ken J.; Kasen, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Quataert, Eliot, E-mail: kenshen@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Exploratory Research Long-Term Exploratory Research Long-term research addresses the chemical instabilities that impede the development of advanced batteries. Researchers focus on synthesizing novel components into battery cells and determining failure modes, while maintaining strengths in materials synthesis and evaluation, advanced diagnostics, and improved electrochemical model development. Goals include developing a better understanding of why systems fail, creating models that predict system failure and permit system optimization, and investigating new and promising materials. The work concentrates on six research areas: Advanced cell chemistry, Non-carbonaceous anodes, New electrolytes, Novel cathode materials, Advanced diagnostics and analytical methods, and Phenomenological modeling.

136

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

electricity.gif (3233 bytes) electricity.gif (3233 bytes) Electricity continues to be the most rapidly growing form of energy consumption in the IEO99 projections. The strongest long-term growth in electricity consumption is projected for the developing countries of Asia. Long-term growth in electricity consumption is expected to be strongest in the developing economies of Asia, followed by Central and South America (Figure 64). In the reference case for the International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99), the projected growth rates for electricity consumption in the developing Asian nations average nearly 5 percent per year from 1996 to 2020 (Table 17). Electricity consumption growth in Central and South America is projected to exceed 4 percent between 1996 and 2020. The projected increases in electricity use are based on expectations of rapid

137

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. The federally-sponsored nuclear technology programs of the United States are almost exclusively the province of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The nuclear energy areas in DOE include, but are not limited to, R&D related to power reactors and the responsibility for the waste management system for final disposition of the spent fuel resulting from nuclear power reactors. Although a major use of nuclear technology is to supply energy for electricity production, the DOE has far broader roles regarding nuclear

138

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS IS DOE RESPONSIBLE FOR LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP IF DOE TRANSFERS PROPERTY TO A PUBLIC ENTITY? By Order from the Secretary of Energy, The DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration must comply with Order 454.1: Use of Institutional Controls, www.directives.doe.gov/directives/0454.1-APolicy/view. The Order requires DOE to maintain institutional controls as long as necessary to perform their intended protective purposes and to seek sufficient funds. DOE must also determine whether responsibility for required institutional controls on transferred property can be maintained by subsequent owners consistent with applicable law. If this implementation responsibility cannot be

139

Long-Term Stewardship Related Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication & Engagement » Long-Term Stewardship » Communication & Engagement » Long-Term Stewardship » Long-Term Stewardship Related Information Long-Term Stewardship Related Information DOE Orders & Policies DOE O 200.l - Information Management Program, 09/30/1996 DOE O 430.1B - Real Property Asset Management, 09/24/2003 DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, 11/29/2010 DOE O 458.1 Chg 2, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, 06/06/2011 DOE O 430.1B Chg 2, Real Property and Asset Management, 09/24/2003 DOE P 454.1 - Use of Institutional Controls, 04/09/2003 and Guidance DOE Home Page for Guidance and Resources for LTS-related Requirements DOE Documents - Transition from Cleanup to LTS Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact

140

Mo Type Phase in Long-Term Aged INCONEL Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FORMATION OF A PtzMo TYPE PHASE IN LONG-TERM AGED lNCONEL@ ALLOY 686. Michael G. ... formation of a low-temperature iutermetallic Pt*Mo type .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Long Term World Oil Supply - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Long-Term World Oil Supply Scenarios. The Future Is Neither as Bleak or Rosy as Some Assert. By. John H. Wood, Gary R. Long, David F. Morehouse Conventionally ...

142

Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

T. Haney R. VanHorn

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Long-Term Statistics and Extreme Waves of Sea Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model of sea storms for describing long-term statistics of extreme wave events is presented. The formulation generalizes Boccotti’s equivalent triangular storm model by describing an actual storm history in the form of a generic ...

Francesco Fedele; Felice Arena

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Insuring Long-Term Care in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term care expenditures constitute one of the largest uninsured financial risks facing the elderly in the United States and thus play a central role in determining the retirement security of elderly Americans. In this ...

Finkelstein, Amy

145

On Long-Term Net Flow over Great Bahama Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 398-day time series of middepth current measurements is combined with available wind and bottom pressure measurements and historical salinity data to characterize long-term net flow patterns over Great Bahama Bank between the Tongue of the ...

Ned P. Smith

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you with additional guidance for planning the transition of long-term response action management requirements to receiving Program Secretarial Offices ...

147

Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Site Transition Framework (STF) provides a framework for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and sites where DOE may have anticipated long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&...

148

Observed Long-Term Trends for Agroclimatic Conditions in Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of agroclimatic indices representing Canadian climatic conditions for field crop production are analyzed for long-term trends during 1895–2007. The indices are categorized for three crop types: cool season, warm season, and overwintering. ...

Budong Qian; Xuebin Zhang; Kai Chen; Yang Feng; Ted O’Brien

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Long-term outlook for nuclear generation depends on lifetime of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These projects are currently under construction. Overall generation from nuclear power grows by 14.3% from 2011 through 2040 (see chart below).

150

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000-Table 2. Carbon Emission  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Emission Factors Carbon Emission Factors (Kilograms-carbon per million Btu) Fuel Type Carbon Coefficient at Full Combustion Combustion Fraction Adjusted Emissions Factor Petroleum Motor Gasoline 19.33 0.990 19.14 Liquefied Petroleum Gas Used as Fuel 17.20 0.995 17.11 Used as Feedstock 16.87 0.200 3.37 Jet Fuel 19.33 0.990 19.14 Distillate Fuel 19.95 0.990 19.75 Residual Fuel 21.49 0.990 21.28 Asphalt and Road Oil 20.62 0.000 0.00 Lubricants 20.24 0.600 12.14 Petrochemical Feedstocks 19.37 0.200 3.87 Kerosene 19.72 0.990 19.52 Petroleum Coke 27.85 0.500 13.93 Petroleum Still Gas 17.51 0.995 17.42 Other Industrial 20.31 0.990 20.11 Coal Residential and Commercial 25.92 0.990 25.66 Metallurgical 25.55 0.990 25.29 Industrial Other 25.61 0.990 25.39 Electric Utility1 25.74 0.990 24.486 Natural Gas Used as Fuel

151

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 2. Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors (Kilograms-carbon equivalent per million Btu) Fuel Type Carbon Dioxide Coefficient at Full Combustion Combustion Fraction Adjusted Emissions Factor Petroleum Motor Gasoline 19.36 0.990 19.17 Liquefied Petroleum Gas Used as Fuel 17.18 0.995 17.09 Used as Feedstock 16.88 0.200 3.38 Jet Fuel 19.33 0.990 19.14 Distillate Fuel 19.95 0.990 19.75 Residual Fuel 21.49 0.990 21.28 Asphalt and Road Oil 20.62 0.000 0.00 Lubricants 20.24 0.600 12.14 Petrochemical Feedstocks 19.37 0.200 3.87 Kerosene 19.72 0.990 19.52 Petroleum Coke 27.85 0.500 13.93 Petroleum Still Gas 17.51 0.995 17.42 Other Industrial 20.31 0.990 20.11 Coal Residential and Commercial 26.00 0.990 25.74 Metallurgical 25.56 0.990 25.30 Industrial Other 25.63 0.990 25.38 Electric Utility1 25.76 0.990 25.50 Natural Gas

152

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), and the U.S. projections that appear in the IEO are consistent with those published in the AEO. World energy consumption in this year's IEO2000 is projected to

153

International Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 with projections to 2020 March 16, 2000 Jay E. Hakes Energy Information Administration Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Today, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) releases its mid-term projections of international energy use and carbon emissions, published in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000). The IEO2000 report provides an assessment of world energy markets with projections of regional energy consumption, energy consumption by primary fuel, electricity consumption, carbon emissions, nuclear generating capacity, international coal trade flows, and energy use in the transportation sector. World oil production projections are also included in the report. The report is an extension of EIA's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO),

154

International energy outlook 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and economic outlook, followed by energy consumption by end-use sector. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas, world coal market and electricity consumption and supply are then discussed. The final chapter covers energy-related carbon dioxide emissions.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Study of long term options for electric vehicle air conditioning  

SciTech Connect

There are strong incentives in terms of national energy and environmental policy to encourage the commercialization of electrically powered vehicles in the U.S. Among these incentives are reduced petroleum consumption, improved electric generation capacity utilization, reduced IC engine emissions, and, depending on the primary fuel used for electric power generation, reduced emissions of carbon dioxide. A basic requirement for successfully commercializing any motor vehicle in the US is provision of adequate passenger comfort heating and air conditioning (cooling). Although air conditioning is generally sold as optional equipment, in excess of 80% of the automobiles and small trucks sold in the US have air conditioning systems. In current, pre-commercial electric vehicles, comfort heating is provided by a liquid fuel fired heater that heats water which is circulated through the standard heater core in the conventional interior air handling unit. Air conditioning is provided by electric motor driven compressors, installed in a system having, perhaps, an {open_quotes}upsized{close_quotes} condenser and a standard evaporator (front and rear evaporators in some instances) installed in the conventional interior air handler. Although this approach is adequate in the near term for initial commercialization efforts, a number of shortcomings of this arrangement, as well as longer range concerns need to be addressed. In this project, the long term alternatives for cooling and heating electric vehicles effectively, efficiently (with minimum range penalties), and without adverse environmental impacts have been examined. Identification of options that can provide both heating and cooling is important, in view of the disadvantages of carrying separate heating and cooling systems in the vehicle.

Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Study of long term options for electric vehicle air conditioning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are strong incentives in terms of national energy and environmental policy to encourage the commercialization of electrically powered vehicles in the U.S. Among these incentives are reduced petroleum consumption, improved electric generation capacity utilization, reduced IC engine emissions, and, depending on the primary fuel used for electric power generation, reduced emissions of carbon dioxide. A basic requirement for successfully commercializing any motor vehicle in the US is provision of adequate passenger comfort heating and air conditioning (cooling). Although air conditioning is generally sold as optional equipment, in excess of 80% of the automobiles and small trucks sold in the US have air conditioning systems. In current, pre-commercial electric vehicles, comfort heating is provided by a liquid fuel fired heater that heats water which is circulated through the standard heater core in the conventional interior air handling unit. Air conditioning is provided by electric motor driven compressors, installed in a system having, perhaps, an [open quotes]upsized[close quotes] condenser and a standard evaporator (front and rear evaporators in some instances) installed in the conventional interior air handler. Although this approach is adequate in the near term for initial commercialization efforts, a number of shortcomings of this arrangement, as well as longer range concerns need to be addressed. In this project, the long term alternatives for cooling and heating electric vehicles effectively, efficiently (with minimum range penalties), and without adverse environmental impacts have been examined. Identification of options that can provide both heating and cooling is important, in view of the disadvantages of carrying separate heating and cooling systems in the vehicle.

Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy reve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroelectric power provides a cheap source of electricity with few carbon emissions. Yet, reservoirs are not operated sustainably, which we define as meeting societal needs for water and power while protecting long-term health of the river ecosystem. Reservoirs that generate hydropower are typically operated with the goal of maximizing energy revenue, while meeting other legal water requirements. Reservoir optimization schemes used in practice do not seek flow regimes that maximize aquatic ecosystem health. Here, we review optimization studies that considered environmental goals in one of three approaches. The first approach seeks flow regimes that maximize hydropower generation, while satisfying legal requirements, including environmental (or minimum) flows. Solutions from this approach are often used in practice to operate hydropower projects. In the second approach, flow releases from a dam are timed to meet water quality constraints on dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature and nutrients. In the third approach, flow releases are timed to improve the health of fish populations. We conclude by suggesting three steps for bringing multi-objective reservoir operation closer to the goal of ecological sustainability: (1) conduct research to identify which features of flow variation are essential for river health and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health and (3) develop optimal control softwares that combine water balance modelling with models that predict ecosystem responses to flow.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts (Connecticut) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts (Connecticut) United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate $325.50 per ZREC; $200 per LREC Program Info Funding Source RPS Start Date 05/01/2012 State Connecticut Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider The United Illuminating Company Note: The deadline for the second request for proposals (RFP) under this program is June 13, 2013.

159

Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 2007 State Ontario Program Type Climate Policies Industry Recruitment/Support Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Provider Ontario Ministry of Energy Currently, Ontario's electricity system has a capacity of approximately 35,000 MW of power. The Ontario Power Authority forecasts that more than 15,000 MW will need to be renewed, replaced or added by 2030.

160

Annual Energy Outlook 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Annual Energy Outlook 2001 With Projections to 2020 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2001 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses the macroeconomic projections, world oil and natural gas markets, oxygenates in gasoline, distributed electricity generation, electricity industry restructuring, and carbon dioxide emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Outlook [Caring About Places...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donlyn Lyndon editor Outlook James F. Fulton publisher T o dn w h i c h they join — outlook or lookout — carries subtlydesign assistant watchman. Outlook becomes a point of view,

Lyndon, Donlyn

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030, based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2009 reference case in December 2008.

None

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Long-Term Stability of Some Barometric Pressure Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of Pressure sensors have been tested in the laboratory for accuracy and long-term stability. The Paroscientific 215-AT, Rosemount 1201 FIB, and Setra 270 were found to be the most accurate, maintaining 0.1-mb accuracy over long periods. ...

Richard E. Payne

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Software architecture awareness in long-term software product evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software architecture has been established in software engineering for almost 40 years. When developing and evolving software products, architecture is expected to be even more relevant compared to contract development. However, the research results ... Keywords: Architecture knowledge management, Cooperative and human aspects, Long-term evolution, Qualitative empirical studies, Software architecture, Software products

Hataichanok Unphon; Yvonne Dittrich

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

IAEA-TECDOC-1403 The long term stabilization of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................ 265 S.V. Mikheykin ANNEX XII. UKRAINE: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEASURES TO BE TAKEN FOR LONG TERM ................................................................... 281 G. Maslyakov ANNEX XIII. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEASURES range of technical measures can be employed to prevent or reduce the extent of these processes. Capping

166

Long-term fuzzy management of water resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present context of water resource scarcity, a complete approach for long-term storage/transfer/distribution system management is proposed. The main management objective of such a kind of system is to manage reserves and releases so as to minimize ... Keywords: fuzzy logic, modeling, optimization, water resource management

Roger Marcelin Faye; Salam Sawadogo; Claude Lishou; Félix Mora-Camino

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Long-Term Wind Speed Trends over Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of long-term linear trends of wind speed provide a useful indicator for circulation changes in the atmosphere and are invaluable for the planning and financing of sectors such as wind energy. Here a large number of wind ...

Alberto Troccoli; Karl Muller; Peter Coppin; Robert Davy; Chris Russell; Annette L. Hirsch

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Long-Term Ice Variability in Arctic Marginal Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of records of fast ice thickness (1936–2000) and ice extent (1900–2000) in the Kara, Laptev, East Siberian, and Chukchi Seas provide evidence that long-term ice thickness and extent trends are small and generally not statistically ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Genrikh V. Alekseev; Roman V. Bekryaev; Uma S. Bhatt; Roger Colony; Mark A. Johnson; Valerii P. Karklin; David Walsh; Alexander V. Yulin

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Long-term Stock Market Forecasting using Gaussian Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Address3 email4 Abstract5 Forecasting stock market prices is an attractive topic to researchers from6 to analyze18 and forecast stock prices and index changes. The accuracy of these techniques is still an19-term predictions in stock prices.32 33 1.2 Motivation34 In stock market, investors need long-term forecasting

de Freitas, Nando

170

Idaho National Laboratory Site Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has established long-term stewardship programs to protect human health and the environment at sites where residual contamination remains after site cleanup. At the Idaho National Laboratory Site, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERLA) long-term stewardship activities performed under the aegis of regulatory agreements, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for the Idaho National Laboratory, and state and federal requirements are administered primarily under the direction of the Idaho Cleanup Project. It represents a subset of all on-going environmental activity at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. This plan provides a listing of applicable CERCLA long-term stewardship requirements and their planned and completed implementation goals. It proffers the Long-Term Stewardship Environmental Data Warehouse for Sitewide management of environmental data. This plan will be updated as needed over time, based on input from the U.S. Department of Energy, its cognizant subcontractors, and other local and regional stakeholders.

B. E. Olaveson

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Guidelines: Long-Term Layup of Fossil Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Placing fossil units into long-term layup for several years requires protective measures beyond those commonly used for short periods.Guidelines developed and demonstrated by Florida Power & Light Company show how to prevent equipment deterioration during long shutdown periods and how to subsequently reactivate the units.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

173

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 - DRAFT - June 12, 2012 1 Table B1. Total energy...

174

Annual Energy Outlook  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4) January 2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 With Projections to 2025 January 2004 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) was prepared by the Energy...

175

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

176

Long-Term Demonstration of Sorbent Enhancement Additive Technology for Mercury Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT enhancemenT aDDiTive TechnoLogy for mercury conTroL Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The combustion of subbituminous coals typically results in higher fractions of elemental mercury emissions than the combustion of bituminous coals. This complicates mercury capture efforts, particularly for technologies using powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection, because elemental mercury is not readily captured by PAC injection alone. In short, unmodified PACs are better suited for bituminous coals than for subbituminous coals. Various proprietary sorbent enhancement additives (SEA) have been developed to increase the mercury reactivity of PACs, and perhaps fly

177

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint Research and Development Plan Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation's

178

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook For NASEO Winter Fuels Outlook Conference November 1, 2013| Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA works closely...

179

The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-Term Monthly Temperature,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-Term Monthly Temperature, The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-Term Monthly Temperature, Precipitation, Sea Level Pressure, and Station Pressure Data (1992) (NDP-041) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.ndp041 data Data PDF PDF File graphics NDP-041 Temperature Stations graphics NDP-041 Precipitation Stations Please note: the latest version of the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) is available directly from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. Investigators R. S. Vose, R. L. Schmoyer, P. M. Steurer, T. C. Peterson, R. Heim, T. R. Karl, and J. K. Eischeid This NDP contains monthly temperature, precipitation, sea-level pressure, and station-pressure data for thousands of meteorological stations worldwide. The database was compiled from pre-existing national, regional, and global collections of data as part of the Global Historical Climatology

180

Measurement strategies for estimating long-term average wind speeds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainty and bias in estimates of long-term average wind speeds inherent in continuous and intermittent measurement strategies are examined by simulating the application of the strategies to 40 data sets. Continuous strategies have smaller uncertainties for fixed duration measurement programs, but intermittent strategies make more efficient use of instruments and have smaller uncertainties for a fixed amount of instrument use. Continuous strategies tend to give biased estimates of the long-term annual mean speed unless an integral number of years' data is collected or the measurement program exceeds 3 years in duration. Intermittent strategies with three or more month-long measurement periods per year do not show any tendency toward bias.

Ramsdell, J.V.; Houston, S.; Wegley, H.L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Samish Indian Nation Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Tribes strategic energy planning effort is divided into three phases: (1) Completing an Energy Resource Assessment; (2) Developing a Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan; and (3) Preparing a Strategic Energy Implementation Plan for the Samish Homelands. The Samish Indian Nation developed a comprehensive Strategic Energy plan to set policy for future development on tribal land that consists of a long-term, integrated, systems approach to providing a framework under which the Samish Community can use resources efficiently, create energy-efficient infrastructures, and protect and enhance quality of life. Development of the Strategic Energy plan will help the Samish Nation create a healthy community that will sustain current and future generations by addressing economic, environmental, and social issues while respecting the Samish Indian Nation culture and traditions.

Christine Woodward; B. Beckley; K. Hagen

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Preparing Class B and C Waste for Long Term Storage  

SciTech Connect

Commercial Nuclear Generating Stations outside of the Atlantic Compact will lose access to the Barnwell Disposal Facility in July of 2008. Many generators have constructed Interim On-Site Storage Buildings (IOSB) in which to store class B and C waste in the future as other permanent disposal options are developed. Until such time it is important for these generators to ensure class B and C waste generation is minimized and waste generated is packaged to facilitate long term storage. (authors)

Snyder, M.W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District - Rancho Seco (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Static Equilibrium: Forecasting Long-Term Energy Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a static equilibrium model that can be used by power companies to analyze retirement and investment decisions. Given deterministic expectations of prices, technology alternatives, and growth rates, the model defines a long-term equilibrium for an electricity market that can be used as a practical starting point for analyzing dynamic equilibrium, the distribution of outcomes associated with investment and retirement in a probabilistic world. The report includes a spreadsheet that ca...

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization: South Africa Department of Environment Affairs and Tourism Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Scenario_team-LTMS_Scenarios Country: South Africa Southern Africa Coordinates: -30.559482°, 22.937506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-30.559482,"lon":22.937506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2007 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

186

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2008 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2008 (IEO2008) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2008 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

187

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

BIOFILTRATION OF VOLATILE POLLUTANTS: Fundamental Mechanisms for Improved Design, Long-term Operation, Prediction, and Implementation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biofiltration systems can be used for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs); however, the systems are poorly understood and are normally operated as ''black boxes''. Common operational problems associated with biofilters include fouling, deactivation, and overgrowth, all of which make them ineffective for continuous, long-term use. The objective of this investigation was to develop generic methods for long-term stable operation, in particular by using selective limitation of supplemental nutrients while maintaining high activity. As part of this effort, we have provided a deeper fundamental understanding of the important biological and transport mechanisms in biodestruction of sparingly soluble VOCs and have extended this approach and mathematical models to additional systems of high priority EM relevance--direct degradation and cometabolic degradation of priority pollutants such as BTEX and chlorinated organics. Innovative aspects of this project included development of a user-friendly two-dimensional predictive model/program for MS Windows 95/98/2000 to elucidate mass transfer and kinetic limitations in these systems, isolation of a unique microorganism capable of using sparingly soluble organic and chloroorganic VOCs as its sole carbon and energy source, and making long-term growth possible by successfully decoupling growth and degradation metabolisms in operating trickle bed bioreactors.

Davison,Brian H.

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance

190

Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2013 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth Issues In Focus. Outlook for Labor Productivity Growth The AEO2004 reference case economic forecast is a projection of possible economic growth, from the short term to the longer term, in a consistent framework that stresses demand factors in the short term and supply factors in the long term [33]. Productivity is perhaps the most important concept for the determination of employment, inflation, and supply of output in the long term. Productivity is a measure of economic efficiency that shows how effectively economic inputs are converted into output. Advances in productivity—that is, the ability to produce more with the same or less input—are a significant source of increased potential national income. The U.S. economy has been able to produce more goods and services over time, not only by requiring a proportional increase of labor time but also by making production more efficient. To illustrate the importance of productivity improvements, on the eve of the American Revolution, U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) per capita stood at approximately $765 (in 1992 dollars) [34]. Incomes rose dramatically over the next two centuries, propelled upward by the Industrial Revolution, and by 2002 GDP per capita had grown to $30,000 (1992 dollars). Productivity improvements played a major role in the increase in per capita GDP growth.

192

Density Forecasting for Long-Term Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term electricity demand forecasting plays an important role in planning for future generation facilities and transmission augmentation. In a long-term context, planners must adopt a probabilistic view of potential peak demand levels. Therefore density forecasts (providing estimates of the full probability distributions of the possible future values of the demand) are more helpful than point forecasts, and are necessary for utilities to evaluate and hedge the financial risk accrued by demand variability and forecasting uncertainty. This paper proposes a new methodology to forecast the density of long-term peak electricity demand. Peak electricity demand in a given season is subject to a range of uncertainties, including underlying population growth, changing technology, economic conditions, prevailing weather conditions (and the timing of those conditions), as well as the general randomness inherent in individual usage. It is also subject to some known calendar effects due to the time of day, day of week, time of year, and public holidays. A comprehensive forecasting solution is described in this paper. First, semi-parametric additive models are used to estimate the relationships between demand and the driver variables, including temperatures, calendar effects and some demographic and economic variables. Then the demand distributions are forecasted by using a mixture of temperature simulation, assumed future economic scenarios, and residual bootstrapping. The temperature simulation is implemented through a new seasonal bootstrapping method with variable blocks. The proposed methodology has been used to forecast the probability distribution of annual and weekly peak electricity demand for South Australia since 2007. The performance of the methodology is evaluated by comparing the forecast results with the actual demand of the summer 2007–2008.

Rob J. Hyndman; Shu Fan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technology base studies of long-term MCFC performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project aims to identify the long-term endurance problems of the MCFC by investigating corrosion of stainless steel (310, 316L). This presentation focuses on results from SEM and cross-section analysis. Significant differences between immersed and film-wetted electrodes are summarized. Results suggest that pre-oxidation can be a solution to obtaining a compact oxide layer. Adding Al to alloy leads to a very stable oxide layer, but increases resistivity. Alloy behavior must be investigated under continuously polarized conditions. 4 figs.

Selman, J.R.; Yazici, M.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Corrosion of Spent Nuclear Fuel: The Long-Term Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel, essentially U{sub 2}, accounts for over 95% of the total radioactivity of all of the radioactive wastes in the United States that require disposal, disposition or remediation. The UO{sub 2} in SNF is not stable under oxiding conditions and may also be altered under reducing conditions. The alteration of SNF results in the formation of new uranium phases that can cause the release or retardation of actinide and fission product radionuclides. Over the long term, and depending on the extent to which the secondary uranium phases incorporate fission products and actinides, these alteration phases become the near-field source term.

Rodney C. Ewing

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. This analysis quantifies the relative merit of various technological advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors and presents them graphically as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. Substantial annual energy gains (exceeding 50% at 350/sup 0/C) are shown to be attainable with improved parabolic troughs.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Sensors for environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship.  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys the needs associated with environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship. Emerging sensor technologies are reviewed to identify compatible technologies for various environmental monitoring applications. The contaminants that are considered in this report are grouped into the following categories: (1) metals, (2) radioisotopes, (3) volatile organic compounds, and (4) biological contaminants. Regulatory drivers are evaluated for different applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements are derived from these regulatory metrics. Sensor capabilities are then summarized according to contaminant type, and the applicability of the different sensors to various environmental monitoring applications is discussed.

Miller, David Russell; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Davis, Mary Jo (Science Applications International Corporation, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,511 1,563 1,686 1,793 1,888 1,987 2,114 2,233 1.2 United States a 1,222 1,266 1,357 1,404 1,431 1,468 1,528 1,570 0.7 Canada 170 162 171 199 223 240 255 271 1.7 Mexico/Chile 119 135 158 190 234 279 331 392 3.6 OECD Europe 1,024 1,082 1,086 1,123 1,144 1,215 1,277 1,348 0.7 OECD Asia 347 377 408 438 478 505 539 561 1.3 Japan 205 215 242 257 276 288 293 293 1.0 South Korea 72 90 91 98 110 117 136 148 1.7 Australia/NewZealand 70 71 75 83 91 101 110 119 1.7 Total OECD 2,882 3,022 3,180 3,353 3,510

198

One: The California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Christopher Thornberg,signs of having peaked. The outlook for 2006 is dominated by

Thornberg, Christopher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model's parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Hwang, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model`s parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Hwang, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Long-Term Inflow And Structural Test Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Long-term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program is collecting long-term, continuous inflow and structural response data to characterize the extreme loads on wind turbines. A heavily instrumented Micon 65/13M turbine with SERI 8-m blades is being used as the first test turbine for this program. This turbine and its two sister turbines are located in Bushland, TX, a test site that exposes the turbines to a wind regime that is representative of a Great Plains commercial site. The turbines and their inflow are being characterized with 60 measurements: 34 to characterize the inflow, 19 to characterize structural response, and 7 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. The primary characterization of the inflow into the LIST turbine relies upon an array of five sonic anemometers. Primary characterization of the structural response of the turbine uses several sets of strain gauges to measure bending loads on the blades and the tower and two accelerometers to measure the motion of the nacelle. Data from the various instruments are sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using a newly developed data acquisition system that features a time-synchronized continuous data stream that is telemetered from the turbine rotor. The data, taken continuously, are automatically divided into 10-minute segments and archived for analysis. Preliminary data are presented to illustrate the operation of the turbine and the data acquisition and analysis system.

Herbert J. Sutherland; Perry L. Jones; Byron A. Neal

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Long-term safety issues associated with mixer pump operation  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we examine several long-term issues: the effect of pump operation on future gas release events (GREs), uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion. Heat load in excess of the design limit, uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion have been shown not to be safety concerns. The effect of pump operation on future GREs could not be quantified. The problem with evaluating the long-term effects of pump operation on GREs is a lack of knowledge and uncertainty. In particular, the phenomena governing gas retention, particle size distribution, and settling are not well understood, nor are the interactions among these factors understood. There is a possibility that changes in these factors could increase the size of future GREs. Bounding estimates of the potential increase in size of GREs are not possible because of a lack of engineering data. Proper management of the hazards can reduce, but not eliminate, the possibility of undesirable changes. Maintaining temperature within the historical limits can reduce the possibility of undesirable changes. A monitoring program to detect changes in the gas composition and crust thickness will help detect slowly occurring changes. Because pump operation has be shown to eliminate GREs, continued pump operation can eliminate the hazards associated with future GREs.

Kubic, W.L. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Long-term global nuclear energy and fuel cycle strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Vision Project is examining, using scenario building techniques, a range of long-term nuclear energy futures. The exploration and assessment of optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies is an essential element of the study. To this end, an established global E{sup 3} (energy/economics/environmental) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed using this multi-regional E{sup 3} model, wherein future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term demographic (population, workforce size and productivity), economic (price-, population-, and income-determined demand for energy services, price- and population-modified GNP, resource depletion, world-market fossil energy prices), policy (taxes, tariffs, sanctions), and top-level technological (energy intensity and end-use efficiency improvements) drivers. Using the framework provided by the global E{sup 3} model, the impacts of both external and internal drivers are investigated. The ability to connect external and internal drivers through this modeling framework allows the study of impacts and tradeoffs between fossil- versus nuclear-fuel burning, that includes interactions between cost, environmental, proliferation, resource, and policy issues.

Krakowski, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Emissions Figure 103. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035 Figure 104. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 105. U.S.energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel in IEO2009 and IEO2010, 2007, 2015, and 2035 Figure 106. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 107. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the Non-OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 108. World carbon dioxide emissions from liquids combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 109. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 110. World carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion, 1990-2035

205

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). EIA published an “early release” version of the AEO2008 reference case in December 2007; however, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), which was enacted later that month, will have a major impact on energy markets, and given the year-long life of AEO2008 and its use as a baseline for analyses of proposed policy changes, EIA decided to update the reference case to reflect the provisions of EISA2007.

206

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Outlook Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans Tancred Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Supply and Demand 3. Ethanol Supply 4. Gasoline Supply 5. Gasoline Prices A. Long-Term Equilibrium Price Analysis B. Short-Term Price Volatility 6. Conclusion 7. Appendix A. Estimating MTBE Consumption by State 8. Appendix B. MTBE Imports and Exports 9. Appendix C. Glossary of Terms 10. End Notes 11. References 1. Summary The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year. Three impending State bans on MTBE blending could significantly affect gasoline

207

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing National Security Science while Protecting the Environment Advancing National Security Science while Protecting the Environment Los Alamos Field Office Vision Juan Griego, Acting Manager Juan Griego, Acting Manager The National Nuclear Security Administration is committed to stewardship of the Nation's and New Mexico's resources. I take that responsibility personally and I ensure that everything the Los Alamos Site Office does to support the Los Alamos National Laboratory's mission has environmental protection and stewardship fully considered. As a result, I challenged LANL to integrate environmental protection activities into a comprehensive, long-term execution strategy. The intent of this effort is to take control of LANL's future and set the standard for environmental stewardship for all of New Mexico. The mission performance of the Laboratory depends on many factors,

208

LONG-TERM TRENDS IN SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies indicate that a maximum field strength in sunspots shows a gradual decrease over the last several years. By extrapolating this trend, Penn and Livingston proposed that sunspots may completely disappear in the not-so-distant future. To verify these recent findings, we employ historic synoptic data sets from seven observatories in the former USSR covering the period from 1957 to 2011 (from 1998 to 2011, observations were taken at only one observatory). Our results indicate that while sunspot field strengths rise and wane with solar cycle, there is not a long-term trend that would suggest a gradual decrease in sunspot magnetic fields over the four and a half solar cycles covered by these observations.

Pevtsov, Alexei A. [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Nagovitsyn, Yury A.; Rybak, Alexey L. [Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Tlatov, Andrey G., E-mail: apevtsov@nso.edu, E-mail: nag@gao.spb.edu, E-mail: tlatov@mail.ru [Kislovodsk Solar Station of Pulkovo Observatory, Kislovodsk 357700 (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Implications for Long Term Uraninite Stability and Bioremediation Scheme Implementation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to study the reoxidation of biologically precipitated U(IV). Several experiments were performed and are summarized below. These experiments include: (1) a long-term (~200 days) U(VI) reduction experiment under low sulfate conditions in order to study in detail changes in iron phases and biomass and determine how they affect/buffer reoxidation; (2) a short term (~70 days) experiment where we tracked the uranium profile via XANES prior to reoxidation and during reoxidation in order to determine the U speciation; (3) a short term experiment where we compare the oxidation of U(IV) by oxygen and nitrate in the absence of FeS; and (4) a short term experiment where we compare the oxidation of U(IV) by oxygen and nitrate in the presence of FeS precipitates.

Peter R Jaffe

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

New look at long-term collector performance and utilizability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple technique has been developed to calculate monthly collection efficiency or monthly utilizability for solar thermal flat-plate and concentrating generic collectors. It is applicable to collectors operating with a fixed fluid inlet temperature although extensions to other more generalized uses of utilizability are discussed. The heart of the technique consists of empirically determined performance maps that make possible quick evaluations of changes in collector design, geographic location and collector inlet temperature. The collector input variables are those that are commonly measured in most thermal test procedures; geographic input variables are the mean monthly temperature and K/sub T/ (the Liu and Jordan clearness factor). The method, in general, gives good results compared to long term hourly simulation. The technique also allows one to determine under what operating conditions collector performance begins to depend on site-to-site solar radiation/weather variability and what uncertainties can be expected from its use.

Evans, D.L.; Rule, T.T.; Wood, B.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Long-term variation in distribution of sunspot groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the relation between the distribution of sunspot groups and the Gleissberg cycle. As the magnetic field is related to the area of the sunspot groups, we used area-weighted sunspot group data. On the one hand, we confirm the previously reported long-term cyclic behaviour of the sum of the northern and southern sunspot group mean latitudes, although we found a somewhat longer period (P~104 years). We introduced the difference between the ensemble average area of sunspot groups for the two hemispheres, which turns out to show similar behaviour. We also investigated a further aspect of the Gleissberg cycle where while in the 19th century the consecutive Schwabe cycles are sharply separated from each other, one century later the cycles overlap each other more and more.

Forgacs-Dajka, E; Borkovits, T

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Long-Term Field Monitoring of an EIFS Clad Wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A popular retrofit option is to install an exterior insulation finish system to the walls of existing buildings. This study evaluates the thermal and moisture performance of such a system with a vented wall assembly. In addition to being a case study, this field monitoring was intended to verify computation methods of building envelope performance. The long term monitoring was designed to be non-destructive so that the building envelope performance is not affected by the measurements that are made, and to allow easy removal of sensors for recalibration and retrieval at the end of the test period. The field monitoring is planned for two years to capture a wide range of environmental conditions. This paper discusses the instrumentation used in the study and presents interim results of the thermal resistance of the wall and surface moisture.

Nady Sad William; M. Nady; A. Saïd; William C. Brown; Iain S. Walker

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Long-Term Inflow and Structural Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Long-term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program is collecting long-term, continuous inflow and structural response data to characterize the extreme loads on wind turbines. A heavily instrumented Micon 65/13M turbine with SERI 8-m blades is being used as the first test turbine for this test program. This turbine and its two sister turbines are located in Bushland, TX a test site that exposes the turbines to a wind regime that is representative of a Great Plains commercial site. The turbines and their inflow are being characterized with 60 measurements: 34 to characterize the inflow, 19 to characterize structural response, and 7 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. The primary characterization of the inflow into the LIST turbine relies upon an array of five sonic anemometers. These three-axis anemometers are placed approximately 2-diameters upstream of the turbine in a pattern designed to describe the inflow. Primary characterization of the structural response of the turbine uses several sets of strain gauges to measure bending loads on the blades and the tower and two accelerometers to measure the motion of the nacelle. Data from the various instruments are sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using a newly developed data acquisition system that features a time-synchronized continuous data stream that is telemetered from the turbine rotor. The data, taken continuously, are automatically divided into 10-minute segments and archived for analysis. Preliminary data are presented to illustrate the operation of the turbine and the data acquisition and analysis system.

SUTHERLAND,HERBERT J; JONES,PERRY L.; NEAL,BYRON A.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

Structure Function Analysis of Long Term Quasar Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of ~40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts / flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

W. H. de Vries; R. H. Becker; R. L. White; C. Loomis

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

215

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) AD - Associated/dissolved natural gas AEO98 - Annual Energy Outlook 1998 AEO99 - Annual Energy Outlook 1999 AFVs - Alternative-fuel vehicles AGA - American Gas Association API - American Petroleum Institute BTAB - BT Alex Brown CAAA90 - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CCAP - Climate Change Action Plan CDM - Clean Development Mechanism CFCs - Chlorofluorocarbons CNG - Compressed natural gas CO - Carbon monoxide CO2 - Carbon dioxide DOE - U.S. Department of Energy DRI - DRI/McGraw-Hill EIA - Energy Information Administration EOR - Enhanced oil recovery EPA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT - Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE - Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EU - European Union FERC - Federal Energy Regulatory Commission GDP - Gross domestic product

216

International energy outlook 1998  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Data Acquisition for Low-Temperature Well Tests and Long-Term...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACQUISITION FOR LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL TESTS AND LONG-TERM MONITORING DATA ACQUISITION FOR LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL TESTS AND LONG-TERM MONITORING Prepared For:...

218

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation Title Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 -...

219

Long-term Energy Supply Contracts in European Competition Policy: Fuzzy not Crazy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term supply contracts often have ambiguous effects on the competitive structure, investment and consumer welfare in the long term. In a context of market building, these effects are likely to be worsened and thus even ...

Glachant, Jean-Michel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Zambia : long-term generation expansion study - executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. The analysis involved the hydro operations studies of the Zambezi river basin and the systems planning studies for the least-cost generation expansion planning. Two well-known and widely accepted computer models were used in the analysis: PC-VALORAGUA model for the hydro operations and optimization studies and the WASP-III Plus model for the optimization of long-term system development. The WASP-III Plus model is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory's Energy and Power Evaluation Model (ENPEP). The analysis was conducted in close collaboration with the Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO). On the initiative from The World Bank, the sponsor of the study, ZESCO formed a team of experts that participated in the analysis and were trained in the use of computer models. Both models were transferred to ZESCO free of charge and installed on several computers in the ZESCO corporate offices in Lusaka. In September-October 1995, two members of the ZESCO National Team participated in a 4-week training course at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, U.S.A., focusing on the long-term system expansion planning using the WASP and VALORAGUA models. The hydropower operations studies were performed for the whole Zambezi river basin, including the full installation of the Kariba power station, and the Cahora Bassa hydro power station in Mozambique. The analysis also included possible future projects such as Itezhi-Tezhi, Kafue Gorge Lower, and Batoka Gorge power stations. As hydropower operations studies served to determine the operational characteristics of the existing and future hydro power plants, it was necessary to simulate the whole Zambezi river basin in order to take into account all interactions and mutual influences between the hydro power plants. In addition, it allowed for the optimization of reservoir management and optimization of hydro cascades, resulting in the better utilization of available hydro potential. Numerous analyses were performed for different stages of system development. These include system configurations that correspond to years 1997, 2001, 2015 and 2020. Additional simulations were performed in order to determine the operational parameters of the three existing hydro power stations Victoria Falls, Kariba, and Kafue Gorge Upper, that correspond to the situation before and after their rehabilitation. The rehabilitation works for these three major power stations, that would bring their operational parameters and availability back to the design level, are planned to be carried out in the period until 2000. The main results of the hydro operations studies are presented in Table ES-1. These results correspond to VALORAGUA simulations of system configurations in the years 2001 and 2015. The minimum, average, and maximum electricity generation is based on the simulation of monthly water inflows that correspond to the chronological series of unregulated water inflows at each hydro profile in the period from April 1961 to March 1990. The recommended hydrology dataset provided in the Hydrology Report of the SADC Energy Project AAA 3.8 was used for this study.

Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Buehring, W.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Collaboration in long-term stewardship at DOE Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan, DOE/RL-2010-35 Rev 1. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large parcel that includes one of the six (6) cocooned reactors on site. These accomplishments relied upon the transparency between DOE cleanup programs and their contractors working together to successfully transition the land while addressing the challenges that arise. All parties, the three different DOE Programs and their respective prime contractors are dedicated to working together and continuing the progress of transitioning land to LTS, in alignment with the Program Plan and compliant with contractual requirements. This paper highlights the accomplishments and collaborative efforts to address the challenges faced as work progresses from the cleanup to transitioning of land parcels to LTS Program.

Moren, R. J.; Zeisloft, J. H.; Feist, E. T.; Brown, D.; Grindstaff, K. D.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between the contractors and DOE-RL. Information Management (IM) is a key part of the LTS program. The IM Program identifies, locates, stores, protects and makes accessible Hanford LTS records and data to support the transfer of property ultimately to LM. As such, DOE-RL manages the Hanford LTS Program in a manner consistent with LM's goals, policies, and procedures.

MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

223

Long-Term Global Trade-Offs Related to Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

An overall comparative assessment of different energy systems and their potential long-term role in contributing to a sustainable energy mix is examined through the use of a global, long-term Energy, Economics, Environment (E{sup 3}) model. This model is used to generate a set of surprise-free futures that encompass a range of economic potentialities. The focus of this study is nuclear energy (NE), and the range of possible futures embodies extrema of NE growth [a Basic Option (BO)] to an NE Phase Out (PO). These NE scenario extrema are expressed against a background that reflects E{sup 3} circumstances ranging from a Business-As-Usual (BAU) to one that is Ecologically Driven (ED), with the latter emphasizing price-induced reductions in greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions associate with a mix of fossil energy sources. Hence, four ''views-of-the-future'' scenarios emerge to form the framework of this study: BAU/BO, BAU/PO, ED/BO, and ED/PO. Model results ranging from (regional and temporal) primary- and nuclear-energy demands, carbon-dioxide emissions, nuclear-material (plutonium) accumulations and attendant proliferation-risk implications, Gross National Product (GNP) impacts, and a range of technology requirements provide essential input to the subject assessment.

Krakowski, R.A.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning  

SciTech Connect

A global energy/economics/environmental (E{sup 3}) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better {open_quotes}top-level{close_quotes}, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a {open_quotes}business-as-usual{close_quotes} (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year {approximately}2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations).

Krakowski, R.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

THE PITTSBURGH REMI MODEL: LONG-TERM REMI MODEL FORECAST FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE PITTSBURGH REMI MODEL: LONG-TERM REMI MODEL FORECAST FOR ALLEGHENY COUNTY AND THE PITTSBURGH made. REMI LONG-TERM FORECAST AND BEA PROJECTIONS This report includes UCSUR's 1998 economic and population projections for the Pittsburgh Region. The purpose of UCSUR's long-term regional forecasts

Sibille, Etienne

226

Annual Energy Outlook 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2000 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses current energy issues—appliance standards, gasoline and diesel fuel standards, natural gas industry expansion, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends.

227

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Preface Highlights World Energy Consumption The World Oil Market (Errata as of May 13, 1998) Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Power Hydroelectric and Other Renewable Energy Electricity Appendix A-World Energy Consumption, Oil Production, and Carbon Emissions Tables (PDF) Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A1-A13 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A14-A26 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A27-A39 Click Here For the HTML Version of Appendix A, Tables A40-A50 Appendix B-World Energy Projection System Appendix C-A Status Report on Developing Transportation for Caspian Basin Oil and Gas Production Preface The Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s outlook for world energy trends is presented in this report. Model projections now extending to the year 2020 are reported, and regional trends are discussed.

228

The economics of long-term global climate change  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Long term study of the seismic environment at LIGO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LIGO experiment aims to detect and study gravitational waves using ground based laser interferometry. A critical factor to the performance of the interferometers, and a major consideration in the design of possible future upgrades, is isolation of the interferometer optics from seismic noise. We present the results of a detailed program of measurements of the seismic environment surrounding the LIGO interferometers. We describe the experimental configuration used to collect the data, which was acquired over a 613 day period. The measurements focused on the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, in which the secondary microseismic peak and noise due to human activity in the vicinity of the detectors was found to be particularly critical to interferometer performance. We compare the statistical distribution of the data sets from the two interferometer sites, construct amplitude spectral densities of seismic noise amplitude fluctuations with periods of up to 3 months, and analyze the data for any long term trends in the amplitude of seismic noise in this critical frequency range.

E. J. Daw; J. A. Giaime; D. Lormand; M. Lubinski; J. Zweizig

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Long-term stability of the APS storage ring  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne National Laboratory and has been fully operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATs). The 7-GeV synchrotron light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Long-term stability of the APS storage ring  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne ''National Laboratory and has been fully-operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATS). The 7-GeV synchrotrons light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/ environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Coexistence Analysis of Adjacent Long Term Evolution (LTE) Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the licensing and deployment of Long term evolution (LTE) systems are ramping up, the study of coexistence of LTE systems is an essential topic in civil and military applications. In this paper, we present a coexistence study of adjacent LTE systems aiming at evaluating the effect of inter-system interference on system capacity and performance as a function of some of the most common mitigation techniques: frequency guard band, base station (BS) antenna coupling loss, and user equipment (UE) antenna spacing. A system model is constructed for two collocated macro LTE networks. The developed model takes into consideration the RF propagation environment, power control scheme, and adjacent channel interference. Coexistence studies are performed for a different combination of time/frequency division duplex (TDD/FDD) systems under three different guard-bands of 0MHz, 5MHz, and 10MHz. Numerical results are presented to advice the minimum frequency guard band, BS coupling loss, and UE antenna isolation required for a healthy system operation.

Aulama, Mohannad M. [University of Jordan; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Long-term goals for solar thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes long-term performance and cost goals for three solar thermal technologies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed these goals in support of the Draft Five Year Research and Development Plan for the National Solar Thermal Technology Program (DOE 1984b). These technology goals are intended to provide targets that, if met, will lead to the widespread use of solar thermal technologies in the marketplace. Goals were developed for three technologies and two applications: central receiver and dish technologies for utility-generated electricity applications, and central receiver, dish, and trough technologies for industrial process heat applications. These technologies and applications were chosen because they are the primary technologies and applications that have been researched by DOE in the past. System goals were developed through analysis of future price projections for energy sources competing with solar thermal in the middle-to-late 1990's time frame. The system goals selected were levelized energy costs of $0.05/kWh for electricity and $9/MBtu for industrial process heat (1984 $). Component goals established to meet system goals were developed based upon projections of solar thermal component performance and cost which could be achieved in the same time frame.

Williams, T.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Brown, D.R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

LONG-TERM PERIODICITY VARIATIONS OF THE SOLAR RADIUS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study the long-term periodicity variations of the solar radius, daily solar radius data from 1978 February to 2000 September at the Calern Observatory are used. Continuous observations of the solar radius are difficult due to the weather, seasonal effects, and instrument characteristics. Thus, to analyze these data, we first use the Dixon criterion to reject suspect values, then we measure the cross-correlation between the solar radius and sunspot numbers. The result indicates that the solar radius is in complete antiphase with the sunspot numbers and shows lead times of 74 months relative to the sunspot numbers. The Lomb-Scargle and date compensated discrete Fourier transform methods are also used to investigate the periodicity of the solar radius. Both methods yield similar significance periodicities around {approx}1 yr, {approx}2.6 yr, {approx}3.6 yr, and {approx}11 yr. Possible mechanisms for these periods are discussed. The possible physical cause of the {approx}11 yr period is the cyclic variation of the magnetic pressure of the concentrated flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone.

Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

California Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (CPUC, 2008) The Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (Plan) was developed through a collaborative process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (CPUC, 2008) The Long Term Energy Efficiency together over an elevenmonth period. This Plan sets forth a roadmap for energy efficiency in California costeffective deep levels of energy efficiency improvements including building shell upgrades, highefficiency

238

The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation Ian S F Jones, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York i.jones@ldeo.columbia.edu Helen E Young Earth Ocean and Space, Australian Technology Park, Sydney, HelenYoung@ozemail.com.au Introduction The carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere is rising rapidly, mostly as a result of fossil fuel burning. This is leading to more trapping of solar radiation in the atmosphere with the expectation that the world's climate will change. Rapid climate change has a downside risk of endangering the food security of the poor and raising the spectra of large scale transmigration. The UNFCCC was an agreement amongst most of the sovereign nations of the world

239

Two Long-Term Instrumental Climatic Data Bases of the People's Republic of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/cli.ndp039 Two Long-Term Instrumental Climatic Data Bases of the People's Republic of China (1997) Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-039 Download View, download, or print PDF documentation of NDP-039 Contributed by Tao Shiyan, Fu Congbin, Zeng Zhaomei, Zhang Qingyun Institute of Atmospheric Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, China Prepared by D. P. Kaiser (d9k@ornl.gov) Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4699 Date Published: September 1997 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the

240

Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary flow and pressure testing of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, as part of the preparations for the initial 90-day segment of the Long-Term Flow Test, has revealed several significant features concerning the hydraulic behavior of this reservoir as a function of injection and production pressure levels. Of most significance to the future operation of HDR power plants is the influence of elevated production backpressure on the effective reservoir flow impedance (i.e., the difference between injection and production pressures, divided by the production flow rate). It has been found that the effective flow impedance at high backpressure is significantly lower than the corresponding impedance at low backpressure. At an injection pressure of 3700 psi and a back-pressure of 2210 psi, the effective flow impedance for the present reservoir is 20 psi/gpm--less than 40% of the effective flow impedance for similar injection conditions, but at low backpressure (about 170 psi). Recently, a 10-day reservoir flow test was conducted at a somewhat lower backpressure of 1500 psi, and at a slightly higher injection pressure of 3750 psi. At these new conditions, there was an increase in the effective reservoir flow impedance to 23.6 psi/gpm, but also a significant increase in the production flow rate and temperature--from 74 gpm to 95 gpm, and from 154 C to 180 C. The net reservoir water loss rate averaged over the last 5 days of this latest flow test was 7.3 gpm, which corresponds to a net recovery of 93% of the injected water--a very significant result that has been obtained from our preliminary reservoir flow testing. Under both of these high backpressure flow conditions, the reservoir was not extending, as evidenced by a very low rate of water loss and the absence of microseismic activity.

Brown, Donald W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release Summary Presentation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Early Release Energy Information Administration December 17, 2008 www.eia.doe.gov 2 EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Presentation -- December 17, 2008 The economy, oil prices, resources, policies, and behavior drive the AEO2009 reference case * Long-term economic growth averages about 2.5 percent per year between 2007 and 2030 * World crude oil prices recover from a near-term decline and reach $130 per barrel (in 2007 dollars) by 2030 * A robust domestic natural gas resource base allows for a steady expansion of production given projected growth in demand and prices * Recently-enacted policies and concerns over greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, combined with high energy prices, moderate projected growth in energy consumption and

242

Annual Energy Outlook 2005-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AD AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 AEO2005 Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Altos Altos Partners AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Btu British thermal unit CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (EIA) CBO Congressional Budget Office CCCC Climate Change Credit Corporation CH 4 Methane CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide CTL Coal-to-liquids DB Deutsche Bank, A.G. E85 Fuel containing a blend of 70 to 85 percent ethanol and 30 to 15 percent gasoline by volume EEA Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. EIA Energy Information Administration EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EVA Energy Ventures Analysis, Incorporated FERC

243

ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis ShortShort--Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for ...

244

Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment is required to realize high yields vital to commercial success. The focus of the pretreatment step is to methodically change key features of the biomass to favor enzymatic hydrolysis. This work assesses the compositional changes due to oxidative and non-oxidative longterm lime pretreatment of poplar wood (up to 4 weeks of pretreatment) at mild temperatures (25ºC to 65ºC), and their effect on the enzymatic yield of glucan and xylan. The most important pretreatment yield of lignin was 54 g lignin remaining/100 g lignin in raw biomass, and was accomplished for 4-week lime pretreatment at 65ºC in oxidative conditions. The corresponding pretreatment yields of glucan and xylan were 85.9 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass and 80.2 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass respectively. For poplar wood oxidatively pretreated with lime for 4 weeks at 65ºC and enzymatically hydrolyzed with an enzyme loading of 15 FPU/g glucan in raw biomass during a 3-day period, the best overall yields of glucan and xylan, were 80.7 g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g glucan in raw biomass and 66.9 g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g xylan in raw biomass respectively. The corresponding hydrolysis yields were 94.0 g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g glucan in treated biomass and 83.5 g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g xylan in treated biomass respectively. Because there is a previous study of long-term lime pretreatment of corn stover (Kim, 2004), the data obtained in this work show the effect of using woody lignocellulose as substrate. From the comparison, resulted that in the case of poplar wood oxidatively pretreated at 65ºC for 4 weeks, less lignin was removed and more carbohydrates were solubilized, however the hydrolysis yield of glucan was almost equal and the hydrolysis yield of xylan was higher than the reported by Kim for corn stover oxidatively pretreated at 55ºC for 4 weeks. The overall yield of glucan resulted lower in the case of poplar wood because of the lower pretreatment yield of glucan. Thus, it is important to complete the mass balances including an analysis on the pretreatment liquor to determine if the solubilized glucan was degraded.

Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Short Short- -Term Energy Outlook Term Energy Outlook Chart Gallery for Chart Gallery for November...

246

2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Key factors driving the short-term outlook. 2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook. 2 • Disruption of crude oil and liquefied natural gas supply from

247

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2009-2040...

248

Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Outlook National Association of State Energy Officials State Heating Oil and Propane Conference August 30, 2004 William Trapmann Energy Information ...

249

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Non-OECD Statistics" (2012), www.iea.org (subscription site). Projections: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013, DOEEIA-0383(2013) (Washington, DC: April 2013); AEO2013 National...

250

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Table G1. Heat rates Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton...

251

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

252

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 234 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information...

253

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Reference case Table A10. Electricity trade (billion kilowatthours, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 22 Table A10....

254

Baryons 2002: Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary and outlook presented at the 9th International Conference on the Structure of Baryons (BARYONS 2002), Jefferson Lab, March 3-8, 2002

Wolfram Weise

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F17. Delivered energy...

256

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Projections: EIA, AEO2012 National Energy Modeling System run REF2012.D020112C. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 160 Reference case Table...

257

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Correction/Update July 27th A stray "2010" was left in the middle of Figure 1. August 1st Figure title changes (PDF only): Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 2010-2040 (billion metric tons) This should actually be: Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 (billion metric tons) Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons carbon dioxide emitted per million 2010 dollars of gross domestic product) This should actually be: Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons

258

International energy outlook 1996  

SciTech Connect

This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites (November 2012) Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

260

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites (November 2012) Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Structure for a Living Requirements Repository for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the structure and specifications for a relational repository that will capture long-term requirements (LTRs) and their dependencies on underlying technologies. In addition, it presents principles and prototypical examples for graphical models that supplement the relational repository and support the development, capture, and re-use of long-term instrumentation and control architectural elements to support plant modifications that enable long-term ...

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool Earth - Innovative Energy Technology Plan," (14) AgencySuper-Long-Term Energy Technology Roadmap (Super-Long-TermTechnology Strategy Map (Energy Technology Strategy 2007),"

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) Long-Term Surveillance – Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) DOE established the Environmental Sciences Laboratory (ESL) in Grand Junction, Colorado, in 1991 to support its programs. ESL scientists perform applied research and laboratory-scale demonstrations of soil and groundwater remediation and treatment technologies. Capabilities Installation, monitoring, and operation of permeable reactive barriers Research of permeable reactive barriers and treatment cells Performance assessment and optimization of groundwater remediation systems Groundwater characterization Coupled hydrogeochemical modeling for groundwater remediation

264

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney Disposal Site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis) Executive Summary. Executive Summary (Continued) Executive ...

267

High Temperature Aging Study on Long-Term Aged Alloy 617 and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to gain a better understanding of the high-temperature degradation process of these materials, long-term (up to 10000 hours) aging experiments have ...

268

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035  

SciTech Connect

The projections in the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) focus on the factors that shape the U.S. energy system over the long term. Under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain unchanged throughout the projections, the AEO2011 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. It also serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in energy policies. But AEO2011 is not limited to the Reference case. It also includes 57 sensitivity cases (see Appendix E, Table E1), which explore important areas of uncertainty for markets, technologies, and policies in the U.S. energy economy. Key results highlighted in AEO2011 include strong growth in shale gas production, growing use of natural gas and renewables in electric power generation, declining reliance on imported liquid fuels, and projected slow growth in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions even in the absence of new policies designed to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. AEO2011 also includes in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the energy outlook. They include: impacts of the continuing renewal and updating of Federal and State laws and regulations; discussion of world oil supply and price trends shaped by changes in demand from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development or in supply available from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries; an examination of the potential impacts of proposed revisions to Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for light-duty vehicles and proposed new standards for heavy-duty vehicles; the impact of a series of updates to appliance standard alone or in combination with revised building codes; the potential impact on natural gas and crude oil production of an expanded offshore resource base; prospects for shale gas; the impact of cost uncertainty on construction of new electric power plants; the economics of carbon capture and storage; and the possible impact of regulations on the electric power sector under consideration by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some of the highlights from those discussions are mentioned in this Executive Summary. Readers interested in more detailed analyses and discussions should refer to the 'Issues in focus' section of this report.

None

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Long-Term US Industrial Energy Use and CO2 Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a description and scenario results from our recently-developed long-term model of United States industrial sector energy consumption, which we have incorporated as a module within the ObjECTS-MiniCAM integrated assessment model. This new industrial model focuses on energy technology and fuel choices over a 100 year period and allows examination of the industrial sector response to climate policies within a global modeling framework. A key challenge was to define a level of aggregation that would be able to represent the dynamics of industrial energy demand responses to prices and policies, but at a level that remains tractable over a long time frame. In our initial results, we find that electrification is an important response to a climate policy, although there are services where there are practical and economic limits to electrification, and the ability to switch to a low-carbon fuel becomes key. Cogeneration of heat and power using biomass may also play a role in reducing carbon emissions under a policy constraint.

Wise, Marshall A.; Sinha, Paramita; Smith, Steven J.; Lurz, Joshua P.

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China’s building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China’s building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China’s building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China’s building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Technology base studies of long-term MCFC performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cathode dissolution into the electrolyte matrix and endurance of current collector/separator plate materials are the main life-limiting factors of the state-of-the art MCFC. These components are also major contributors to the total system cost. Therefore, to reduce capital cost, it is necessary to minimize hardware corrosion and increase cell life. This study consists of experimental evaluation of corrosion processes with the objective to further practical; understanding of corrosion behavior of alloys and alloy components under cathodic gas conditions. Nickel, iron, cobalt and stainless steels 310 and 316L are analyzed. The experimental study consists of: (1) Observation of open circuit potential (OCP) changes. Surface reactions occurring without net passage of current are proposed based on this measurement. (2) Applying cyclic voltammetry, which provides information about the possible electrode reactions at different stages of polarization. (3) Applying AC impedance to support the result of tasks 1 and 2 at different stages of oxidation, and data analysis by means of equivalent circuits. Open circuit conditions as well as positive and negative polarization are used in the impedance measurements. (4) Surface analysis of the electrodes by SEM-EDX and X-ray diffraction. To obtain more information from electrochemical measurements a novel approach has been applied in cell design. In this two electrode approach, one electrode is fully immersed, and the other is wetted by carbonate melt via an alumina tube which has a thin film on it. While camera observation of these two different electrode conditions will identify the effect of carbonate wetting on the state of the surface, electrochemical measurements enable a quantitative comparison between complete submersion and wetting by a film of carbonate.

Selman, J.R.; Yazici, M.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PROTEC TM TEAR-OFFS: RESULTS OF LONG TERM TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a series of tests (Phases 1 and 2) to assess the potential use of a Mylar{reg_sign} tear-off system as a primary or secondary protective barrier to minimize acid etching ('frosting'), accidental scratching, and/or radiation damage for shielded cells, glovebox, and/or chemical hood windows. Conceptually, thin, multi-layered sheets of Mylar (referred to throughout this report as the ProTec{trademark} tear-off system) can be directly applied to the shielded cell, glovebox, or hood sash window to serve as a secondary (or primary) barrier. Upon degradation of visual clarity due to accidental scratching, spills/splatters, and/or radiation damage, the outer layer (or sheet) of Mylar could be removed refreshing or restoring the view. Due to the multilayer aspect, the remaining Mylar layers would provide continued protection for the window from potential reoccurrences. Although the concept of using a tear-off system as a protective barrier is conceptually enticing, potential technical issues were identified and addressed as part of this phased study to support implementation of this type of system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specific test conditions of interest to the DWPF included the performance of the tear-off system exposed to or under the following conditions: (1) acid(s) (concentrated (28.9 M) HF, concentrated (15.9M) HNO{sub 3}, 6M HCl, and 0.6M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}); (2) base (based on handling of radioactive sludges with pH of {approx}12-13); (3) gamma radiation (due to radioactive sources or materials being used in the analytical cells); (4) scratch resistance (simulating accidental scratching with the manipulators); and (5) in-situ testing (sample coupons exposed to actual field conditions in DWPF). The results of the Phase 1 study indicated that the ProTec tear-off concept (as a primary or secondary protective barrier) is a potential technical solution to prevent or retard excessive damage that would result from acid etching, base damage (as a result of a sludge spill or splatter), gamma radiation damage, and/or accidental scratching (due to manipulator/tool contact). Although identified as a potential solution, the Phase 1 testing was relatively short-term with exposure times up to 1-2 months for the acid and gamma radiation tests. Phase 2 testing included longer exposure times for the acid resistance (up to 456 days) and gamma radiation exposure (700 days with a cumulative gamma dose of {approx}3.1 x 10{sup 5} rad) assessments. The tear-off system continued to perform well in these longer-term acid resistance testing and gamma exposure conditions. Complete removal of the tear-offs after these long-term exposure times indicate that not only could visual clarity be restored but the mechanical integrity could be retained. The results also provided insight into the ability of the ProTec tear-off system to withstand the chemical and physical abuses expected in off-normal shielded cells operations. The conceptual erasing of scratches or marks by excessive manipulator abuse was demonstrated in the SRNL Shielded Cells mock-up facility through the removal of the outer layer tear-off with manipulators. In addition, the Phase 2 testing included an in-situ assessment of a prototype tear-off system in the DWPF Sampling Cells where the system was exposed to actual field conditions including radioactive sources, acidic and basic environments, dusting, and chemical cleaning solutions over a 5-6 month period. DWPF personnel were extremely satisfied with the performance (including the successful removal of 3 layers with manipulators) of the ProTec tear-off system under actual field conditions. The successful removal of the outer layer tear-offs with the manipulator, using tabs not specifically designed for remote operations, demonstrates that the system is 'manipulator-friendly' and could be implemented in a remote environment. The ability to remove the outer layer tear-off not only regains visual clarity but also reduces waste disposal volumes (i.e., dispo

Peeler, D

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Summer 2003 Motor Gasoline Outlook ... State gasoline taxes ... that occurred between spring 1999 and fall 2001, ...

275

Why do I need long-term care insurance? Your odds of needing long-term care services may be greater than you think. More than 2 in 5 persons over the age of 65 will require  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of long-term care services. How expensive is long-term care? It can cost a national average of $90,155 a year for nursing home care alone.2 Long-term care insurance can help offset this cost. When people Prudential Financial Long-Term Care Cost Study, 2010. Prudential Financial Global Market Research. http

Reynolds, Albert C.

276

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms List of Acronyms AEO Annual Energy Outlook LDV Light-duty vehicle AEO2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 LED Light emitting diode AEO20014 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 LNG Liquefied natural gas ATRA American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 LPG Liquefied petroleum gases bbl Barrels LRG Liquefied refinery gases Btu British thermal units MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy MECS Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule MMbbl/d Million barrels per day CO2 Carbon dioxide MMBtu Million Btu CTL Coal-to-liquids MMst Million short tons DOE U.S. Department of Energy NEMS National Energy Modeling System E85 Motor fuel containing up to 85% ethanol NGL Natural gas liquids

277

International Energy Outlook 2001 - World Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents the Energy Information Administration (EIA) outlook for world energy markets to 2020. Current trends in world energy markets are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of the IEO2001 projections for energy consumption by primary energy source and for carbon emissions by fossil fuel. Uncertainty in the forecast is highlighted by an examination of alternative assumptions about economic growth and their impacts on the

278

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2012 April 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2012) Acronyms List of Acronyms AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 LDVs Light-duty vehicles AEO Annual Energy Outlook LFMM Liquid Fuel Market Module AEO20011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 LNG Liquefied natural gas AEO2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 MACT Maximum achievable control technology bpd barrels per day MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Btu British thermal units mpg miles per gallon CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy NGL National gas liquids CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration CHP Combined heat and power NOx Nitrogen oxides CO2 Carbon dioxide OCS Outer Continental Shelf CTL Coal-to-liquids OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

279

Towards Long-Term Corrosion Resistance in FE Service Environments  

SciTech Connect

The push for carbon capture and sequestration for fossil fuel energy production has materials performance challenges in terms of high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance. Such challenges will be illustrated with examples from several current technologies that are close to being realized. These include cases where existing technologies are being modified—for example fireside corrosion resulting from increased corrosivity of flue gas in coal boilers refit for oxy-fuel combustion, or steam corrosion resulting from increased temperatures in advanced ultra supercritical steam boilers. New technology concepts also push the high temperature corrosion and oxidation limits—for example the effects of multiple oxidants during the use of high CO2 and water flue gas used as turbine working fluids.

G. R. Holcomb and P. Wang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Role of the breeder in long-term energy economics  

SciTech Connect

Private and public decisions affecting the use of nuclear and other energy technologies over a long-run time horizon were studied using the ETA-MACRO model which provides for economic- and energy-sector interactions. The impact on the use of competing energy technologies of a public decision to apply benefit-cost analysis to the production of carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere is considered. Assuming the public choice is to impose an appropriate penalty tax on those technologies which generate CO/sub 2/ and to allow decentralized private decisions to choose the optimal mix of energy technologies that maximize a nonlinear objective function subject to constraints, the study showed that breeder technology provides a much-larger share of domestically consumed energy. Having the breeder technology available as a substitute permits control of CO/sub 2/ without significant reductions in consumption or gross national product growth paths.

Kosobud, R.F.; Daly, T.A.; Chang, Y.I.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Long-term underwater camera surveillance for monitoring and analysis of fish populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term underwater camera surveillance for monitoring and analysis of fish populations Bastiaan J Laboratories, Taiwan Abstract Long-term monitoring of the underwater environ- ment is still labour intensive work. Using underwater surveillance cameras to monitor this environment has the potential advantage

Fisher, Bob

282

Guide for Predicting Long-Term Reliability of Nuclear Power Plant Systems, Structures, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines for predicting long-term reliability of nuclear power plant systems, structures, and components. The methods described will allow life cycle management planners to make improved estimates of lost generation and revenues, which play an important role in the choice of the economically optimum long-term maintenance plan for systems and components.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

On the long-term retention of geometry-centric digital engineering artifacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the challenges of long-term preservation of digital geometric models and the engineering processes associated with them. For engineering, design, manufacturing, and physics-based simulation data this requires formats that are accessible ... Keywords: Digital preservation, Knowledge capture, Long-term knowledge retention, Representation, Standards

William C. Regli; Joseph B. Kopena; Michael Grauer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Long-Term Ecological Research community metadata standardisation project: a progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the process by which the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network standardised their metadata through the adoption of the Ecological Metadata Language (EML). We describe the strategies developed to improve motivation ... Keywords: EML, LTER Network, Long-Term Ecological Research Network, ecological metadata language, machine-mediated data synthesis, metadata management, metadata-driven data synthesis, standardisation

Inigo San Gil; Karen Baker; John Campbell; Ellen G. Denny; Kristin Vanderbilt; Brian Riordan; Rebecca Koskela; Jason Downing; Sabine Grabner; Eda Melendez; Jonathan M. Walsh; Mason Kortz; James Conners; Lynn Yarmey; Nicole Kaplan; Emery R. Boose; Linda Powell; Corinna Gries; Robin Schroeder; Todd Ackerman; Ken Ramsey; Barbara Benson; Jonathan Chipman; James Laundre; Hap Garritt; Don Henshaw; Barrie Collins; Christopher Gardner; Sven Bohm; Margaret O'Brien; Jincheng Gao; Wade Sheldon; Stephanie Lyon; Dan Bahauddin; Mark Servilla; Duane Costa; James Brunt

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER Don Steiner, Jeffrey Freidberg Farrokh Najmabadi William Nevins , and John Perkins The Energy Issues Working Group on Long-Term Visions energy production in the next century? 2. What is fusion's potential for penetrating the energy market

Najmabadi, Farrokh

286

Geomagnetic control of the foF2 long-term trends A. V. Mikhailov1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic control of the foF2 long-term trends A. V. Mikhailov1 , D. Marin2 1 Institute dependence of trend magnitude on geomagnetic (invariant) latitude is con®rmed. Periods of negative/positive foF2 trends corresponding to the periods of long-term increasing/ decreasing geomagnetic activity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Long-term stewardship (LTS) includes the physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, removal actions, and facility stabilization). This concept includes land-use controls, information management, monitoring and maintenance. Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites

288

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. Author(s): Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.;

289

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the 0: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam SUMMARY Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 6, 2011 EIS-0480: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon

290

Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/57/57/48073739.pdf Cost: Free Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Screenshot References: Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action[1] "This paper highlights the relevant information that needs to be tracked in order to build a comprehensive MRV system for climate finance, proposing

291

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,448 6,657 6,480 6,627 6,762 6,880 7,070 7,283 0.3 United States a 5,418 5,608 5,381 5,454 5,501 5,523 5,607 5,691 0.0 Canada 548 546 551 574 593 609 628 654 0.6 Mexico/Chile 482 503 548 599 668 748 835 937 2.1 OECD Europe 4,147 4,223 4,054 4,097 4,097 4,151 4,202 4,257 0.0 OECD Asia 2,085 2,200 2,287 2,296 2,329 2,341 2,365 2,358 0.2 Japan 1,105 1,176 1,243 1,220 1,223 1,215 1,194 1,150 -0.1 South Korea 531 581 600 627 653 666 703 730 0.8 Australia/NewZealand 449 443 444 449 452 460 468 478 0.3 Total OECD 12,680

292

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kaya Identity factor projections Kaya Identity factor projections * Carbon dioxide intensity * Energy intensity * GDP per capita * Population This page inTenTionally lefT blank 289 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan

293

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2000 projections. Developing nations in Asia and in Central and South America are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2000 projections. Developing nations in Asia and in Central and South America are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Worldwide electricity consumption in 2020 is projected to be 76 percent higher than its 1997 level. Long-term growth in electricity consumption is expected to be strongest in the developing economies of Asia, followed by Central and South America. The projected growth rates for electricity consumption in the developing Asian nations are close to 5 percent per year over the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000) forecast period (Table 20), and the growth rate for Central and South America averages about 4.2 percent per year. As a result, the developing nations in the two regions

294

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5350 bytes) transportation.gif (5350 bytes) Transportation energy use is projected to constitute more than half of the worldÂ’s oil consumption in 2020. Developing nations account for more than half the expected growth in transportation energy use in the IEO99 forecast. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents a more detailed analysis than in previous years of the underlying factors conditioning long-term growth prospects for worldwide transportation energy demand. A nationÂ’s transportation system is generally an excellent indicator of its level of economic development. In many countries, personal travel still means walking or bicycling, and freight movement often involves domesticated animals. High rates of growth from current levels in developing countries such as China and India still leave their populations

295

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic growth Economic growth Macroeconomic projections in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are trend projections, with no major shocks assumed and with potential growth determined by the economyâ€(tm)s supply capability. Growth in aggregate supply depends on increases in the labor force, growth of capital stocks, and improvements in productivity. Long-term demand growth depends on labor force growth,income growth, and population growth. AEO2014 uses the U.S. Census Bureauâ€(tm)s December 2012 middle population projection. The U.S. Census Bureau revised its population projections primarily to reflect lower assumptions regarding international net migration. In AEO2014, U.S. population is expected to grow at an annual rate of 0.7% from 2012 to 2040, or 0.2 percentage points lower than the 0.9% average

296

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets in the long term, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. The AEO2012 Reference case provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or potential technology breakthroughs. Some of the highlights in the AEO2012 Reference case include: Projected growth of energy use slows over the projection period, reflecting an extended economic recovery and increasing energy efficiency in end-use applications Projected transportation energy demand grows at an annual rate of 0.2

297

Key Drivers Affecting the Outlook for Renewables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release, International Energy Outlook 2011 . ... AECO Germany - BEB Hub Netherlands - TTF Belgium - Zeebrugge

298

International Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) ieo99cvr.gif (8385 bytes) Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The International Energy Outlook 1999 (IEO99) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. The report is an extension of EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). U.S. projections appearing in IEO99 are consistent with those published in AEO99. IEO99 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private

299

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

235 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Regional maps Figure F4. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions...

300

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Brazil July 24, ... Germany Non-OECD OECD 108.00 86.00 69.00 44.00 35.00

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Learning from Multiple Outlooks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider semi-supervised learning from multiple outlooks of the same learning task, that is, learning from different representations of the same type of data. As opposed to learning from multiple views where it is assumed that the exact same instances have multiple representations, we only assume the availability of samples of the same learning task in different domains. We develop an algorithmic framework that is based on mapping the (unlabeled) data followed by adjusting the mapping using the scarcer labeled data. The mapped data from all the outlooks can then be used for a generic classification algorithm. We further provide sample complexity results under the assumption that the different outlooks are inherently low dimension Gaussian mixtures. Experiments with real-world data indicate the performance boost from using multiple outlooks.

Gal-on, Maayan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F11. Delivered energy consumption in Russia by end-use sector and fuel,...

303

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F7. Delivered energy consumption in Japan by end-use sector and fuel,...

304

Sugarcane juice extraction and preservation, and long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New technologies, such as an efficient vapor-compression evaporator, a stationary lime kiln (SLK), and the MixAlco process, compelled us to re-evaluate methods for producing sugar from cane. These technologies allow more water and lime to be used, and they add more value to bagasse. Extracting and preserving the sugars, and lime pretreating the bagasse to enhance biodigestibility, all at the same time in a pile, was demonstrated to be unfeasible; therefore, sugar extraction must occur before lime treating the bagasse. Sugar extraction should occur countercurrently by lixiviation, where liquid moves in stages opposite to the soaked bagasse (megasse), which is conveyed by screw-press conveyors that gently squeeze the fiber in each stage, improving extraction. The performance of a pilot-scale screw-press conveyor was tested for dewatering capabilities and power consumption. The unoptimized equipment decreased megasse moisture from 96 to 89%. Simulation of the process suggested that eight stages are necessary to achieve 98% recovery from typical sugarcane. The cumulative power for the screw-press conveyor system was 17.0±2.1 hp?h/ton dry fiber. Thin raw juice preserved with lime for several months showed no sucrose degradation and no quality deterioration, except for reducing sugar destruction. The lime loading needed for 1-year preservation is 0.20 g Ca(OH)2/g sucrose. Shorter times require less lime. After preservation, the juice was carbonated and filtered, and the resulting sludge pelletized. Due to their high organic content, the pellets were too weak for calcination temperatures used in the SLK. The organics must be decreased prior to pelletization and sodium must be supplemented as a binding agent. Long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse showed two delignification phases: bulk (rapid) and residual (slow). These were modeled by two simultaneous first-order reactions. Treatments with air purging and higher temperatures (50 ? 57oC) delignified more effectively, especially during the residual phase, thus yielding higher cellulase-enzyme digestibilities after 2 ? 8 weeks of treatment. At temperatures > 60oC, pure oxygen purging is preferred. Fresh bagasse was of better quality than old bagasse. Treatment with NaOH yielded a larger bulk delignification phase than Ca(OH)2. Long-term lime pulping of bagasse was unsuitable for copy-quality paper, but it was appropriate for strawboard and other filler applications.

Granda Cotlear, Cesar Benigno

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Study of Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN Jump to: navigation, search Name Study of Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN Agency/Company /Organization Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Institution for Transport Policy Studies (ITPS), Clean Air Asia, Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), Mizuho Information & Research Institute (MHIR) Partner Nippon Foundation, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Transport Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cleanairinitiative.org/

306

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE GREEN RIVER, UTAH DISPOSAL SITE Ttable of Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE GREEN RIVER, UTAH DISPOSAL SITE Ttable of Contents DOE/AL/62350-89 May 20, 1998 REV. 1 VER.4 08914TOC.DOC (GRN) i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 1-1 1.1 Background .................................................................................................... 1- 2 1.2 Licensing process ........................................................................................ 1-2 1.3. Acquisition .............................................................................................. 1-2 1.4 Long-term surveillance plan .................................................................... 1-3

307

Long-term surveillance plan for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico disposal site  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Ambrosia Lake disposal site in McKinley County, New Mexico, describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the disposal site. The DOE will carry out this program to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Long-term surveillance plan for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico disposal site  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Ambrosia Lake disposal site in McKinley County, New Mexico, describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the disposal site. The DOE will carry out this program to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Key Energy Issues to 2020 Prices Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Production and Imports Carbon Dioxide Emissions Key Energy Issues to 2020 Currently, most attention in energy markets is focused on near-term issues of world oil supply and prices, U.S. natural gas prices, and the transition to restructured electricity markets in several regions of the country. The Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) addresses the longer-term trends of electricity industry restructuring, fossil fuel supply and prices, and the impacts of economic growth on projected energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. AEO2001 does not project short-term events, such as supply disruptions or severe weather. The AEO2001 projections assume a transition to full competitive pricing of

310

EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the 3-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury SUMMARY This SEIS supplements the January 2011 Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury. It will analyze the potential environmental impact for a facility at and in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 4, 2013 EIS-0423-S1: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury

311

China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Agency/Company /Organization Government of China Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.beconchina.org/ener Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China EE[1] Overview "Energy conservation is a long-term strategic guideline in China's economic and social development, and an extremely urgent matter at present. The NDRC has therefore formulated the Plan of Energy Conservation, which aims to push the whole society towards energy conservation and energy intensity reduction, to remove energy bottlenecks, to build an energy

312

Greenhouse gases and future long-term changes in the stratospheric temperature and the ozone layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical two-dimensional (2D) interactive dynamical-radiative-photochemical model including aerosol physics is used to examine the expected long-term changes in stratospheric temperature and the Earth's ozone layer due to anthropogenic pollution of ...

I. G. Dyominov; A. M. Zadorozhny

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Piggyback Tectonics- Long-Term Growth Of Kilauea On The South Flank Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piggyback Tectonics- Long-Term Growth Of Kilauea On The South Flank Of Piggyback Tectonics- Long-Term Growth Of Kilauea On The South Flank Of Mauna Loa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Piggyback Tectonics- Long-Term Growth Of Kilauea On The South Flank Of Mauna Loa Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Compositional and age data from offshore pillow lavas and volcaniclastic sediments, along with on-land geologic, seismic, and deformation data, provide broad perspectives on the early growth of Kilauea Volcano and the long-term geometric evolution of its rift zones. Sulfur-rich glass rinds on pillow lavas and volcaniclastic sediments derived from them document early underwater growth of a large compositionally diverse alkalic edifice. The alkalic rocks yield 40Ar / 39Ar ages as old as about 275 ka; transitional-composition lavas, which

314

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) On 11 February 2011, the Department replaced its DOE Order 5400.5 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Chg 2, dated 1-7-93 except for Chapter III (-Derived Concentration Guides for Air and Water‖) and Figure IV-1 (-Surface Contamination Guidelines‖) with a new DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection and the Environment. In DOE Order 458.1, DOE establishes more requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation (including long-term stewardship requirements) associated with radiological activities conducted under the control of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to the Atomic

315

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations (LTO) Program. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a Memorandum of Understanding in late 2010 to "establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be

316

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations (LTO) Program. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a Memorandum of Understanding in late 2010 to "establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be

317

EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West 26: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in the EIS include the Sitewide Removal Alternative, the Sitewide Close-In-Place Alternative, the Phased Decisionmaking Alternative (Preferred Alternative), and the No Action Alternative. The analysis and information contained in the EIS are intended to assist DOE and NYSERDA with the consideration of environmental

318

Summary Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Statement Final LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY DOE/EIS-0423-S1 September 2013 SUMMARY AND GUIDE FOR STAKEHOLDERS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT For additional information on this Mercury Storage SEIS, contact: David Levenstein, Document Manager Office of Environmental Compliance (EM-11) U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2612 Germantown, MD 20874 Website: http://www.mercurystorageeis.com Printed with soy ink on recycled paper FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND

319

Long-term vs. Short-term Contracts; A European perspective on natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the economics of long-term gas contracts under changing institutional conditions, mainly gas sector liberalisation. The paper is motivated by the increasingly tense debate in continental Europe, UK and the US on the security...

Neuhoff, Karsten; von Hirschhausen, Christian

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2013 Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

322

EUROCONTROL EUROCONTROL Long-Term Forecast: IFR Flight Movements 2010-2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

published in September 2010 (Ref.1). This forecast replaces the EUROCONTROL Long-Term Forecast issued in November 2008. The forecast uses four scenarios to explore the future of the aviation and the risks that lie

Flight Movements

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Inconsistencies between Long-Term Trends in Storminess Derived from the 20CR Reanalysis and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global atmospheric reanalyses have become a common tool for both validation of climate models and diagnostic studies, such as assessing climate variability and long-term trends. Presently, the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR), which assimilates ...

Oliver Krueger; Frederik Schenk; Frauke Feser; Ralf Weisse

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Learning long term face aging patterns from partially dense aging databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies on face aging are handicapped by lack of long term dense aging sequences for model training. To handle this problem, we propose a new face aging model, which learns long term face aging patterns from partially dense aging databases. The learning strategy is based on two assumptions: (i) short term face aging pattern is relatively simple and is possible to be learned from currently available databases; (ii) long term face aging is a continuous and smooth Markov process. Adopting a compositional face representation, our aging algorithm learns a function-based short term aging model from real aging sequences to infer facial parameters within a short age span. Based on the predefined smoothness criteria between two overlapping short term aging patterns, we concatenate these learned short term aging patterns to build the long term aging patterns. Both the subjective assessment and objective evaluations of synthetic aging sequences validate the effectiveness of the proposed model. 1.

Jinli Suo; Xilin Chen; Shiguang Shan; Wen Gao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Long-Term Performance Data and Analysis of CIS/CIGS Modules Deployed Outdoors (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-term performance data of copper indium diselenide (CIS) and gallium-alloyed CIS (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules are investigated to assess the reliability of this technology.

del Cueto, J. A.; Kroposki, B.; Rummel, S.; Anderberg, A.

2008-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Long-Term Trends in Summertime Habitat Suitability for Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SA, Schoellhamer DH. 2004. Trends in the sediment yield ofKevin Fleming. 2008. Long-term Trends in Summertime HabitatTR. 2007. Multi- decadal trends for three declining fish

Nobriga, Matthew L.; Sommer, Ted R.; Feyrer, Frederick; Fleming, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar...

328

Characterization of the Nimbus-7 SBUV Radiometer for the Long-Term Monitoring of Stratospheric Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precise knowledge of in-orbit sensitivity change is critical for the successful monitoring of stratosphere ozone by satellite-based remote sensors. This paper evaluates those aspects of the in-flight operation that influence the long-term ...

R. P. Cebula; H. Park; D. F. Heath

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Temporal Analysis of Long-Term Atmospheric Moisture Levels in Phoenix, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term monthly averaged dew point and relative humidity levels for Phoenix, Arizona are examined in this investigation. Dew points are generally unchanged over the 1896–1984 period of instrumental record; relative humidities have dropped ...

Sandra W. Brazel; Robert C. Balling Jr.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Incorporating endogenous demand dynamics into long-term capacity expansion power system models for Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops a novel approach to long-term power system capacity expansion planning for developing countries by incorporating endogenous demand dynamics resulting from social processes of technology adoption. ...

Jordan, Rhonda LeNai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Long-term contracts for new investments in power generation capacity : pain or gain?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, a debate has ensued regarding the role of long-term power purchase agreements for securing investments in power generation capacity in organized wholesale markets. This thesis illuminates the issues ...

Sakhrani, Vivek A. (Vivek Ashok)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Estimation of Long-Term Climate Information at Locations with Short-Term Data Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accurate mapping of climate has widespread interest and benefit and depends on the availability of long-term data. Accuracy increases with the amount of data, but, often, insufficient data exist for the desired accuracy. To produce accurate ...

John Sansom; Andrew Tait

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Long-Term Coastal Upwelling over a Continental Shelf–Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term coastal upwelling over a continental shelf-slope with emphasis on the planetary dispersion of Rossby waves is studied with numerical models. The ocean is forced by a wind stress with a limited longshore extent. The thermocline ...

Nobuo Suginohara; Yoshiteru Kitamura

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Tracking Soil Microbes' Response to Long-Term Warming | U.S....  

Office of Science (SC) Website

University of New Hampshire Durham, NH 03824 serita.frey@unh.edu Funding This work, including maintenance of the long-term soil warming experiments, was supported by a...

335

Using the PARAGON Framework to Establish an Accurate, Consistent, and Cohesive Long-Term Aerosol Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive and cohesive aerosol measurement record with consistent, well-understood uncertainties is a prerequisite to understanding aerosol impacts on long-term climate and environmental variability. Objectives to attaining such an ...

David J. Diner; Robert T. Menzies; Ralph A. Kahn; Theodore L. Anderson; Jens Bösenberg; Robert J. Charlson; Brent N. Holben; Chris A. Hostetler; Mark A. Miller; John A. Ogren; Graeme L. Stephens; Omar Torres; Bruce A. Wielicki; Philip J. Rasch; Larry D. Travis; William D. Collins

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Quasi-Decadal Variability of the Stratosphere: Influence of Long-Term Solar Ultraviolet Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple regression statistical model is applied to investigate the existence of upper-stratospheric ozone, temperature, and zonal wind responses to long-term (solar cycle) changes in solar ultraviolet radiation using 11.5 years of reprocessed ...

L. L. Hood; J. L. Jirikowic; J. P. McCormack

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

An Approach to the Detection of Long-Term Trends in Upper Stratospheric Ozone from Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A central problem in the detection of long-term trends in upper stratospheric ozone from orbiting remote sensors involves the separation of instrument drifts from true geophysical changes. Periodic flights of a Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet ...

John E. Frederick; Xufeng Niu; Ernest Hilsenrath

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Guidance for implementing the long-term surveillance program for UMTRA Project Title I Disposal Sites  

SciTech Connect

This guidance document has two purposes: it provides guidance for writing site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSP) and it describes site surveillance, monitoring, and long-term care techniques for Title I disposal sites of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.). Long-term care includes monitoring, maintenance, and emergency measures needed to protect public health and safety and the environment after remedial action is completed. This document applies to the UMTRCA-designated Title I disposal sites. The requirements for long-term care of the Title I sites and the contents of the LTSPs are provided in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations (10 CFR Section 40.27) provided in Attachment 1.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Does Head Start Improve Long-Term Outcomes? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aughinbaugh, Alison (200? ) "Does Head Start Yield Long-TermDuncan Thomas (1995) "Does Head Start Make a Difference?"J. Smith (1998) "How much does childhood poverty affect the

LUDWIG, JENS O; Miller, Doug

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Long-Term Performance Data and Analysis of CIS/CIGS Modules Deployed Outdoors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-term performance data of copper indium diselenide (CIS) and gallium-alloyed CIS (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) modules are investigated to assess the reliability of this technology.

del Cueto, J.A.; Rummel, S.; Kroposki, B.; Anderberg, A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE-EA-0183; Long-Term Regional Dialogue Policy Record of Decision, July 19, 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 31 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT RECORD OF DECISION Long -Term Regional Dialogue Policy SUMMARY The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a policy on the agency's long- term power supply role after fiscal year (FY) 2011. This policy is intended to provide BPA's customers with greater clarity about their Federal power supply so they can effectively plan for the future and, if they choose, make capital investments in long-term electricity infrastructure. This Long-Term Regional Dialogue Policy (Policy), which is the result of a Regional Dialogue process that began in 2002, is described more fully in a separately issued Administrator's Record of Decision (ROD) that addresses the legal and policy rationale supporting the administrative

342

The Present, Mid-Term, and Long-Term Supply Curves for Tellurium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For calculating the material intensity (I A ) and W p cost, it is assumed that the long-term thickness (d) is 1.0 micron, the Te utilization (U A ) is 90%, the CdTe density is...

343

Long-Term Regional Estimates of Evapotranspiration for Mexico Based on Downscaled ISCCP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and evaluation of a long-term high-resolution dataset of potential and actual evapotranspiration for Mexico based on remote sensing data are described. Evapotranspiration is calculated using a modified version of the Penman–...

Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood; Francisco Munoz-Arriola

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Long-Term Tracking of Regenerated Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of regenerated selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst has become quite commonplace in the utility industry over the past several years. As a result, a clear understanding of the long-term performance of regenerated catalysts is needed so that informed purchasing decisions can be made and accurate catalyst management plans can be developed. EPRI and others have evaluated the initial performance of regenerated catalysts in numerous studies, but long-term performance has not been studied in ad...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

2011 Long-Term Tracking of Regenerated Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of regenerated SCR catalyst has become quite commonplace in the utility industry over the past several years. As a result, a clear understanding of the long-term performance of regenerated catalysts is needed so that informed purchasing decisions can be made and accurate catalyst management plans can be developed. EPRI and others have evaluated the initial performance of regenerated catalysts in numerous studies, but long-term performance has not been studied in adequate detail. The current proje...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Life Cycle Management Economic Tools Demonstration: Risk-Informed Long-Term Planning for Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, the EPRI Life Cycle Management (LCM) process and economic evaluation software tools have used point-value deterministic calculations to identify the economically optimum long-term plan for a system, structure, or component (SSC). This collaborative project demonstrates the unique capabilities of four tools that use probabilistic techniques to risk-inform LCM planning (i.e., accounting for risk and uncertainty in long-term asset management resource allocation decisions).

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

INL-Site Idaho Completion Project Long Term Stewardship Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Strategic Plan provides a brief historical overview of ICP long-term stewardship at the INL Site and the major goals and strategies that will drive the continued implementation of long-term stewardship in the future. The specific activities and processes that will be required to implement these goals should be outlined within an implementation plan and within implementing procedures and work plans.

Olaveson, B.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

348

Short-Term Energy Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013 1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights The U.S. Energy Information ...

349

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA Administrator's Press Briefing on the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) Annual Energy Outlook 1998 - Errata as of 3698 Data from the AEO98 Assumptions to the AEO98 (Nat'Gas...

350

Petroleum and Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation to the National Association of State Energy Officials 2005 Energy Outlook Conference, in Washington, DC, on February 17, 2005, giving EIA's outlook for petroleum and natural gas supply, demand, and prices.

Information Center

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

International Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2009-2040 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 55.1 55.4 53.4 52.5 52.1 51.8 51.5 50.7 -0.3 United States a 57.1 57.3 55.3 54.3 54.1 54.0 54.0 53.1 -0.3 Canada 40.1 40.5 38.8 38.9 37.9 36.8 36.3 35.9 -0.4 Mexico/Chile 57.2 57.4 55.6 55.0 54.2 53.2 52.3 51.6 -0.4 OECD Europe 51.9 51.2 49.4 47.9 46.2 45.7 45.3 45.0 -0.4 OECD Asia 55.3 55.5 56.3 53.5 52.5 51.6 51.3 50.8 -0.3 Japan 52.7 53.2 57.2 54.1 53.3 52.8 52.2 51.8 -0.1 South Korea 52.8 53.7 50.7 48.1 47.2 45.4 46.0 45.8 -0.5 Australia/NewZealand 67.1 66.3 63.1 60.9 60.1 59.5 58.7 58.0 -0.4

352

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook. Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration State Heating Oil and Propane Program August 2000

353

International Energy Outlook - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2004 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2004 are consistent with those published in EIAÂ’s Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2004 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2004 projections are based on U.S. and foreign government laws in effect on October 1, 2003.

354

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. The International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand over the 27-year projection period from 2003 to 2030. Despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year's outlook, world economic growth continues to increase at an average annual rate of 3.8 percent over the projection period, driving the robust increase in world energy use. Total world consumption of marketed energy expands from 421 quadrillion Brit- ish thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 722 quadrillion Btu in

355

Annual Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Outlook 2010 Restrospective Review July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review While the integrated nature of NEMS may result in some feedback that slightly modifies the initial assumptions about world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment, these feedbacks tend to be relatively small, so that the initial assumptions for world oil price and the macroeconomic growth environment largely determine the overall projection environ- ment. To the extent that this general environment deviates from the initial assumptions, the NEMS projection results will also deviate. Table 2 provides a summary of the percentage of years in

356

Summer_Gas_Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- April 2001) 1 Summer 2001 Motor Gasoline Outlook Summary April 2001 For the upcoming summer season (April to September), motor gasoline markets are projected to once again exhibit a very tight supply/demand balance. * Retail gasoline prices (regular grade) are expected to average $1.49 per gallon, slightly lower than last summer's average of $1.53 per gallon, but still above the previous (current-dollar) record summer average of $1.35 recorded in 1981. Nominal prices are expected to reach a peak of $1.52 per gallon in June but then decline gradually to about $1.43 by December. These projections presume no

357

Conoco details energy outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the U.S., government should adopt policies that encourage U.S. petroleum companies to diversify crude oil sources around the world, says Conoco Inc. That's the key them underlying Conoco's latest world energy outlook through 2000. In its 1989 outlook, Conoco called on the U.S. government to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain to exploration and development and provide a tax credit of $5/bbl of oil equivalent (BOE) for production from U.S. frontier areas as keys to reducing U.S. oil import dependence. Although Conoco included opening the ANWR Coastal Plain and more of the U.S. offshore among U.S. policy recommendations in its current outlook, the company placed the greatest emphasis on incentives for worldwide exploration.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NASEO Energy Outlook Conference NASEO Energy Outlook Conference 2/26/01 Click here to start Table of Contents NASEO Energy Outlook Conference Retail Product Prices Are Driven By Crude Oil WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 Annual World Oil Demand Growth by Region, 1991-2001 Total OECD Oil Stocks* Fundamentals Explain High Crude Oil Prices Product Price Spreads Over Crude Oil Vary With Seasons and Supply/Demand Balance U.S. Distillate Inventories Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter Heating Oil Imports Strong in 2001 Retail Heating Oil and Diesel Fuel Prices Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs Propane prices Influenced by Crude Oil and Natural Gas

359

Long-Term Data Reveal Patterns and Controls on Stream Water Chemistry in a Forested Stream: Walker Branch, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

We present 20 years of weekly stream water chemistry, hydrology, and climate data for the Walker Branch watershed in eastern Tennessee, USA. Since 1989, the watershed has experienced a similar to 1.08 degrees C increase in mean annual temperature, a similar to 20% decline in precipitation, and a similar to 30% increase in forest evapotranspiration rates. As a result, stream runoff has declined by similar to 34%. We evaluate long-term trends in stream water concentrations and fluxes for nine solutes and use wet deposition data to calculate approximate watershed input-output budgets. Dissolved constituents were classified as geochemical solutes (Ca2+, Mg2+, and SO42-) or nutrients (NH4+, NO3-, soluble reactive phosphorus [SRP], total soluble nitrogen [TSN], total soluble phosphorus [TSP], and dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). Geochemical solutes are predominantly controlled by discharge, and the long-term changes in catchment hydrology have led to significant trends in the concentrations and fluxes of these solutes. Further, the trends in geochemical solute concentrations indicate shifting soil flowpath contributions to streamflow generation through time, with deep groundwater having a greater proportional contribution in recent years. Despite dramatic changes in watershed runoff, there were no trends in inorganic nutrient concentrations (NH4+, NO3-, and SRP). While most nutrients entering the watershed are retained, stream fluxes of nutrient solutes have declined significantly as a result of decreasing runoff. Nutrient concentrations in the stream exhibit large seasonality controlled by in-stream biological uptake. Stream benthic communities are sensitive to hydrologic disturbance, and changes in the frequency or intensity of storm events through time can affect nutrient fluxes. Stream NO3- concentrations are also sensitive to drought, with concentrations decreasing (increasing) if conditions during the three years prior to the time of sampling were drier (wetter) than the long-term mean. Future changes in the incidence of storm events, as well as the number and duration of droughts, have the potential to significantly alter watershed nutrient losses. Our analysis indicates that changing climates can differentially affect watershed element cycles either through changes in biogeochemical process rates or through changes in catchment hydrology. Furthermore, climate change can include both long-term trending in mean climate variables, as well as changes in the frequency and intensity of storms and droughts, with each of these types of change having distinct effects on the biological and geochemical processes governing different solutes.

Lutz, Brian D [Duke University; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Bernhardt, Emily [Duke University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

International energy outlook 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. After a chapter entitled 'Highlights', the report begins with a review of world energy and an economic outlook. The IEO2005 projections cover a 24 year period. The next chapter is on world oil markets. Natural gas and coal reserves and resources, consumption and trade discussed. The chapter on electricity deals with primary fuel use for electricity generation, and regional developments. The final section is entitled 'Energy-related greenhouse gas emissions'.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney disposal site. The site is in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site may be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Cheney disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete and the NRC formally accepts this plan. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Cheney disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Outsourcing with Long Term Contracts: Capital Structure and Product Market Competition Effects ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes how capital structure and product market competition affect the firms ’ choice between outsourcing with long term contracts and outsourcing to the spot market. When outsourcing to the spot market firms are exposed to price uncertainty, whereas a long term contract allows them to set in advance the outsourcing price. We show that, to the extent that leverage and uncertainty can lead to financial distress costs in bad states of nature, firms may use long term contracts as a risk management device to hedge input price uncertainty. With a monopoly in the final product market, the outsourcing decision involves a trade-off between a positive convexity effect of input price uncertainty under the spot regime and the option to avoid financial distress costs under the long term contract regime. Moreover, product market competition among buyers can lead to an increase in financial distress costs not only for firms outsourcing to the spot market but also for firms outsourcing with a long term contract. We examine the monopolist’s outsourcing decision and derive the equilibrium for an oligopoly, and show that the equilibrium depends on the magnitude of these costs and on the level of efficiency of the supplier.

João C. A. Teixeira; I Ph. D; Bart M. Lambrecht; Grzegorz Pawlina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Graphic data - Highlights > Graphic data - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic data - Highlights Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 2. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 3. World liquids production, 1990-2035 Figure 4. Net change in world natural gas production by region, 2007-2035 Figure 5. World coal consumption by region, 1990-2035 Figure 6. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 7. World renewable electricity generation by energy source excluding world and hydropower, 2007-2035 Figure 8. World delivered energy consumption in the industrial sector, 2007-2035 Figure 9. World delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector, 2005-2035 Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035

364

Annual Energy Outlook 2001-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Acronyms AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AGA American Gas Association ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge BEA Bureau of Economic Analysis (U.S. Department of Commerce) BRP Blue Ribbon Panel Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS EIAÂ’s 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CCTI Climate Change Technology Initiative CDM Clean Development Mechanism CO Carbon monoxide DBAB Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRI Standard & PoorÂ’s DRI E85 Motor fuel containing 85 percent ethanol EIA Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced oil recovery EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992

365

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage ACEEE American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AGA American Gas Association ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge API American Petroleum Institute BRP Blue Ribbon Panel Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CARB California Air Resources Board CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CDM Clean Development Mechanism CECA Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act CIDI Compression ignition direct injection CO Carbon monoxide DBAB Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRI Standard & PoorÂ’s DRI EIA Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced oil recovery EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether

366

Simulating soil C dynamics with EPIC: Model description and testing against long-term data  

SciTech Connect

Soil carbon sequestration (SCS) has emerged as a technology with significant potential to help stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thus reduce the threat of global warming. Methods and models are needed to evaluate and recommend SCS practices based on their effects on carbon dynamics and environmental quality. EPIC (Environment Policy Integrated Climate) is a widely used and tested model for simulating many agroecosystem processes including plant growth, crop yield, tillage, wind and water erosion, runoff, soil density, and leaching. Here we describe new C and N modules developed in EPIC built on concepts from the Century model to connect the simulation of soil C dynamics to crop management, tillage methods, and erosion processes. The added C and N routines interact directly with soil moisture, temperature, erosion, tillage, soil density, leaching, and translocation functions in EPIC. Equations were also added to describe the effects of soil texture on soil C stabilization. Lignin concentration is modeled as a sigmoidal function of plant age. EPIC was tested against data from a Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) 6-yr experiment at five sites in three U.S. Great Plains states and a 61-y long-term agronomic experiment in Canada. Mean Square Deviations (MSD) calculated for CRP sites were less than 0.01 kg C2 m2, except for one site where it reached 0.025 kg2 C2 m. MSD values in the 61-y experiment ranged between 0.047 and 0.077 kg C2 m2. In conclusion, the version of the EPIC model presented and tested here contains the necessary algorithms to simulate SCS and improve understanding of the interactions among soil erosion, C dynamics, and tillage. A strength of the model as tested is its ability to explain the variability in crop production, C inputs and SOC and N cycling over a wised range soil, cropping and climatic conditions over periods from 6 to 61 years. For example, at the Breton site over 61 years, EPIC accounted for 69% of the variability in grain yields, 89 % of the variability in C inputs and 91 % of the variability in SOC content in the top 15 cm. Continued development is be needed is in understanding why it overpredicts at low SOC and underpredicts at high SOC. Possibilities now exit to connect the C and N cycling parts of EPIC to algorithms to describe denitrification as driven by C metabolism and oxygen availability.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Williams, Jimmy R.; Mcgill, William B.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Quiroga Jakas, Maria C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

BIOPROTA: an international forum for environmental modelling in support of long-term radioactive waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An international Forum, BIOPROTA, has been set up and maintained which allows common long-term environmental radiological assessment problems, such as post-closure modelling studies to be identified and then addressed. The focus of the Forum is to address key uncertainties in environmental modelling and related dose assessment with special reference to evaluation of the long-term impact of contaminant releases associated with radioactive waste management. The application of shared resources results in effective resource management and the development of common solutions to common problems. The Forum began in 2002 and has benefited from the knowledge and experience of organisations from Belgium (SCK.CEN), Czech Republic (NRI), Canada (OPG), Finland (Posiva), France (ANDRA, EdF), Japan (NUMO), Korea (KAERI), Norway (NRPA), Spain (ENRESA, CIEMAT), Sweden (SKB, SSI), Switzerland (Nagra), UK (Nirex, Nexia, UKAEA) and the USA (EPRI). These organisations include a mixture of operators, regulators and research institutes, and hence, including the participation of their technical support organizations, constitutes a very broad-based Forum. Enviros has acted as the technical secretariat to the Forum since its formation. Initially the Forum focused on three themes aimed at advancing knowledge and improving model predictions relating to performance and safety assessments: Theme 1 Development of a database to meet the key biosphere assessment information deficiencies. Theme 2 Implementation of a series of tasks to address key modelling issues, including uncertainties and inconsistencies in the modelling of inhalation, irrigation and soil contamination dose pathways; and approaches to the modelling the transfer of radionuclides across the geosphere-biosphere interface zone (GBIZ). Theme 3 Provision of guidance on site characterisation and experimental and monitoring protocols relevant to improving confidence in the biosphere component of the overall performance assessment. Substantial work under Themes 2 and 3 was completed in 2005/06 resulting in the publication of a variety of reports and guidance documents. Results of the model comparisons conducted under Theme 2 suggest that we can be confident in model structures and we have gained knowledge of the sensitive assumptions. Population of the database produced under Theme 1 is ongoing after release of an initial version which focused on data for Cl-36, Se-79, Tc-99, I-129, Np-237 and U-series radionuclides. In 2006, BIOPROTA received further international interest. The 2006 annual workshop identified a series of current issues for which proposals for tasks aimed at addressing these issues are under development. This includes exchange of information on models and processes of relevance to Cl-36 behaviour, as well as modelling the disequilibrium in the U-238 decay chain in environmental systems; more precise understanding of released C-14 distribution within various environmental carbon pools; and studies of the GBIZ under environmental change. A special workshop was held on Cl-36 behaviour and the workshop report published. An overview of the current state of play in biosphere modeling and dose assessment programmes relating to radioactive waste management will be presented based on national presentations by Forum members at the 2007 workshop and the key research outputs developed through the Forum will be described. (authors)

Smith, K.L.; Smith, G. [Enviros Consulting Ltd, D5 Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Laciok, A. [Nuclear Research Institute, CZ-25068 REZ (Costa Rica)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision  

SciTech Connect

The interactions and feedbacks among plants, animals, microbes, humans, and the environment ultimately form the world in which we live. This world is now facing challenges from a growing and increasingly affluent human population whose numbers and lifestyles are driving ever greater energy demand and impacting climate. These and other contributing factors will make energy and climate sustainability extremely difficult to achieve over the 20-year time horizon that is the focus of this report. Despite these severe challenges, there is optimism that deeper understanding of our environment will enable us to mitigate detrimental effects, while also harnessing biological and climate systems to ensure a sustainable energy future. This effort is advanced by scientific inquiries in the fields of atmospheric chemistry and physics, biology, ecology, and subsurface science - all made possible by computing. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science has a long history of bringing together researchers from different disciplines to address critical national needs in determining the biological and environmental impacts of energy production and use, characterizing the interplay of climate and energy, and collaborating with other agencies and DOE programs to improve the world's most powerful climate models. BER science focuses on three distinct areas: (1) What are the roles of Earth system components (atmosphere, land, oceans, sea ice, and the biosphere) in determining climate? (2) How is the information stored in a genome translated into microbial, plant, and ecosystem processes that influence biofuel production, climate feedbacks, and the natural cycling of carbon? (3) What are the biological, geochemical, and physical forces that govern the behavior of Earth's subsurface environment? Ultimately, the goal of BER science is to support experimentation and modeling that can reliably predict the outcomes and behaviors of complex biological and environmental systems, leading to robust solutions for DOE missions and strategic goals. In March 2010, the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee held the Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision workshop to identify scientific opportunities and grand challenges for BER science in the coming decades and to develop an overall strategy for drafting a long-term vision for BER. Key workshop goals included: (1) Identifying the greatest scientific challenges in biology, climate, and the environment that DOE will face over a 20-year time horizon. (2) Describing how BER should be positioned to address those challenges. (3) Determining the new and innovative tools needed to advance BER science. (4) Suggesting how the workforce of the future should be trained in integrative system science. This report lays out grand research challenges for BER - in biological systems, climate, energy sustainability, computing, and education and workforce training - that can put society on a path to achieve the scientific evidence and predictive understanding needed to inform decision making and planning to address future energy needs, climate change, water availability, and land use.

Arkin, A.; Baliga, N.; Braam, J.; Church, G.; Collins, J; Cottingham, R.; Ecker, J.; Gerstein, M.; Gilna, P.; Greenberg, J.; Handelsman, J.; Hubbard, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Liao, J.; Looger, L.; Meyerowitz, E.; Mjolness, E.; Petsko, G.; Sayler, G.; Simpson, M.; Stacey, G.; Sussman, M.; Tiedje, J.; Bader, D.; Cessi, P.; Collins, W.; Denning, S.; Dickinson, R.; Easterling, D.; Edmonds, J.; Feddema, J.; Field, C.; Fridlind, A.; Fung, I.; Held, I.; Jackson, R.; Janetos, A.; Large, W.; Leinen, M.; Leung, R.; Long, S.; Mace, G.; Masiello, C.; Meehl, G.; Ort, D.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Penner, J.; Prather, M.; Randall, D.; Rasch, P.; Schneider, E.; Shugart, H.; Thornton, P.; Washington, W.; Wildung, R.; Wiscombe, W.; Zak, D.; Zhang, M.; Bielicki, J.; Buford, M.; Cleland, E.; Dale, V.; Duke, C.; Ehleringer, J.; Hecht, A.; Kammen, D.; Marland, G.; Pataki, D.; Riley, M. Robertson, P.; Hubbard, S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A New Apparatus For Long-Term Petrophysical Investigations On Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apparatus For Long-Term Petrophysical Investigations On Geothermal Apparatus For Long-Term Petrophysical Investigations On Geothermal Reservoir Rocks At Simulated In-Situ Conditions Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A New Apparatus For Long-Term Petrophysical Investigations On Geothermal Reservoir Rocks At Simulated In-Situ Conditions Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We present a new apparatus capable of maintaining in-situ conditions pertinent to deep geothermal reservoirs over periods of months while in the same time allowing a variety of continuous petrophysical investigations. Two identical devices have been set up at the GFZ-Potsdam. Lithostatic overburden- and hydrostatic pore pressures of up to 100 and 50 MPa, respectively can be simulated. In addition in-situ temperature

370

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 The report is intended to help assess and establish the technical basis for extended long-term storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel. It provides: 1) an overview of the ISFSI license renewal process based on 10 CFR 72 and the guidance provided in NUREG-1927; 2) definitions and terms for structures and components in DCSSs, materials, environments, aging effects, and aging mechanisms; 3) TLAAs and AMPs, respectively, that have been developed for managing aging effects on the SSCs important to safety in the dry cask storage system designs; and 4) AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs

371

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Development and implementation of future advanced fuel cycles including those that recycle fuel materials, use advanced fuels different from current fuels, or partition and transmute actinide radionuclides, will impact the waste management system. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign can reasonably conclude that advanced fuel cycles, in combination with partitioning and transmutation, which remove actinides, will not materially alter the performance, the spread in dose results around the mean, the modeling effort to include significant features, events, and processes

372

Systematic Flights Obtain Long-Term Data Set of Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systematic Flights Obtain Long-Term Data Set of Cloud Properties Systematic Flights Obtain Long-Term Data Set of Cloud Properties Beginning in January 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is sponsoring the first-of-its-kind long-term airborne research campaign to obtain data from low-level clouds above its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The five-month campaign is centered near Lamont, Oklahoma, a mid-latitude region that experiences a wide range of cloud types, including the "thin" clouds that are the focus of the campaign. Thin clouds contain so little water that the sun can be seen through them. Scientists refer to such clouds as "clouds with low-optical water depth," or CLOWD. Because these clouds are often tenuous and scattered, even some of the best

373

EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive 023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization) Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina EIS-0023: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization) Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina SUMMARY This EIS analyzes the potential environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

374

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Development and implementation of future advanced fuel cycles including those that recycle fuel materials, use advanced fuels different from current fuels, or partition and transmute actinide radionuclides, will impact the waste management system. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign can reasonably conclude that advanced fuel cycles, in combination with partitioning and transmutation, which remove actinides, will not materially alter the performance, the spread in dose results around the mean, the modeling effort to include significant features, events, and processes

375

Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Asset  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Asset Exclusion Qualified Wisconsin Business Certification (Wisconsin) Long-Term Wisconsin Capital Assets Deferral and Wisconsin-Source Asset Exclusion Qualified Wisconsin Business Certification (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Commercial Institutional Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Personal Tax Incentives Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation WEDC may certify businesses as a "Qualified Wisconsin Business". The designation allows investors with WI capital gains tax liability to both defer that tax liability and if an investment is maintained for a minimum

376

Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest - July 2012 Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest - July 2012 During the summer of 2012, 56 percent of the Lower 48 states were experiencing drought conditions as of May 8, almost twice the area compared to the same time the previous year, according to data from the U.S. Drought Monitor. In addition to heightened water supply concerns, the dry conditions can also provide favorable conditions for a busier wildfire season across many parts of the country. The operating challenges and implications resulting from these extreme temperatures and drought conditions can potentially impact reliable operations throughout the U.S. electric power grid. It is therefore essential for electric sector owners

377

EIS-0269: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and 9: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0269: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee Summary This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts regarding management decisions on depleted UF6 by evaluating the environmental impacts of a range of reasonable alternative strategies as well as providing a means for the public to have a meaningful opportunity to be heard on this matter. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available For Download August 10, 1999 EIS-0269: Record of Decision

378

Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Long Term World Oil Supply Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis) 07/28/2000 Click here to start Table of Contents Long Term World Oil Supply (A Resource Base/Production Path Analysis) Executive Summary Executive Summary (Continued) Executive Summary (Continued) Overview The Year of Peak Production..When will worldwide conventional oil production peak?... Lower 48 Crude Oil Reserves & Production 1945-2000 Texas Oil and Condensate Production, and Texas First Purchase Price (FPP), 1980-1999 Published Estimates of World Oil Ultimate Recovery Different Interpretations of a Hypothetical 6,000 Billion Barrel World Original Oil-in-Place Resource Base Campbell-Laherrère World Oil Production Estimates, 1930-2050 Laherrere’s Oil Production Forecast, 1930-2150

379

Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Constraints On The Mechanism Of Long-Term, Steady Subsidence At Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California, From Gps, Leveling, And Insar Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Leveling surveys across Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) have documented subsidence that is centered on the summit caldera and decays symmetrically on the flanks of the edifice. Possible mechanisms for this deformation include fluid withdrawal from a subsurface reservoir, cooling/crystallization of subsurface magma, loading by the volcano and dense intrusions, and crustal thinning due to tectonic extension (Dzurisin

380

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/0458.1-BOrder/view On 11 February 2011, the Department replaced its DOE Order 5400.5 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Chg 2, dated 1-7-93 except for Chapter III (-Derived Concentration Guides for Air and Water‖) and Figure IV-1 (-Surface Contamination Guidelines‖) with a new DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection and the Environment. In DOE Order 458.1, DOE establishes more requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation (including long-term stewardship requirements) associated with radiological activities conducted under the control of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High Temperature Steam Electrolysis: Demonstration of Improved Long-Term Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-term performance is an ongoing issue for hydrogen production based on high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE). For commercial deployment, solid-oxide electrolysis stacks must achieve high performance with long-term degradation rates of {approx}0.5%/1000 hours or lower. Significant progress has been achieved toward this goal over the past few years. This paper will provide details of progress achieved under the Idaho National Laboratory high temperature electrolysis research program. Recent long-term stack tests have achieved high initial performance with degradation rates less than 5%/khr. These tests utilize internally manifolded stacks with electrode-supported cells. The cell material sets are optimized for the electrolysis mode of operation. Details of the cells and stacks will be provided along with details of the test apparatus, procedures, and results.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R. C. O'Brien; G. Tao

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development August 14, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON- U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary Clarence H. "Bud" Albright, Jr. today announced the selection of 10 cost-shared hydrogen storage research and development projects, which will receive up to $15.3 million over five years, subject to annual appropriations. These projects are part of President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative that committed $1.2 billion on research and development (R&D) for hydrogen-powered fuel cells. The projects also support the President's Advanced Energy Initiative to reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign energy sources by changing the way we power our cars, homes, and

383

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Forecasts & Analysis > Annual Energy Outlook 2011 : Annual Energy Outlook 2011 with Projections to 2035

384

Kaons: Review and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a review of recent results and an outlook of kaon physics. After enjoying a renaissance, the discipline is now becoming and endangered species. Action will be needed to keep kaon physics at the heart of future FPCP meetings.

Augusto Ceccucci

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hadronic Physics: an Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief outlook, in two senses, is presented for hadronic physics. The likely near term future for experiment and lattice effort is sketched and I speculate on future directions in theory. I also look out at other fields, presenting a short review of QCD ideas in ''Beyond the Standard Model'' physics.

Swanson, Eric S. [Dept of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA 15260 (United States)

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

International Energy Outlook 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration International Energy Outlook 2013 DOE/EIA-0484(2013) ... 930.90 540.30 1982.00 2836.01 1193.30 1092.45 550.26 1983.00 3033.53

387

Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Environmental and Economic Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Background The growth of the economy and the accompanying increase in energy consumption in the People's Republic of China (China) are impacting the world's energy markets and global environment. That impact was seen in rising oil prices prior to the economic collapse of 2008. China plans to move ahead in the use of its coal resources as a source of transportation fuels. It is important that the U.S. have the best possible

388

Challenges for Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Long-Term Energy Models: Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency James Sweeney Stanford University Director, Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency Professor, Management Science and Engineering Presentation to EIA 2008 Energy Conference 34 ! Years of Energy Information and Analysis Some Modeling History * Original Federal Energy Administration Demand Models in PIES and IEES (1974) - Residential, Industrial, Commercial Sectors * Econometric models * Dynamic specification * Allowed matrix of own-elasticities and cross- elasticities of demand for PIES and IEES - Electricity, Natural Gas, Oil, Coal - Designed to examine implications of changes in energy prices, taxes, price regulation - For analysis of "energy conservation" options, estimate of direct impacts used as reduction of

389

Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms  

SciTech Connect

The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

390

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co’s well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. 1 tab., 9 figs.

Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

391

Long-Term SOFC Stability with Coated Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study details long-term performance data for anode-supported thin-film YSZ-based SOFCs utilizing a ferritic stainless steel cathode current collector (Crofer22 APU) coated with a protective (Mn,Co)3O4 spinel to prevent Cr volatilization. Two standard cathode compositions, La(Sr)FeO3 and La(Sr)MnO3, were considered. The coating proved effective in blocking Cr migration, which resulted in long-term stability of the manganite cathode. In contrast the ferrite cathode indicated degradation that could not be attributed to Cr poisoning.

Simner, Steve P.; Anderson, Michael D.; Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Savannah River Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely Reach Milestone Savannah River Site 2012 Outlook: Transuranic Waste Program Set to Safely Reach Milestone January 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis By May, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions expects to be shipping transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant almost continuously, using six TRUPACT-III shipping containers like the one shown here. By May, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions expects to be shipping transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant almost continuously, using six TRUPACT-III shipping containers like the one shown here. Workers relocate a pipe overpack container used to transport small amounts of excess plutonium oxide destined for long-term storage at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

393

Annual Energy Outlook-List of Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ABWR ABWR Advanced Boiling Water Reactor AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AECL Atomic Energy Canada Limited AEO2003 Annual Energy Outlook 2003 AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 ALAPCO Association of Local Air Pollution Control Officials AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge AP1000 Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor ARI Advanced Resources International AT-PZEV Advanced technology partial zero-emission vehicle BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BNFL British Nuclear Fuels Limited plc Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CARB California Air Resources Board CBO Congressional Budget Office CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CGES Centre for Global Energy Studies CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide DB Deutsche Bank A.G. DES Department of Environmental Services (New Hampshire)

394

Annual Energy Outlook 1998 Forecasts - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 With Projections to 2020 1998 With Projections to 2020 Annual Energy Outlook 1999 Report will be Available on December 9, 1998 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO98 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. “Issues in Focus” discusses three current energy issues—electricity restructuring, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis

395

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011 3 6 Table A18. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source (Million Metric Tons, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Residential Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 80 73 68 64 61 58 -1.2% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 259 261 263 263 262 260 0.0% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 -1.1% Electricity 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 872 820 757 778 833 878 916 0.4% Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1220 1160 1092 1110 1161 1202 1234 0.2% Commercial Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 43 39 38 38 37 37 -0.5% Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 169 183 189 193 200 207 0.8% Coal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

396

Long-Term Climate Commitments Projected with Climate–Carbon Cycle Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) are used to project climate change commitments for the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Simulations are run until the year ...

G.-K. Plattner; R. Knutti; F. Joos; T. F. Stocker; W. von Bloh; V. Brovkin; D. Cameron; E. Driesschaert; S. Dutkiewicz; M. Eby; N. R. Edwards; T. Fichefet; J. C. Hargreaves; C. D. Jones; M. F. Loutre; H. D. Matthews; A. Mouchet; S. A. Müller; S. Nawrath; A. Price; A. Sokolov; K. M. Strassmann; A. J. Weaver

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Long-Term Reduction of Divertor Carbon Sources in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 171 (1999)41st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Seattle Washington, US, 1999948925415

Whyte, D.G.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

The effects of forest fuel reduction on fire severity and long-term carbon storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two forest management objectives being debated in the context of federally managed landscapes in the US Pacific Northwest involve a perceived trade-off between fire restoration… (more)

[No author

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses > Annual Energy Outlook Early Release > Overview Analyses > Annual Energy Outlook Early Release > Overview Annual Energy Outlook Early Release Overview Full Printer-Friendly Version Overview Energy Trends to 2035 | Economic Growth | Energy Prices | Energy Consumption by Sector | Energy Consumption by Primary Fuel | Energy Intensity | Energy Production and Imports | Electricity Generation | Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Energy Trends to 2035 In preparing the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO2010), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2010 reference case, which is presented and compared with the updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (updated AEO2009) reference case released in April 20091 (see Table 1 below). Because of the uncertainties inherent in any energy market projection, particularly in periods of high price volatility, rapid market transformation, or active changes in legislation, the reference case results should not be viewed in isolation. Readers are encouraged to review the alternative cases when the complete AEO2010 publication is released in order to gain perspective on how variations in key assumptions can lead to different outlooks for energy markets.

400

Short- and long-term price forecasting for palm and lauric oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dorab E. Mistry presents excerpts from a talk he delivered at the 6th Indonesian Palm Oil Conference (IPOC) & 2011 Price Outlook, organized by the Indonesian Palm Oil Association (GAPKI) and held December 1–3, 2010, at the Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali. Sho

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

Natural Gas Winter Outlook 2000-2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is based on the Winter Fuels Outlook published in the 4th Quarter Short-Term Energy Outlook and discusses the supply and demand outlook from October 2000 through March 2001.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Sorting in Patrick Geddes' Outlook Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n g in P a t r i c k Outlook Tower Geddes' JÈ Joyce Barleythree months at the Outlook 'lower in Edinburgh, sorting theand services. • The Outlook Tower was a disused observatory

Earley, Joyce

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Synchronization and cell search algorithms in 3GPP long term evolution systems (FDD mode)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper initial downlink synchronization (sync) and cell identification algorithms for the 3rd generation partnership project (3GPP) long term evolution (LTE) systems are presented. The frequency division duplex (FDD) mode is used in the downlink ... Keywords: 3GPP LTE, MIMO, OFDM, cell search, frequency and time synchronization

Abdo N. Gaber; Loay D. Khalaf; Ahmad M. Mustafa

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Conceptual designs for a long term {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} storage vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a report on conceptual designs for a long term, 250 years, storage container for plutonium oxide ([sup 238]PuO[sub 2]). These conceptual designs are based on the use of a quartz filter to release the helium generated during the plutonium decay. In this report a review of filter material selection, design concepts, thermal modeling, and filter performance are discussed.

Kwon, D.M.; Replogle, W.C.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Estimating long-term world coal production with logit and probit transforms David Rutledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating long-term world coal production with logit and probit transforms David Rutledge form 27 October 2010 Accepted 27 October 2010 Available online 4 November 2010 Keywords: Coal reserves Coal resources Coal production estimates IPCC Logistic model Cumulative normal model An estimate

Weinreb, Sander

406

Non-causal models in long term planning via set contractive optimal control methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion of consistency for optimal plans introduced in [F.E. Kydland, E.C. Prescott, Rules rather than decisions: The inconsistency of optimal plans, J. Polit. Econ. 85 (3) (1977) 473-491] is studied in relation to dynamic programming and to multi-objective ... Keywords: Balance set, Long term optimal planning, Pareto solutions

E. A. Galperin; I. Galperin

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable- mental friendly. Compared with fossil energy, it is expensive to transport renewable energy for a long distance. Another problem of renewable energy is fluctuation and it is not so stable as fossil energy

408

A long-term sensitivity analysis of the denitrification and decomposition model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although sensitivity analysis (SA) was conducted on the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model, a global SA over a long period of time is lacking. We used a method of Bayesian analysis of computer code outputs (BACCO) with the Gaussian emulation ... Keywords: BACCO, BACCO GEM-SA, DNDC, GEM-SA, GSA, Global sensitivity analysis, Long-term, SA

Xiaobo Qin; Hong Wang; Yu'E Li; Yong Li; Brian Mcconkey; Reynald Lemke; Changsheng Li; Kelsey Brandt; Qingzhu Gao; Yunfan Wan; Shuo Liu; Yuntong Liu; Chao Xu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Long term contracts, expansion, innovation and stability: North Dakota's lignite mines thrive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

North Dakota's lignite coal industry is mainly located in three countries in the central part of the state. Its large surface lignite mines are tied through long-term (20-40 years) contracts to power plants. The article talks about operations at three of the most productive mines - the Freedom mine, Falkirk mine and Center Mine. 4 figs.

Buchsbaum, L.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

AvAilAble for licensing Battery overcharge protection, increased safety and long-term stability.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AvAilAble for licensing Battery overcharge protection, increased safety and long-term stability of lithium-ion batteries. The electrolytes can be alkali metal salts or polar aprotic solvents of overcharge tolerance--the dangerous voltage of the battery will never be reached even when over

Kemner, Ken

411

Roundtable on Long-Term Management In The Cleanup of Contaminated Sites  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Public Environmental Oversight (CPEO) convened a roundtable in Washington, DC on June 28, 2002 to discuss innovative approaches to long-term management in the cleanup of contaminated property. Twenty participants attended the meeting, including representatives of federal agencies, local government, state regulatory agencies, environmental organizations, and thinking tanks, as well as private consultants with experience in site remediation and redevelopment.

Aimee Houghton

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long-Term Strategic Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long-Term Strategic Planning to Inform Policy Development/University Cooperative Research Center since 1996 PSERC #12;Intentionally Blank Page #12;U.S. Energy Infrastructure Research Center program under which PSERC was created. #12;U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long

413

Page 1 of 140 An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 of 140 An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Technology and Policy.......................................................................................... Technology and Policy Program, Engineering Systems Division December 18th, 2009 Certified by

414

Heuristic solutions to the long-term unit commitment problem with cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a long-term version of the unit commitment problem that spans over one year divided into hourly time intervals. It includes constraints on electricity and heating production as well as on biomass consumption. The problem is of interest for ... Keywords: Energy planning, Local search, Mixed integer programming heuristics, Unit commitment with cogeneration plants

Niels Hvidberg Kjeldsen; Marco Chiarandini

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Long-Term Variability in a Coupled Atmosphere–Biosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully coupled atmosphere–biosphere model, version 3 of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3) and the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS), is used to illustrate how vegetation dynamics may be capable of producing long-term variability in the ...

Christine Delire; Jonathan A. Foley; Starley Thompson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Causes of Long-Term Drought in the U.S. Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Great Plains experienced a number of multiyear droughts during the last century, most notably the droughts of the 1930s and 1950s. This study examines the causes of such droughts using ensembles of long-term (1930–2000) simulations ...

Siegfried D. Schubert; Max J. Suarez; Philip J. Pegion; Randal D. Koster; Julio T. Bacmeister

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

On the Theory of the Long-Term Variability of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the atmosphere's long-term variability is contained in the planetary modes with zonal wavenumber m?5. It is proposed that a considerable fraction of this variability is induced by the nonlinear interaction of synoptic-scale modes (m>5) ...

Joseph Egger; Heinz-Dieter Schilling

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

hal-00122749,version1-8Jan2007 Time Series Forecasting: Obtaining Long Term Trends with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For example when forecast- ing an electrical consumption, it could be advan- tageous to predict all hourly As second example, we use the Polish electrical load time series [ 6]. This series contains hourly valueshal-00122749,version1-8Jan2007 Time Series Forecasting: Obtaining Long Term Trends with Self

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Long-term time series prediction with the NARX network: An empirical evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NARX network is a dynamical neural architecture commonly used for input-output modeling of nonlinear dynamical systems. When applied to time series prediction, the NARX network is designed as a feedforward time delay neural network (TDNN), i.e., ... Keywords: Chaotic time series, Long-term prediction, NARX neural network, Nonlinear traffic modeling, Recurrence plot

José Maria P. Menezes, Jr.; Guilherme A. Barreto

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Understanding Microstructural Effects on Long Term Electrical Fatigue in Multilayer PZT Actuators*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and lower device degradation with usage time was observed. Keywords: lead zirconate titanate, PbTixZr1-xO3Understanding Microstructural Effects on Long Term Electrical Fatigue in Multilayer PZT Actuators to 1325 °C. Sintering times were 6 and 24 minutes. Samples were poled and additionally electrically

Balzar, Davor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Diversity in OECD energy consumption: Achievements and long-term goals  

SciTech Connect

Energy consumption in the industrialized world has resumed a rising trend but has been moderated by increased energy efficiency. The demand for energy is also being spread more evenly over a variety of fuels. This paper provides a measure for diversity and examines the implications for energy prices, while reiterating the long-term goal of lower energy consumption.

Heal, D.W. (Univ. College of Wales, Aberystwyth (England))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Determining factors that affect long-term evolution in scientific application software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the characteristics of scientific application software is its long lifetime of active maintenance. There has been little software engineering research into the development characteristics of scientific software and into the factors that support ... Keywords: Characteristics of scientific software development, Empirical study, Long-term software evolution, Model of change, Scientific software

Diane Kelly

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Annual Energy Outlook 2007: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO AEO Annual Energy Outlook AEO2006 Annual Energy Outlook2006 AEO2007 Annual Energy Outlook 2007 ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials B2, B5, B20 Biodiesel (2, 5, and 20 percent) BLS Bureau of Labor Statistics BNSF BNSF Railway Company BTC Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CBO Congressional Budget Office CCS Carbon capture and sequestration CFL Compact fluorescent light CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide CPI Consumer price index CRP Conservation Reserve Program CSX CSX Transportation CT Computed tomography CTL Coal-to-liquids DB Deutsche Bank AG DDGS Dried distillers' grains and solubles DM&E Dakota Minnesota & Eastern Railroad DOE U.S. Department of

424

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ACI ACI Activated carbon injection AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AEO2005 Annual Energy Outlook 2005 AEO2006 Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Altos Altos Partners ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge API American Petroleum Institute BLGCC Black liquor gasification coupled with a combined-cycle power plant BOE Barrels of oil equivalent BTL Biomass-to-liquids Btu British thermal units CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CARB California Air Resources Board CBO Congressional Budget Office CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide CPI Consumer price index CRI Color rendering index CTL Coal-to-liquids DB Deutsche Bank AG DCL Direct coal liquefaction DOE U.S. Department of Energy E85 Fuel containing a blend of 70 to 85 percent ethanol EEA Energy and Environmental

425

Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook. Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil. Distillate Outlook. When Will Crude Oil Prices Fall?

426

EIA Short -Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2008 NASEO 2008/09 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 7, 2008 Washington, DC Howard Gruenspecht Acting ...

427

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO2009),1 including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports.2 The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2009 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

428

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Introduction  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Introduction Introduction Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to generate the projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 [1] (AEO2010), including general features of the model structure, assumptions concerning energy markets, and the key input data and parameters that are the most significant in formulating the model results. Detailed documentation of the modeling system is available in a series of documentation reports [2]. The National Energy Modeling System The projections in the AEO2010 were produced with the NEMS, which is developed and maintained by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide projections of domestic energy-economy markets in the long term and perform policy analyses requested by decisionmakers in the White House, U.S. Congress, offices within the Department of Energy, including DOE Program Offices, and other government agencies. The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections are also used by analysts and planners in other government agencies and outside organizations.

429

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an "Overview" summarizing the AEO2007 reference case. The next section, "Legislation and Regulations," discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for light-duty trucks finalized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in March 2006. It also provides an update on the handling of key provisions in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT2005) that could not be incorporated in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006) because of the absence of implementing regulations or funding appropriations. Finally, it provides a summary of how sunset provisions in selected Federal fuel taxes and tax credits are handled in AEO2007.

430

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon outlooks for China to 2030 or later, they differ inof 5% to 30% power capacity by 2030 and a high of 90% powermodels except Tyndall through 2030, but diverge after 2030

Zheng, Nina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

An Outlook on Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

A. B. Balantekin

2013-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

An Outlook on Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief outlook on low-energy nuclear physics is presented. Selected recent developments in nuclear structure theory are highlighted and a few open questions are discussed.

Balantekin, A B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those...

434

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook Briefing for the 7th Annual International Airport Operations/Jet Fuel Conference Orlando, Florida Mike Burdette

435

Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2/9/2005: Petroleum Supply and Market Outlook. This presentation contains content that your browser may not be able to show properly.

436

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

437

Responses of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil organic and fertilizer amendments under long-term management  

SciTech Connect

Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) co-exist in soil, but their relative distribution may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Effects of changes in soil organic matter and nutrient content on the AOB and AOA are poorly understood. Our aim was to compare effects of long-term soil organic matter depletion and amendments with labile (straw) and more recalcitrant (peat) organic matter, with and without easily plant-available nitrogen, on the activities, abundances and community structures of AOB and AOA. Soil was sampled from a long-term field site in Sweden that was established in 1956. The potential ammonia oxidation rates, the AOB and AOA amoA gene abundances and the community structures of both groups based on T-RFLP of amoA genes were determined. Straw amendment during 50 years had not altered any of the measured soil parameters, while the addition of peat resulted in a significant increase of soil organic carbon as well as a decrease in pH. Nitrogen fertilization alone resulted in a small decrease in soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, but an increase in primary production. Type and amount of organic matter had an impact on the AOB and AOA community structures and the AOA abundance. Our findings confirmed that AOA are abundant in soil, but showed that under certain conditions the AOB dominate, suggesting niche differentiation between the two groups at the field site. The large differences in potential rates between treatments correlated to the AOA community size, indicating that they were functionally more important in the nitrification process than the AOB. The AOA abundance was positively related to addition of labile organic carbon, which supports the idea that AOA could have alternative growth strategies using organic carbon. The AOB community size varied little in contrast to that of the AOA. This indicates that the bacterial ammonia oxidizers as a group have a greater ecophysiological diversity and potentially cover a broader range of habitats.

Wessen, E.; Nyberg, K.; Jansson, J.K.; Hallin, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

2013 Propane Market Outlook  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

3 3 Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing the Propane Industry Through 2020 P R E S E N T E D B Y : Prepared for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) by: ICF International, Inc. 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 Tel (703) 218-2758 www.icfi.com Principal Authors: Mr. Michael Sloan msloan@icfi.com Mr. Warren Wilczewski wwilczewski@icfi.com Propane Market Outlook at a Glance ¡ Total consumer propane sales declined by more than 17 percent between 2009 and 2012, including 3.3 percent in 2011 and 10 to 12 percent in 2012. The declines in 2011 and 2012 were due primarily to much warmer than normal weather, as well as the impact of higher propane prices and continuing efficiency trends. Sales are expected to rebound in 2013 with a return to more

439

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012

440

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Admin- istration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). Projections in IEO2007 are divided according to Organi- zation for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and non-members (non-OECD). There are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term outlook carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

International Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1997 April 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

442

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (IEO2006) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administra- tion (EIA) of the outlook for international energy mar- kets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2006 are consistent with those published in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), which was pre- pared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2006 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associa- tions, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Orga- nization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). IEO2006 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Non- marketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included

443

International Energy Outlook 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 International Energy Outlook 1995 May 1995 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts The International Energy Outlook is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). General questions concerning the contents of the report should be referred to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Arthur T. Andersen (202/586-1441), Director, Energy Demand and Integration Division;

444

Annual Energy Outlook 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) Annual Energy Outlook 1999 With Projections to 2020 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222).

445

Annual Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1998 With Projections to 2020 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administra- tion and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other or- ganization. The Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Informa- tion Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA's National Energy Modeling

446

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

447

Annual Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2) 2) December 2001 Annual Energy Outlook 2002 With Projections to 2020 December 2001 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Scott Sitzer (ssitzer@ eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2308), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; Susan H. Holte (sholte@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-4838), Director, Demand and Integration Division; James M. Kendell (jkendell@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-9646), Director, Oil and Gas Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor. For ordering information and questions on other energy statistics available from EIA, please contact EIA's National

448

Electric Industry Outlook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outlook Outlook Challenges and Opportunities that Impact EEI Members and Their Federal Customers Steve Kiesner Director National Customer Markets Federal Utility Partnership Working Group May 22, 2013 San Francisco, CA Agenda ï‚› Necessary infrastructure investments to address: ï‚› Reliability ï‚› Environmental and other policy requirements ï‚› And continue the development of a grid for the 21 st Century ï‚› Our move to natural gas and what it means to customers ï‚› How technology is changing our world and those of our customers ï‚› Potential Federal-Utility Partnerships with Electrification as a transportation fuel 2 Infrastructure Investments Richard McMahon Vice President, Finance and Energy Supply Commission lays out U.S. energy efficiency roadmap through 2030

449

Annual Energy Outlook 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

96) 96) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1996 With Projections to 2015 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/ 586-1130),

450

Annual Energy Outlook 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Annual Energy Outlook 1997 With Projections to 2015 December 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 1997 (AEO97) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, under the direction of Mary J. Hutzler (mhutzler@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222). General questions may be addressed to Arthur T. Andersen (aanderse@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1441),

451

International energy outlook 1994  

SciTech Connect

The International Energy Outlook 1994 (IEO94) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets between 1990 and 2010. The report is provided as a statistical service to assist energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. These forecasts are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Depart. of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO94 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1993-which means that provisions of the Climate Change Action Plan unveiled by the Administration in mid-October are not reflected by the US projections.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Gas Supply: Outlook for Critical New Sources to Meet Growing Gas Requirements: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outlook for natural gas supplies is pivotal to long-term changes in the U.S. generation mix and to immediate costs of electricity. The price shock of 2000-01 was followed by another in 2002-03, and prices remain anomalously high. A sea change in expectations for natural gas is taking place, driven primarily by persistent difficulties expanding supplies in the face of accelerating depletion. This report assesses the lackluster recent gas supply response and the outlook for two major emerging sources, ...

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

453

Carbon Sequestration in European Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments...

454

World Energy Outlook 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OECD/IEA - OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 To Cover... To Cover To Cover ... ... Transport Energy and CO 2 Where are we going? What are the dangers? How do we change direction? Primarily reporting on: IEA WEO 2008 IEA ETP 2008 On-going work with IEA's Mobility Model One or two detours to talk about modelling © OECD/IEA - 2008 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 14 000 16 000 18 000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Mtoe Other renewables Hydro Nuclear Biomass Gas Coal Oil World energy demand expands by 45% between now and 2030 - an average rate of increase of 1.6% per year - with coal accounting for more than a third of the overall rise Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook 2008 Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook Where are we headed? World Energy Outlook

455

author regarding possible amendments. Long Term Contracts vs. Short-Term Trade of Natural Gas – A European Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the economics of long-term gas contracts under changing institutional conditions, mainly gas sector liberalisation. The paper is motivated by the increasingly tense debate in continental Europe, UK and the US on the security of long-term gas supply. We discuss the main issues regarding long-term contracts, i.e. the changing role of the flexibility clause, the effect of abandoning the destination clause, and the strategic behaviour of producers between long-term sales and spot-sales. The literature suggests consumers and producers benefit from risk hedging through long-term contracts. Furthermore long-term contracts may reduce exercise of market power. Our analysis adds an additional benefit if the long-run demand elasticity is significantly higher than the short-run elasticity, both strategic producers and consumers benefit from lower prices and larger market volume. Some policy implications of the findings are also discussed.

Karsten Neuhoff; Christian Von Hirschhausen; Karsten Neuhoff; Christian Von Hirschhausen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage Key Issues Prices Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Production and Imports Carbon Emissions Key Issues Important energy issues addressed in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) include, among others, the ongoing restructuring of U.S. electricity markets, near-term prospects for world oil markets, and the impacts of energy use on carbon emissions. AEO2000 reflects the restructuring of U.S. electricity markets and the shift to increased competition by assuming changes in the financial structure of the industry. Ongoing efficiency and operating improvements are also assumed to continue. The projections assume a transition to full competitive pricing in States with specific deregulation plans—California, New York, New England, the Mid-Atlantic States, Illinois, Texas, Michigan, Ohio, Arizona, and New Mexico. Other States are assumed to continue cost-of-service electricity pricing. The provisions of the California legislation regarding stranded cost recovery and price caps are included. In other regions, stranded cost recovery is assumed to be phased out by 2008.

457

What do near-term observations tell us about long-term developments in greenhouse gas emissions?  

SciTech Connect

Long-term scenarios developed by integrated assessment models are used in climate research to provide an indication of plausible long-term developments in the global energy system and land-use patterns and the associated emissions. The phenomena that determine these longterm developments (several decades or even centuries) are very different than those that operate on a shorter time-scales (a few years). Nevertheless, in the literature, we still often find direct comparisons between short-term observations and long-term developments that do not take into account the differing dynamics over these time scales. In this letter, we discuss some of differences between the factors that operate on in the short and long term and use long-term historical emissions trends to show that short-term observations are very poor indicators of long-term future emissions developments. Based on this, we conclude that the performance of long-term scenarios should be evaluated against the appropriate, corresponding long-term variables and trends. The research community may facilitate this by developing appropriate data sets and protocols that can be used to test the performance of long-term scenarios and the models that produce them.

Van Vuuren, Detlef; Edmonds, James A.; Smith, Steven J.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Karas, Joseph F.; Kainuma, M.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Riahi, Keywan; van Ruijven, Bas; Swart, Robert; Thomson, Allison M.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

Calcifying Cyanobacteria - The potential of biomineralization for Carbon Capture and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Carbon Sequestration,: 2001:1?14.   33.  expansion of biological carbon sequestration of atmosphericcontrary, for long-term carbon sequestration it is important

Jansson, Christer G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Modeling the Long-Term Market Penetration of Wind in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Long-Term Market Penetration of Wind in the United States July 2003 * NREL/CP-620-34469 W. Short, N. Blair, D. Heimiller, and V. Singh Presented at the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) WindPower 2003 Conference Austin, Texas May 21, 2003 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

460

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Alan Meier Long-standing trends in the energy efficiency of computing promise an explosion in data collected from mobile sensors, controls, and portable computing devices. This talk will describe the research that revealed those efficiency trends and the implications of those trends for our ability to understand and respond to the world around us. The talk will also summarize work in progress characterizing related trends in mobile communications, sensors, batteries, and energy harvesting. A recording of this talk will be available on the UCB Energy and Resources

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461

Towards an Improved High Resolution Global Long-Term Solar Resource Database  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of an ongoing project to develop and deliver a solar mapping processing system to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using the data sets that are planned for production at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). NCDC will be producing a long-term radiance and cloud property data set covering the globe every three hours at an approximate resolution of 10 x 10 km. NASA, the originators of the Surface meteorology and Solar Energy web portal are collaborating with SUNY-Albany to develop the production system and solar algorithms. The initial result will be a global long-term solar resource data set spanning over 25 years. The ultimate goal of the project is to also deliver this data set and production system to NREL for continual production. The project will also assess the impact of providing these new data to several NREL solar decision support tools.

Stackhouse, Jr., P. W.; Cox, S. J.; Chandler, W. S.; Hoell, J. M.; Zhang, T.; Westberg, D.; Perez, R.; Hemker, C.; Schlemmer, J.; Renne, D.; Sengupta, M; Bates, J.; Knapp, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible Electrification and Mitigation: Long-Term GHG Deep-Cut Scenario Compatible with Economic Development Speaker(s): Taishi Sugiyama Date: August 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Lynn Price We have analyzed scenarios of Japanese energy systems in the 21st century with special focus on the electrification and climate change mitigation. We have described the causality pathway as to how the major drivers will have impacts on the structure of energy systems and found the followings: (1) Steady electrification in the building sector is expected driven by technological progresses and social change in the absence of climate change policy; (2) With strong greenhouse gas emission constraints, the combination of accelerated electrification across all sectors and

463