Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation Title Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 -...

2

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexico’s energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexico’s crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexico’s electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario – investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario – analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martínez; Autónoma México; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martínez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

China's Building Energy Demand: Long-Term Implications from a Detailed Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China’s building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China’s building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China’s building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China’s building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool Earth - Innovative Energy Technology Plan," (14) AgencySuper-Long-Term Energy Technology Roadmap (Super-Long-TermTechnology Strategy Map (Energy Technology Strategy 2007),"

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent and its electricity demand at 19 Mtoe. If wastemeet water heating and electricity demand in the residentialJournal Vol.4, No.4 electricity demand, fuel requirements

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the present level. Natural gas demand is expected to avoid2030 to 2050, however, natural gas demand will fall slowly

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency and in the coke manufacturing efficiency in thesystems and next-generation coke ovens. Demand for steamingsystems and next-generation coke ovens. Steaming coal

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higlily efficient natural gas power generation) Developing Ccoal natural gas thermal power generation Sources : Preparednatural gas demand will fall slowly because of improvements in L N G thermal power generation

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tons oil equivalent (Mtoe) 700 i Sources : Estimates byas nuclear, oil will be the most important energy sourcenuclear energy, oil will be the most important energy source

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primaryF Y 2050. As a result, non-fossil energy sources (nuclear,the reference scenario, non-fossil energy sources' share of

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be expected to reduce energy consumption by about 15% (=(69-sectors expanded energy consumption on a lull in Fig. 4-1factors behind energy consumption, we have paid attention to

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy sources (excluding hydro and geothermal)C O ; Hydro and 4 Po geothermal energies I Nuclear Gas I OilNuclear Hydro/geothermal Renewables Primary energy supply

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-firedetc. • Wind power • Solar • Geothermal ^ Hydro O LO CO CT> Chydro and geothermal) are assumed to expand their share of electric utilities' power

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Density Forecasting for Long-Term Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term electricity demand forecasting plays an important role in planning for future generation facilities and transmission augmentation. In a long-term context, planners must adopt a probabilistic view of potential peak demand levels. Therefore density forecasts (providing estimates of the full probability distributions of the possible future values of the demand) are more helpful than point forecasts, and are necessary for utilities to evaluate and hedge the financial risk accrued by demand variability and forecasting uncertainty. This paper proposes a new methodology to forecast the density of long-term peak electricity demand. Peak electricity demand in a given season is subject to a range of uncertainties, including underlying population growth, changing technology, economic conditions, prevailing weather conditions (and the timing of those conditions), as well as the general randomness inherent in individual usage. It is also subject to some known calendar effects due to the time of day, day of week, time of year, and public holidays. A comprehensive forecasting solution is described in this paper. First, semi-parametric additive models are used to estimate the relationships between demand and the driver variables, including temperatures, calendar effects and some demographic and economic variables. Then the demand distributions are forecasted by using a mixture of temperature simulation, assumed future economic scenarios, and residual bootstrapping. The temperature simulation is implemented through a new seasonal bootstrapping method with variable blocks. The proposed methodology has been used to forecast the probability distribution of annual and weekly peak electricity demand for South Australia since 2007. The performance of the methodology is evaluated by comparing the forecast results with the actual demand of the summer 2007–2008.

Rob J. Hyndman; Shu Fan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model's parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Hwang, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model`s parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Hwang, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

In this analysis, the authors projected Japan's energy demand/supply and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions to 2050. Their analysis of various scenarios indicated that Japan's CO{sub 2} emissions in 2050 could be potentially reduced by 26-58% from the current level (FY 2005). These results suggest that Japan could set a CO{sub 2} emission reduction target for 2050 at between 30% and 60%. In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050 from the present level, Japan will have to strongly promote energy conservation at the same pace as an annual rate of 1.9% after the oil crises (to cut primary energy demand per GDP (TPES/GDP) in 2050 by 60% from 2005) and expand the share of non-fossil energy sources in total primary energy supply in 2050 to 50% (to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions per primary energy demand (CO{sub 2}/TPES) in 2050 by 40% from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclear power will account for 60%, solar and other renewable energy sources for 20%, hydro power for 10% and fossil-fired generation for 10%, indicating substantial shift away from fossil fuel in electric power supply. Among the mitigation measures in the case of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 60% in 2050, energy conservation will make the greatest contribution to the emission reduction, being followed by solar power, nuclear power and other renewable energy sources. In order to realize this massive CO{sub 2} abatement, however, Japan will have to overcome technological and economic challenges including the large-scale deployment of nuclear power and renewable technologies.

Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Azevedo, Ines Lima

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Challenges for Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Long-Term Energy Models: Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency James Sweeney Stanford University Director, Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency Professor, Management Science and Engineering Presentation to EIA 2008 Energy Conference 34 ! Years of Energy Information and Analysis Some Modeling History * Original Federal Energy Administration Demand Models in PIES and IEES (1974) - Residential, Industrial, Commercial Sectors * Econometric models * Dynamic specification * Allowed matrix of own-elasticities and cross- elasticities of demand for PIES and IEES - Electricity, Natural Gas, Oil, Coal - Designed to examine implications of changes in energy prices, taxes, price regulation - For analysis of "energy conservation" options, estimate of direct impacts used as reduction of

20

Long-term global nuclear energy and fuel cycle strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Vision Project is examining, using scenario building techniques, a range of long-term nuclear energy futures. The exploration and assessment of optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies is an essential element of the study. To this end, an established global E{sup 3} (energy/economics/environmental) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed using this multi-regional E{sup 3} model, wherein future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term demographic (population, workforce size and productivity), economic (price-, population-, and income-determined demand for energy services, price- and population-modified GNP, resource depletion, world-market fossil energy prices), policy (taxes, tariffs, sanctions), and top-level technological (energy intensity and end-use efficiency improvements) drivers. Using the framework provided by the global E{sup 3} model, the impacts of both external and internal drivers are investigated. The ability to connect external and internal drivers through this modeling framework allows the study of impacts and tradeoffs between fossil- versus nuclear-fuel burning, that includes interactions between cost, environmental, proliferation, resource, and policy issues.

Krakowski, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SERI photovoltaic venture analysis: long term demand estimation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a sectoral demand analysis for photovoltaic power systems used in the residential sector (single family homes), the service, commercial, and institutional sector (schools), and in the central power sector. The results described are the output of a set of three normative modeling activities carried out by the MIT Energy Laboratory. They are based on the assumption that the sectors, i.e., the utilities, schools, and homeowners, will switch to photovoltaic power systems when they are cost-effective relative to the competition, that is, centralized power generation using conventional fuels. In each case the assumption is made that the market for photovoltaic power systems will be a new market, not a retrofit market. As a result the annual (total for utilities) sales potential at a given price is estimated for each sector assuming a specific level of new installations in that sector, i.e., new single-family homes, new schools, and additions to utility stocks. As such, the results presented are maxima for a given application. While the methodology presented does not allow for any early acceptors, it does assume that once economic all new homeowners, school-builders, and utilities will buy to a fixed level.

Tabors, R.D.; Finger, S.; Burns, A.; Carpenter, P.; Dinwoodie, T.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Name Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Implementation, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/pubs/61 Country Zambia UN Region Eastern Africa References Zambia-Long-Term Generation Expansion Study[1] Abstract The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. Overview "The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. The

23

Long-Term Stewardship Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. Long-Term Stewardship Study More Documents & Publications EIS-0226: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0226: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report

24

Long-Term Stewardship Study | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study Long-Term Stewardship Study The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. Long-Term Stewardship Study More Documents & Publications Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact Sheet (September 2013) Chairs Meeting - April 2010

25

Incorporating endogenous demand dynamics into long-term capacity expansion power system models for Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research develops a novel approach to long-term power system capacity expansion planning for developing countries by incorporating endogenous demand dynamics resulting from social processes of technology adoption. ...

Jordan, Rhonda LeNai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) Long-term Energy Plan (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 2007 State Ontario Program Type Climate Policies Industry Recruitment/Support Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Provider Ontario Ministry of Energy Currently, Ontario's electricity system has a capacity of approximately 35,000 MW of power. The Ontario Power Authority forecasts that more than 15,000 MW will need to be renewed, replaced or added by 2030.

27

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center WELCOME TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP RESOURCE CENTER The purpose of this web site is to provide the public and the Department of Energy's (DOE) community with a variety of information resources for long-term stewardship (LTS) responsibilities. LTS includes the physical controls, institutions, information and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites or portions of sites where DOE has completed or plans to complete "cleanup" (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, corrective actions, removal actions and facility stabilization) and where legacy contamination will remain hazardous. The DOE's Legacy Management (LM) procedures for DOE sites

28

Long Term Operation of Renewable Energy Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a renewable energy project, a building was designed and constructed to demonstrate several renewable energy technologies at the Wind Test Center of the Alternative Energy Institute (AEI). The systems are passive and active heating, solar hot water, daylighting, passive cooling, and generation of electricity from a 10 kW wind turbine and 1.9 kW of photovoltaic panels, each connected to the utility grid through inverters. Since 1991, 16,900 kWh have been purchased and 31,300 kWh returned to the utility grid. A significant portion of the purchased power has been used in charging our electric van. The building does not have auxiliary heating or cooling systems powered by fossil fuels. A data acquisition system monitors building, exterior, and system temperatures as well as power outputs of the wind and PV systems. The data are sampled at 1 Hz and averaged each 15 minutes. Annual, seasonal and diurnal patterns are shown in graphical format. Temperatures for the coldest days of winter and hottest summer days are also presented.

Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Davis, D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center FAQS IS DOE RESPONSIBLE FOR LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP IF DOE TRANSFERS PROPERTY TO A PUBLIC ENTITY? By Order from the Secretary of Energy, The DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration must comply with Order 454.1: Use of Institutional Controls, www.directives.doe.gov/directives/0454.1-APolicy/view. The Order requires DOE to maintain institutional controls as long as necessary to perform their intended protective purposes and to seek sufficient funds. DOE must also determine whether responsibility for required institutional controls on transferred property can be maintained by subsequent owners consistent with applicable law. If this implementation responsibility cannot be

30

Diversity in OECD energy consumption: Achievements and long-term goals  

SciTech Connect

Energy consumption in the industrialized world has resumed a rising trend but has been moderated by increased energy efficiency. The demand for energy is also being spread more evenly over a variety of fuels. This paper provides a measure for diversity and examines the implications for energy prices, while reiterating the long-term goal of lower energy consumption.

Heal, D.W. (Univ. College of Wales, Aberystwyth (England))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Samish Indian Nation Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Tribes strategic energy planning effort is divided into three phases: (1) Completing an Energy Resource Assessment; (2) Developing a Long-Term Strategic Energy Plan; and (3) Preparing a Strategic Energy Implementation Plan for the Samish Homelands. The Samish Indian Nation developed a comprehensive Strategic Energy plan to set policy for future development on tribal land that consists of a long-term, integrated, systems approach to providing a framework under which the Samish Community can use resources efficiently, create energy-efficient infrastructures, and protect and enhance quality of life. Development of the Strategic Energy plan will help the Samish Nation create a healthy community that will sustain current and future generations by addressing economic, environmental, and social issues while respecting the Samish Indian Nation culture and traditions.

Christine Woodward; B. Beckley; K. Hagen

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: South Africa Long Term Mitigation Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization: South Africa Department of Environment Affairs and Tourism Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Background analysis, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Scenario_team-LTMS_Scenarios Country: South Africa Southern Africa Coordinates: -30.559482°, 22.937506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-30.559482,"lon":22.937506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paul Holtberg, Moderator Paul Holtberg, Moderator April 26, 2011 | Washington, D.C. Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives Speakers 2 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * John Conti, Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis, Energy Information Administration * Mark Finley, General Manager, Global Energy Markets and U.S. Economics, BP * Douglas Meade, Director of Research, INFORUM Forecasts/projections and uncertainty 3 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * Forecast or projections? * Know your analyst * Tools * Uncertainty - Basic underlying trends (e.g., population growth, economic growth, social norms) - Technology (e.g., new technologies, improved technology, breakthroughs vs. evolutionary, new applications)

35

California Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (CPUC, 2008) The Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (Plan) was developed through a collaborative process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan (CPUC, 2008) The Long Term Energy Efficiency together over an elevenmonth period. This Plan sets forth a roadmap for energy efficiency in California costeffective deep levels of energy efficiency improvements including building shell upgrades, highefficiency

36

Long-Term Stewardship Related Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication & Engagement » Long-Term Stewardship » Communication & Engagement » Long-Term Stewardship » Long-Term Stewardship Related Information Long-Term Stewardship Related Information DOE Orders & Policies DOE O 200.l - Information Management Program, 09/30/1996 DOE O 430.1B - Real Property Asset Management, 09/24/2003 DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, 11/29/2010 DOE O 458.1 Chg 2, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, 06/06/2011 DOE O 430.1B Chg 2, Real Property and Asset Management, 09/24/2003 DOE P 454.1 - Use of Institutional Controls, 04/09/2003 and Guidance DOE Home Page for Guidance and Resources for LTS-related Requirements DOE Documents - Transition from Cleanup to LTS Site Transition Process upon Completion of the Cleanup Mission: Fact

37

Long Term World Oil Supply - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Long-Term World Oil Supply Scenarios. The Future Is Neither as Bleak or Rosy as Some Assert. By. John H. Wood, Gary R. Long, David F. Morehouse Conventionally ...

38

China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Agency/Company /Organization Government of China Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.beconchina.org/ener Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China EE[1] Overview "Energy conservation is a long-term strategic guideline in China's economic and social development, and an extremely urgent matter at present. The NDRC has therefore formulated the Plan of Energy Conservation, which aims to push the whole society towards energy conservation and energy intensity reduction, to remove energy bottlenecks, to build an energy

39

Static Equilibrium: Forecasting Long-Term Energy Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a static equilibrium model that can be used by power companies to analyze retirement and investment decisions. Given deterministic expectations of prices, technology alternatives, and growth rates, the model defines a long-term equilibrium for an electricity market that can be used as a practical starting point for analyzing dynamic equilibrium, the distribution of outcomes associated with investment and retirement in a probabilistic world. The report includes a spreadsheet that ca...

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY ISSUES WORKING GROUP ON LONG-TERM VISIONS FOR FUSION POWER Don Steiner, Jeffrey Freidberg Farrokh Najmabadi William Nevins , and John Perkins The Energy Issues Working Group on Long-Term Visions energy production in the next century? 2. What is fusion's potential for penetrating the energy market

Najmabadi, Farrokh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japan Long-Term Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering EnergyResidential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Long-Term Global Trade-Offs Related to Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

An overall comparative assessment of different energy systems and their potential long-term role in contributing to a sustainable energy mix is examined through the use of a global, long-term Energy, Economics, Environment (E{sup 3}) model. This model is used to generate a set of surprise-free futures that encompass a range of economic potentialities. The focus of this study is nuclear energy (NE), and the range of possible futures embodies extrema of NE growth [a Basic Option (BO)] to an NE Phase Out (PO). These NE scenario extrema are expressed against a background that reflects E{sup 3} circumstances ranging from a Business-As-Usual (BAU) to one that is Ecologically Driven (ED), with the latter emphasizing price-induced reductions in greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions associate with a mix of fossil energy sources. Hence, four ''views-of-the-future'' scenarios emerge to form the framework of this study: BAU/BO, BAU/PO, ED/BO, and ED/PO. Model results ranging from (regional and temporal) primary- and nuclear-energy demands, carbon-dioxide emissions, nuclear-material (plutonium) accumulations and attendant proliferation-risk implications, Gross National Product (GNP) impacts, and a range of technology requirements provide essential input to the subject assessment.

Krakowski, R.A.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coal investment and long-term supply and demand outlook for coal in the Asia-Pacific Region  

SciTech Connect

The theme of this symposium to look ahead almost a quarter century to 2020 gives one the freedom to speculate more than usual in projections for coal. It is important to attempt to take a long term look into the future of coal and energy, so that one can begin to prepare for major changes on the horizon. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the crystal ball for making long term projections is accurate for 2020. Hopefully it can suggest plausible changes that have long term strategic importance to Asia`s coal sector. This paper presents the medium scenario of long term projects of coal production, consumption, imports and exports in Asia. The second part of the paper examines the two major changes in Asia that could be most important to the long term role of coal. These include: (1) the impact of strict environmental legislation on energy and technology choices in Asia, and (2) the increased role of the private sector in all aspects of coal in Asia.

Johnson, C.J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission, Enerdata, in collaboration with LEPII Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Greenhouse Gas Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.enerdata.net/docssales/press-office-20th-world-energy-congress.pdf Cost: Free Related Tools Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) WorldScan SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook

45

Long-Term Modeling of the California Energy System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy systems and climate policies. Some issues specific to modeling the California energy system will be discussed, including building equipment efficiency and electricity trade....

46

Role of the breeder in long-term energy economics  

SciTech Connect

Private and public decisions affecting the use of nuclear and other energy technologies over a long-run time horizon were studied using the ETA-MACRO model which provides for economic- and energy-sector interactions. The impact on the use of competing energy technologies of a public decision to apply benefit-cost analysis to the production of carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere is considered. Assuming the public choice is to impose an appropriate penalty tax on those technologies which generate CO/sub 2/ and to allow decentralized private decisions to choose the optimal mix of energy technologies that maximize a nonlinear objective function subject to constraints, the study showed that breeder technology provides a much-larger share of domestically consumed energy. Having the breeder technology available as a substitute permits control of CO/sub 2/ without significant reductions in consumption or gross national product growth paths.

Kosobud, R.F.; Daly, T.A.; Chang, Y.I.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) On 11 February 2011, the Department replaced its DOE Order 5400.5 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Chg 2, dated 1-7-93 except for Chapter III (-Derived Concentration Guides for Air and Water‖) and Figure IV-1 (-Surface Contamination Guidelines‖) with a new DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection and the Environment. In DOE Order 458.1, DOE establishes more requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation (including long-term stewardship requirements) associated with radiological activities conducted under the control of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to the Atomic

48

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar...

49

China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment  

SciTech Connect

We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

50

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A long-term investment planning model for mixed energy infrastructure integrated with renewable- mental friendly. Compared with fossil energy, it is expensive to transport renewable energy for a long distance. Another problem of renewable energy is fluctuation and it is not so stable as fossil energy

51

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

52

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

53

Integrating short-term demand response into long-term investment planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mentioned sources of flexibility are offered by the supply-side of the power system. However, integration of smart grid technologies in the electric power system [5], for example though smart meters, creates opportunities to more efficiently balance... – Cedric.DeJonghe@esat.kuleuven.be, Tel. +32 16 32 17 22, Fax +32 16 32 19 85 - University of Leuven (K.U.Leuven) Energy Institute, ELECTA branch (Electric Energy and Computer Architectures), Kasteelpark Arenberg 10 box 2445 / B-3001 Heverlee / Belgium...

De Jonghe, Cedric; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Belmans, Ronnie

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long-Term Strategic Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long-Term Strategic Planning to Inform Policy Development/University Cooperative Research Center since 1996 PSERC #12;Intentionally Blank Page #12;U.S. Energy Infrastructure Research Center program under which PSERC was created. #12;U.S. Energy Infrastructure Investment: Long

55

Long-Term US Industrial Energy Use and CO2 Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a description and scenario results from our recently-developed long-term model of United States industrial sector energy consumption, which we have incorporated as a module within the ObjECTS-MiniCAM integrated assessment model. This new industrial model focuses on energy technology and fuel choices over a 100 year period and allows examination of the industrial sector response to climate policies within a global modeling framework. A key challenge was to define a level of aggregation that would be able to represent the dynamics of industrial energy demand responses to prices and policies, but at a level that remains tractable over a long time frame. In our initial results, we find that electrification is an important response to a climate policy, although there are services where there are practical and economic limits to electrification, and the ability to switch to a low-carbon fuel becomes key. Cogeneration of heat and power using biomass may also play a role in reducing carbon emissions under a policy constraint.

Wise, Marshall A.; Sinha, Paramita; Smith, Steven J.; Lurz, Joshua P.

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) What's New for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) https://www.directives.doe.gov/directives/0458.1-BOrder/view On 11 February 2011, the Department replaced its DOE Order 5400.5 Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Chg 2, dated 1-7-93 except for Chapter III (-Derived Concentration Guides for Air and Water‖) and Figure IV-1 (-Surface Contamination Guidelines‖) with a new DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection and the Environment. In DOE Order 458.1, DOE establishes more requirements to protect the public and the environment against undue risk from radiation (including long-term stewardship requirements) associated with radiological activities conducted under the control of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to

57

Designing indicators of long-term energy supply security. Energy research Centre of the Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report brings out results of a pre-study commissioned by the Netherlands Environmental Assessment agency, MNP. These are due to serve as inputs in the imminent Sustainability Outlook, being prepared by MNP and CPB. The authors thank Joop Oude Lohuis, Jacco Farla, Bert de Vries, and Detlef van Vuuren and co-reader Michiel van Werven for constructive input and comments. The ECN reference number of the present research activity is 7.7551. To our knowledge, so far amazingly little research work has been undertaken to construct meaningful indicators of long-run energy supply security for a particular nation or region. Currently, in addressing energy supply security, policy makers tend to emphasise short-term supply disruptions. In contrast, this pre-study accords with the broader Sustainability Outlook in considering the long-term perspective. This report starts with taking stock, in a concise way, of the official EU energy outlook and issues related to the opportunities to administer changes in the energy mix at the level of major energy use categories. Then a brief survey of relevant literature is made on long-term strategies to ensure survival of systems- be it biological, social, etc.- in an environment largely characterised by high uncertainty and a lot of unchartered territory. We

W. G. Van Arkel; M. G. Boots Acknowledgement

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Implications of Long-Term Trends in the Energy Efficiency of Computing and Communications Speaker(s): Jonathan Koomey Date: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Alan Meier Long-standing trends in the energy efficiency of computing promise an explosion in data collected from mobile sensors, controls, and portable computing devices. This talk will describe the research that revealed those efficiency trends and the implications of those trends for our ability to understand and respond to the world around us. The talk will also summarize work in progress characterizing related trends in mobile communications, sensors, batteries, and energy harvesting. A recording of this talk will be available on the UCB Energy and Resources

59

Planning India's long-term energy shipment infrastructures for electricity and coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Purdue Long-Term Electricity Trading and Capacity Expansion Planning Model simultaneously optimizes both the expansion of transmission and generation capacity. Most commercial electricity system planning software is limited to only transmission planning. An application of the model to India's national power grid, for 2008-2028, indicates substantial transmission expansion is the cost-effective means of meeting the needs of the nation's growing economy. An electricity demand growth rate of 4% over the 20-year planning horizon requires more than a 50% increase in the Government's forecasted transmission capacity expansion, and 8% demand growth requires more than a six-fold increase in the planned transmission capacity expansion. The model minimizes the long-term expansion costs (operational and capital) for the nation's five existing regional power grids and suggests the need for large increases in load-carrying capability between them. Changes in coal policy affect both the location of new thermal power plants and the optimal pattern inter-regional transmission expansions. 15 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Brian H. Bowen; Devendra Canchi; Vishal Agarwal Lalit; Paul V. Precke; F.T. Sparrow; Marty W. Irwin [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). Energy Center at Discovery Park

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Long-Term Surveillance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 LMS/ESL/S10692 ESL-RPT-2013-03 This page intentionally left blank LMS/ESL/S10692 ESL-RPT-2013-03 Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance FY 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 Doc. No. S10692 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Preliminary long-term stability criteria for compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air storage caverns, which are an essential and integral component of a CAES plant, should be designed and operated so as to perform satisfactorily over the intended life of the overall facility. It follows that the long-term ''stability'' of air storage caverns must be considered as a primary concern in projecting the satisfactory operation of CAES facilities. As used in the report, ''stability'' of a storage cavern implies the extent to which an acceptable amount of cavern storage volume can be utilized with routine maintenance for a specified time interval, e.g., 35 years. In this context, cavern stability is relative to both planned utilization and time interval of operation. The objective of the study was to review the existing literature and consult knowledgeable workers in the storage industry, and then report state-of-the-art findings relative to long-term stability of compressed air energy storage caverns in salt domes. Further, preliminary cavern stability criteria were to be presented in a form consistent with the amount of information available on cavern performance in salt domes. Another objective of the study was to outline a methodology for determining the long-term stability of site-specific CAES cavern systems in salt domes.

Thoms, R.L.; Martinez, J.D.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Free World energy survey: historical overview and long-term forecast  

SciTech Connect

This report gives a historical overview of international energy markets from the 1950s to date, and an analysis of future energy prices, economic growth, and potential supply instabilities. Forecasts of energy demand by region and fuel type are provided.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Long-term Energy Supply Contracts in European Competition Policy: Fuzzy not Crazy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term supply contracts often have ambiguous effects on the competitive structure, investment and consumer welfare in the long term. In a context of market building, these effects are likely to be worsened and thus even ...

Glachant, Jean-Michel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

65

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

66

Fast Reactor Technology: A Path to Long-Term Energy Sustainability Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that the development and deployment of advanced nuclear reactors based on fast-neutron fission technology is important to the sustainability, reliability, and security of the world’s long-term energy supply. Of the known and proven energy technologies, only nuclear fission can provide the large quantities of energy required by industrial societies in a sustainable and environmentally acceptable manner. Natural uranium mined from the earth's crust is composed primarily of two isotopes: 99.3 % is U-238, and 0.7 % is the fissile U-235. Nearly all current power reactors are of the “thermal neutron” design, and their capability to extract the potential energy in the uranium fuel is limited to less than 1 % of that available. The remainder of the potential energy is left unused in the spent fuel and in the uranium, depleted in U-235, that remains from the process of enriching the natural uranium in the isotope U-235 for use in thermal reactors. With known fast reactor technology, this unutilized energy can be harvested, thereby extending by a hundred-fold the amount of energy extracted from the same amount of mined uranium. Fast reactors can convert U-238 into fissile material at rates faster than it is consumed making it economically feasible to utilize ores with very low uranium concentrations and potentially even

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

Flynn, W.T.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Study of Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN Jump to: navigation, search Name Study of Long-Term Transport Action Plan for ASEAN Agency/Company /Organization Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Institution for Transport Policy Studies (ITPS), Clean Air Asia, Transport Research Laboratory (TRL), Mizuho Information & Research Institute (MHIR) Partner Nippon Foundation, Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Transport Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cleanairinitiative.org/

69

An adaptive intelligent algorithm for forecasting long term gasoline demand estimation: The cases of USA, Canada, Japan, Kuwait and Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents an adaptive intelligent algorithm for forecasting gasoline demand based of artificial neural network (ANN), conventional regression and design of experiment (DOE). To show the superiority and applicability of the proposed algorithm ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Design of experiment, Forecasting, Gasoline consumption, Multi-Layer Perceptron, Regression

A. Azadeh; R. Arab; S. Behfard

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sustaining Long-Term Energy Savings for a Major Texas State Agency Performance Contracting Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Mental Health and Mental Retardation agency, now part of the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, was challenged to deal with regularly deteriorating infrastructure at twentythree large campuses located throughout the state during large statewide budget cuts in 2003. Repair and replacement funding was considerably reduced with costs amounting to more than $250 million. The agency therefore decided to take advantage of new state legislation passed in the prior biennium allowing state agencies to use utility savings performance contracting as a means to replace aging and inefficient equipment. In such contracts, the utility savings will pay for the more efficient equipment cost over a fifteen-year period. The utility savings are measured over the life of the contract in order to ensure the savings stream and maintain the savings guarantee. The agency chose an energy services firm specializing in performance contracting. This company uses a utility bill analysis software tool based on cooling degree-days and heating degree-days. To date, savings have accrued for over two years for the first phase of the project and are presented in this paper for one of the measured electric meters. This paper focuses on the on-going savings stream to demonstrate the importance of continued measurement and verification on a representative meter at the Austin State Hospital located in Austin, Texas. In this paper, the Energy Services Company (ESCO) savings results are compared to savings results calculated from a regression analysis software package using average outdoor air temperature data and actual preand post-retrofit data. The software used as the comparison calculates simple mean, two-parameter (2P), three-parameter (3P) change point, or fourparameter (4P) change point models to be used as the utility baseline. To accurately account for the guaranteed savings, it is necessary to apply detailed as well as practical measurement and verification techniques. The agency continues to work closely with the ESCO to generate a savings persistence program that both parties can effectively put into practice; thus ensuring long-term goals are met.

Culp, C.; Bou-Saada, T. E.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Long Term Innovative Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's Hydrogen and DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, Fuel Cell Presolicitation Workshop Bryan Pivovar With Input/Feedback from Rod Borup (LANL), Debbie Myers (ANL), DOE and others as noted in presentation Lakewood, CO March 16, 2010 Long Term Innovative Technologies National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Innovative/Long Term and RELEVANT Mission of DOE Mission of EERE (Applied Program) Mission of HFCT To enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells in diverse sectors of the economy-with emphasis on applications that will most effectively strengthen the nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment-through research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies, and through diverse activities to overcome

72

www.elsevier.com/locate/solener LONG-TERM PERSPECTIVE ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOLAR ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—We use dynamic optimization methods to analyze the development of solar technologies in light of the increasing scarcity and environmental pollution associated with fossil fuel combustion. Learning from solar R&D efforts accumulates in the form of knowledge to gradually reduce the cost of solar energy, while the scarcity and pollution externalities associated with fossil fuel combustion come into effect through shadow prices that must be included in the effective cost of fossil energy. Accounting for these processes, we characterize the optimal time profiles of fossil and solar energy supply rates and the optimal investment in solar R&D. We find that the optimal rate of fossil energy supply should decrease over time and vanish continuously upon depletion of the fossil fuel reserves, while the optimal supply of solar energy should gradually increase and eventually take over the entire energy demand. The optimal solar R&D investment should initially be set at the highest feasible rate, calling for early engagement in solar R&D programs, long

Yacov Tsur; Amos Zemel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On- going Mission Sites February 2012 Introduction Long-term stewardship (LTS) includes the physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, removal actions, and facility stabilization). This concept includes land-use controls, information management, monitoring and maintenance. DOE has ongoing mission areas related to advancing energy and nuclear security, promoting scientific discovery and innovation, and ensuring environmental responsibility

74

Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO{sub 2} quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste incineration continues to treat the largest amount of waste. Investments in new waste incineration capacity may, however, be superseded by investments in new Waste-to-Energy technologies, particularly those utilising sorted fractions such as organic waste and refuse derived fuel. The changed use of waste proves to always affect a combination of technologies. What is affected varies among the different Waste-to-Energy technologies and is furthermore dependent on the CO{sub 2} quota costs and on the geographical scope. The necessity for investments in flexibility measures varies with the different technologies such as storage of heat and waste as well as expansion of district heating networks. Finally, inflexible technologies such as nuclear power plants are shown to be affected.

Muenster, M., E-mail: maem@risoe.dtu.d [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Meibom, P. [Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Long-Term Testing of Protective Coatings and Claddings at Allegheny Energy Supply Hatfield's Ferry #2 Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Excessive waterwall corrosion due to the presence of iron sulfide (FeS) deposits was discovered in an Allegheny Energy Supply boiler firing eastern bituminous coal and retrofitted with a low-nitrogen oxide (NOx) cell burner (LNCB) system. Weld overlays with a high chromium (Cr) content reduced corrosion rates to tolerable levels. This report summarizes EPRI's long-term service tests of various coatings and weld overlays in the company's Hatfield's Ferry #2 boiler.

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website http:www-pub.iaea.orgMTCDp References MAED 21 "MAED model evaluates future energy demand based on medium- to long-term scenarios of socio-economic,...

77

Long-Term Stewardship Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Long Term Stewardship Office of Long Term Stewardship LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP STUDY Volume I - Report Prepared to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement: Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998). Final Study October 2001 - i - Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and 38 other plaintiffs [Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998)]. The Study describes and analyzes several issues and a variety of information associated with long-term stewardship. The Study

78

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand for Nuclear Weapons . . . 4.3 ProliferationZero: Is Pursuing a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World Too Difficult?Accidents, and Nuclear Weapons. Princeton University Press,

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.3.2 Nuclear Energy System Model . . . . . . . . . . .Brief History of Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . Nuclear FuelModeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 Nuclear Energy System

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Brief History of Nuclear Energy . . . . . . . . NuclearBrief History of Nuclear Energy The history of nuclear powerRisk The history of nuclear energy to date reflects

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, LawrenceF.P. "Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer- Second

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors.of International Solar Energy Congress, New Delhi, India.Thermal Storage of Solar Energy 11 , Amsterdam, The

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

85

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report, National Nuclear Security Administration, Departmentproliferation and security risks of nuclear energy systemsthe proliferation and security risk posed by nuclear energy

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

Walton, M. [Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62% of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108{degrees}C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were <30{degrees}C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site. 25 refs.

Walton, M. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Achieving long-term operation with a capacitor-driven energy storage and sharing network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is the most precious resource in sensor networks. The ability to move energy around makes it feasible to build distributed energy storage systems that can robustly extend the lifetime of networked sensor systems. eShare supports the concept ... Keywords: Energy, capacitor, embedded system, green, networks

Ting Zhu; Yu Gu; Tian He; Zhi-Li Zhang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Evaluation of the long-term energy analysis program used for the 1978 EIA Administrator's Report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP), a computer model of the energy portion of the US economy that was used for the 1995-2020 projections in its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, is presented. An overview of the 1978 version, LEAP Model 22C, is followed by an analysis of the important results needed by its users. The model is then evaluated on the basis of: (1) the adequacy of its documentation; (2) the local experience in operating the model; (3) the adequacy of the numerical techniques used; (4) the soundness of the economic and technical foundations of the model equations; and (5) the degree to which the computer program has been verified. To show which parameters strongly influence the results and to approach the question of whether the model can project important results with sufficient accuracy to support qualitative conclusions, the numerical sensitivities of some important results to model input parameters are described. The input data are categorized and discussed, and uncertainties are given for some parameters as examples. From this background and from the relation of LEAP to other available approaches for long-term energy modeling, an overall evaluation is given of the model's suitability for use by the EIA.

Peelle, R. W.; Weisbin, C. R.; Alsmiller, Jr., R. G.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic energy for bombs are in much of their course inter- changeable and interdependent. ” – Acheson-Lilienthal Report[

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the heels of the Manhattan Project, nuclear energy tookmeans. Following early Manhattan Project efforts at thermal

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental Aspects of Nuclear Reactor Fuel Elements.June 2010. [10] Wendy Allen. Nuclear Reactors for Generatingnuclear energy development. Nuclear reactor and fuel cycle

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use and Greenhouse Gasto Development of Long-Term Energy Demand Scenarios forto Development of Long-Term Energy Demand Scenarios for

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Long-Term Modeling of Wind Energy in the United States  

SciTech Connect

An improved representation of wind energy has been developed for the ObjECTS MiniCAM integrated assessment modeling framework. The first version of this wind model was used for the CCTP scenarios, where wind accounts for between 9% and 17% of U.S. electricity generation by 2095. Climate forcing stabilization policies tend to increase projected deployment. Accelerated technological development in wind electric generation can both increase output and reduce the costs of wind energy. In all scenarios, wind generation is constrained by its costs relative to alternate electricity sources, particularly as less favorable wind farm sites are utilized. These first scenarios were based on exogenous resource estimates that do not allow evaluation of resource availability assumptions. A more detailed representation of wind energy is under development that uses spatially explicit resource information and explicit wind turbine technology characteristics.

Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Wise, Marshall A.; Lurz, Joshua P.; Barrie, Daniel

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Achieving A Long Term Business Impact by Improving the Energy Effectiveness and Reliability of Electric Motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 100,000 electric motors drive the production equipment throughout a large chemical company. The energy-efficiency and reliability of these motors during their entire life have a decided impact on the company's manufacturing costs and production capability. The Corporate Motor Technology Team (CMTT) conceived and led a program to optimize the cost effectiveness and reliability of new motors and developed criteria to determine whether to repair or replace motors that fail. The higher energy efficiency of the electric motors offered by vendors today plays a crucial role in these decisions. The company's current motor specification, procurement, maintenance, repair and replacement practices are vastly improved and consistent across the corporation. The 1995 savings attributed to the higher energy efficiency of over 2000 motors installed the prior year amount to $570,000 and will continue to accrue year after year. So will the savings stemming from lower maintenance cost and reduced downtime.

Whelan, C. D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Addressing Global Warming, Air Pollution Health Damage, and Long-Term Energy Needs Simultaneously  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollution simultaneously, namely wind- and solar energy for electric power, electric vehicles and diesel vehicles currently cause. 4) Studies to date suggest little reduction or an exacerbation of global estimates of the effects of cellulosic ethanol on global warming to date are premature and low. 6) Wind

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

98

University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Long-Term Modeling of Solar Energy: Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) and PV Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an overview of research conducted on solar energy technologies and their implementation in the ObjECTS framework. The topics covered include financing assumptions and selected issues related to the integration of concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics PV technologies into the electric grid. A review of methodologies for calculating the levelized energy cost of capital-intensive technologies is presented, along with sensitivity tests illustrating how the cost of a solar plant would vary depending on financing assumptions. An analysis of the integration of a hybrid concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) system into the electric system is conducted. Finally a failure statistics analysis for PV plants illustrates the central role of solar irradiance uncertainty in determining PV grid integration characteristics.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Validation Framework for the Long Term Preservation of High Energy Physics Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study group on data preservation in high energy physics, DPHEP, is moving to a new collaboration structure, which will focus on the implementation of preservation projects, such as those described in the group's large scale report published in 2012. One such project is the development of a validation framework, which checks the compatibility of evolving computing environments and technologies with the experiments software for as long as possible, with the aim of substantially extending the lifetime of the analysis software, and hence of the usability of the data. The framework is designed to automatically test and validate the software and data of an experiment against changes and upgrades to the computing environment, as well as changes to the experiment software itself. Technically, this is realised using a framework capable of hosting a number of virtual machine images, built with different configurations of operating systems and the relevant software, including any necessary external dependencies.

Dmitri Ozerov; David M. South

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

102

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Amchitka, Alaska, Site  

SciTech Connect

This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan describes how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to fulfill its mission to maintain protection of human health and the environment at the Amchitka, Alaska, Site1. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. The U.S. Department of Defense, in conjunction with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), conducted the first nuclear test (Long Shot) to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. The final nuclear test (Cannikin), the largest United States underground test, was a weapons-related test. Surface disturbances associated with these tests have been remediated. However, radioactivity remains deep below the surface, contained in and around the test cavities, for which no feasible remediation technology has been identified. In 2006, the groundwater model (Hassan et al. 2002) was updated using 2005 data collected by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation. Model simulation results indicate there is no breakthrough or seepage of radionuclides into the marine environment within 2,000 years. The Amchitka conceptual model is reasonable; the flow and transport simulation is based on the best available information and data. The simulation results are a quantitative prediction supported by the best available science and technology. This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan is an additional step intended for the protection of human health and the environment. This plan may be modified from time to time in the future consistent with the mission to protect human health

None

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

104

Long-Term Climate and Derived Surface Hydrology and Energy Flux Data for Mexico: 1925–2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studying the role of land surface conditions in the Mexican portion of the North American monsoon system (NAMS) region has been a challenge due to the paucity of long-term observations. A long-term gridded observation-based climate dataset ...

Chunmei Zhu; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of high-temperature [>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)] aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. [Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

Tatro, C.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Univariate modeling and forecasting of monthly energy demand time series using abductive and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neural networks have been widely used for short-term, and to a lesser degree medium and long-term, demand forecasting. In the majority of cases for the latter two applications, multivariate modeling was adopted, where the demand time series is related ... Keywords: Abductive networks, Energy demand, Medium-term load forecasting, Neural networks, Time series forecasting, Univariate time series analysis

R. E. Abdel-Aal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

LONG TERM THERMAL STABILITY IN AIR OF IONIC LIQUID BASED ALTERNATIVE HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS FOR CLEAN ENERGY PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term aging on the thermal stability and chemical structure of seven different ILs so as to explore their suitability for use as a heat transfer fluid. This was accomplished by heating the ILs for 15 weeks at 200°C in an oxidizing environment and performing subsequent analyses on the aged chemicals.

Fox, E.

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Long Term Thermal Stability In Air Of Ionic Liquid Based Alternative Heat Transfer Fluids For Clean Energy Production  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term aging on the thermal stability and chemical structure of seven different ILs so as to explore their suitability for use as a heat transfer fluid. This was accomplished by heating the ILs for 15 weeks at 200?C in an oxidizing environment and performing subsequent analyses on the aged chemicals.

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Long-Term Surveillance Plan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AL/62350-235 AL/62350-235 REV. 1 LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE ESTES GULCH DISPOSAL SITE NEAR RIFLE, COLORADO November 1997 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (615) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Estes Gulch Disposal Site Near Rifle... http://lts1.lm.doe.gov/documents/rfl/ltsp.html 1 of 25 5/20/2009 1:38 PM Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division UMTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico

115

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Estimating disaggregated price elasticities in industrial energy demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Econometric energy models are used to evaluate past policy experiences, assess the impact of future policies and forecast energy demand. This paper estimates an industrial energy demand model for the province of Ontario using a linear-logit specification for fuel type equations which are embedded in an aggregate energy demand equation. Short-term, long-term, own- and cross-price elasticities are estimated for electricity, natural gas, oil and coal. Own- and cross-price elasticities are disaggregated to show that overall price elasticities and the energy-constant price elasticities when aggregate energy use is held unchanged. These disaggregations suggest that a substantial part of energy conservation comes from the higher aggregate price of energy and not from interfuel substitution. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

Elkhafif, M.A.T. (Ontario Ministry of Energy, Toronto (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption per ton steel #12;Industrial Energy EfficiencyIndustrial Energy Efficiency Policy Analysis intensity trends and policy background · Focus on Industrial Energy Efficiency · Policy analysis PrimaryEnergy(Mtce) Commercial Buildings Residential Buildings Transportation Industry China 0 500 1,000 1

Knowles, David William

118

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Outlook positive over long term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends established in 1987 will be very important in reestablishing some level of confidence in future price expectations. The authors expect prices to fluctuate widely in the coming year as OPEC makes and breaks various production quota agreements. Continued price instability will certainly all but negate short term marginally economic exploration and development prospects. Utilization rates will suffer accordingly. But on the positive side, the long term outlook is considerably more stable. Rock-bottom prices will increase the demand for cheap oil substantially. We're already seeing world demand figures rise. Increased demand will cause the world's (mainly OPEC's) excess production to be depleted over the next three to five years. Prices will rise slowly in parallel with the decline in excess production capacity over several years. Banking on upward price pressure, financially sound operators with solid cash flow will want to take advantage of low exploration and development costs. Utilization, then, can be expected to follow oil prices in a slow upward spiral over the next three to five years. Next year, the industry should begin to feel the effect of the beginning of that upward trend.

Not Available

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Long-term testing  

SciTech Connect

Land-based gas turbines are significantly different from automotive gas turbines in that they are designed to operate for 50,000 h or greater (compared to 5,000--10,000 h). The primary goal of this research is to determine the long-term survivability of ceramic materials for industrial gas turbine applications. Research activities in this program focus on the evaluation of the static tensile creep and stress rupture (SR) behavior of three commercially available structural ceramics which have been identified by the gas turbine manufacturers as leading candidates for use in industrial gas turbines. For each material investigated, a minimum of three temperatures and four stresses will be used to establish the stress and temperature sensitivities of the creep and SR behavior. Because existing data for many candidate structural ceramics are limited to testing times less than 2,000 h, this program will focus on extending these data to times on the order of 10,000 h, which represents the lower limit of operating time anticipated for ceramic blades and vanes in gas turbine engines. A secondary goal of the program will be to investigate the possibility of enhancing life prediction estimates by combining interrupted tensile SR tests and tensile dynamic fatigue tests in which tensile strength is measured as a function of stressing rate. The third goal of this program will be to investigate the effects of water vapor upon the SR behavior of the three structural ceramics chosen for the static tensile studies by measuring the flexural strength as a function of stressing rate at three temperatures.

Ferber, M.; Graves, G.A. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

122

Long Term Innovative Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States' energy security, environmental quality, and economic vitality in public-private partnerships. It supports this goal through: * Enhancing energy efficiency and...

123

A dynamic model of industrial energy demand in Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyses the effects of input price movements, technology changes, capacity utilization and dynamic mechanisms on energy demand structures in the Kenyan industry. This is done with the help of a variant of the second generation dynamic factor demand (econometric) model. This interrelated disequilibrium dynamic input demand econometric model is based on a long-term cost function representing production function possibilities and takes into account the asymmetry between variable inputs (electricity, other-fuels and Tabour) and quasi-fixed input (capital) by imposing restrictions on the adjustment process. Variations in capacity utilization and slow substitution process invoked by the relative input price movement justifies the nature of input demand disequilibrium. The model is estimated on two ISIS digit Kenyan industry time series data (1961 - 1988) using the Iterative Zellner generalized least square method. 31 refs., 8 tabs.

Haji, S.H.H. [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

125

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

126

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Exploratory Long-Term Exploratory Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Batteries Battery Systems Applied Battery Research Long-Term Exploratory Research Ultracapacitors Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines

128

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

129

Long-Term Surveillance Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~- ~- 1 .. I I . I I I ' I I I I I t I ' 1 .. ~ * -. . * * , . -. * . - l' ** ... * . DOE/Al/62350-60F ~--- - · ---,~REV. 1 CONTROLLED COPY NO. United States Department of Energy LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN fOR THE SHIPROCK DISPOSAL SITE; SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO September 1994 Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche. Number of pages in this report: 1 1 3 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (615) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce

130

eShare: A Capacitor-Driven Energy Storage and Sharing Network for Long-Term Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circuit with a DC/DC converter for powering the embedded sensor device that is attached to the energy.g., environmental energy or DC power supply). However, these diverse energy sources in- troduce a challenge from less than 1mA for environmental energy to more than 10A for DC power supply). If the charging con

Zhang, Zhi-Li

131

eShare: a capacitor-driven energy storage and sharing network for long-term operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to move energy around makes it feasible to build distributed energy storage systems that can robustly extend the lifetime of networked sensor systems. eShare supports the concept of energy sharing among multiple embedded sensor ... Keywords: capacitor, embedded system, energy, green, networks

Ting Zhu; Yu Gu; Tian He; Zhi-Li Zhang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Long-Term Environmental Stewardship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Long-Term Environmental Stewardship The Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Program ensures protection of human health and the environment, following site remediations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Continuing environmental commitment Long-term stewardship activities are designed to prevent exposures to residual contamination and waste including groundwater monitoring ongoing pump-and-treatment activities maintenance of barriers and other contaminant structures periodic inspections control of site access posted signs Long-term environmental stewardship (LTES) data access DOE requires that data used to make decisions concerning LTES conditions be readily accessible to the public. To accomplish this, sample analysis data

133

Planning for the Transition to Long-Term Stewardship at Three U.S. Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a pilot study that resulted in the generation of draft planning documents for the upcoming transition from remediation construction to long-term stewardship at three national laboratories managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Chicago Operations Office (CH). The remediation construction work at these facilities is being completed under the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) Program. Once the remediation is complete, the responsibility for long-term stewardship (LTS) of the closed waste sites is expected to be transferred to the DOE organization responsible for managing each of the three facilities (i.e., the site landlord). To prepare for this transfer, an extensive planning effort is required. This pilot study utilized the DOE guidance in effect at the time to (1) develop a series of documents identifying applicable requirements that the LTS Programs will need to satisfy, issues that need to be resolved before the transfer can proceed, and criteria to be used to determine when active remediation is complete and a given site is ready for transfer to the LTS Program; (2) examine alternate structures for possible LTS Programs; and (3) develop draft LTS Implementation Plans. This advanced planning effort yielded a number of observations and lessons learned that are applicable to any facility approaching the end of its remediation construction phase.

Moos, L. P.; Ditmars, J. D.; Heston, S. L.; Granzen, G. A.; Holzemer, M. J.; Bennett, D. B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

135

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

136

Long-Term Surveillance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NRC in the referenced letter have been addressed and are reflected in this submittal. This Long Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) is intended to satisfy the requirements set forth in 10 CFR 40.28 whereby the long-term custodian must provide an LTSP to the NRC as a step in the licensing/license termination process. Please call me at (970) 248-6037 if you have questions. Sincerely, Enclosures cc w/enclosure:

Mail Stop Ta; M. Plessinger Mactec-ers

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanResearch Program California Energy Commission November 7,Chris Kavalec. California Energy Commission. CEC (2003a)

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 (16) NEDO, "Wind Power Generation Roadmap," 2005 (17)from 2005). Concerning power generation mix in 2050, nuclearintroduction of nuclear power generation is assumed from the

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vol.4, No.4 followed by solar power, nuclear Fig. 2 powersources including solar power will expand substantially.P V and concentrated solar power generation. As a result,

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline (with a 3% bioethanol content) under the referencefrom Brazil and other bioethanol producing countries. We2050. Biofuels (including bioethanol) have been globally

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation Roadmap toward 2030 (PV2030)," 2004 (16) NEDO, "new nuclear plants by 2030, as assumed for the referencegradually in or after 2030. These systems are estimated to

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feasibility of new nuclear power plant construction may growadditional expansion of nuclear power plant, and CCS (carbonconstruct 13 nuclear power plants (with a total capacity of

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higlily efficient electricity distribution equipments (in electricity transmission and distribution equipments by

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial furnaces/processes (SCOPE 2 I next-generation coke ovens,industrial sector will repair and improve existing production processes and introduce next-generation coke ovens

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 1,500-degree-Celsius combined cycle plants. Oil thermalintegrated gasification combined cycle) and other highlyof 1,700-degree-Celsius combined cycle generation systems.

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o f tedinologies Ibi nuclear, solar PV aid other new energj'cell vehicles In 2050: Solar PV generation at 100 millionvehicles) in 2050 In 2050: Solar PV generation at 40 million

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-Term Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Demonstration of Sorbent Enhancement Additive Technology for Mercury Control In this project, The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center...

148

Long Term World Oil Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: The following pages summarize a recent EIA presentation on estimates of the world conventional oil resource base and the year when production from it will peak and then begin to decline. A version of this presentation was given by former EIA Administrator Jay Hakes to the April 18, 2000 meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in New Orleans, Louisiana. Specific information about this presentation may be obtained from John Wood (john.wood@eia.doe.gov), Gary Long (gary.long@eia.doe.gov) or David Morehouse (david.morehouse@eia.doe.gov). Long Term World Oil Supply http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld001.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:23 PM] Slide 2 of 20 http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentations/2000/long_term_supply/sld002.htm [8/10/2000 4:56:24 PM]

149

Short and Long-Term Perspectives: The Impact on Low-Income Consumers of Forecasted Energy Price Increases in 2008 and A Cap & Trade Carbon Policy in 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released its short-term forecast for residential energy prices for the winter of 2007-2008. The forecast indicates increases in costs for low-income consumers in the year ahead, particularly for those using fuel oil to heat their homes. In the following analysis, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has integrated the EIA price projections with the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 in order to project the impact of these price increases on the nation's low-income households by primary heating fuel type, nationally and by Census Region. The report provides an update of bill estimates provided in a previous study, "The Impact Of Forecasted Energy Price Increases On Low-Income Consumers" (Eisenberg, 2005). The statistics are intended for use by policymakers in the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program and elsewhere who are trying to gauge the nature and severity of the problems that will be faced by eligible low-income households during the 2008 fiscal year. In addition to providing expenditure forecasts for the year immediately ahead, this analysis uses a similar methodology to give policy makers some insight into one of the major policy debates that will impact low-income energy expenditures well into the middle decades of this century and beyond. There is now considerable discussion of employing a cap-and-trade mechanism to first limit and then reduce U.S. emissions of carbon into the atmosphere in order to combat the long-range threat of human-induced climate change. The Energy Information Administration has provided an analysis of projected energy prices in the years 2020 and 2030 for one such cap-and-trade carbon reduction proposal that, when integrated with the RECS 2001 database, provides estimates of how low-income households will be impacted over the long term by such a carbon reduction policy.

Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

151

Collaborative methods in social movement organizing : a case study of long-term alliance development and energy efficiency planning in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some social movement organizations have begun to use collaborative methods to create decentralized network power for shared action through long-term alliance development and participation in collaborative public decision-making ...

Mackres, Eric Benjamin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy Basics: Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters. How Demand Water Heaters Work Demand...

153

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response Duke Energy is using the name “Save-a-Energy Efficiency Division. Duke Energy describes all of itsPresident, and C.E.O. Duke Energy Kateri Callahan President

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

One: The California Long-Term Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA LONG-TERM OUTLOOK Tom K. Lieser, ExecutiveThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," TheThe California Long-Term Outlook: Projections to 2020," The

Lieser, Tom K

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

156

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

157

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

158

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

159

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

160

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Residential sector: the demand for energy services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to project the demand for residential services, and, thereby, the demand for energy into the future. The service demands which best represent a complete breakdown of residential energy consumption is identified and estimates of the amount of energy, by fuel type, used to satisfy each service demand for an initial base year (1978) are detailed. These estimates are reported for both gross (or input) energy use and net or useful energy use, in the residential sector. The various factors which affect the consumption level for each type of energy and each identified service demand are discussed. These factors include number of households, appliance penetration, choice of fuel type, technical conversion efficiency of energy using devices, and relative energy efficiency of the building shell (extent of insulation, resistance to air infiltration, etc.). These factors are discussed relative to both the present and expected future values, for the purpose of projections. The importance of the housing stock to service demand estimation and projection and trends in housing in Illinois are discussed. How the housing stock is projected based on population and household projections is explained. The housing projections to the year 2000 are detailed. The projections of energy consumption by service demand and fuel type are contrasted with the various energy demand projections in Illinois Energy Consumption Trends: 1960 to 2000 and explains how and why the two approaches differ. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term. Volume 2, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependence in natural gas usage. January typically sees theindustrial fuels usage. Natural gas demand has been risinggas demands regionally, to account for variability in energy usage

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Power UsageSetpoint (°C) Peak Electric Demand Power Usage Effective-Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Scenario

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

167

Environmental Management Long-Term Stewardship Transition Guidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after the completion of facility cleanup. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. This report describes the background of long-term stewardship and gives general guidance about considerations when ownership and/or responsibility of a site should be transferred to a long-term stewardship program. This guidance document will assist the U.S. Department of Energy in: (a) ensuring that the long-term stewardship program leads transition planning with respect to facility and site areas, and (b) describing the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete.

Kristofferson, Keith

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation section in the U.S. Department section in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;ppaappeerr ttoo bbeeLBNL-292E Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards

169

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy-Efficient Dry-Type Distribution Transformers: New Opportunities to Cut Energy Bills and Lock-in Long-Term Energy Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly 90% of the electricity that powers the industrial sector flows through dry-type distribution transformers. These transformers are very efficient- most convert in excess of 95% of input power to output power. However, because transformers are generally energized 24 hours per day, 365 days per year, even small efficiency improvements can yield big energy and dollar savings for power users. Until now, energy-efficient dry-type transformers have been hard to identify. As a result, most users either have failed to specify efficiency at all or relied on the imperfect indicator of low temperature rise. Most manufactures have not offered an "energy-efficient" product line. Now, the National Electrical Manufacturers' Association (NEMA), the transformer manufacturers' trade association, has published a standard defining energy-efficient transformers. This new standard, NEMA standard TP-1, makes it easier for vendors, specifiers, contractors and end-users to identify and determine the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficient transformers. In addition, some manufacturers are beginning to offer equipment lines specifically designed to meet the energy efficiency levels defined in NEMA standard TP-1.

deLaski, A.; Suozzo, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced Energy Storage Infrastructure in UC San Diego's Microgrid Speaker(s): Byron Washom Date: August 14, 2008 -...

172

The Integration of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Demand...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Integration of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Demand Response and Climate Change: Challenges and Opportunities for Evaluators and Planners Title The Integration of Energy...

173

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast. Miguel Garcia

174

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

175

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Long-Term Wind Power Variability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

Wan, Y. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A residential energy demand system for Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharp price fluctuations and increasing environmental and distributional concerns, among other issues, have led to a renewed academic interest in energy demand. In this paper we estimate, for the first time in Spain, an ...

Labandeira Villot, Xavier

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long term, customer and utility smart grid investments inlocal air pollution. As smart grid technologies, widespreadControlled Appliances “Smart Grid Compatible” by 2015. <

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 22 July 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance

180

Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Site Transition Framework (STF) provides a framework for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and sites where DOE may have anticipated long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact Now it is Britain's turn to think harder, says Brian both are true. Most predict that fossil fuels must remain a significant part of our energy supply, Britain has had a comfortable and profitable respite from anxieties about security of energy supply. Now

Cambridge, University of

182

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

183

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. The federally-sponsored nuclear technology programs of the United States are almost exclusively the province of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The nuclear energy areas in DOE include, but are not limited to, R&D related to power reactors and the responsibility for the waste management system for final disposition of the spent fuel resulting from nuclear power reactors. Although a major use of nuclear technology is to supply energy for electricity production, the DOE has far broader roles regarding nuclear

184

Statement by Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman on House Passage of H.R. 6- Creating Long-Term Energy Alternatives for The Nation Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"I'm pleased that the new Congress is joining us in taking our nation's energy security seriously.  And I look forward to working with the Congress as it works on this and other energy legislation...

185

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

step is to calculate energy service demand in each category,mainly determine the energy service demand while pricesthe energy source. In both energy service demand and energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance  

SciTech Connect

Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energy’s (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOE’s long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOE’s cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

Kristofferson, Keith

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05.pdf Edward Beimborn Center for Urban Transportation Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Presentation to the District IV Conference Institute of Transportation Engineers June, 2005, updated September

Saldin, Dilano

188

Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

Letters: Energy demand prediction using GMDH networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry is in transition as it moves towards a competitive and deregulated environment. In this emerging market, traditional electric utilities as well as energy traders, power pools and independent system operators (ISOs) need the ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Energy demand, Forecasting, Group method of data handling (GMDH) networks, Self-organizing networks

Dipti Srinivasan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off- site energy demand (2030) 20% decrease to parameter 20%off-site energy demand (2030) 20% decrease to parameter 20%off-site energy demand (2030) 20% decrease to parameter 20%

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand for renewable fuels increasing the fastestincluding E85 and biodiesel fuels for light-duty vehicles, biomass for co-firing at coal-fired electric power plants, and...

192

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Speaker(s): Sebastien Houde Date: September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne The goal of this talk is to discuss two interrelated research projects that aim to assess the welfare effects of energy policies that rely on standards and information. The first project focuses on the Energy Star certification program. Using unique micro-data on the US refrigerator market, I first show that consumers respond to certification in different ways. Some consumers appear to rely heavily on Energy Star and pay little attention to electricity costs, others are the reverse, and still others appear to be insensitive to both electricity costs and Energy Star. I then develop a

193

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement...

195

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg251500.pdf....

196

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings Title Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings Publication Type Thesis Year of...

197

South Korea-ANL Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea-ANL Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side Management in South Korea Agency...

198

Modeling the residential demand for energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand for energy is derived from the demand for services that appliances and energy together provide. This raises a number of serious econometric issues when estimating energy-demand functions: delineation of short-run and long-run household responses, specification of the price variable and in particular, the assumption that the model is recursive, or in other words, that the appliance choice equation and the energy consumption equation are uncorrelated. The dissertation utilizes a structural model of energy use whose theoretical underpinnings derive from the conditional logit model and an extension of that model to the joint-discrete/continuous case by Dubin and McFadden (1980). It uses the 1978 to 1979 National Interim Energy Comsumption Survey. Three appliance portfolio choices are analyzed; choice of water and space heating and central air-conditioning; choice of room air conditioners; and choice of clothes dryers, either as multinomial logit or binary probit choices. Results varied widely across the appliance choice considered; use of Hausman's test led to acceptance of the null hypothesis of orthogonality in some cases but not in others. Demand for electricity and natural gas tended to be price inelastic; however, estimated own-price effects differed considerably when disaggregated by appliance categories and across methods of estimation.

Kirby, S.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandDirect DemandDirect Jump to: navigation, search Name DemandDirect Place Woodbury, Connecticut Zip 6798 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation services to end-use electricity customers in order to reduce electricity consumption, improve grid reliability, and promote renewable energy. Coordinates 44.440496°, -72.414991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.440496,"lon":-72.414991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Policy implications of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand to 2015, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The summary of the 1997 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand discusses the implications of the projection that are important for GRI strategic planning and scenario development, and for the gas industry. The projection indicates that with adequate technology advances, natural gas will play a major role in an increasingly competitive energy mix well into the next century. It is expected that the expansion in gas markets experienced over the last decade will continue over the long term.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Management Institute (DMI) Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address 35 Walnut Street Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip 02481 Sector Buildings Product Provides analysis for buildings on reducing energy use Website http://www.dmiinc.com/ Coordinates 42.3256508°, -71.2530294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3256508,"lon":-71.2530294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

204

Economic efficiency, IRPs and long term contracts  

SciTech Connect

There is no market failure that warrants utility regulation of the construction of new generating plants, the supply of energy efficiency or the purchase of fuel under contract. The natural monopoly problem applies to the distribution of electricity and gas, not to generation, energy conservation, or gas purchases. Utility regulation magnifies a market failure, which is the principal agent problem. Regulatory allowance of utilities signing long term fixed price contracts and undertaking conservation measures result in costs and risks being shifted to ratepayers that would not occur under competitive market conditions. Economic efficiency would be enhanced if cost of service regulation of electric and gas utilities were replaced by a competitive market process for the construction of new power plants, utility conservation programs and contracts to purchase fuel. Conservation measures could be supplied by energy service companies. Gas merchants could provide gas and energy conservation directly to ultimate customers, if they had access to LDC pipelines. With a competitive market established to sell gas and energy services, contracts and conservation measures would not require cost-of- service regulation.

Sutherland, R.J.

1993-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS) to begin pre-a facility using Energy Management Control Systems (EMCS) orAct of 2007 energy management control systems The Energy

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building Title Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy...

207

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand Modeling Energy Demand Modeling The software is intended to be used for Energy Demand Modeling. This can be utilized from regional to national level. A Graphical User Interface of the software takes the input from the user in a quite logical and sequential manner. These input leads to output in two distinct form, first, it develops a Reference Energy System, which depicts the flow of energy from the source to sink with all the losses incorporated and second, it gives a MATLAB script file for advance post processing like graphs, visualization and optimizations to develop and evaluate the right energy mix policy frame work for a intended region. Keywords Reference Energy System, Software, GUI, Planning, Energy Demand Model EDM, Energy Policy Planning Validation/Testing

208

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services provided to the energy markets, Order 745 advancesin the wholesale energy market (both day-ahead and real-the capacity market is. The energy market does not feature

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is determined by the market energy price offered by themay be paid the spot market energy price. (e.g. PJM SRM, UKor the wholesale market price for energy. By codifying the

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Utilities in many states have been implementing energy efficiency and load management programs...

212

Kitchen Table Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20/2012 20/2012 1 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Kitchen Table" Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades 3/20/2012 2 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Although the home performance industry's delivery of comprehensive energy and comfort improvements has been growing across the country, it continues to struggle in creating consumer attention and demand. Our industry's delivery timing is off. We are not yet engaging the homeowner at their sweet spot of making improvements -- right after they purchase a home! This is when they move most aggressively with all sorts of home improvement projects -- and, unfortunately, seldom with any concerns of energy use. I strongly believe the home inspection industry is in a prime position to educate new homeowners on the long-term

213

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

044E 044E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Charles Goldman, Michael Reid, Roger Levy and Alison Silverstein Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2010 The work described in this report was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes

215

Univariate Modeling and Forecasting of Monthly Energy Demand Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this report. #12;i ABSTRACT These electricity demand forms and instructions ask load-serving entities and Instructions for Electricity Demand Forecasts. California Energy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis.................................................................................................................................7 Form 1 Historic and Forecast Electricity Demand

Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

216

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Title Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Fuller, Merrian C., Cathy Kunkel, Mark Zimring, Ian M. Hoffman, Katie L. Soroye, and Charles A. Goldman Tertiary Authors Borgeson, Merrian Pagination 136 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency-they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars1 flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements2, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula-and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs-there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers-especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

217

Energy and Security in Northeast Asia: Supply and Demand, Conflict and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power and hydroelectricity account for 7 percent andnuclear energy and hydroelectricity constitute 5 percent andIn the long term, hydroelectricity production growth will be

Fesharaki, Fereidun; Banaszak, Sarah; WU, Kang; Valencia, Mark J.; Dorian, James P.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric DemandDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ ReturnDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Long-term care and the elderly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term care expenditures represent one of the largest uninsured financial risks facing the elderly. Medicaid provides incomplete insurance against these costs: unlimited nursing home benefits with a deductible equal to ...

Coe, Norma B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030 under EnvironmentalEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy EfficiencyEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Abstract--The implementation of auctions of long-term firm energy call options and forward contracts as part of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for investors, as they enable merchant power plants to sell their electricity for up to 5 years ahead at known) energy production capacity in dry years. For thermal plants, the FEC is given by the available capacity, a thermal plant whose variable operating cost was equal to the rationing cost would have a firm energy

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

222

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW” by 2030, or 14–

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

225

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

226

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

227

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

228

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29 5.6. Peak and hourly demand43 6.6. Peak and seasonal demandthe average percent of peak demand) significantly impact the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Achieving Very High Efficiency and Net Zero Energy in an Existing Home in a Hot-Humid Climate: Long-Term Utility and Monitoring Data (Revised)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study summarizes the first six months of detailed data collected on a single family home that experienced a series of retrofits targeting reductions in energy use. The project was designed to develop data on how envelope modifications and renewable measures can result in considerable energy reductions and potentially net zero energy for an existing home. Originally published in February 2012, this revised version of the report contains further research conducted on the Parker residence. Key updates include one full year of additional data, an analysis of cooling performance of the mini-split heat pump, an evaluation of room-to-room temperature distribution, and an evaluation of plug-in automobile charging performance, electricity consumption, and load shape.

Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Long-Term Wind Speed Trends over Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of long-term linear trends of wind speed provide a useful indicator for circulation changes in the atmosphere and are invaluable for the planning and financing of sectors such as wind energy. Here a large number of wind ...

Alberto Troccoli; Karl Muller; Peter Coppin; Robert Davy; Chris Russell; Annette L. Hirsch

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities o #and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities

Olsen, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2013 November 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis ...

233

Idaho National Laboratory Site Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has established long-term stewardship programs to protect human health and the environment at sites where residual contamination remains after site cleanup. At the Idaho National Laboratory Site, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERLA) long-term stewardship activities performed under the aegis of regulatory agreements, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for the Idaho National Laboratory, and state and federal requirements are administered primarily under the direction of the Idaho Cleanup Project. It represents a subset of all on-going environmental activity at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. This plan provides a listing of applicable CERCLA long-term stewardship requirements and their planned and completed implementation goals. It proffers the Long-Term Stewardship Environmental Data Warehouse for Sitewide management of environmental data. This plan will be updated as needed over time, based on input from the U.S. Department of Energy, its cognizant subcontractors, and other local and regional stakeholders.

B. E. Olaveson

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

236

Chapter 3 Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

these resources result from one of two methods of reducing load: energy efficiency or demand response load management. The energy efficiency method designs and deploys...

237

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities Title Examining Synergies between Energy Management and...

238

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

239

Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...

240

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Industrial Demand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial.gif (5205 bytes) The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's...

242

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

243

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

244

Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites presents a comprehensive knowledge-set of matrix, fiber and interphase behavior under long-term aging conditions, theoretical modeling and experimental methods.This bookcovers long-term constituent ...

Kishore V. Pochiraju; Gyaneshwar P. Tandon; Gregory A. Schoeppner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

EnergySolve Demand Response | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnergySolve Demand Response EnergySolve Demand Response Jump to: navigation, search Name EnergySolve Demand Response Place Somerset, New Jersey Product Somerset-based utility bill outsourcing company that provides electronic utility bill auditing, tariff analysis, late fee avoidance, and flexible bill payment solutions. Coordinates 45.12402°, -92.675379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.12402,"lon":-92.675379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney Disposal Site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

249

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

250

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform - REDRAMP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project description * Subdivision energy efficiency features * Home energy monitoring * Demand side management * Feeder loading * Battery Energy Storage System * Future Work Team Members Project Objective and Methodology * The main objective is to reduce peak power demand of a housing subdivision by 65% (compared to housing development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic Diagram Project Physical Location: Las Vegas, NV Red Rock Hotel/Casino

251

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and...

252

Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Provides a blueprint for protecting...

253

Long-term Preservation and Management of Electronic Health ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term Data Preservation and Management of Electronic Health Records. ... Long-term Data Preservation and Management of EHRs Fact Sheet.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Title A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

255

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Demand Response Quick Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand response quick assessment tool image The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. This assessment tool will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfort impact for various demand responsive strategies. Users of the tool will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tool will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points

256

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the most natural gas usage (33% and 51% of total demanddependence in natural gas usage, and consequently, Januarygas demand exhibits a strong winter peak in residential usage

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Maximum demand, year 2050 electricity consumption reachesefficiency, year 2050 electricity consumption is 357 TWh,capita electricity consumption increases from 7,421 kWh/year

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Long-Term Preservation of Digital Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-Term Preservation of Digital Material { Building an Archive to Preserve Digital Cultural Heritage from the Internet by Andreas Aschenbrenner Digital information has become seemingly ubiquitous, as technology saturates all aspects of our life. Consequently, people become increasingly dependent on digital information and the Internet as a medium for gaining and exchanging information. At the same time, the structure and content of the Internet growingly mirrors society, making it an important part of our modern cultural heritage.

Andreas Aschenbrenner

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both types of programs. Xcel Energy markets both energyEnergy Efficiency Marketing Xcel Energy Paul Suskie Chairman

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites (November 2012) Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

262

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites (November 2012) Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

263

Demand Response Energy Consulting LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Response Energy Consulting LLC Response Energy Consulting LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Response & Energy Consulting LLC Place Delanson, New York Zip NY 12053 Sector Efficiency Product Delanson-based demand response and energy efficiency consultants. Coordinates 42.748995°, -74.185794° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.748995,"lon":-74.185794,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA, and published in the Conference Proceedings Structure of SBEAM Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demandUSA, and published in the Conference Proceedings Structure of SBEAM Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demandUSA, and published in the Conference Proceedings Relative Importance Total off- site energy demand (

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japan’s population, an important factor in predicting residential energy demand as well

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites Long-term stewardship (LTS) includes the physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed or plans to complete cleanup (e.g., landfill closures, remedial actions, removal actions, and facility stabilization). This concept includes land-use controls, information management, monitoring and maintenance. Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites

267

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

268

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project...

269

Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Website Jump to: navigation, search Name Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website Abstract This task of the International Energy Agency is a broad,...

270

1995 Demand-Side Managment - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. Target Audience ... Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side

271

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2012 November 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov

272

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy spillage, operating costs and capacityfocused on renewable energy utilization, cost of operationssystem operating costs, • renewable energy utilization,

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Renewable Energy Integration . . . . . . . . . . .Impacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar in Demand Solar in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? A new study says U.S. developers are likely to install about 3,300 megawatts of solar panels in 2012 -- almost twice the amount installed last year. In case you missed it... This week, the Wall Street Journal published an article, "U.S. Solar-Panel Demand Expected to Double," highlighting the successes of

275

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission [FERC] (2008). Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission [FERC] (2009). A National AssessmentEIS EMCS EMS EPA ESCO ESPC FERC GE HVAC ISO ISO-NE kW kWh MW

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of real-time electricity prices (left) and windinflexible) demand and real-time prices. The case study inas a special case. The real-time price process is modeled as

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy scenarios to explore alternative energy pathways indo not include the alternative energy pathways (such asmodeling to investigate alternative energy supply strategies

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

279

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 16 Annual peak electricity demand by sector. Tableincludes an hourly electricity demand (i.e. power) profileof aggregating sectoral electricity demands into a statewide

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 22. Agricultural natural gas demand by planning area.23. “Other” sector natural gas demand by planning area.Projections Monthly natural gas demands are depicted in

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

282

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

283

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

284

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

285

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

286

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

same or better levels of energy services. ” This definitionSenior Vice President, Energy Services and Technology NewNational Association of Energy Service Companies Chuck Gray

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to managing their energy usage. Greater customer willingnessto managing their energy usage. And greater customera net reduction in energy usage. 5 With sufficient advance

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Regulation Services with Demand Response - Energy Innovation ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; ... (i.e. target ...

290

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achieving all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Thisinvestment in cost-effective energy efficiency. Coordinationto achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. 1

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control system energy management system U.S. Environmentalbuilding energy management systems (EMS) can deliversystem; EMS = energy management system; ISO = independent

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of locational renewable energy production in each renewableto total renewable energy production, although accountingproduction data from the 2006 data set of the National Renewable Energy

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programs Integrated Energy Audit Provide engineeringtechnicians performed energy audits and provided advice to8 PG&E’s Integrated Energy Audit, a program for businesses

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

what if wholesale market energy prices remain low or if CPPwith high prices in the real-time energy market. Nationalmarket prices and reliability circumstances, even though energy

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasting for wind energy: Temperature dependence andlarge amounts of wind energy with a small electric system.Large scale integration of wind energy in the european power

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Limitations to Large-Scale Renewable EnergyImpacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand prepared the residential sector forecast. Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Lynn

298

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director, Energy and Environmental Policy American ForestEnergy Efficiency Partnerships Roger Cooper Executive Vice President, Policy and Planning American

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Energy Research & Development Authority offers incentivesState Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) Existing Facilities Program offers incentives

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. “Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to everyone at the Demand Response Research Center, theEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with CommunicatingEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy  Efficiency and Demand Response in the California 1   4.0   Energy Efficiency and Demand Response 5   4.2.   Demand Response 

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A...

305

Strategies for reducing energy demand in the materials sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research answers a key question - can the materials sector reduce its energy demand by 50% by 2050? Five primary materials of steel, cement, aluminum, paper, and plastic, contribute to 50% or more of the final energy ...

Sahni, Sahil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

307

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new technology and systems integration tools. Energy controland systems that support integration and coordination of energyand systems integration represent key building blocks for enabling greater coordination of energy

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

Lippmann, M.J.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), 2009-07-28 SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological Research Site in Colorado), 2010-12-14 ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News SUMMER 2011 T he ORNL Distrib- uted Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and services useful i n e n v i r o n m e n t a l research. The ORNL D A A C c u r r e n t l y archives and distributes greater than 900 prod- ucts categorized as Field Campaign, Land Validation, Regional and Global, or Model Archive. Please visit us online at http://daac.ornl.gov for a comprehensive description of data, and tools available from the ORNL DAAC. Archived news can be found at http://daac.ornl.gov/ news.shtml. http://www.nasa.gov * Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Subsets

310

CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

312

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

313

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and DemandRenewable Energy, former Distributed Energy Program of theOptimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. Author(s): Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.;

315

Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/57/57/48073739.pdf Cost: Free Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action Screenshot References: Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate Action[1] "This paper highlights the relevant information that needs to be tracked in order to build a comprehensive MRV system for climate finance, proposing

316

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Sector Residential Peak Demand (MW) Commercial IndustrialTable 16. Non-coincident peak demand by sector. growth Avg.IEPR Projected non-coincident peak demand (MW) 3.1.2. Hourly

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Los Alamos National Laboratory: About the Long-Term Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Long-Term Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability Strategy Integrate, measure and enhance The value of a long-term horizon is to consider the nature of environmental...

318

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why is a long-term strategy important? PreviousNext Why is a long-term strategy important? Because we protect the environment. That is our practice today, and it is our commitment...

319

author regarding possible amendments. Long Term Contracts vs. Short-Term Trade of Natural Gas – A European Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the economics of long-term gas contracts under changing institutional conditions, mainly gas sector liberalisation. The paper is motivated by the increasingly tense debate in continental Europe, UK and the US on the security of long-term gas supply. We discuss the main issues regarding long-term contracts, i.e. the changing role of the flexibility clause, the effect of abandoning the destination clause, and the strategic behaviour of producers between long-term sales and spot-sales. The literature suggests consumers and producers benefit from risk hedging through long-term contracts. Furthermore long-term contracts may reduce exercise of market power. Our analysis adds an additional benefit if the long-run demand elasticity is significantly higher than the short-run elasticity, both strategic producers and consumers benefit from lower prices and larger market volume. Some policy implications of the findings are also discussed.

Karsten Neuhoff; Christian Von Hirschhausen; Karsten Neuhoff; Christian Von Hirschhausen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

PRELIMINARY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 2012-2022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRELIMINARY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 2012-2022 AUGUST 2011 CEC-200-2011-011-SD CALIFORNIA or adequacy of the information in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast forecast. Bryan Alcorn and Mehrzad Soltani Nia prepared the industrial forecast. Miguel Garcia- Cerrutti

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

322

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

323

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. This analysis quantifies the relative merit of various technological advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors and presents them graphically as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. Substantial annual energy gains (exceeding 50% at 350/sup 0/C) are shown to be attainable with improved parabolic troughs.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project Erika Zvingilaite Risø DTU System Analysis for optimization of energy systems Environmental effects Global externalities cost of CO2 Future scenarios for the Nordic energy systems 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040, 2050 (energy-production, consumption, emissions, net costs

325

Long-term surveillance plan for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico disposal site  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Ambrosia Lake disposal site in McKinley County, New Mexico, describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the disposal site. The DOE will carry out this program to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Long-term surveillance plan for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico disposal site  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Ambrosia Lake disposal site in McKinley County, New Mexico, describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the disposal site. The DOE will carry out this program to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Workshop on Long-Term Preservation & Management of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop on Long-term Preservation and Management of Electronic Health Records. Purpose: The expected outcomes of the workshop include: ...

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

328

Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Slag Management System for Gasification Operations · Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC Operating Conditions · Advanced ...

329

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook tol i f o r n i a Japan’s Residential Energy Demand Outlook toParticularly in Japan’s residential sector, where energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Statistical analysis of what drives industrial energy demand: Volume III of the PURHAPS model documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall price of energy has far less direct effect on industrial demand than conventional models, such as the Jorgenson translog model, have indicated. Much of what appears to be conservation in recent years can be explained as the result of structural changes (e.g., less steel production), electrification, and a slowdown in the long-term trend towards more use of energy relative to other factors of production. This report documents these findings and the other findings from the statistical analysis used in developing the PURchased Heat And Power System, as used in producing the 1982 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. This report is intended partly to convey these findings to substantive energy experts and energy policy analysts; it is also intended to fulfill EIA requirements for model documentation. Volume I of this series documents the full mathematical specification of the model, including accounting identites and benchmarks; Volume II documents the data used both in the estimation and in the model. Appendix B of this report provides a purely historical breakdown of actual changes in oil and electricity use from 1974 to 1981, showing what changes are due to general economic growth, improved general productivity, etc. preliminary work for the 1983 Annual Energy Outlook is discussed in general terms.

Werbos, P.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XIII%20-%20Demand%20Response%20Resou Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/estimating-demand-response-market-pot Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This resource presents demand response (DR) potential results from top-performing programs in the United States and Canada, as well as a DR

332

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

333

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

334

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

335

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

336

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

337

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

338

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

339

Industrial Demand Module 1999, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Industrial Demand Module 2005, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Industrial Demand Module 2006, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Industrial Demand Module 2009, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

Industrial Demand Module 2003, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Industrial Demand Module 2007, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Industrial Demand Module 2002, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Industrial Demand Module 2001, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Industrial Demand Module 2008, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Industrial Demand Module 2000, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Industrial Demand Module 2004, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/ Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/hydra Cost: Free Language: English References: http://maps.nrel.gov/hydra Logo: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Use HyDRA to view, download, and analyze hydrogen data spatially and dynamically. HyDRA provides access to hydrogen demand, resource, infrastructure, cost, production, and distribution data. A user account is

351

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

event by paying higher real-time prices and still receivingvarying prices (e.g. , real-time prices, CPP) facilitatecorrelated with high prices in the real-time energy market.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedS. (2008). Automated Demand Response Results from Multi-Yearusing Open Automated Demand Response, California Energy

Lekov, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to Peak Demand?..5 3.potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuildings’ contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research resultspotential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuilding’s contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Swarm intelligence approaches to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes two new models based on artificial bee colony (ABC) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey. ABC and PSO electricity energy estimation models (ABCEE and PSOEE) are developed ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Artificial bee colony, Electricity energy estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Swarm intelligence

Mustafa Servet K?Ran; Eren ÖZceylan; Mesut GüNdüZ; Turan Paksoy

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opportunities for Energy  Efficiency and Demand Response in Agricultural/Water End?Use Energy Efficiency Program.    i 1   4.0   Energy Efficiency and Demand Response 

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A study of industrial equipment energy use and demand control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand and duty factors were measured for selected equipment [air compressors, electric furnaces, injection-molding machines, a welder, a granulator (plastics grinder), a sheet metal press and brake, a lathe, a process chiller, and cooling tower pumps and fans] in two industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were found to be near 100 %, for lightly loaded centrifugal equipment (lathe, sheet metal shear and brake, and granulator) near 10 %, and for injection-molding machines near 50 %. The measured demand factors differ from those often estimated during energy surveys. Duty factors for some equipment were found to exceed 100 %, showing that some loads were on for longer periods than that indicated by plant personnel. Comparing a detailed summary of equipment rated loads to annual utility bills, when measurements are not available, can prevent over-estimation of the demand and duty factors for a plant. Raw unadjusted estimates of demand factors of 60 % or higher are often made, yet comparisons of rated loads to utility bills show that some equipment demand factors may be 50 % or less. This project tested a simple beacon alerting system, which used a blue strobe light to alert plant personnel when a preset demand limit had been reached. Tests of load shedding verified that the estimated demand savings of 50 kVA were realized (out of a total demand of almost 1200 kVA) when lighting and air conditioning loads were turned off.

Dooley, Edward Scott

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight

359

Long term performance of radon mitigation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State andand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and

Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Global Energy Demand, Supply, Consequences, Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Joule Population-Energy Equation Power = N x (GDP/N) x (Watts/GDP) C Emission Rate = Power x (Carbon/J) #12;d HVAC Onsite Power & Heat Natural Ventilation, Indoor Environment Building Materials Appliances Thermal · Building Materials Tenants · Lease space from Developer or Property Manager · Professional firms, retailers

Knowles, David William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.edisonfoundation.net/IEE/Documents/EPRI_AssessmentAchievableEEPote Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/assessment-achievable-potential-energ Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Mandates/Targets This report discusses the 2008 U.S. Energy Information Administration statistic that electricity consumption in the United States is predicted to

363

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

364

The Economics of Energy (and Electricity) Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% electrical efficiency might be able to deliver electrical heat using half the gas of gas fired boiler with ‘90% efficiency’ (p.152-153). An electric car uses around 15 kWh per 100 km, around 5 times less than the average fossil fuel car. This implies... that there is always a wide-range of observed efficiencies in the economy, with the average efficiency of the provision of an energy service being significantly less than the efficiency of the most efficient. Current new fossil fuel cars and gas boilers are 50...

Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

365

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations (LTO) Program. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a Memorandum of Understanding in late 2010 to "establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be

366

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations (LTO) Program. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a Memorandum of Understanding in late 2010 to "establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be

367

Summary Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Statement Final LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY DOE/EIS-0423-S1 September 2013 SUMMARY AND GUIDE FOR STAKEHOLDERS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT For additional information on this Mercury Storage SEIS, contact: David Levenstein, Document Manager Office of Environmental Compliance (EM-11) U.S. Department of Energy Post Office Box 2612 Germantown, MD 20874 Website: http://www.mercurystorageeis.com Printed with soy ink on recycled paper FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND

368

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How does it work? Tankless water heaters deliver hot water as it is needed, eliminating the need for storage tanks. Tankless water heaters, also known as demand-type or instantaneous water heaters, provide hot water only as it is needed. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters, which can save you money. Here you'll find basic information about how they work, whether a tankless water heater might be right for your home, and what criteria to use when selecting the right model. Check out the Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic to learn if a tankless water heater is right for you.

369

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

370

Impact of selected energy conservation technologies on baseline demands  

SciTech Connect

This study is an application of the modeling and demand projection capability existing at Brookhaven National Laboratory to specific options in energy conservation. Baseline energy demands are modified by introducing successively three sets of conservation options. The implementation of improved building standards and the use of co-generation in industry are analyzed in detail and constitute the body of this report. Two further sets of energy demands are presented that complete the view of a low energy use, ''conservation'' scenario. An introduction to the report covers the complexities in evaluating ''conservation'' in view of the ways it is inextricably linked to technology, prices, policy, and the mix of output in the economy. The term as used in this report is narrowly defined, and methodologies are suggested by which these other aspects listed can be studied in the future.

Doernberg, A

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: eco3.org/wp-content/plugins/downloads-manager/upload/Report%20on%20Dem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-conservation-and-commercializa Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Resource Integration Planning

372

United States energy supply and demand forecasts 1979-1995  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of U.S. energy supply and demand by fuel type and economic sector, as well as historical background information, are presented. Discussion and results pertaining to the development of current and projected marginal energy costs, and their comparison with market prices, are also presented.

Walton, H.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (Open Auto-DR or OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4849E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2010 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords cement industry, cement sector, demand response, electricity use, energy efficiency, market sectors, mineral manufacturing, technologies Abstract This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

375

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

376

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Website: sequestration.mit.edu/pdf/MichaelHamilton_thesis_dec2009.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/analytical-framework-long-term-policy Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This report addresses obstacles to commercial deployment of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and provides policy recommendations for successful

377

EIS-0269: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0269:...

378

Long-term Planning and Investment for Transmission and Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and generating capacity. Long-term Planning and Investment for Transmission and Generation More Documents & Publications 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review -...

379

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with our workforce, sponsors, and public. We reduce our environmental risk through legacy cleanup, pollution prevention, and long-term sustainability programs." View document >...

380

Precipitates in Long Term Aging Al 5083 Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Precipitates in Long Term Aging Al 5083 Alloy. Author(s), Gaosong Yi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Gaosong Yi. Abstract Scope, Al 5083 alloy ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Probabilistic Assessment of Long-Term Vault Durability in ...  

Probabilistic Forecast (GoldSim software) Short-term effect Long-term rate Failure time Results Vault thickness Sulfate attack depth Hypothetical ...

382

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-term Operation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Papers and Publications: Long-Term Evaluation of Activated Carbon Injection for Mercury Control Upstream of a COHPAC Fabric Filter PDF-298KB presented at Air Quality IV...

383

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Jump to: navigation,...

384

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The energy-intensive industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow accounting procedure, whereas the nonenergy-intensive and the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 14). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data.

385

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Software/modeling tools Website: cdm-mongolia.com/files/2_Methods_Hoseok_16May2010.pdf Cost: Free Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Screenshot References: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ADB-Methods_and_Tools_for_Energy_Demand_Projection&oldid=398945" Categories:

386

Energy demand and indoor climate of a traditional low-energy building in a hot climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy demand in the built environment is quite important. China holds a large population and the energy use in the building sector is about… (more)

Li, Ang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Demand Response Quick...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Back to Tool Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick...

388

Available Technologies: Improving Long Term Storage of ...  

Researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have developed technology to reduce the hydrocarbon double bonds in isoprenoid-based biofuels, bonds that make ...

389

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

390

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

391

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

392

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure Industrial energy demand is projected as a combination of “bottom up” characterizations of the energy-using technology and “top down” econometric estimates of behavior. The influence of energy prices on industrial energy consumption is modeled in terms of the efficiency of use of existing capital, the efficiency of new capital acquisitions, and the mix of fuels utilized, given existing capital stocks. Energy conservation from technological change is represented over time by trend-based “technology possibility curves.” These curves represent the aggregate efficiency of all new technologies that are likely to penetrate the future markets as well as the aggregate improvement in efficiency of 1994 technology.

393

Developing long-term stable product line architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Product lines are usually built for the long term in order to repay the initial investment. While long-term stable software systems are already hard, if they are developed individually, it is even harder for complete product lines. At the time a new ... Keywords: AUTOSAR, multi product lines, scoping, software architecture, software product lines

Christian Tischer; Birgit Boss; Andreas Müller; Andreas Thums; Rajneesh Acharya; Klaus Schmid

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Investigating self-reporting behavior in long-term studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-reporting techniques, such as data logging or a diary, are frequently used in long-term studies, but prone to subjects' forgetfulness and other sources of inaccuracy. We conducted a six-week self-reporting study on smartphone usage in order to investigate ... Keywords: application usage, long-term study, self-reporting, survey

Andreas Möller; Matthias Kranz; Barbara Schmid; Luis Roalter; Stefan Diewald

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Long-Term Changes in the Equatorial Pacific Trade Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past work has shown that surface zonal equatorial wind stress, zonally integrated from one side of the Pacific to the other, is the key variable for estimating long-term El Niño behavior in the eastern Pacific. The long-term behavior of this key ...

Allan J. Clarke; Anna Lebedev

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Learning about the world through long-term query logs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, we demonstrate the value of long-term query logs. Most work on query logs to date considers only short-term (within-session) query information. In contrast, we show that long-term query logs can be used to learn about the world we live ... Keywords: data mining, knowledge discovery, query logs, user behavior

Matthew Richardson

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Summary of Conclusions. . . The global rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and BP's Macondo Well Spill Tad Patzek, Petroleum that run the U.S. Complexity, models, risks Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.3/4 #12

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

398

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comleted Copy in PDF Format Comleted Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO 2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The

399

Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Benefits Long-Term Benefits Long-term Repository Benefits of Using Cermet Waste Packages A cermet waste package may improve the long-term performance of the YM repository by two mechanisms: reducing (1) the potential for nuclear criticality in the repository and (2) the long-term release rate of radionuclides from the waste package. In the natural environment, the centers of uranium ore deposits have remained intact for very long time periods while the outer edges of the ore deposit have degraded. A cermet waste package may operate in the same way. The sacrificial, slow degradation of the waste package and the DU oxide protects the SNF uranium dioxide in the interior of the package long after the package has failed. Page 2 of 4 Follow the link below to learn more about Cermets:

400

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate California electricity consumption (GWh) Over two-thirds of total electricity demand is concentrated in the residential andrate N/A PG&E SMUD SCE LADWP SDGE BGP Other All CA 2005 IEPR Residential electricity

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Long Term Roadmap for DPNC September 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by attempts for a quantum theory of gravity, using gamma ray bursts as distant photon sources. In most models monitor the gamma ray sky, with rather good acceptance and excellent angular resolution, both using conversion in the tracker and the electromagnetic calorimeter. Measurements of high energy gamma ray emission

Schibler, Ueli

402

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecast methods report. California Energy Commission, CEC-Chris Kavalec. California Energy Commission. CEC (2005d)Office, 5/12/2006. California Energy Advanced Energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

404

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

405

Energy Efficiency Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds and Demand Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 2, 2006 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group San Francisco CA Overview of Talk * National Overview * Energy Efficiency Programs and Funds * Demand Response Programs and Funds * FEMP Resources on Public Benefit Funds *Suggestions for Federal Customers DSM Spending is increasing! * 2006 Utility DSM and Public Benefit spending is ~$2.5B$ - $1B for C&I EE programs * CA utilities account for 35% of total spending 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 1994 2000 2005 2006 Costs (in billion $) DSM Costs Load Management Gas EE Other States Electric EE California Electric EE EE Spending in 2006 (by State) $ Million < 1 (23) 1 - 10 (2) 11 - 50 (13) 51 - 100 (7) > 100 (5) 790 101 257

406

What do near-term observations tell us about long-term developments in greenhouse gas emissions?  

SciTech Connect

Long-term scenarios developed by integrated assessment models are used in climate research to provide an indication of plausible long-term developments in the global energy system and land-use patterns and the associated emissions. The phenomena that determine these longterm developments (several decades or even centuries) are very different than those that operate on a shorter time-scales (a few years). Nevertheless, in the literature, we still often find direct comparisons between short-term observations and long-term developments that do not take into account the differing dynamics over these time scales. In this letter, we discuss some of differences between the factors that operate on in the short and long term and use long-term historical emissions trends to show that short-term observations are very poor indicators of long-term future emissions developments. Based on this, we conclude that the performance of long-term scenarios should be evaluated against the appropriate, corresponding long-term variables and trends. The research community may facilitate this by developing appropriate data sets and protocols that can be used to test the performance of long-term scenarios and the models that produce them.

Van Vuuren, Detlef; Edmonds, James A.; Smith, Steven J.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Karas, Joseph F.; Kainuma, M.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Riahi, Keywan; van Ruijven, Bas; Swart, Robert; Thomson, Allison M.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development August 14, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON- U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary Clarence H. "Bud" Albright, Jr. today announced the selection of 10 cost-shared hydrogen storage research and development projects, which will receive up to $15.3 million over five years, subject to annual appropriations. These projects are part of President Bush's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative that committed $1.2 billion on research and development (R&D) for hydrogen-powered fuel cells. The projects also support the President's Advanced Energy Initiative to reduce our Nation's dependence on foreign energy sources by changing the way we power our cars, homes, and

410

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Building Energy Software Tools Directory Search Search Help Building Energy Software Tools Directory...

411

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

U.S. Propane Demand - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

413

Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Exploratory Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Exploratory Research Long-Term Exploratory Research Long-term research addresses the chemical instabilities that impede the development of advanced batteries. Researchers focus on synthesizing novel components into battery cells and determining failure modes, while maintaining strengths in materials synthesis and evaluation, advanced diagnostics, and improved electrochemical model development. Goals include developing a better understanding of why systems fail, creating models that predict system failure and permit system optimization, and investigating new and promising materials. The work concentrates on six research areas: Advanced cell chemistry, Non-carbonaceous anodes, New electrolytes, Novel cathode materials, Advanced diagnostics and analytical methods, and Phenomenological modeling.

414

STRATEGIC ENERGY INITIATIVE @ Winter 2005 Precarious energy situation demands strategic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy solutions that could have a significant impact, especially in the southeastern U.S. Blowin of the oil it produced in 1970. -- Georgia Tech Strategic Energy Initiative and U.S. Dept. of Energy's Energy energy. At the U.S.Department of Energy-funded SolarThermal Test Facility on the main campus, Georgia

Sherrill, David

415

Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Environmental and Economic Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Background The growth of the economy and the accompanying increase in energy consumption in the People's Republic of China (China) are impacting the world's energy markets and global environment. That impact was seen in rising oil prices prior to the economic collapse of 2008. China plans to move ahead in the use of its coal resources as a source of transportation fuels. It is important that the U.S. have the best possible

416

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the entire forecast period, primarily because both weather-adjusted peak and electricity consumption were forecast. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather normalization, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, conservation, California Solar Initiative. #12

417

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney disposal site. The site is in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site may be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Cheney disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete and the NRC formally accepts this plan. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Cheney disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Integrating Energy Efficiency and Demand Response into Utility Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the methods in which utilities integrate their supply-side and demand-side resources to meet their generating resource requirements. The major steps in developing a resource plan are reviewed, including the alternative methods currently employed. Finally, the report presents the results of a short survey that was administered to the advisors in Energy Utilization. The results show that methods are more sophisticated than 20 years ago, but more could be accomplished in ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Mo Type Phase in Long-Term Aged INCONEL Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FORMATION OF A PtzMo TYPE PHASE IN LONG-TERM AGED lNCONEL@ ALLOY 686. Michael G. ... formation of a low-temperature iutermetallic Pt*Mo type .

420

Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

T. Haney R. VanHorn

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Long-Term Statistics and Extreme Waves of Sea Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model of sea storms for describing long-term statistics of extreme wave events is presented. The formulation generalizes Boccotti’s equivalent triangular storm model by describing an actual storm history in the form of a generic ...

Francesco Fedele; Felice Arena

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Insuring Long-Term Care in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term care expenditures constitute one of the largest uninsured financial risks facing the elderly in the United States and thus play a central role in determining the retirement security of elderly Americans. In this ...

Finkelstein, Amy

423

On Long-Term Net Flow over Great Bahama Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 398-day time series of middepth current measurements is combined with available wind and bottom pressure measurements and historical salinity data to characterize long-term net flow patterns over Great Bahama Bank between the Tongue of the ...

Ned P. Smith

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you with additional guidance for planning the transition of long-term response action management requirements to receiving Program Secretarial Offices ...

425

Observed Long-Term Trends for Agroclimatic Conditions in Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of agroclimatic indices representing Canadian climatic conditions for field crop production are analyzed for long-term trends during 1895–2007. The indices are categorized for three crop types: cool season, warm season, and overwintering. ...

Budong Qian; Xuebin Zhang; Kai Chen; Yang Feng; Ted O’Brien

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Long-term goals for solar thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes long-term performance and cost goals for three solar thermal technologies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) developed these goals in support of the Draft Five Year Research and Development Plan for the National Solar Thermal Technology Program (DOE 1984b). These technology goals are intended to provide targets that, if met, will lead to the widespread use of solar thermal technologies in the marketplace. Goals were developed for three technologies and two applications: central receiver and dish technologies for utility-generated electricity applications, and central receiver, dish, and trough technologies for industrial process heat applications. These technologies and applications were chosen because they are the primary technologies and applications that have been researched by DOE in the past. System goals were developed through analysis of future price projections for energy sources competing with solar thermal in the middle-to-late 1990's time frame. The system goals selected were levelized energy costs of $0.05/kWh for electricity and $9/MBtu for industrial process heat (1984 $). Component goals established to meet system goals were developed based upon projections of solar thermal component performance and cost which could be achieved in the same time frame.

Williams, T.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Brown, D.R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

428

Zambia : long-term generation expansion study - executive summary.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. The analysis involved the hydro operations studies of the Zambezi river basin and the systems planning studies for the least-cost generation expansion planning. Two well-known and widely accepted computer models were used in the analysis: PC-VALORAGUA model for the hydro operations and optimization studies and the WASP-III Plus model for the optimization of long-term system development. The WASP-III Plus model is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory's Energy and Power Evaluation Model (ENPEP). The analysis was conducted in close collaboration with the Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO). On the initiative from The World Bank, the sponsor of the study, ZESCO formed a team of experts that participated in the analysis and were trained in the use of computer models. Both models were transferred to ZESCO free of charge and installed on several computers in the ZESCO corporate offices in Lusaka. In September-October 1995, two members of the ZESCO National Team participated in a 4-week training course at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, U.S.A., focusing on the long-term system expansion planning using the WASP and VALORAGUA models. The hydropower operations studies were performed for the whole Zambezi river basin, including the full installation of the Kariba power station, and the Cahora Bassa hydro power station in Mozambique. The analysis also included possible future projects such as Itezhi-Tezhi, Kafue Gorge Lower, and Batoka Gorge power stations. As hydropower operations studies served to determine the operational characteristics of the existing and future hydro power plants, it was necessary to simulate the whole Zambezi river basin in order to take into account all interactions and mutual influences between the hydro power plants. In addition, it allowed for the optimization of reservoir management and optimization of hydro cascades, resulting in the better utilization of available hydro potential. Numerous analyses were performed for different stages of system development. These include system configurations that correspond to years 1997, 2001, 2015 and 2020. Additional simulations were performed in order to determine the operational parameters of the three existing hydro power stations Victoria Falls, Kariba, and Kafue Gorge Upper, that correspond to the situation before and after their rehabilitation. The rehabilitation works for these three major power stations, that would bring their operational parameters and availability back to the design level, are planned to be carried out in the period until 2000. The main results of the hydro operations studies are presented in Table ES-1. These results correspond to VALORAGUA simulations of system configurations in the years 2001 and 2015. The minimum, average, and maximum electricity generation is based on the simulation of monthly water inflows that correspond to the chronological series of unregulated water inflows at each hydro profile in the period from April 1961 to March 1990. The recommended hydrology dataset provided in the Hydrology Report of the SADC Energy Project AAA 3.8 was used for this study.

Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Buehring, W.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs EIA Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC Meeting Agenda Jim Turnure, Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 2 * EIA WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION (15 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: OVERVIEW OF EIA RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODELS AND CURRENT METHODS FOR INCORPORATING ENERGY EFFICIENCY/EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS (30 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS GENERAL OVERVIEW AND DISCUSSION (45 minutes) * EXPERTS ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION/BRAINSTROMING: HOW CAN EIA BENEFIT FROM APPLICATION OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS TO RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL ENERGY DEMAND MODELING?

430

Best Practices: Energy Savings Efficient energy use reduces Colorado State's total energy demand, decreases harmful  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

square foot on campus has flattened out. Students making a difference In 2004, Colorado State became one, decreases harmful emissions, and minimizes the cost of providing energy to the campus. As a result of energy conservation initiatives that have been implemented over the past 20 years, growth in the average demand per

431

Collaboration in long-term stewardship at DOE Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan, DOE/RL-2010-35 Rev 1. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large parcel that includes one of the six (6) cocooned reactors on site. These accomplishments relied upon the transparency between DOE cleanup programs and their contractors working together to successfully transition the land while addressing the challenges that arise. All parties, the three different DOE Programs and their respective prime contractors are dedicated to working together and continuing the progress of transitioning land to LTS, in alignment with the Program Plan and compliant with contractual requirements. This paper highlights the accomplishments and collaborative efforts to address the challenges faced as work progresses from the cleanup to transitioning of land parcels to LTS Program.

Moren, R. J.; Zeisloft, J. H.; Feist, E. T.; Brown, D.; Grindstaff, K. D.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

432

LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between the contractors and DOE-RL. Information Management (IM) is a key part of the LTS program. The IM Program identifies, locates, stores, protects and makes accessible Hanford LTS records and data to support the transfer of property ultimately to LM. As such, DOE-RL manages the Hanford LTS Program in a manner consistent with LM's goals, policies, and procedures.

MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface The Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013), prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices...

435

Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co’s well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. 1 tab., 9 figs.

Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Systematic Flights Obtain Long-Term Data Set of Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systematic Flights Obtain Long-Term Data Set of Cloud Properties Systematic Flights Obtain Long-Term Data Set of Cloud Properties Beginning in January 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is sponsoring the first-of-its-kind long-term airborne research campaign to obtain data from low-level clouds above its Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The five-month campaign is centered near Lamont, Oklahoma, a mid-latitude region that experiences a wide range of cloud types, including the "thin" clouds that are the focus of the campaign. Thin clouds contain so little water that the sun can be seen through them. Scientists refer to such clouds as "clouds with low-optical water depth," or CLOWD. Because these clouds are often tenuous and scattered, even some of the best

438

Energy packet networks: smart electricity storage to meet surges in demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When renewable energy is used either as a primary source, or as a back-up source to meet excess demand, energy storage becomes very useful. Simple examples of energy storage units include electric car batteries and uninterruptible power supplies. More ... Keywords: energy packet networks, network control of energy flow, on-demand energy dispatching, smart grid, store and forward energy, storing renewable energy

Erol Gelenbe

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand shifting are thermal energy storage systems, whichlockout, pre-cooling, thermal energy storage, cooling loadlockout • Pre-cooling • Thermal energy storage • Cooling

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solution Procedure for SDP Energy Prices We use electricityLondon for assistance with energy price modeling. Siddiquiof DER under uncertain energy prices with demand response

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Heuristic solutions to the long-term unit commitment problem with cogeneration plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a long-term version of the unit commitment problem that spans over one year divided into hourly time intervals. It includes constraints on electricity and heating production as well as on biomass consumption. The problem is of interest for ... Keywords: Energy planning, Local search, Mixed integer programming heuristics, Unit commitment with cogeneration plants

Niels Hvidberg Kjeldsen; Marco Chiarandini

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimization Monthly peak demand management Daily time-of-Some tariff designs have peak demand charges that apply tothat may result in a peak demand that occurs in one month to

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dryer WH - Clothes Washer Clothes Washer WH - DishwasherDishwasher Water Heating Figure 7 Breakdown of residentialUEC Water Heating (WH) Dishwasher Advanced Energy Pathways -

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - World Energy Demand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about energy security and greenhouse gas emissions support the development of new nuclear generating capacity. World average capacity utilization rates have continued to rise...

445

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

446

Industrial Demand Module 1998, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description ofthe NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in supportof its models (Public Law 94-385, section 57.b2). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Forecasts of intercity passenger demand and energy use through 2000  

SciTech Connect

The development of national travel demand and energy-use forecasts for automobile and common-carrier intercity travel through the year 2000. The forecasts are driven by the POINTS (Passenger Oriented Intercity Network Travel Simulation) model, a model direct-demand model which accounts for competition among modes and destinations. Developed and used to model SMSA-to-SMSA business and nonbusiness travel, POINTS is an improvement over earlier direct demand models because it includes an explicit representation of cities' relative accessibilities and a utility maximizing behavorial multimodal travel function. Within POINTS, pathbuilding algorithms are used to determine city-pair travel times and costs by mode, including intramodal transfer times. Other input data include projections of SMSA population, public and private sector employment, and hotel and other retail receipts. Outputs include forecasts of SMSA-to-SMSA person trips and person-miles of travel by mode. For the national forecasts, these are expanded to represent all intercity travel (trips greater than 100 miles, one way) for two fuel-price cases. Under both cases rising fuel prices, accompanied by substantial reductions in model-energy intensities, result in moderate growth in total intercity passenger travel. Total intercity passenger travel is predicted to grow at approximately one percent per year, slightly fster than population growth, while air travel grows almost twice as fast as population. The net effect of moderate travel growth and substantial reduction in model energy intensities is a reduction of approximately 50 percent in fuel consumption by the intercity passenger travel market.

Kaplan, M.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Millar, M.; Gur, Y.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

ENERGY DEMAND AND CONSERVATION IN KENYA: INITIAL APPRAISAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Statistics d) Nairobi, Kenya. See also Estimates ofDEMAND AND CONSERVATION IN KENYA: INITIAL APPRAISAL LeeDemand and Conservation in Kenya: Initial Appraisal Lee

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Electric grid planners: demand response and energy efficiency to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Form EIA-411, Coordinated Bulk Power Demand and Supply Report Note: All data are reported for time of summer peak, rather than overall demand.

450

Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity Chris in this paper. Energy consumption data was sourced from the Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics' Australian Energy Statistics publication. Price and income data were sourced from the Australian Bureau

451

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

The symbiosis of carbon-dioxide sequestration and hydrogen fuel: what is its significance for the long-term global energy system. Final progress report July 1998 - July 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examined the implications of the ''fuel decarbonization/carbon sequestration'' strategy for the world energy system.

Socolow, Robert H.; Ogden, Joan M.; Williams, Robert H.

2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

454

United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts (Connecticut) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts (Connecticut) United Illuminating - ZREC and LREC Long Term Contracts (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate $325.50 per ZREC; $200 per LREC Program Info Funding Source RPS Start Date 05/01/2012 State Connecticut Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Provider The United Illuminating Company Note: The deadline for the second request for proposals (RFP) under this program is June 13, 2013.

455

NETL: Gasification - Long-Term Candle Filter Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Candle Filter Tests Long-Term Candle Filter Tests National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center advancement of hot gas filtration technology provides the design for optimal, long-term evaluation of material performance for particulate control device (PCD) filter elements. Testing is performed using the commercially available Siemens PCD, due to its demonstrated excellent collection efficiency during normal operation. The PCD, located downstream of the primary gas cooler, houses up to 91 candle-type filter elements. They're currently used in the development of candle filters that can efficiently remove particulates at varying temperatures, using low-cost materials and innovative design.

456

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 2 - Liquid Fuels World liquids consumption in the IEO2009 reference case increases from 85 million barrels per day in 2006 to 107 million barrels per day in 2030. Unconventional liquids, at 13.4 million barrels per day, make up 12.6 percent of total liquids production in 2030. Figure 25. World Liquids Consumption by Region and Country Group, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 26. World Liquids Supply in Three Cases, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2006-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

457

A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

Hartman, Raymond Steve

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF DRAFT FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Report, over the entire forecast period, primarily because both weather-adjusted peak and commercial sectors. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather normalization, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, California Solar Initiative. #12;ii #12

459

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response”, Proceedings ofAuthority (NYSERDA), the Demand Response Research Center (

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings” Center for Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), IEA/OECD Analyses

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Long-Term Cathodoluminescent Characterization of Thin-Film Oxide Phosphors in a Wide Range of Electron Excitation Densities  

SciTech Connect

Long-term processes of cathodoluminescence degradation of thin film phosphors Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Ti and Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}:Mn were investigated in a wide range of e-beam energies, current and power densities. The time dependencies describing decreasing of emission intensity have been found. At high-level densities of e-beam irradiation the specific behavior of long-term degradation processes was observed, which is characteristic with rapid degradation at initial stage and slow consequent decrease of intensity. The most probable mechanisms responsible for long-term processes of degradation in investigated phosphors are proposed.

Bondar, V D; Felter, T E; Hunt, C E; Dubov, Y G; Chakhovskoy, A G

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

462

Long-Term Cathodoluminescent Characterization of Thin-Film Oxide Phosphors in a Wide Range of Electron Excitation Densities  

SciTech Connect

Long-term processes of cathodoluminescence degradation of thin film phosphors Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Ti and Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}:Mn were investigated in a wide range of e-beam energies, current and power densities. The time dependencies describing decreasing of emission intensity have been found. At high-level densities of e-beam irradiation the specific behavior of long-term degradation processes was observed, which is characteristic with rapid degradation at initial stage and slow consequent decrease of intensity. The most probable mechanisms responsible for long-term processes of degradation in investigated phosphors are proposed.

Bondar, V D; Felter, T E; Hunt, C E; Dubov, Y G; Chakhovskoi, A G

2001-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

463

Comfort-aware home energy management under market-based demand-response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To regulate energy consumption and enable Demand-Response programs, effective demand-side management at home is key and an integral part of the future Smart Grid. In essence, the home energy management is a mix between discrete appliance scheduling problem ... Keywords: demand-response, energy management, smart grid

Jin Xiao, Jian Li, Raouf Boutaba, James Won-Ki Hong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Study of long term options for electric vehicle air conditioning  

SciTech Connect

There are strong incentives in terms of national energy and environmental policy to encourage the commercialization of electrically powered vehicles in the U.S. Among these incentives are reduced petroleum consumption, improved electric generation capacity utilization, reduced IC engine emissions, and, depending on the primary fuel used for electric power generation, reduced emissions of carbon dioxide. A basic requirement for successfully commercializing any motor vehicle in the US is provision of adequate passenger comfort heating and air conditioning (cooling). Although air conditioning is generally sold as optional equipment, in excess of 80% of the automobiles and small trucks sold in the US have air conditioning systems. In current, pre-commercial electric vehicles, comfort heating is provided by a liquid fuel fired heater that heats water which is circulated through the standard heater core in the conventional interior air handling unit. Air conditioning is provided by electric motor driven compressors, installed in a system having, perhaps, an {open_quotes}upsized{close_quotes} condenser and a standard evaporator (front and rear evaporators in some instances) installed in the conventional interior air handler. Although this approach is adequate in the near term for initial commercialization efforts, a number of shortcomings of this arrangement, as well as longer range concerns need to be addressed. In this project, the long term alternatives for cooling and heating electric vehicles effectively, efficiently (with minimum range penalties), and without adverse environmental impacts have been examined. Identification of options that can provide both heating and cooling is important, in view of the disadvantages of carrying separate heating and cooling systems in the vehicle.

Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Study of long term options for electric vehicle air conditioning  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are strong incentives in terms of national energy and environmental policy to encourage the commercialization of electrically powered vehicles in the U.S. Among these incentives are reduced petroleum consumption, improved electric generation capacity utilization, reduced IC engine emissions, and, depending on the primary fuel used for electric power generation, reduced emissions of carbon dioxide. A basic requirement for successfully commercializing any motor vehicle in the US is provision of adequate passenger comfort heating and air conditioning (cooling). Although air conditioning is generally sold as optional equipment, in excess of 80% of the automobiles and small trucks sold in the US have air conditioning systems. In current, pre-commercial electric vehicles, comfort heating is provided by a liquid fuel fired heater that heats water which is circulated through the standard heater core in the conventional interior air handling unit. Air conditioning is provided by electric motor driven compressors, installed in a system having, perhaps, an [open quotes]upsized[close quotes] condenser and a standard evaporator (front and rear evaporators in some instances) installed in the conventional interior air handler. Although this approach is adequate in the near term for initial commercialization efforts, a number of shortcomings of this arrangement, as well as longer range concerns need to be addressed. In this project, the long term alternatives for cooling and heating electric vehicles effectively, efficiently (with minimum range penalties), and without adverse environmental impacts have been examined. Identification of options that can provide both heating and cooling is important, in view of the disadvantages of carrying separate heating and cooling systems in the vehicle.

Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards"Top-Runner Approach"  

SciTech Connect

As one of the measures to achieve the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions agreed to in the"Kyoto Protocol," an institutional scheme for determining energy efficiency standards for energy-consuming appliances, called the"Top-Runner Approach," was developed by the Japanese government. Its goal is to strengthen the legal underpinnings of various energy conservation measures. Particularly in Japan's residential sector, where energy demand has grown vigorously so far, this efficiency standard is expected to play a key role in mitigating both energy demand growth and the associated CO2 emissions. This paper presents an outlook of Japan's residential energy demand, developed by a stochastic econometric model for the purpose of analyzing the impacts of the Japan's energy efficiency standards, as well as the future stochastic behavior of income growth, demography, energy prices, and climate on the future energy demand growth to 2030. In this analysis, we attempt to explicitly take into consideration more than 30 kinds of electricity uses, heating, cooling and hot water appliances in order to comprehensively capture the progress of energy efficiency in residential energy end-use equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibit astonishing growth in Japan's residential sector due to universal increasing ownership of electric and other appliances, it is important to implement an elaborate efficiency standards policy for these appliances.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Marnay, Chris

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Long-Term Stability of Some Barometric Pressure Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of Pressure sensors have been tested in the laboratory for accuracy and long-term stability. The Paroscientific 215-AT, Rosemount 1201 FIB, and Setra 270 were found to be the most accurate, maintaining 0.1-mb accuracy over long periods. ...

Richard E. Payne

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-Term Carbon Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit with a Spray Drier and Fabric Filter The intent of DOE's Phase I and II field tests was to work with industry to evaluate the most promising mercury control technologies at full-scale in a variety of configurations. Although longer-term tests were conducted, the test period was not sufficient to answer many fundamental questions about long-term consistency of mercury removal and reliability of the system when integrated with plant processes. As the technologies move towards commercial implementation, it is critical to accurately define the mercury removal performance and costs so that power companies and policy makers can make informed decisions. Therefore, the overall objective of this Phase III project is to determine the mercury removal performance, long-term emissions variability, and associated O&M costs of activated carbon injection for >90% mercury control over a 10 to 12 month period on a unit that represents the combination of coal and emission control equipment that will be used for many new and existing power plants.

469

Software architecture awareness in long-term software product evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software architecture has been established in software engineering for almost 40 years. When developing and evolving software products, architecture is expected to be even more relevant compared to contract development. However, the research results ... Keywords: Architecture knowledge management, Cooperative and human aspects, Long-term evolution, Qualitative empirical studies, Software architecture, Software products

Hataichanok Unphon; Yvonne Dittrich

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

IAEA-TECDOC-1403 The long term stabilization of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................ 265 S.V. Mikheykin ANNEX XII. UKRAINE: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEASURES TO BE TAKEN FOR LONG TERM ................................................................... 281 G. Maslyakov ANNEX XIII. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF MEASURES range of technical measures can be employed to prevent or reduce the extent of these processes. Capping

471

Long-term fuzzy management of water resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present context of water resource scarcity, a complete approach for long-term storage/transfer/distribution system management is proposed. The main management objective of such a kind of system is to manage reserves and releases so as to minimize ... Keywords: fuzzy logic, modeling, optimization, water resource management

Roger Marcelin Faye; Salam Sawadogo; Claude Lishou; Félix Mora-Camino

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Long-Term Ice Variability in Arctic Marginal Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of records of fast ice thickness (1936–2000) and ice extent (1900–2000) in the Kara, Laptev, East Siberian, and Chukchi Seas provide evidence that long-term ice thickness and extent trends are small and generally not statistically ...

Igor V. Polyakov; Genrikh V. Alekseev; Roman V. Bekryaev; Uma S. Bhatt; Roger Colony; Mark A. Johnson; Valerii P. Karklin; David Walsh; Alexander V. Yulin

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Long-term Stock Market Forecasting using Gaussian Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Address3 email4 Abstract5 Forecasting stock market prices is an attractive topic to researchers from6 to analyze18 and forecast stock prices and index changes. The accuracy of these techniques is still an19-term predictions in stock prices.32 33 1.2 Motivation34 In stock market, investors need long-term forecasting

de Freitas, Nando

474

Guidelines: Long-Term Layup of Fossil Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Placing fossil units into long-term layup for several years requires protective measures beyond those commonly used for short periods.Guidelines developed and demonstrated by Florida Power & Light Company show how to prevent equipment deterioration during long shutdown periods and how to subsequently reactivate the units.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

475

Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision  

SciTech Connect

The interactions and feedbacks among plants, animals, microbes, humans, and the environment ultimately form the world in which we live. This world is now facing challenges from a growing and increasingly affluent human population whose numbers and lifestyles are driving ever greater energy demand and impacting climate. These and other contributing factors will make energy and climate sustainability extremely difficult to achieve over the 20-year time horizon that is the focus of this report. Despite these severe challenges, there is optimism that deeper understanding of our environment will enable us to mitigate detrimental effects, while also harnessing biological and climate systems to ensure a sustainable energy future. This effort is advanced by scientific inquiries in the fields of atmospheric chemistry and physics, biology, ecology, and subsurface science - all made possible by computing. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science has a long history of bringing together researchers from different disciplines to address critical national needs in determining the biological and environmental impacts of energy production and use, characterizing the interplay of climate and energy, and collaborating with other agencies and DOE programs to improve the world's most powerful climate models. BER science focuses on three distinct areas: (1) What are the roles of Earth system components (atmosphere, land, oceans, sea ice, and the biosphere) in determining climate? (2) How is the information stored in a genome translated into microbial, plant, and ecosystem processes that influence biofuel production, climate feedbacks, and the natural cycling of carbon? (3) What are the biological, geochemical, and physical forces that govern the behavior of Earth's subsurface environment? Ultimately, the goal of BER science is to support experimentation and modeling that can reliably predict the outcomes and behaviors of complex biological and environmental systems, leading to robust solutions for DOE missions and strategic goals. In March 2010, the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee held the Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision workshop to identify scientific opportunities and grand challenges for BER science in the coming decades and to develop an overall strategy for drafting a long-term vision for BER. Key workshop goals included: (1) Identifying the greatest scientific challenges in biology, climate, and the environment that DOE will face over a 20-year time horizon. (2) Describing how BER should be positioned to address those challenges. (3) Determining the new and innovative tools needed to advance BER science. (4) Suggesting how the workforce of the future should be trained in integrative system science. This report lays out grand research challenges for BER - in biological systems, climate, energy sustainability, computing, and education and workforce training - that can put society on a path to achieve the scientific evidence and predictive understanding needed to inform decision making and planning to address future energy needs, climate change, water availability, and land use.

Arkin, A.; Baliga, N.; Braam, J.; Church, G.; Collins, J; Cottingham, R.; Ecker, J.; Gerstein, M.; Gilna, P.; Greenberg, J.; Handelsman, J.; Hubbard, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Liao, J.; Looger, L.; Meyerowitz, E.; Mjolness, E.; Petsko, G.; Sayler, G.; Simpson, M.; Stacey, G.; Sussman, M.; Tiedje, J.; Bader, D.; Cessi, P.; Collins, W.; Denning, S.; Dickinson, R.; Easterling, D.; Edmonds, J.; Feddema, J.; Field, C.; Fridlind, A.; Fung, I.; Held, I.; Jackson, R.; Janetos, A.; Large, W.; Leinen, M.; Leung, R.; Long, S.; Mace, G.; Masiello, C.; Meehl, G.; Ort, D.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Penner, J.; Prather, M.; Randall, D.; Rasch, P.; Schneider, E.; Shugart, H.; Thornton, P.; Washington, W.; Wildung, R.; Wiscombe, W.; Zak, D.; Zhang, M.; Bielicki, J.; Buford, M.; Cleland, E.; Dale, V.; Duke, C.; Ehleringer, J.; Hecht, A.; Kammen, D.; Marland, G.; Pataki, D.; Riley, M. Robertson, P.; Hubbard, S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Shale-Oil Recovery (FERWG-III)  

SciTech Connect

The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on shale-oil recovery. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term prospects for shale-oil availability. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

Penner, S.S.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Long-Term Rights for New Resources: A Crucial Missing Ingredient in RTO Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unless generation that can produce low-cost energy is brought back into the mix, regional transmission organizations will become just a very expensive means to deliver high-cost energy and to allocate increasingly scarce, natural monopoly transmission resources to those prepared to pay the most. For baseload as well as renewable generation that cannot be located close to load, long-term transmission rights ensure delivery of their output at a predictable price.

Bogorad, Cynthia; Huang, William

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

spent 14.7 billion on DSM programs between 1989 and 1999, an average of 1.3 billion per year. Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources More Documents & Publications Chapter 3 Demand-Side...

479

Residual Fuel Demand - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the 1986 to 1991 period, residual fuel oil demand declined only slightly both in absolute and as a percent of total product demand. While not shown, residual fuel ...

480

Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability. Petroleum geologists suggest that observed steep declining rates may involve pressure-dependent permeability (PDP). This study accounts for PDP in three potential shale media: the shale matrix, the existing natural fractures, and the created hydraulic fractures. Sensitivity studies comparing expected long-term rate and pressure production behavior with and without PDP show that these two are distinct when presented as a sequence of coupled build-up rate-normalized pressure (BU-RNP) and its logarithmic derivative, making PDP a recognizable trend. Pressure and rate field data demonstrate evidence of PDP only in Horn River and Haynesville but not in Fayetteville shale. While the presence of PDP did not seem to impact the long term recovery forecast, it is possible to determine whether the observed behavior relates to change in hydraulic fracture conductivity or to change in fracture network permeability. As well, it provides insight on whether apparent fracture networks relate to an existing natural fracture network in the shale or to a fracture network induced during hydraulic fracturing.

Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-term energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Modeling the Long-Term Market Penetration of Wind in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Long-Term Market Penetration of Wind in the United States July 2003 * NREL/CP-620-34469 W. Short, N. Blair, D. Heimiller, and V. Singh Presented at the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) WindPower 2003 Conference Austin, Texas May 21, 2003 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

482

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

483

Proceedings of the Chinese-American symposium on energy markets and the future of energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The Symposium was organized by the Energy Research Institute of the State Economic Commission of China, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Johns Hopkins University from the United States. It was held at the Johns Hopkins University Nanjing Center in late June 1988. It was attended by about 15 Chinese and an equal number of US experts on various topics related to energy demand and supply. Each presenter is one of the best observers of the energy situation in their field. A Chinese and US speaker presented papers on each topic. In all, about 30 papers were presented over a period of two and one half days. Each paper was translated into English and Chinese. The Chinese papers provide an excellent overview of the emerging energy demand and supply situation in China and the obstacles the Chinese planners face in managing the expected increase in demand for energy. These are matched by papers that discuss the energy situation in the US and worldwide, and the implications of the changes in the world energy situation on both countries. The papers in Part 1 provide historical background and discuss future directions. The papers in Part 2 focus on the historical development of energy planning and policy in each country and the methodologies and tools used for projecting energy demand and supply. The papers in Part 3 examine the pattern of energy demand, the forces driving demand, and opportunities for energy conservation in each of the major sectors in China and the US. The papers in Part 4 deal with the outlook for global and Pacific region energy markets and the development of the oil and natural gas sector in China.

Meyers, S. (ed.)

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z