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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fining Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

2

THE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seismic reflection cannot (e.g. Liberty et al., 1999; Musil et al., 2002). The images producedTHE VALUE OF BOREHOLE -TO-SURFACE INFORMATION IN NEAR-SURFACE CROSSWELL SEISMIC TOMOGRAPHY Geoff J properties is important in many fields. One method that can image the seismic velocity structure

Barrash, Warren

3

A Bayesian framework for fracture characterization from surface seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a methodology for quantitatively characterizing the fractured nature of a hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoir from surface seismic data under a Bayesian inference framework. Fractures provide pathways for fluid ...

Zamanian, S. Ahmad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of seismic waves generated by surface blasting at Indiana coal mines A project pursuant is to investigate the characteristics of mine blast seismic waves in southern Indiana. Coal mines are prevalent blasting) and coal mines (surface blasting) to gain new understanding of seismic wave propagation, ground

Polly, David

5

Interpretation of long-offset transient electromagnetic data fromMount Merapi, Indonesia, using a three-dimensional optimizationapproach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the years 1998, 2000, and 2001, long-offset transientelectromagnetic (LOTEM) surveys were carried out at the active volcanoMerapi in Central Java. The measurements investigated the conductivitystructure of the volcanic edifice. Our area of interest, which is belowthe summit and the upper flanks, was investigated using horizontal andvertical magnetic field time derivative data from seventransmitter-receiver setups. Because of topography and athree-dimensional (3-D) underground structure, a 3-D interpretation isused. The method optimizes few parameters of a 3-D model by a stableleast squares joint inversion of the data, providing sufficientresolution capability. Reasonable data fits are achieved with anonhorizontally layered model featuring a very conductive basement belowdepths of 1.5 km. While hydrothermal alteration is also considered, wetentatively explain the high conductivities by aqueous solutions withrelatively high salt contents. A large magma body or a small superficialreservoir below Merapi's central volcanic complex, as discussed by otherauthors, cannot be resolved by the LOTEM data.

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan L.; Hordt, Andreas; Tezkan, Bulent

2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

6

Modeling the Near-Surface Using High-Resolution Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Arabian Peninsula, the near-surface represents a major challenge in seismic exploration. For accurate deep subsurface reservoir imaging, an accurate near-surface velocity model is required. In this dissertation, I ...

Al-Zayer, Ramzy Mohammed

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Improved seismic imaging of geology across high-velocity Earth surfaces will allow more rigorous evaluation of geothermal prospects beneath volcanic outcrops. Seismic-based quantification of fracture orientation and intensity will result in optimal positioning of geothermal wells.

8

Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net throughout Japan by applying seismic interferometry to the data recorded with KiK-net, a strong motion network in Japan. Each KiK-net station has two receivers; one receiver on the surface and the other

Cerveny, Vlastislav

9

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface-to-tunnel seismic tomography studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Roland Gritto, Valeri A in the proposed nuclear waste repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A 5-km-long source line and a 3-km-long receiver line were located on top of Yucca Mountain ridge and inside the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF

Korneev, Valeri A.

10

Inferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-flow measurements are rare or entirely absent. This will result in a smooth global heat-flow map that may proveInferring surface heat flux distributions guided by a global seismic model: particular application to Antarctica Nikolai M. Shapiro*, Michael H. Ritzwoller Department of Physics, Center for Imaging the Earth

Shapiro, Nikolai

11

Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Laser- and Radar-based Mission Concepts for Suborbital and Spaceborne Monitoring of Seismic Surface Waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a suborbital or spaceborne system to monitor seismic waves poses an intriguing prospect for advancing the state of seismology. This capability would enable an unprecedented global mapping of the velocity structure of the earth's crust, understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics and wave propagation effects, and event source location, characterization and discrimination that are critical for both fundamental earthquake research and nuclear non-proliferation applications. As part of an ongoing collaboration between LLNL and JPL, an advanced mission concept study assessed architectural considerations and operational and data delivery requirements, extending two prior studies by each organization--a radar-based satellite system (JPL) for earthquake hazard assessment and a feasibility study of space- or UAV-based laser seismometer systems (LLNL) for seismic event monitoring. Seismic wave measurement requirements include lower bounds on detectability of specific seismic sources of interest and wave amplitude accuracy for different levels of analysis, such as source characterization, discrimination and tomography, with a 100 {micro}m wave amplitude resolution for waves nominally traveling 5 km/s, an upper frequency bound based on explosion and earthquake surface displacement spectra, and minimum horizontal resolution (1-5 km) and areal coverage, in general and for targeted observations. For a radar system, corresponding engineering and operational factors include: Radar frequency (dictated by required wave amplitude measurement accuracy and maximizing ranging, Doppler or interferometric sensitivity), time sampling (maximum seismic wave frequency and velocity), and overall system considerations such as mass, power and data rate. Technical challenges include characterization of, and compensation for, phase distortion resulting from atmospheric and ionospheric perturbations and turbulence, and effects of ground scattering characteristics and seismic ground motion on phase coherence over interferometric time intervals. Since the temporal sampling requirement may be finer than that possible for a high-altitude sensor to traverse a synthetic aperture length, a geostationary, real-aperture Ka-band system or constellation for equatorial and moderate-latitude global coverage is one option considered. The short wavelength would maximize interferometric sensitivity to small surface displacements and minimize required antenna area. Engineering issues include the design and deployment of a large ({approx} 100m) fixed aperture antenna; and fast electronic beam steering (entire aperture within nominal 1 s interferometric interval) with high-efficiency integrated transmit/receive modules. For a suborbital system, platform instability is an issue whereas at high earth orbit signal-to-noise and attendant power requirements dominate. Data delivery requirements include large-volume data storage and transmission; development of real-time, on-board event detection and processing algorithms, and data management structures for these very large data sets. A far-term roadmap would comprise a proof-of-concept demonstration using a laser or radar system mounted on a stratospheric balloon or UAV to image seismic wavefields from planned events (e.g. large mine blasts and/or purpose-designed explosions) and earthquake targets of opportunity. The technological challenges to developing any such seismic monitoring system, whether laser- or radar-based, are at this stage enormous. However, these concept studies suggest the long-term feasibility of such a system and drive the development of enabling technologies while fostering collaboration on meeting scientific and operational challenges of agencies such as NASA, DOE and DoD.

Foxall, W; Schultz, C A; Tralli, D M

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/Algorithm.pps In addition, we presented a second application of the Q algorithm at the SEG International Conference in Houston, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest there as well, and it can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys/resgeo/ppt/attenuation.pps.

Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS Candidate and Conventional...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in Nevada through Directed Research and Public Outreach Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey...

15

Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV...

16

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

Seismic Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

R. Quittmeyer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

A model of the near-surface seismic velocity: southern San Joaqin Valley, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, representative hydrograph for the central valley Figure 1. (a. ) Sea-level correctional velocity the from preliminary study estimated for the 1980's. Page 3 3 3. Preliminary test data plotted for the model of constant velocity above and below the water... variations, a major problem is to determine the static corrections for seismic data which were surveyed during the last 20 years. Because of the limited number of traveltime measurements, it would be desirable to use all ot the measurements which were...

Ferry, James Gerard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

19

ESG2006, Grenoble, 30/08-01/09/2006 Third International Symposium on the Effects of Surface Geology on Seismic Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), USA. E3D is listed by the OECD's Nuclear Energy AgencyESG2006, Grenoble, 30/08-01/09/2006 1 Third International Symposium on the Effects of Surface Benchmark: Seismic Modeling Trials Using E3D with the ModelAssembler Community Modeling Environment John N

20

Near-surface seismic attenuation of P-waves in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impedance contmsts in the near-surface layers. Data were also analyzed to characterize vertical and horizontal variations in the ambient noise levels near the surface. It was found that by burying geophones 10 ft below the surface, the ambient noise level... was reduced by 20 dB. Furthermore, by burying geophone 50 ft or 100 ft, the ambient noise levels were less by 30 to 35 dB than at the surface. The ambient noise level increases at the surface because of numerous noise sources which in turn decreases...

Al-Zahrani, Said Awdhah

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine Learning for Seismic Signal Processing: Seismic Phase Classification on a Manifold Juan--In this research, we consider the supervised learning problem of seismic phase classification. In seismology, knowledge of the seismic activity arrival time and phase leads to epicenter localization and surface

Meyer, Francois

22

Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Wave Propagation in Alluvial Basins and Influence of Site-City Interaction 1 Seismic Wave of alluvial deposits have a major influence on seismic wave propagation and amplification. However influence seismic wave propagation near the free surface. In this paper, the influence of surface structures

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component...

24

CX-001827: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a 3-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSlnSAR and Kinematic Structural Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 04...

25

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Controllable seismic source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Canadian Seismic Agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Compressional wave character in gassy, near-surface sediments in southern Louisiana determined from variable frequency cross-well, borehole logging, and surface seismic measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity and attenuation data were used to test theoretical equations describing the frequency dependence of compressional wave velocity and attenuation through gas-rich sediments in coastal Louisiana. The cross-well data were augmented with velocities derived from a nearby seismic refraction station using a low-frequency source. Energy at 1 and 3 kHz was successfully transmitted over distances from 3.69 to 30 m; the 5 and 7-kHz data were obtained only at distances up to 20 m. Velocity tomograms were constructed for one borehole pair and covered a depth interval of 10--50 m. Results from the tomographic modeling indicate that gas-induced low velocities are present to depths of greater than 40 m. Analysis of the velocity dispersion suggests that gas-bubble resonance must be greater than 7 kHz, which is above the range of frequencies used in the experiment. Washout of the boreholes at depths above 15 m resulted in a degassed zone containing velocities higher than those indicated in both nearby refraction and reflection surveys. Velocity and attenuation information were obtained for a low-velocity zone centered at a depth of approximately 18 m. Measured attenuations of 1.57, 2.95, and 3.24 dB/m for the 3-, 5-, and 7-kHz signals, respectively, were modeled along with the velocity data using a silt-clay sediment type. Density and porosity data for the model were obtained from the geophysical logs; the bulk and shear moduli were estimated from published relationships. Modeling results indicate that gas bubbles measuring 1 mm in diameter occupy at least 25% to 35% of the pore space.

Thompson, M.D.; McGinnis, L.D.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Fasnacht, T. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HH Seismic hammer is a large, %22weight-drop%22 source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

Jones, Kyle Richard

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 --Basic principles and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 -- Basic principles and applications Kees Wapenaar1 , Deyan Draganov1 , Roel Snieder2 , Xander Campman3 , and Arie Verdel3 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry is the retrieval of seismic surface-wave responses from ambient noise and the subsequent tomographic determination

Snieder, Roel

32

Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using vector-sensor beamforming the problem of estimating the shape parameters of seismic wavefields in linear arrays. The purpose of the subsurface layers from the seismic wavefields registered by surface sensors. However, only the waves

Spagnolini, Umberto

33

Seismic sensitivity to sub-surface solar activity from 18 years of GOLF/SoHO observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar activity has significantly changed over the last two Schwabe cycles. After a long and deep minimum at the end of Cycle 23, the weaker activity of Cycle 24 contrasts with the previous cycles. In this work, the response of the solar acoustic oscillations to solar activity is used in order to provide insights on the structural and magnetic changes in the sub-surface layers of the Sun during this on-going unusual period of low activity. We analyze 18 years of continuous observations of the solar acoustic oscillations collected by the Sun-as-a-star GOLF instrument onboard the SoHO spacecraft. From the fitted mode frequencies, the temporal variability of the frequency shifts of the radial, dipolar, and quadrupolar modes are studied for different frequency ranges which are sensitive to different layers in the solar sub-surface interior. The low-frequency modes show nearly unchanged frequency shifts between Cycles 23 and 24, with a time evolving signature of the quasi-biennial oscillation, which is particularly...

Salabert, D; Turck-Chieze, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

ESG2006, Grenoble, 30/08-01/09/2006 Third International Symposium on the Effects of Surface Geology on Seismic Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

population density in some parts of the area, and to site effects induced by loose sediments in glacial. AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SEISMICITY OF THE WESTERN ALPS The western Alps (Fig. 1) result from the Europe­Africa

Thouvenot, François

36

Surface wave interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

Halliday, David Fraser

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now interpreted as a large negative anomaly associated with the entire field. The results of the State Smock horizontal well and the Bowers 4-25 well confirmed the lack of additional recoverable hydrocarbons in the Vernon Field. (4) The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach, Burke County, North Dakota area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the geological and geophysical data; the microbial values here were the highest we have observed. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling, however, a pipeline has not yet been completed that would allow the wells to be placed into production. We also present in this annual report the results of recent efforts to map carbonate facies tracts in the middle Devonian Dundee and Rogers City Limestones using gamma ray, bulk density, and photoelectric effect geophysical well log amplitudes. This work was undertaken to identify fairways for exploration in the Dundee and Rogers City where surface geochemical techniques could then be used to screen potential leads.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Seismic sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1987-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Genetic Adaptive­surface models from seismic travel­time data. Given a sub­surface model, the physics of wave propagation through refractive media can be used to compute travel times for seismic waves. How­ ever, in practice, we have

Louis, Sushil J.

40

Seismic sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

3-D Seismic Methods for Shallow Imaging Beneath Pavement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research presented in this dissertation focuses on survey design and acquisition of near-surface 3D seismic reflection and surface wave data on pavement. Increased efficiency for mapping simple subsurface interfaces through a combined use...

Miller, Brian

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;SEISMIC RAY THEORY Seismic Ray Theory presents the most comprehensive treatment of the seismic ray method available. This method plays an important role in seismology, seismic exploration, and the interpretation of seismic measurements. The book presents a consistent treatment of the seismic ray method, based

Cerveny, Vlastislav

43

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah Hughes University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 Key Terms: earthquake

Sheehan, Anne F.

44

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

45

FOCUSED GAUSSIAN BEAMS FOR SEISMIC IMAGING ROBERT L. NOWACK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOCUSED GAUSSIAN BEAMS FOR SEISMIC IMAGING ROBERT L. NOWACK Abstract. The application of focused Gaussian beams is investigated for the seismic imaging of common-shot reflection data. The focusing of Gaussian beams away from the source and receiver surface adds flexibility to beam imaging algorithms

Nowack, Robert L.

46

Seismic Crystals And Earthquake Shield Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically demonstrate that earthquake shield made of seismic crystal can damp down surface waves, which are the most destructive type for constructions. In the paper, seismic crystal is introduced in aspect of band gaps (Stop band) and some design concepts for earthquake and tsunami shielding were discussed in theoretical manner. We observed in our FDTD based 2D elastic wave simulations that proposed earthquake shield could provide about 0.5 reductions in magnitude of surface wave on the Richter scale. This reduction rate in magnitude can considerably reduce destructions in the case of earthquake.

B. Baykant Alagoz; Serkan Alagoz

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Detecting and characterizing mesoscale and submesoscale structures of Mediterranean water from joint seismic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mediterranean water from joint seismic and hydrographic measurements in the Gulf of Cadiz E. Quentel,1,2 X 26 March 2010. [1] Marine seismic and hydrographic data from the GO cruise in the Gulf of Cadiz of acoustic reflectors in the water column. Seismic data show strong reflectors near the surface, above

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

Ambient noise seismic imaging Journal: McGraw Hill 2008 Yearbook of Science & Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ForReview Ambient noise seismic imaging Journal: McGraw Hill 2008 Yearbook of Science & Technology List of Authors: Ritzwoller, Michael Keywords: ambient noise, seismology, seismic tomography, Rayleigh wave, Love wave, surface wave Abstract: A recent innovation in seismic imaging based on using long time

Ritzwolle, Mike

49

Seismic imaging with the generalized Radon transform: A curvelet transform perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic imaging with the generalized Radon transform: A curvelet transform perspective M V de Hoop1@purdue.edu Abstract. A key challenge in the seismic imaging of reflectors using surface reflection data. Introduction 1.1. Seismic Imaging with Arrays ­ Beyond Current Capabilities Much research in modern

Smith, Hart F.

50

Investigating the stratigraphy of an alluvial aquifer using crosswell seismic traveltime tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be used in situations where surface seismic reflection has failed e.g., Liberty et al., 1999Investigating the stratigraphy of an alluvial aquifer using crosswell seismic traveltime tomography In this study, we investigate the use of crosswell P-wave seismic tomography to obtain spatially extensive

Barrash, Warren

51

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration...

52

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

53

Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface Geologic and Hydrologic Structure Within the Coso...

54

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Seismic characterization of fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic characterization of fractures. Jos M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

JM Carcione

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient seismic noise Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.M. Shapiro, and Y. Yang, Processing seismic ambient noise data to obtain reliable broad-band surface wave... wave tomography of the ... Source: Ritzwolle, Mike -...

58

New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;New Paradigm for Seismic Networks: Crowd-Sourced Seismic Networks, including Buildings Tom Egill Hauksson #12;SCSN: what does it encompass? · ~360 Seismic Stations · ~60 stations from partners SCSN/SCEDC total of ~26 FTE's #12;Crowd Sourced Networks · Current broadband seismic network

Greer, Julia R.

59

Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Seismic modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of a Vector Hypercube for Seismic Modelling Abstract Seismic modelling is a computationally to produce realistic seismic traces intensive problem. A 2D syn- Rosemary Renautt and Johnny of seismic data. The two-dimensional wave equation which describes the propagation of stress waves

Renaut, Rosemary

60

Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surfaces is a collection of four individual essays which focus on the characteristics and tactile qualities of surfaces within a variety of perceived landscapes. Each essay concentrates on a unique surface theme and purpose; ...

DeMaio, Ernest Vincent, 1964-

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fracture Properties From Seismic Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractures scatter seismic energy and this energy can be analyzed to provide information about fracture

Burns, Daniel R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geochemical sampling team collected additional 148 samples at Vernon Field along 5 new traverses. Most of the locations were sampled for three types of analyses: microbial, iodine and enzyme leach; no results from the second batch of samples were available in time for this report. In addition to the sampling, a study was begun on the feasibility of collecting and analyzing hydrocarbon gases (C1-C8) directly. Although several companies offer these services, the cost ($200-300/sample w/o sampling fee) is high, on par with the cost of a 3D seismic survey, and may not include the raw data. However direct sampling of reservoir gases collecting in the soil appear to offer the best approach and should be included in this study. It would probably work well at Vernon Field. It may be possible to lower costs considerably; initial estimates of $20/sample for GCMS (Gas Chromatography--mass spectrometry) analysis are attractive and might induce to Michigan producers to include soil surveys in their routine field work-ups. A complete set of digital data was assembled for Vernon Field and nearby locations. The set consists of well locations, formation top picks, lithologies and scanned images of driller's reports and scout tickets. Well logs are still being located. The annual meeting for the Class Revisit work group is tentatively scheduled for the week of March 1-7 in Tampa, Fl. By that time all of the geochemical data will be available and final decisions regarding drilling can be made.

James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittichk; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

CX-012119: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Recovery Act: Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR and Kinematic Analysis CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 05/13/2014 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office

66

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

67

Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Abstract The...

68

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the same reasons cited above.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Canadian Seismic Agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ECTN network has remained stable over the past year; progress on the new concentrator software has been slow. Major developments have taken place in the Ottawa Data Laboratory including the installation of a new VAX system and further development of the Seismic Analysis Monitor software. A new initiative has been the development of hardware and software for the Sudbury Local Telemetered Network, which can be considered a prototype for a smart outstation. The performance of the ECTN over the past year is described along with a summary of eastern Canadian seismicity during the reporting period and a list of EPB research publications on eastern Canadian seismicity during the past year. 4 figures, 3 tables.

Basham, P.W.; Lyons, J.A.; Drysdale, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Andersen, F.; Hayman, R.B.; Wetmiller, R.J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic viscoelastic attenuation Submitted to: Encyclopedia of Solid Earth Geophysics Harsh Gupta-3046 USA E-mail: vernon.cormier@uconn.edu Tel: 860-486-3547 Fax: 860-486-3346 #12;SEISMIC VISCOELASTIC ATTENUATION Synonyms Seismic intrinsic attenuation Definitions Linear viscoelastic attenuation. The loss

Cormier, Vernon F.

71

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2ND SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three horizontal wells have been completed (St. Springdale & Trezil 9-15 HD, St. Springdale 13-14 HD, St. Springdale & Stedronsky 10-15 HD) and three more wells were spudded (St. Springdale & CSX 2-22 HD, St. Springdale & Mann 9-21 HD and St. Springdale 7-22 HD) in the Springdale play this past reporting period. All are horizontal wells in the Brown Niagaran. This brings the total wells in the play to 12 with seven wells contributing to a total daily production exceeding 350 bbls/day. Data from these wells has been converted from drillers logs (footage calls) and converted to Michigan GeoRef coordinates and plotted. The Gamma Ray data along the well bore was available since it was used to steer the tool during drilling and this data was superimposed on the well trajectories in an effort to help distinguish pay zones from unproductive rock. One new geochemical survey was conducted over the projected surface path of the State Springdale & Stedronsky 14-15 HD and a final project survey was planned over one of the unsurveyed wells. This will bring the total surveyed wells to five and should provide enough data to determine if the idea of only sampling along the well bore is a sound strategy.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Baku City and Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with the seismic hazard assessment for Baku and the Absheron peninsula. The assessment is based on the information on the features of earthquake ground motion excitation, seismic wave propagation (attenuation), and site effect. I analyze active faults, seismicity, soil and rock properties, geological cross-sections, the borehole data of measured shear-wave velocity, lithology, amplification factor of each geological unit, geomorphology, topography, and basic rock and surface ground motions. To estimate peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the surface, PGA at the basic rock is multiplied by the amplification parameter of each surface layers. Quaternary soft deposits, representing a high risk due to increasing PGA values at surface, are studied in detail. For a near-zone target earthquake PGA values are compared to intensity at MSK-64 scale for the Absheron peninsula. The amplification factor for the Baku city is assessed and provides estimations for a level of a seismic motion and seismic intensity of the studied area.

Babayev, Gulam R. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Study of seismic design bases and site conditions for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an investigation of four topics pertinent to the seismic design of nuclear power plants: Design accelerations by regions of the continental United States; review and compilation of design-basis seismic levels and soil conditions for existing nuclear power plants; regional distribution of shear wave velocity of foundation materials at nuclear power plant sites; and technical review of surface-founded seismic analysis versus embedded approaches.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Seismic methods for resource exploration in enhanced geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite-difference modeling study of seismic wave propagation was conducted to determine how to best investigate subsurface faults and fracture zones in geothermal areas. The numerical model was created based on results from a previous seismic reflection experiment. A suite of fault models was investigated including blind faults and faults with surface expressions. The seismic data suggest that blind faults can be detected by a sudden attenuation of seismic wave amplitudes, as long the fault is located below the receiver array. Additionally, a conversion from P- to S-waves indicates the reflection and refraction of the P-waves while propagating across the fault. The drop in amplitudes and the excitation of S-waves can be used to estimate the location of the fault at depth. The accuracy of the numerical modeling depends on the availability of a priori in situ information (velocity and density) from borehole experiments in the geothermal area.

Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hanford annual second quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (ENN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 99.92%. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.46%. For the second quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 159 times. Of these triggers 14 were local earthquakes: 7 (50%) in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 (21%) in the pre-basalt sediments, and 4 (29%) in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant seismic event for the second quarter was on March 23, 1998 when a 1.9 Mc occurred near Eltopia, WA and was felt by local residents. Although this was a small event, it was felt at the surface and is an indication of the potential impact on Hanford of seismic events that are common to the Site.

Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Rohay, A.C.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

SMACS. Probabilistic Seismic Analysis System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SMACS (Seismic Methodology Analysis Chain with Statistics) system of computer programs is one of the major computational tools of the U.S. NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). SMACS is comprised of the core program SMAX, which performs the SSI response analyses, five preprocessing programs, and two postprocessors. The preprocessing programs include: GLAY and CLAN, which generate the nominal impedance matrices and wave scattering vectors for surface-founded structures; INSSIN, which projects the dynamic properties of structures to the foundation in the form of modal participation factors and mass matrices; SAPPAC, which projects the dynamic and pseudostatic properties of multiply-supported piping systems to the support locations, and LNGEN, which can be used to generate the multiplication factors to be applied to the nominal soil, structural, and subsystem properties for each of the response calculations in accounting for random variations of these properties. The postprocessors are: PRESTO, which performs statistical operations on the raw data from the response vectors that SMAX produces to calculate best fit lognormal distributions for each response location, and CHANGO, which manipulates the data produced by PRESTO to produce other results of interest to the user. Also included is the computer program SAP4 (a modified version of the University of California, Berkeley SAPIV program), a general linear structural analysis program used for eigenvalue extractions and pseudostatic mode calculations of the models of major structures and subsystems. SAP4 is used to prepare input to the INSSIN and SAPPAC preprocessing programs. The GLAY and CLAN programs were originally developed by J.E. Luco (UCSD) and H.L. Wong (USC).

Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Mraz, M.J. [EQE Incorporated, San Ramon, CA (United States); Bumpus, S.; Gerhard, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

78

Canadian seismic agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of this report, the contract resources were spent on operation and maintenance of the Eastern Canada Telemetred Network (ECTN), development of special purpose local network systems, servicing and maintenance of the strong-motion seismograph network in eastern Canada, operation of the Ottawa data lab and earthquake monitoring and reporting. Of special note in this period was the final completion of the Sudbury (SLTN) and Charlevoix (CLTN) local networks and the integration of their data processing and analysis requirements in the regular analysis stream for ECTN data. These networks now acquire high quality digital data for detailed analysis of seismic activity and source properties from these two areas, thus effectively doubling the amount of seismic data being received by the Ottawa data lab. 37 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Seismic Facies Characterization By Scale Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the years, there has been an ongoing struggle to relate well-log and seismic data due to the inherent bandwidth limitation of seismic data, the problem of seismic amplitudes, and the apparent inability to delineate ...

Herrmann, Felix J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

82

Overview of seismic panel activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1991, the DOE-EM appointed a Seismic Panel to develop seismic criteria that can be used for evaluation of underground storage tanks containing high level radioactive wastes. The Panel expects to issue the first draft of the criteria report in January 1992. This paper provides an overview of the Panel's activities and briefly discusses the criteria. 3 refs.

Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational Energy Agency |Award ofRenewable EnergySecurity &Seismic

84

Structure and evolution of the Australian continent : insights from seismic and mechanical heterogeneity and anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I explore the geophysical structure and evolution of the Australian continental lithosphere. I combine insights from isotropic and anisotropic seismic surface-wave tomography with an analysis of the anisotropy ...

Simons, Frederik Jozef Maurits, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Seismic Imaging of Receiver Ghosts of Primaries Instead of Primaries Themselves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The three key steps of modern seismic imaging are (1) multiple attenuation, (2) velocity estimation, and (3) migration. The multiple-attenuation step is essentially designed to remove the energy that has bounces at the free surface (also known...

Ma, Nan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

Development of a hydraulic borehole seismic source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a 5 year, $10 million Sandia/Industry project to develop an advanced borehole seismic source for use in oil and gas exploration and production. The development Team included Sandia, Chevron, Amoco, Conoco, Exxon, Raytheon, Pelton, and GRI. The seismic source that was developed is a vertically oriented, axial point force, swept frequency, clamped, reaction-mass vibrator design. It was based on an early Chevron prototype, but the new tool incorporates a number of improvements which make it far superior to the original prototype. The system consists of surface control electronics, a special heavy duty fiber optic wireline and draw works, a cablehead, hydraulic motor/pump module, electronics module, clamp, and axial vibrator module. The tool has a peak output of 7,000 lbs force and a useful frequency range of 5 to 800 Hz. It can operate in fluid filled wells with 5.5-inch or larger casing to depths of 20,000 ft and operating temperatures of 170 C. The tool includes fiber optic telemetry, force and phase control, provisions to add seismic receiver arrays below the source for single well imaging, and provisions for adding other vibrator modules to the tool in the future. The project yielded four important deliverables: a complete advanced borehole seismic source system with all associated field equipment; field demonstration surveys funded by industry showing the utility of the system; industrial sources for all of the hardware; and a new service company set up by their industrial partner to provide commercial surveys.

Cutler, R.P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

LUNAR SEISMIC PROFILING EXPERIMENT DESIGN VERIFICATION THERMAL PAGI OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Analytical Model with Test Data 50 1. 1 5. 1. 2 5. 1. 3 5. I. 4 Lunar Surface and Cold Wall to ExperimentATM 1109 LUNAR SEISMIC PROFILING EXPERIMENT DESIGN VERIFICATION THERMAL PAGI OF VACUUM TEST DATE 9 /1 5I 72 This ATM summarizes the LSPE Design Verification Thermal Vacuum Test of the prototype model

Rathbun, Julie A.

88

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING Norimitsu Nakata  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC INTERFEROMETRY FOR TEMPORAL MONITORING by Norimitsu Nakata #12;c Copyright by Norimitsu Seismic interferometry, where one computes coherency of waves between two or more receivers and averages from the first study related to seismic interferometry (although the name of seismic interferometry has

Snieder, Roel

93

Temporal Integration of Seismic Traveltime Tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-lapse geophysical measurements and seismic imaging methods in particular are powerful techniques

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Integrated system for seismic evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the various features of the Seismic Module of the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures). This system was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and capability of nuclear power plant facilities. The CARES is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis i.e., static or dynamic, linear or nonlinear, etc. This paper describes the features of the Seismic Module in particular. The development of the Seismic Module of the CARES system is based on an approach which incorporates all major aspects of seismic analysis currently employed by the industry into an integrated system that allows for carrying out interactively computations of structural response to seismic motions. The code operates on a PC computer system and has multi-graphics capabilities. It has been designed with user friendly features and it allows for interactive manipulation of various analysis phases during the seismic design process. The capabilities of the seismic module include (a) generation of artificial time histories compatible with given design ground response spectra, (b) development of Power Spectral Density (PSD) functions associated with the seismic input, (c) deconvolution analysis using vertically propagating shear waves through a given soil profile, and (d) development of in-structure response spectra or corresponding PSD's. It should be pointed out that these types of analyses can also be performed individually by using available computer codes such as FLUSH, SAP, etc. The uniqueness of the CARES, however, lies on its ability to perform all required phases of the seismic analysis in an integrated manner. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Xu, J.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

96

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Canadian seismic agreement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the twenty-first progress report under the agreement entitled Canadian Seismic Agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Canadian Commercial Corporation. Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1988 to June 30, 1989 and supported in part by the NRC agreement are described below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity. In this time period eastern Canada experienced its largest earthquake in over 50 years. This earthquake, which has been christened the Saguenay earthquake, has provided a wealth of new data pertinent to earthquake engineering studies in eastern North America and is the subject of many continuing studies, which are presently being carried out at GD and elsewhere. 41 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C., Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Lapointe, S.P.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geophysics Div.)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Investigating the point seismic array concept with seismic rotation measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatially-distributed arrays of seismometers are often utilized to infer the speed and direction of incident seismic waves. Conventionally, individual seismometers of the array measure one or more orthogonal components of rectilinear particle motion (displacement, velocity, or acceleration). The present work demonstrates that measure of both the particle velocity vector and the particle rotation vector at a single point receiver yields sufficient information to discern the type (compressional or shear), speed, and direction of an incident plane seismic wave. Hence, the approach offers the intriguing possibility of dispensing with spatially-extended received arrays, with their many problematic deployment, maintenance, relocation, and post-acquisition data processing issues. This study outlines straightforward mathematical theory underlying the point seismic array concept, and implements a simple cross-correlation scanning algorithm for determining the azimuth of incident seismic waves from measured acceleration and rotation rate data. The algorithm is successfully applied to synthetic seismic data generated by an advanced finite-difference seismic wave propagation modeling algorithm. Application of the same azimuth scanning approach to data acquired at a site near Yucca Mountain, Nevada yields ambiguous, albeit encouraging, results. Practical issues associated with rotational seismometry are recognized as important, but are not addressed in this investigation.

Abbott, Robert E.; Aldridge, David Franklin

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The dynamics of a seismic wave field: Animation and analysis of kinematic GPS data recorded during the 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of a seismic wave field: Animation and analysis of kinematic GPS data recorded during. Freymueller (2011), The dynamics of a seismic wave field: Animation and analysis of kinematic GPS data identify dynamic ground motion due to Swaves (body waves), Love waves and Rayleigh waves (surface waves

Grapenthin, Ronni

102

Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

103

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

Stochastic estimation of aquifer geometry using seismic refraction data with borehole depth constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a Bayesian model to invert surface seismic refraction data with depth constraints from boreholes for characterization of aquifer geometry and apply it to seismic and borehole data sets collected at the contaminated Oak Ridge National Laboratory site in Tennessee. Rather than the traditional approach of first inverting the seismic arrival times for seismic velocity and then using that information to aid in the spatial interpolation of wellbore data, we jointly invert seismic first arrival time data and wellbore based information, such as depths of key lithological boundaries. We use a staggered grid finite difference algorithm with second order accuracy in time and fourth order accuracy in space to model seismic full waveforms and use an automated method to pick the first arrival times. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to draw many samples from the joint posterior probability distribution, on which we can estimate the key interfaces and their associated uncertainty as a function of horizontal location and depth. We test the developed method on both synthetic and field case studies. The synthetic studies show that the developed method is effective at rigorous incorporation of multiscale data and the Bayesian inversion reduces uncertainty in estimates of aquifer zonation. Applications of the approach to field data, including two surface seismic profiles located 620 m apart from each other, reveal the presence of a low velocity subsurface zone that is laterally persistent. This geophysically defined feature is aligned with the plume axis, suggesting it may serve as an important regional preferential flow pathway.

Chen, Jinsong [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Korneev, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gaines, David [University of Tennessee; Baker, Gregory S. [University of Tennessee; Watson, David [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Micro-meteoroid seismic uplift and regolith concentration on kilometric scale asteroids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic shaking is an attractive mechanism to explain the destabilisation of regolith slopes and the regolith migration found on the surfaces of asteroids (Richardson et al. 2004; Miyamoto et al. 2007). Here, we use a continuum mechanics method to simulate the seismic wave propagation in an asteroid. Assuming that asteroids can be described by a cohesive core surrounded by a thin non-cohesive regolith layer, our numerical simulations of vibrations induced by micro-meteoroids suggest that the surface peak ground accelerations induced by micro-meteoroid impacts may have been previously under-estimated. Our lower bound estimate of vertical accelerations induced by seismic waves is about 50 times larger than previous estimates. It suggests that impact events triggering seismic activity are more frequent than previously assumed for asteroids in the kilometric and sub-kilometric size range. The regolith lofting is also estimated by a first order ballistic approximation. Vertical displacements are small, but lofting...

Garcia, Raphael F; Mimoun, David

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times. We obtained {approx}1500 absolute P and S arrival times and {approx}3200 P and S wave arrival time differences. Event locations do not change greatly when 3D velocity structure is included. Three-dimensional velocity structure, where resolvable, does not differ greatly from our optimized 1D model, indicating that the improved 1D model is adequate for routine event location. Finally, we calculated moment magnitudes, MW, for nearly 155 events using the coda magnitude technique of Mayeda et al., (2003). The fact that most of the relocated events occur below the known sedimentary structures extending to 7 km suggests that they are tectonic in origin. Shallow events within the sedimentary crust in the (southern) Minagish region may be related to oil field activities, although the current study cannot unambiguously determine the source of current seismicity in Kuwait. The improved velocity model reduces the scatter of travel time residuals relative to the locations reported in the KNSN bulletin and may be used for ground motion prediction and hazard estimate studies in Kuwait.

Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic seismic risk analysis of existing buildings in regions with moderate seismicity C to apply an approach based on risk for the seismic assessment of existing buildings. In this innovative analytical seismic assessment methods, as the ratio between the capacity and the requirement of the current

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic vulnerability analysis of moderate seismicity areas using in situ experimental techniques (LGIT), LCPC, CNRS, Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble Abstract Seismic vulnerability analysis. This curve is particularly interesting in moderate seismic areas. This methodology is applied to the Grenoble

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiated seismic energy from coda measurements and no scaling in apparent stress with seismic March 2010; accepted 9 April 2010; published 31 August 2010. [1] The seismic coda consists of scattered of radiated wave energy. We apply an empirical Green's function (EGF) method to the seismic coda in order

Prieto, Germán A.

110

Polarized seismic and solitary waves run-up at the sea bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polarization effects in hydrodynamics are studied. Hydrodynamic equation for the nonlinear wave is used along with the polarized solitary waves and seismic waves act as initial waves. The model is then solved by Fourier spectral and Runge-Kutta 4 methods, and the surface plot is drawn. The output demonstrates the inundation behaviors. Consequently, the polarized seismic waves along with the polarized solitary waves tend to generate dissimilar inundation which is more disastrous.

Dennis, L. C.C.; Zainal, A. A.; Faisal, S. Y. [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of strategies for seismic design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current trends in seismic design require a new approach, oriented in satisfying motion related design requirements and limiting both structural and non-structural damage. Seismic isolation and damping devices are currently ...

Tsertikidou, Despoina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Seismic Attribute Analysis Using Higher Order Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic data processing depends on mathematical and statistical tools such as convolution, crosscorrelation and stack that employ second-order statistics (SOS). Seismic signals are non-Gaussian and therefore contain information beyond SOS. One...

Greenidge, Janelle Candice

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Multiphase fluid flow and time lapse seismics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-lapse seismic surveys aim to monitor the migration and dispersal of the CO2 ... of CO2-brine flow and seismic wave propagation to model and monitor CO2...

santos

114

Subsurface imaging with reverse vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents imaging results from a 3D reverse vertical seismic profile (RVSP) dataset measured at a hydrocarbon bearing pinnacle reef in northern Michigan. The study presented many challenges in seismic data ...

Krasovec, Mary L. (Mary Lee), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Development of a HT Seismic Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The program objective is to design; fabricate and field test two high temperature (HT) seismic tools in an EGS application.

116

SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON. TRANSFORM AND DOUBLE BEAMFORMING: A CURVELET. TRANSFORM PERSPECTIVE. M V DE...

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Seismic Modelling for the Sub-Basalt Imaging Problem Including an Analysis and Development of the Boundary Element Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The north-east Atlantic margin (NEAM) is important for hydrocarbon exploration because of the growing evidence of hydrocarbon reserves in the region. However, seismic exploration of the sub-surface is hampered by large ...

Dobson, Andrew

118

BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOOK REVIEW Seismic Communication and Adventure Among African Elephants The Elephant's Secret Sense in Namibia as she first develops the hypothesis that elephants can communicate using seismic signals. Science documenting the elephants' listening behavior and responses to seismic cues. However, these scientific

Munshi-South, Jason

119

SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS: METHOD AND VALIDATION Clotaire Michel, France cmichel@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic vulnerability in wide areas is usually assessed like USA or Italy. France is a country with moderate seismicity so that it requires lower-cost methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

120

SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW J. E. Santos1, G. B. Savioli2, J. M. Carcione3, D´e, Argentina SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. I Storage of CO2). SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW ­ p. #12;Introduction. II CO2 is separated from natural

Santos, Juan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Seismic, shock, and vibration isolation - 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains papers presented at a conference on pressure vessels and piping. Topics covered include: Design of R-FBI bearings for seismic isolation; Benefits of vertical and horizontal seismic isolation for LMR nuclear reactor units; and Some remarks on the use and perspectives of seismic isolation for fast reactors.

Chung, H. (Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)); Mostaghel, N. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Mine seismicity and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface and underground mining operations generate seismic ground motions which are created by chemical explosions and ground failures. It may come as a surprise to some that the ground failures (coal bumps, first caves, pillar collapses, rockbursts, etc.) can send signals whose magnitudes are as strong or stronger than those from any mining blast. A verification system that includes seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide sensors is being completed as part of the CTBT. The largest mine blasts and ground failures will be detected by this system and must be identified as distinct from signals generated by small nuclear explosions. Seismologists will analyze the seismic records and presumably should be able to separate them into earthquake-like and non earthquake-like categories, using a variety of so-called seismic discriminants. Non-earthquake essentially means explosion- or implosion-like. Such signals can be generated not only by mine blasts but also by a variety of ground failures. Because it is known that single-fired chemical explosions and nuclear explosion signals of the same yield give very similar seismic records, the non-earthquake signals will be of concern to the Treaty verification community. The magnitude of the mine-related events is in the range of seismicity created by smaller nuclear explosions or decoupled tests, which are of particular concern under the Treaty. It is conceivable that legitimate mining blasts or some mine-induced ground failures could occasionally be questioned. Information such as shot time, location and design parameters may be all that is necessary to resolve the event identity. In rare instances where the legitimate origin of the event could not be resolved by a consultation and clarification procedure, it might trigger on On-Site Inspection (OSI). Because there is uncertainty in the precise location of seismic event as determined by the International Monitoring System (IMS), the OSI can cover an area of up to 1,000 squared kilometers. In active mining districts this area could include several different mining operations. So, an OSI could be disruptive both to the mining community and to the US Government which must host the foreign inspection team. Accordingly, it is in the best interest of all US parties to try and eliminate the possible occurrence of false alarms. This can be achieved primarily by reducing the ambiguity of mine-induced seismic signals, so that even if these remain visible to the IMS they are clearly consistent with recognizable mining patterns.

Chiappetta, F. [Blasting Analysis International, Allentown, PA (United States); Heuze, F.; Walter, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hopler, R. [Powderman Consulting Inc., Oxford, MD (United States); Hsu, V. [Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, FL (United States); Martin, B. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Stump, B. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Zipf, K. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

123

Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia [Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai. Johor (Malaysia); Saad, Rosli [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Seismic reflection imaging of a geothermal aquifer in an urban setting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic reflection survey that was conducted in downtown Boise, Idaho, to help city planners site a new well for injection of spent geothermal water illustrates some methods to safely and successfully employ a seismic reflection survey in an urban setting. The objective of the seismic survey was to estimate the depth and continuity of a basalt and rhyolite volcanic sequence. Well siting was based on geothermal aquifer depth, location of interpreted faults, projected thermal impact of injection on existing wells, surface pipe extension costs, and public land availability. Seismic acquisition tests and careful processing were used to ensure high-quality data while minimizing the potential for damage along city streets. A video camera placed in a sewer and a blast vibration monitor were used to confirm that energy from the seismic source (a 75-in{sup 3} land air gun) did not damage nearby buildings, street surfaces, or buried utilities along the survey lines. Walkaway seismic tests were also used to compare signal quality of the air-gun source to an explosive source for imaging targets up to 800 m depth. These tests show less signal bandwidth from the air-gun source compared to the buried explosive source, but the air-gun signal quality was adequate to meet imaging objectives. Seismic reflection results show that the top of this rhyolite/basalt sequence dips ({approximately}8--1{degree}) southwest away from the Boise foothills at depths of 200 to 800 m. Seismic methods enabled interpretation of aquifer depths along the profiles and located fault zones where injected water may encounter fracture permeability and optimally benefit the existing producing system. The acquisition and processing techniques used to locate the Boise injection well may succeed for other hydrogeologic and environmental studies in urban settings.

Liberty, L. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface] [Boise State Univ., ID (United States). Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Seismic Isolation Working Meeting Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal in nuclear facility and nuclear power plant operations is operating safety during normal operations and maintaining core cooling capabilities during off-normal events including external hazards. Understanding the impact external hazards, such as flooding and earthquakes, have on nuclear facilities and NPPs is critical to deciding how to manage these hazards to expectable levels of risk. From a seismic risk perspective the goal is to manage seismic risk. Seismic risk is determined by convolving the seismic hazard with seismic fragilities (capacity of systems, structures, and components (SSCs)). There are large uncertainties associated with evolving nature of the seismic hazard curves. Additionally there are requirements within DOE and potential requirements within NRC to reconsider updated seismic hazard curves every 10 years. Therefore opportunity exists for engineered solutions to manage this seismic uncertainty. One engineered solution is seismic isolation. Current seismic isolation (SI) designs (used in commercial industry) reduce horizontal earthquake loads and protect critical infrastructure from the potentially destructive effects of large earthquakes. The benefit of SI application in the nuclear industry is being recognized and SI systems have been proposed, in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 4 standard, to be released in 2014, for Light Water Reactors (LWR) facilities using commercially available technology. However, there is a lack of industry application to the nuclear industry and uncertainty with implementing the procedures outlined in ASCE-4. Opportunity exists to determine barriers associated with implementation of current ASCE-4 standard language.

Justin Coleman; Piyush Sabharwall

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Seismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Tomography: Definitions Lapo Boschi (lapo@erdw.ethz.ch) September 14, 2009 Seismic Tomography Seismic tomography is the science of interpreting seismic measurements (seismograms) to derive information about the structure of the Earth. This course does not cover the techniques of seismic observation

Boschi, Lapo

131

Analysis of seismic anisotropy in 3D multi-component seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The importance of seismic anisotropy has been recognized by the oil industry since its first observation in hydrocarbon reservoirs in 1986, and the application of seismic anisotropy to solve geophysical problems has been ...

Qian, Zhongping

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USNRC has initiated a project to determine if any of the likely revisions to traditional earthquake engineering practice are relevant to seismic design of the specialized structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants and of such significance to suggest that a change in design practice might be warranted. As part of the initial phase of this study, a literature survey was conducted on the recent changes in seismic design codes/standards, on-going activities of code-writing organizations/communities, and published documents on displacement-based design methods. This paper provides a summary of recent changes in building codes and on-going activities for future codes. It also discusses some technical issues for further consideration.

HOFMAYER,C.H.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION platform for distributed hybrid testing #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN? Celestina Overview Implementation Validation Next steps #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

138

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES ENISTAT: Experimental-TA Project #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Partners (Users) · METU Ragueneau · SCHOECK (Germany): Steffen Scheer, Seref Diler #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES

139

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION Database: Architecture and implementation #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN Conclusions #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES 3 SERIES Concluding

140

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic wavesbe expected to enhance oil production. INTRODUCTION The hopethe reservoir can cause oil production to increase. Quite

Pride, S.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 4.5.2 Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 022 Investigator: Queen, John (Hi-Q Geophysical Inc.) Objectives: To develop...

142

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Templeton David B. Harris Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

143

INVERSE SCATTERING OF SEISMIC DATA WITH THE ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the inverse scattering of seismic reflection data making use of the generalized Radon transform. Through an extension, the relevant transform attains...

1910-61-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

SEISMIC MONITORING OF CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC MONITORING OF. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUID FLOW. J. E. Santos. 1. , G. B. Savioli. 2. , J. M. Carcione. 3. , D. Gei. 3. 1. CONICET, IGPUBA, Fac.

santos

145

Optimization Online - Constrained optimization in seismic reflection ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 7, 2004 ... Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP augmented Lagrangian approach. F. Delbos (Frederic.Delbos ***at*** ifp.fr)

F. Delbos

2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Finite Element Approximation of Coupled Seismic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

numerical approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in 2D bounded fluid- saturated porous media, with absorbing boundary conditions at...

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer, having a thickness of about 10 nm. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments p.

zyserman

148

Hanford site seismic monitoring instrumentation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a plan to comply with the seismic monitoring provisions of US DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards.

Reidel, S.P.

1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that in a declining oil reservoir, seismic waves sent acrosswells. Because oil reservoirs are often at kilometers orproximity to the oil reservoir. Our analysis suggests there

Pride, S.R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems This...

151

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char....

152

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

153

DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 DOE New Madrid Seismic Zone Electric Utility Workshop Summary Report - August 2010 The DOE New Madrid...

154

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental...

155

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of...

156

Constrained optimization in seismic reflection tomography: an SQP ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic reflection tomography is a method for determining a subsurface velocity model from the traveltimes of seismic waves reflecting on geological interfaces.

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

Poroelastic modeling of seismic boundary conditions across a fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permeability of a fracture can affect how the fracture interacts with seismic waves. ... characteristic parameters that control the seismic response of single...

2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing well logs and microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. We report results of three studies in this report. The first one deals with fractures and faults that provide the primary control on the underground fluid flow through low permeability massive carbonate rocks. Fault cores often represent lower transmissibility whereas the surrounding damaged rocks and main slip surfaces are high transmissibility elements. We determined the physical properties of fault rocks collected in and around the fault cores of large normal faults in central Italy. After studying the P- and S-wave velocity variation during cycles of confining pressure, we conclude that a rigid pore frame characterizes the fault gouge whereas the fractured limestone comprises pores with a larger aspect ratio. The second study was to characterize the seismic properties of brine as its temperature decreases from 25 C to -21 C. The purpose was to understand how the transmitted wave changes with the onset of freezing. The main practical reason for this experiment was to use partially frozen brine as an analogue for a mixture of methane hydrate and water present in the pore space of a gas hydrate reservoir. In the third study we analyzed variations in dynamic moduli in various carbonate reservoirs. The investigations include log and laboratory data from velocity, porosity, permeability, and attenuation measurements.

Gary Mavko

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Templeton, Dennise

162

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Templeton, Dennise

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton AbbeyA JumpSeagoville,SecretEmissionsSeismic

164

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mining Induced Seismicity -Monitoring of a Large Scale Salt Cavern Collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mining Induced Seismicity - Monitoring of a Large Scale Salt Cavern Collapse E. Klein* (Ineris), I in the Lorraine salt basin (France). To monitor the cavern collapse, a multi-parameter system featuring high of the roof cavern, with no ground surface movement detected. The high microseismic regime of the cavern has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Seismic and acoustic observations at Mount Erebus Volcano, Ross Island, Antarctica, 19941998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the lava lake surface; however, this depth could be exaggerated by near-field radial tilt. Seismic and Kienle, 1986; Kaminuma, 1994). Additional remote monitoring included infrasonic microphones (Dibble et al., 1984; Kaminuma et al., 1985) and, from 1986 to 1990, television surveillance of the lava lake (Dibble

Rowe, Charlotte

167

Seismic transducer modeling using ABAQUS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic transducer, known as an orbital vibrator, consists of a rotating imbalance driven by an electric motor. When suspended in a liquid-filled wellbore, vibrations of the device are coupled to the surrounding geologic media. In this mode, an orbital vibrator can be used as an efficient rotating dipole source for seismic imaging. Alternately, the motion of an orbital vibrator is affected by the physical properties of the surrounding media. From this point of view, an orbital vibrator can be used as a stand-alone sensor. The reaction to the surroundings can be sensed and recorded by geophones inside the orbital vibrator. These reactions are a function of the medias physical properties such as modulus, damping, and density, thereby identifying the rock type. This presentation shows how the orbital vibrator and surroundings were modeled with an ABAQUS acoustic FEM. The FEM is found to compare favorably with theoretical predictions. A 2D FEM and analytical model are compared to an experimental data set. Each model compares favorably with the data set.

Stephen R. Novascone

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrothermal al- teration would combine to reduce the effectiveness of standard 3-D seismic processing.

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR BRIDGES M. K. Yegian 1 , F. ASCE ABSTRACT Seismic and impedance calculations; assessment of foundation performance under the design seismic loads; and in the case of existing bridges, if deemed necessary, design of seismic retrofit measures. The outcomes of each

Yegian, Mishac

170

SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SERIES workshopSERIES workshop Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitationRole of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation Istanbul, 8Istanbul, 8--9 February 20129

171

Seismic margins and calibration of piping systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its objective is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant and to determine major contributors to the state-of-the-art seismic and systems analysis process and explicitly includes the uncertainties in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. In Phase I of SSMRP, the overall seismic risk assessment methodology was developed and assembled. The application of this methodology to the seismic PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant has been documented. This report documents the method deriving response factors. The response factors, which relate design calculated responses to best estimate values, were used in the seismic response determination of piping systems for a simplified seismic probablistic risk assessment. 13 references, 31 figures, 25 tables.

Shieh, L.C.; Tsai, N.C.; Yang, M.S.; Wong, W.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Structural concepts and details for seismic design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual discusses building and building component behavior during earthquakes, and provides suggested details for seismic resistance which have shown by experience to provide adequate performance during earthquakes. Special design and construction practices are also described which, although they might be common in some high-seismic regions, may not be common in low and moderate seismic-hazard regions of the United States. Special attention is given to describing the level of detailing appropriate for each seismic region. The UBC seismic criteria for all seismic zones is carefully examined, and many examples of connection details are given. The general scope of discussion is limited to materials and construction types common to Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Although the manual is primarily written for professional engineers engaged in performing seismic-resistant design for DOE facilities, the first two chapters, plus the introductory sections of succeeding chapters, contain descriptions which are also directed toward project engineers who authorize, review, or supervise the design and construction of DOE facilities. 88 refs., 188 figs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400 level receiver array can be used to obtain 3D 9C data. These 9C borehole seismic data provide both compressional wave and shear wave information that can be used for quantitative prediction of rock and pore fluid types. The 400-level borehole receiver array has been deployed successfully in a number of oil and gas wells during the course of this project, and each survey has resulted in marked improvements in imaging of geologic features that are critical for oil or gas production but were previously considered to be below the limits of seismic resolution. This added level of reservoir detail has resulted in improved well placement in the oil and gas fields that have been drilled using the Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} images. In the future, the 400-level downhole seismic receiver array is expected to continue to improve reservoir characterization and drilling success in deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and the northeast Caribbean region" Uri S. ten Brink, William H. Bakun), Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic

ten Brink, Uri S.

175

Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Seismic fluid-structure interaction analysis of a large LMFBR reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a seismic analysis which includes fluid-structure interactions for a large LMFBR reactor with many internal components and structures. Two mathematical models were employed. An axisymmetrical model was used for the vertical excitation analysis whereas a three-dimensional model was used for the horizontal excitation analysis. In both analyses, the sodium coolant was treated by continuum fluid elements. Thus, important seismic effects such as fluid-structure interaction, free-surface sloshing, fluid coupling, etc. are included in the analysis. This study is useful to the design of future LMFBR reactors. The results of this study can be used to improve the margin of safety of LMFBR plants under seismic conditions.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Canadian Seismic Agreement. Annual report, July--June 1990: Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The ``Canadian Seismic Agreement`` supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NORTH HILL CREEK 3-D SEISMIC EXPLORATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind River Resources Corporation (WRRC) received a DOE grant in support of its proposal to acquire, process and interpret fifteen square miles of high-quality 3-D seismic data on non-allotted trust lands of the Uintah and Ouray (Ute) Indian Reservation, northeastern Utah, in 2000. Subsequent to receiving notice that its proposal would be funded, WRRC was able to add ten square miles of adjacent state and federal mineral acreage underlying tribal surface lands by arrangement with the operator of the Flat Rock Field. The twenty-five square mile 3-D seismic survey was conducted during the fall of 2000. The data were processed through the winter of 2000-2001, and initial interpretation took place during the spring of 2001. The initial interpretation identified multiple attractive drilling prospects, two of which were staked and permitted during the summer of 2001. The two initial wells were drilled in September and October of 2001. A deeper test was drilled in June of 2002. Subsequently a ten-well deep drilling evaluation program was conducted from October of 2002 through March 2004. The present report discusses the background of the project; design and execution of the 3-D seismic survey; processing and interpretation of the data; and drilling, completion and production results of a sample of the wells drilled on the basis of the interpreted survey. Fifteen wells have been drilled to test targets identified on the North Hill Creek 3-D Seismic Survey. None of these wildcat exploratory wells has been a dry hole, and several are among the best gas producers in Utah. The quality of the data produced by this first significant exploratory 3-D survey in the Uinta Basin has encouraged other operators to employ this technology. At least two additional 3-D seismic surveys have been completed in the vicinity of the North Hill Creek Survey, and five additional surveys are being planned for the 2004 field season. This project was successful in finding commercial oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids production on a remote part of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation. Much of the natural gas and natural gas liquids are being produced from the Wingate Formation, which to our knowledge has never produced commercially anywhere. Another large percentage of the natural gas is being produced from the Entrada Formation which has not previously produced in this part of the Uinta Basin. In all, at least nine geologic formations are contributing hydrocarbons to these wells. This survey has clearly established the fact that high-quality data can be obtained in this area, despite the known obstacles.

Marc T. Eckels; David H. Suek; Denise H. Harrison; Paul J. Harrison

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

Method for migrating seismic data by using ray tracing in determining two way travel times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for depth migrating ray traces before stacking comprising the steps of: receiving raw seismic data signals representing acoustic waves generated by a plurality of sources and detected by a plurality of receivers, each of said sources and said receivers having a surface position; generating a set of one way travel times for each surface position to all image points; storing said one way travel times; identifying a set of one way travel times from one source surface position to each of said image points; identifying a second set of one way travel times from one receiver surface position to each of said image points; calculating a two way travel time set to said image points by summing said set of one way travel times for said one source surface position and said second set of one way travel times for said one receiver surface position to each of said image points; mapping a seismic trace associated with a source and receiver combination represented by said two way travel time set; and displaying said map of said seismic trace associated with said source and receiver combination.

Wang, Sheinshion; Sinton, J.B.; Hanson, D.W.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

Gemme, Marie-Claude

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II Prepared by: Environment, Health and Safety Division Environmental Services Group May 2010 Revision 1 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National ..................................................................................................................... 15 2.1.1 Demolition of Building 25/25B

184

Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

Fang, Xinding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Bayesian estimation of resistivities from seismic velocities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I address the problem of finding a background model for the estimation of resistivities in the earth from controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data by using seismic data and well logs as constraints. Estimation of ...

Werthmller, Dieter

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Non-physical energy in seismic interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-physical arrivals produced by seismic interferometry, the process whereby Greens functions are synthesized between two points by cross-correlation, crossconvolution or deconvolution, are often considered to provide ...

King, Simon James

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

4-D seismic technologies: intersurvey calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seismic data sets at different times in the production life of a reservoir, calibrating, then comparing the data sets and interpreting intersurvey differences in terms of fluid change or movement. In practice 4-D (time-lapse) analysis is typically...

Kelley, Jeffrey Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Decision analysis for seismic retrofit of structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of earthquakes as deterministic statements that will not occur for a long time rather than as probabilistic statements about the events (May 2004). Due to the aforementioned concerns regarding the decreased likelihood of building damage from seismic activity...-05, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA. Bai, J.-W., Hueste, M. B., and Gardoni, P. (2007). ?A probabilistic framework for the assessment of structural losses due to seismic events.? J. Struct. Engrg., submitted for review. Bracci, J. M...

Williams, Ryan J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Seismic interpretation of the Wind River Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC INTERPBETATICN OF THE BIND RIVER MOUNTAINS A Thesis DAVID VAN VOORHIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ACM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auqust 'l982 Majcr Subject...: Geophysics SEISNIC INTERFRETATION OF THE HIND RIVER NOUNTAINS A Thes is by DAVID VAN VOORBIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman cf. Committee) (N em ber } m (Head of Department) August l 982 ABSTRACT Seismic Interpretation of the Wind...

Van Voorhis, David

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provided. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder off an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

W. A. Dziembowski

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

193

Acoustic and Seismic Modalities for Unattended Ground Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have presented the relative advantages and complementary aspects of acoustic and seismic ground sensors. A detailed description of both acoustic and seismic ground sensing methods has been provided. Acoustic and seismic phenomenology including source mechanisms, propagation paths, attenuation, and sensing have been discussed in detail. The effects of seismo-acoustic and acousto-seismic interactions as well as recommendations for minimizing seismic/acoustic cross talk have been highlighted. We have shown representative acoustic and seismic ground sensor data to illustrate the advantages and complementary aspects of the two modalities. The data illustrate that seismic transducers often respond to acoustic excitation through acousto-seismic coupling. Based on these results, we discussed the implications of this phenomenology on the detection, identification, and localization objectives of unattended ground sensors. We have concluded with a methodology for selecting the preferred modality (acoustic and/or seismic) for a particular application.

Elbring, G.J.; Ladd, M.D.; McDonald, T.S.; Sleefe, G.E.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

Lane, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Location of seismic lines carried out under DOE funded project Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project).

Lane, Michael

196

MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

PETERSON SW

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Second and Third Quarters Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site.

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.

1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

198

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes seismic activity at and around the Hanford Site during Fiscal Year 2004. It is also the first description of seismic activity during the fourth quarter of FY04.

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Time-lapse seismic monitoring of subsurface fluid flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-lapse seismic monitoring repeats 3D seismic imaging over a reservoir to map fluid movements in a reservoir. During hydrocarbon production, the fluid saturation, pressure, and temperature of a reservoir change, thereby altering the acoustic...

Yuh, Sung H.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Motion based seismic design and loss estimation of diagrid structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagrids are becoming an increasingly popular structural system in high rise design and construction. Little research has been performed on the seismic performance of Diagrids and how it integrates with seismic loss ...

Liptack, Robert J. (Robert Jeffrey)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

civilization documentary, economic, social and even political or spiritual value #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERINGS E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION of Research Infrastructures in Performance-based Earthquake Engineering Shaking table testing of models

204

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Geologic Setting and Location Previous Work Stratigraphy of the Progreso Basin and Vicinity . . II METHODS Seismic Stratigraphic Analysis Magnetic Source Depth Determination III SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY . Seismic Depositional Sequences Seismic... proliferation of names and e. ges for the same rocks and formations complicates correlation between basins. The origin of the basins is not clear and the previous concepts of the evolution of the region h''s tsesis ol ows the style and format of the Bulletin...

Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

Taner, M. Turhan

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

207

Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell & De Rocher, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location...

208

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Exploration Activity...

209

Computation of seismic attenuation and dispersion due to ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 23, 2006 ... Seismic attenuation and dispersion are numerically computed for synthetic porous materials that contain arbitrary amounts of mesoscopic-.

masson@localhost.localdomain (masson)

2006-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

First Quarter Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the earthquake data collected from October 2005 to December 2005 from the Hanford Seismic Network

Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STOCHASTIC SEISMIC EMISSION FROM ACOUSTIC GLORIES AND THE QUIET SUN A.-C. DONEA1, C. LINDSEY2 and D; accepted 8 January 2000) Abstract. Helioseismic images of multipolar active regions show enhanced seismic'. The acoustic glories contain elements that sustain an average seismic emission 50% greater than similar

Braun, Douglas C.

212

Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Retrofitting of RC Frames with RC Infilling SERIES Workshop: "Role of research infrastructures in seismic rehabilitation" 8 - 9 February 2012, Istanbul, Turkey C. Z. Chrysostomou, N. Kyriakides, P. Kotronis, P. Roussis, M. Poljansek, F. Taucer RC Infilling of Existing RC Structures for Seismic

213

Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global seismic monitoring as probabilistic inference Nimar S. Arora Department of Computer Science of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), primarily through detection and localization of seismic events. We nuclear explosions. A global network of seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound sensors

Russell, Stuart

214

Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

Southern California, University of

215

Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures for European Synergies (SERIES) M.N. Fardis University of Patras, Greece SUMMARY: Through the 4-year project SERIES (Seismic Engineering Research Infrastructures of their research. It also helps them to enhance their potential, by jointly developing novel seismic testing

216

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

Cameron, Maria Kourkina

217

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION General Committee Final workshop Ispra (IT), May 30 th, 2013 MAID project : Seismic behavior of L- and T-shaped unreinforced Masonry shear walls including Acoustic Isolation Devices #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH

218

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION, In memory of Prof. Roy Severn #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES · Project Framework · Experimental Campaign · Outcome Outline #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH

219

Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Data Reconstruction via Shearlet-Regularized Directional Inpainting S¨oren H¨auser and Jianwei Ma May 15, 2012 We propose a new method for seismic data reconstruction by directional weighted of thousands of meters with a good resolution, the seismic method has become the most commonly used geophysical

Steidl, Gabriele

220

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model Marc Grunberg * , Stéphane Genaud of the Earth interior, and seismic tomogra- phy is a means to improve knowledge in this #28;eld. In order present in this paper the de- sign of a software program implement- ing a fast seismic ray

Genaud, Stéphane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Seismic Volume Visualization for Horizon Extraction Daniel Patel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Volume Visualization for Horizon Extraction Daniel Patel Christian Michelsen Research¨oller § Institute of Computer Graphics and Algorithms, Vienna University of Technology, Austria ABSTRACT Seismic present a novel system for rapidly interpret- ing and visualizing seismic volumetric data. First we

222

LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITHOLOGY-FLUID INVERSION FROM PRESTACK SEISMIC DATA MARIT ULVMOEN Department of Mathematical of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data in a 3D reservoir. The inversion relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic data, and it follows the lines

Eidsvik, Jo

223

Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithology-Fluid Inversion based on Prestack Seismic Data Marit Ulvmoen Summary The focus of the study is on lithology-fluid inversion from prestack seismic data. The target zone is a 3D reservoir model. The likelihood model relates the lithology-fluid classes to elastic variables and the seismic

Eidsvik, Jo

224

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

225

Evaluation of the Deployable Seismic Verification System at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this report is to examine the performance of the Deployable Seismic Verification System (DSVS) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its national laboratories to support monitoring of underground nuclear test treaties. A DSVS was installed at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) near Boulder, Wyoming during 1991 and 1992. This includes a description of the system and the deployment site. System performance was studied by looking at four areas: system noise, seismic response, state of health (SOH) and operational capabilities.

Carr, D.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

DEMONSTRATION OF NONLINEAR SEISMIC SOIL STRUCTURE INTERACTION AND APPLICABILITY TO NEW SYSTEM FRAGILITY CURVES SEISMIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it wasnt the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility).

Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development of the seismic input for use in the seismic safety margins research program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly outlines the overall systems approach being developed for the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. The unique features of the approach being taken to reduce the uncertainty in the seismic input for this program are discussed. These unique features will include extensive use of expert opinion, earthquake rupture simulation studies and the way in which the seismic hazard is incorporated into the overall systems analysis. Some very preliminary results are also given for the Zion site which is the power plant chosen for analysis in Phase I of the program.

Bernreuter, D.L.; Chung, D.H.

1980-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, Bruce P. (Sandoval County, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Bernalillo County, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Bernalillo County, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Seismic Search for Strange Quark Nuggets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bounds on masses and abundances of Strange Quark Nuggets (SQNs) are inferred from a seismic search on Earth. Potential SQN bounds from a possible seismic search on the Moon are reviewed and compared with Earth capabilities. Bounds are derived from the data taken by seismometers implanted on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts. We show that the Apollo data implies that the abundance of SQNs in the region of 10 kg to one ton must be at least an order of magnitude less than would saturate the dark matter in the solar neighborhood.

Eugene T. Herrin; Doris C. Rosenbaum; Vigdor L. Teplitz

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 1. Special topics in earthquake ground motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is divided into twelve chapters: seismic hazard analysis procedures, statistical and probabilistic considerations, vertical ground motion characteristics, vertical ground response spectrum shapes, effects of inclined rock strata on site response, correlation of ground response spectra with intensity, intensity attenuation relationships, peak ground acceleration in the very mean field, statistical analysis of response spectral amplitudes, contributions of body and surface waves, evaluation of ground motion characteristics, and design earthquake motions. (DLC)

Reddy, D.P.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Seismic and source characteristics of large chemical explosions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the very beginning of its arrangement in 1947, the Institute for Dynamics of the Geospheres RAS (former Special Sector of the Institute for physics of the Earth, RAS) was providing scientific observations of effects of nuclear explosions, as well as large-scale detonations of HE, on environment. This report presents principal results of instrumental observations obtained from various large-scale chemical explosions conducted in the Former-Soviet Union in the period of time from 1957 to 1989. Considering principal aim of the work, tamped and equivalent chemical explosions have been selected with total weights from several hundreds to several thousands ton. In particular, the selected explosions were aimed to study scaling law from excavation explosions, seismic effect of tamped explosions, and for dam construction for hydropower stations and soil melioration. Instrumental data on surface explosions of total weight in the same range aimed to test military technics and special objects are not included.

Adushkin, V.V.; Kostuchenko, V.N.; Pernik, L.M.; Sultanov, D.D.; Zcikanovsky, V.I.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Presented at the 2010 Rocky Mountain AAPG Section Meeting in Durango Colorado 1 Pre-and Post-injection Vertical Seismic Profiling over the Southwest Regional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) on Carbon Sequestration's San Juan Basin Fruitland Coal pilot test. The project is funded by the U included a zero offset VSP and three offset VSPs. The zero offset source was located 114 feet from the injection well. Long offset sources were located 1498 feet from the injection well along a 216o azimuth

Wilson, Thomas H.

235

Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L., E-mail: yilungmo@central.uh.edu [University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Laskar, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z. [Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China); Menq, F. [University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Tang, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Bighorns Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE): Amplitude Response to Different Seismic Charge Configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contrary to popular belief, charge weight is not the most important engineering parameter determining the seismic amplitudes generated by a shot. The scientific literature has long claimed that the relationship, A ~R2L1/2, where A is the seismic amplitude generated by a shot, R is the radius of the seismic charge and L is the length of that charge, holds. Assuming the coupling to the formation and the pressure generated by the explosive are constants, this relationship implies that the one should be able to increase the charge radius while decreasing the charge length and obtain more seismic amplitude with less charge weight. This has significant implications for the economics of lithospheric seismic shots, because shallower holes and small charge sizes decrease cost. During the Bighorns Array Seismic Experiment (BASE) conducted in the summer of 2010, 24 shots with charge sizes ranging from 110 to 900 kg and drill hole diameters of 300 and 450 mm were detonated and recorded by an array of up to 2000 single-channel Texan seismographs. Maximum source-receiver offset of 300 km. Five of these shots were located within a one-acre square in an effort to eliminate coupling effects due to differing geological formations. We present a quantitative comparison of the data from these five shots to experimentally test the equation above.

Harder, S. H., Killer, K. C., Worthington, L. L., Snelson, C. M.

2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

239

Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

Wayne D. Pennington

2002-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

240

CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are the primary cause of P-wave, S-wave, and density anomalies in the mantle.

Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L; Grand, S P

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

DETECTABLE SEISMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE INTERACTION OF A PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE WITH EARTH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Galaxies observed today are likely to have evolved from density perturbations in the early universe. Perturbations that exceeded some critical threshold are conjectured to have undergone gravitational collapse to form primordial black holes (PBHs) at a range of masses. Such PBHs serve as candidates for cold dark matter, and their detection would shed light on conditions in the early universe. Here, we propose a mechanism to search for transits of PBHs through/nearby Earth by studying the associated seismic waves. Using a spectral-element method, we simulate and visualize this seismic wave field in Earth's interior. We predict the emergence of two unique signatures, namely, a wave that would arrive almost simultaneously everywhere on Earth's free surface and the excitation of unusual spheroidal modes with a characteristic frequency spacing in free oscillation spectra. These qualitative characteristics are unaffected by the speed or proximity of the PBH trajectory. The seismic energy deposited by a proximal M{sup PBH} = 10{sup 15} g PBH is comparable to a magnitude M{sub w} = 4 earthquake. The non-seismic collateral damage due to the actual impact of such small PBHs with Earth would be negligible. Unfortunately, the expected collision rate is very low even if PBHs constituted all of dark matter, at {approx}10{sup -7} yr{sup -1}, and since the rate scales as 1/M{sup PBH}, fortunately encounters with larger, Earth-threatening PBHs are exceedingly unlikely. However, the rate at which non-colliding close encounters of PBHs could be detected by seismic activity alone is roughly two orders of magnitude larger-that is once every hundred thousand years-than the direct collision rate.

Luo Yang; Hanasoge, Shravan; Tromp, Jeroen [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Pretorius, Frans, E-mail: jtromp@princeton.edu [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Detectable seismic consequences of the interaction of a primordial black hole with Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galaxies observed today are likely to have evolved from density perturbations in the early universe. Perturbations that exceeded some critical threshold are conjectured to have undergone gravitational collapse to form primordial black holes (PBHs) at a range of masses. Such PBHs serve as candidates for cold dark matter and their detection would shed light on conditions in the early universe. Here we propose a mechanism to search for transits of PBHs through/nearby Earth by studying the associated seismic waves. Using a spectral-element method, we simulate and visualize this seismic wave field in Earth's interior. We predict the emergence of two unique signatures, namely, a wave that would arrive almost simultaneously everywhere on Earth's free surface and the excitation of unusual spheroidal modes with a characteristic frequency-spacing in free oscillation spectra. These qualitative characteristics are unaffected by the speed or proximity of the PBH trajectory. The seismic energy deposited by a proximal ${M^{PBH} = 10^{15}}$ g PBH is comparable to a magnitude $M_w=4$ earthquake. The non-seismic collateral damage due to the actual impact of such small PBHs with Earth would be negligible. Unfortunately, the expected collision rate is very low even if PBHs constituted all of dark matter, at ${\\sim 10^{-7} {yr}^{-1}}$, and since the rate scales as ${1/M^{PBH}}$, fortunately encounters with larger, Earth-threatening PBHs are exceedingly unlikely. However, the rate at which non-colliding close encounters of PBHs could be detected by seismic activity alone is roughly two orders of magnitude larger --- that is once every hundred thousand years --- than the direct collision rate.

Yang Luo; Shravan Hanasoge; Jeroen Tromp; Frans Pretorius

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project), DOE Award: DE-EE0002839, Phase 1 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A five-line (23 mile) reflection- seismic survey was conducted at the Hot Pot geothermal prospect area in north-central Nevada under the USDOE (United States Department of Energy) Geothermal Technologies Program. The project objective was to utilize innovative seismic data processing, integrated with existing geological, geophysical and geochemical information, to identify high-potential drilling targets and to reduce drilling risk. Data acquisition and interpretation took place between October 2010 and April 2011. The first round of data processing resulted in large areas of relatively poor data, and obvious reflectors known from existing subsurface information either did not appear on the seismic profiles or appeared at the wrong depth. To resolve these issues, the velocity model was adjusted to include geologic input, and the lines were reprocessed. The resulting products were significantly improved, and additional detail was recovered within the high-velocity and in part acoustically isotropic basement. Features visible on the improved seismic images include interpreted low angle thrust faults within the Paleozoic Valmy Formation, which potentially are reactivated in the current stress field. Intermediate-depth wells are currently targeted to test these features. The seismic images also suggest the existence of Paleogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks which potentially may function as a near- surface reservoir, charged by deeper structures in Paleozoic rocks.

Oski Energy, LLC,

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Training toward Advanced 3D Seismic Methods for CO2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our work is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. We utilize data and results developed through previous DOE-funded CO{sub 2} characterization project (DE-FG26-06NT42734) at the Dickman Field of Ness County, KS. Dickman is a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontinent to Indiana and Illinois. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. In a previous DOE-funded project, geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We believe that sequestration of CO{sub 2} will largely occur in areas of relatively flat geology and simple near surface, similar to Dickman. The challenge is not complex geology, but development of improved, lower-cost methods for detecting natural fractures and subtle faults. Our project used numerical simulation to test methods of gathering multicomponent, full azimuth data ideal for this purpose. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic methods to aide in quantifying reservoir properties and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. The purpose of the current project is graduate and undergraduate student training related to improved 3D seismic technology that addresses key challenges related to monitoring movement and containment of CO{sub 2}, specifically better quantification and sensitivity for mapping of caprock integrity, fractures, and other potential leakage pathways. Specifically, our focus is fundamental research on (1) innovative narrow-band seismic data decomposition and interpretation, and (2) numerical simulation of advanced seismic data (multi-component, high density, full azimuth data) ideal for mapping of cap rock integrity and potential leakage pathways.

Christopher Liner

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic modelling of a fractured carbonate reservoir in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Mohammed Y is required to optimize hydrocarbon production. A rock containing parallel fractures can be seismically to the seismic wavelength. Seismic anisotropy may be detectable from attributes of pre-stack 3-D seismic data

Ali, Mohammed

248

ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control-concrete composite structures; Material properties variability; Seismic design; capacity design. 1 GENERAL CONTEXT

Boyer, Edmond

249

Numerical Analysis of JNES Seismic Tests on Degraded Combined Piping System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power plant safety under seismic conditions is an important consideration. The piping systems may have some defects caused by fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, etc., in aged plants. These cracks may not only affect the seismic response but also grow and break through causing loss of coolant. Therefore, an evaluation method needs to be developed to predict crack growth behavior under seismic excitation. This paper describes efforts conducted to analyze and better understand a series of degraded pipe tests under seismic loading that was conducted by Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES). A special 'cracked-pipe element' (CPE) concept, where the element represented the global moment-rotation response due to the crack, was developed. This approach was developed to significantly simplify the dynamic finite element analysis in fracture mechanics fields. In this paper, model validation was conducted by comparisons with a series of pipe tests with circumferential through-wall and surface cracks under different excitation conditions. These analyses showed that reasonably accurate predictions could be made using the abaqus connector element to model the complete transition of a circumferential surface crack to a through-wall crack under cyclic dynamic loading. The JNES primary loop recirculation piping test was analyzed in detail. This combined-component test had three crack locations and multiple applied simulated seismic block loadings. Comparisons were also made between the ABAQUS finite element (FE) analyses results to the measured displacements in the experiment. Good agreement was obtained, and it was confirmed that the simplified modeling is applicable to a seismic analysis for a cracked pipe on the basis of fracture mechanics. Pipe system leakage did occur in the JNES tests. The analytical predictions using the CPE approach did not predict leakage, suggesting that cyclic ductile tearing with large-scale plasticity was not the crack growth mode for the acceleration excitations considered here. Hence, the leakage was caused by low-cycle fatigue with small-scale yielding. The procedure used to make predictions of low-cycle fatigue crack growth with small-scale yielding was based on the Dowling {Delta}J procedure, which is an extension of linear-elastic fatigue crack growth methodology into the nonlinear plasticity region. The predicted moments from the CPE approach were used using a cycle-by-cycle crack growth procedure. The predictions compare quite well with the experimental measurements.

Zhang T.; Nie J.; Brust, F.; Wilkowski, G.; Hofmayer, C.; Ali, S.; Shim, D-J.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

250

Modeling of the Sedimentary Interbedded Basalt Stratigraphy for the Idaho National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes how the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy were modeled in the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Drill holes indicate the bedrock beneath INL facilities is composed of about 1.1 km of alternating layers of basalt rock and loosely consolidated sediments. Alternating layers of hard rock and soft loose sediments tend to attenuate seismic energy greater than uniform rock due to scattering and damping. The INL PSHA incorporated the effects of the sedimentary interbedded basalt stratigraphy by developing site-specific shear (S) wave velocity profiles. The profiles were used in the PSHA to model the near-surface site response by developing site-specific stochastic attenuation relationships.

Suzette Payne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Seismic switch for strong motion measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seismic switching device that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period.

Harben, Philip E. (Oakley, CA); Rodgers, Peter W. (Santa Barbara, CA); Ewert, Daniel W. (Patterson, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

On seismic signatures of rapid variation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an improved model for an asteroseismic diagnostic contained in the frequency spacing of low-degree acoustic modes. By modelling in a realistic manner regions of rapid variation of dynamically relevant quantities, which we call acoustic glitches, we can derive signatures of the gross properties of those glitches. In particular, we are interested in measuring properties that are related to the helium ionization zones and to the rapid variation in the background state associated with the lower boundary of the convective envelope. The formula for the seismic diagnostic is tested against a sequence of theoretical models of the Sun, and is compared with seismic diagnostics published previously by Monteiro & Thompson (1998, 2005) and by Basu et al. (2004).

G. Houdek; D. O. Gough

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Seismic switch for strong motion measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence ana...

Accadia, T; Astone, P; Ballardin, G; Barone, F; Barsuglia, M; Basti, A; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beker, M G; Belletoile, A; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Blom, M; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Boschi, V; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Branchesi, M; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brisson, V; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Canuel, B; Carbognani, F; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Cuoco, E; DAntonio, S; Dattilo, V; Davier, M; Day, R; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Dietz, A; Drago, M; Endroczi, G; Fafone, V; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Forte, L A; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Gouaty, R; Granata, M; Greverie, C; Guidi, G M; Hayau, J -F; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Jaranowski, P; Kowalska, I; Krolak, A; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Losurdo, G; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Masserot, A; Michel, C; Milano, L; Minenkov, Y; Mohan, M; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mosca, S; Mours, B; Naticchioni, L; Nocera, F; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Paoletti, F; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Persichetti, G; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Poggiani, R; Prato, M; Prodi, G A; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Rabeling, D S; Racz, I; Rapagnani, P; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Ricci, F; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Romano, R; Rosinska, D; Ruggi, P; Sassolas, B; Sentenac, D; Sperandio, L; Sturani, R; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Vajente, G; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; Vasuth, M; Vavoulidis, M; Vedovato, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicere, A; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Ward, R L; Was, M; Yvert, M; Zadrozny, A; Zendri, J -P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Effects of Heterogeneities on Seismic Wave Propagation in the Climax Stock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty requires the ability to detect low-yield (less than 150kton) nuclear events. This kind of monitoring can only be done seismically on a regional scale (within 2000km). At this level, it is difficult to distinguish between low-yield nuclear events and non-nuclear events of similar magnitude. In order to confidently identify a nuclear event, a more detailed understanding of nuclear seismic sources is needed. In particular, it is important to know the effects of local geology on the seismic signal. This study focuses on P-wave velocity in heterogeneous granitoid. The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is currently performing low-yield tests with chemical explosives at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The exact test site was chosen to be in the Climax Stock, a cretaceous granodiorite and quartz-monzonite pluton located in Area 15 of the NNSS. It has been used in the past for the Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests, which provided legacy data that can be used to simulate wave propagation. The Climax Stock was originally chosen as the site of the SPE partly because of its assumed homogeneity. It has since been discovered that the area of the stock where the SPE tests are being performed contains a perched water table. In addition, the stock is known to contain an extensive network of faults, joints, and fractures, but the exact effect of these structural features on seismic wave velocity is not fully understood. The SPE tests are designed to seismically capture the explosion phenomena from the near- to the far-field transition of the seismic waveform. In the first SPE experiment, 100kg of chemical explosives were set off at a depth of 55m. The blast was recorded with an array of sensors and diagnostics, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment, Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, and infrasound sensors. The focus of this study is two-fold: (1) the geophone array that was focused over the SPE shot and (2) a high-resolution seismic profile that was recently acquired at the field site. The geophone array was placed radially around the SPE shot in five directions with 100m spacing and out to a distance of 2 km. The high-resolution profile was about 475m in length with station and shot spacing of 5m using a 7000lb mini-vibe as a source. In both data sets, the first arrivals will be used to develop velocity models. For the geophone array, 1-D P-wave velocity models will be developed to determine an average apparent velocity of the Climax Stock. The high-resolution data will be used to develop a 2-D P-wave velocity model along the seismic profile. This is in an effort to elucidate the water table in more detail and provide additional information on the near-surface structure. These results will be used in the overall modeling effort to fully characterize the test bed and develop a physics-based model to simulate seismic energy from the SPE events.

Hagan Webb, C., Snelson, C. M., White, R., Emmitt, R., Barker, D., Abbott, R., Bonal, N.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic array will considerably improve the recording capacity of regional and local seismic events. It will allow detection of signatures of seismic waves propagating in submeridional and sublatitudinal directions. The latter is of special interest not only to access the influence of the Urals on propagation patterns of seismic waves, but also to address other questions, such as the structure and dynamic characteristics of the internal dynamo of the Earth [9,13]. Recording seismic waves at low angular distances from seismically active subpolar zones will allow us to collect data on vortical and convective movements in subpolar lithosphere blocks and at the boundary of the inner core of the Earth, possibly giving essential clues to the modeling of the Earth's electromagnetic field [3,13]. The present study considers basic features of seismic noise at the Vorkuta station obtained through the analysis of seismic records from March, 2006 till December, 2007.

Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

Basis for seismic provisions of DOE-STD-1020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE-STD-1020 provides for a graded approach for the seismic design and evaluation of DOE structures, systems, and components (SSC). Each SSC is assigned to a Performance Category (PC) with a performance description and an approximate annual probability of seismic-induced unacceptable performance, P{sub F}. The seismic annual probability performance goals for PC 1 through 4 for which specific seismic design and evaluation criteria are presented. DOE-STD-1020 also provides a seismic design and evaluation procedure applicable to achieve any seismic performance goal annual probability of unacceptable performance specified by the user. The desired seismic performance goal is achieved by defining the seismic hazard in terms of a site-specified design/evaluation response spectrum (called herein, the Design/Evaluation Basis Earthquake, DBE). Probabilistic seismic hazard estimates are used to establish the DBE. The resulting seismic hazard curves define the amplitude of the ground motion as a function of the annual probability of exceedance P{sub H} of the specified seismic hazard. Once the DBE is defined, the SSC is designed or evaluated for this DBE using adequately conservative deterministic acceptance criteria. To be adequately conservative, the acceptance criteria must introduce an additional reduction in the risk of unacceptable performance below the annual risk of exceeding the DBE. The ratio of the seismic hazard exceedance probability P{sub H} to the performance goal probability P{sub F} is defined herein as the risk reduction ratio. The required degree of conservatism in the deterministic acceptance criteria is a function of the specified risk reduction ratio.

Kennedy, R.C. [RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting, Yorba Linda, CA (United States); Short, S.A. [EQE International, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the Hanford Seismic Network, there were 337 triggers during the third quarter of fiscal year 2005. Of these triggers, 20 were earthquakes within the Hanford Seismic Network. The largest earthquake within the Hanford Seismic Network was a magnitude 1.3 event May 25 near Vantage, Washington. During the third quarter, stratigraphically 17 (85%) events occurred in the Columbia River basalt (approximately 0-5 km), no events in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km), and three (15%) in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km). During the first quarter, geographically five (20%) earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, 10 (50%) earthquakes were associated with a major geologic structure, and 5 (25%) were classified as random events.

Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Sweeney, Mark D.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Seismic fragility estimates for corroded reinforced concrete bridge structures with two-column bents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assess the losses associated with future earthquakes, seismic vulnerability functions are commonly used to correlate the damage or loss of a structure to the level of seismic intensity. A common procedure in seismic vulnerability assessment...

Zhong, Jinquan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Seismic fragility and retrofitting for a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effectiveness of seismic retrofitting applied to enhance seismic performance was assessed for a five-story reinforced concrete (RC) flat-slab building structure in the central United States. In addition to this, an assessment of seismic...

Bai, Jong-Wha

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic Signiture of a Geothemal Field from Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis Develpment of a low Cost Method to Estimate the Seismic...

263

Seismic Risk Assessment of Port Facilities Ung Jin Na, Samit Ray Chaudhuri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Risk Assessment of Port Facilities Ung Jin Na, Samit Ray Chaudhuri Faculty Advisor : Prof Estimation Methodology Applications (in progress) Port of Long Beach · Seismic Risk Assessment, Decision & Vertical movement, Settlement of Apron Seismic Vulnerability - quay Wall

Shinozuka, Masanobu

264

PRINCIPLES OF SEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSTICS OF THE SHALLOW SUBPHOTOSPHERE Charles Lindsey and D. C. Braun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRINCIPLES OF SEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR DIAGNOSTICS OF THE SHALLOW SUBPHOTOSPHERE Charles Lindsey develop the wave-mechanical formalism for phase-correlation computational seismic holography headinggs: Sun: activity -- Sun: helioseismology -- sunspots 1. INTRODUCTION Computational seismic

Braun, Douglas C.

265

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Earthquake Engineering Research in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Earthquake Engineering Research Infrastructures (RI) in regions of high seismicity. · Limited access of the Scientific and Technical (S resources at some RIs. #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES KEY POINTS

266

Seismic Assessment and Retrofit of Existing Multi-Column Bent Bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Assessment and Retrofit of Existing Multi-Column Bent Bridges By Cole C. Mc ................................................................................................................................... 6 Seismic Activity in Western Washington State Approach ­ Bridge Modeling .............................................11 Seismic Excitations

267

Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete buildings A Dissertation Submitted in Partial dissertation entitled "Seismic fragility curves for reinforced concrete frame and wall- frame buildings. Buildings designed for seismic loading, and buildings designed only for gravity loads, are considered

268

Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles Heather. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 2. Theory and method of seismic interferometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 4.2. Seismic interferometry across the Scottish Highlands

269

Exploring the Earths subsurface with virtual seismic sources and receivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional methods of imaging the Earths subsurface using seismic waves require an identifiable, impulsive source of seismic energy, for example an earthquake or explosive source. Naturally occurring, ambient seismic waves form an ever...

Nicolson, Heather Johan

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D Seismic Data Daniel Patel, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, John Gjelberg, and M. Eduard Groller, Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D Seismic Data Daniel Patel, Christopher for quickly interpreting and illustrating 2D slices of seismic volumetric reflection data. Searching for oil and gas involves creating a structural overview of seismic reflection data to identify hydrocarbon

271

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005...

272

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

failure of seismic reflection data to image thesubsurface demonstrates the robust reliability of aconceptual model approach to geothermal exploration thatemphasizes the...

273

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity are...

274

Development of an Updated Induced Seismicity Protocol for the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Peer Review seismic024majer.pdf More Documents & Publications Microseismic Study with LBNL - Monitoring the Effect of Injection of Fluids from the Lake County Pipeline on...

275

Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gritto (PI), AIT Doug Dreger, UCB Oliver Heidbach, GFZ Larry Hutchings (Presenter), LBNL 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program UCB * EGS operations rely on small-scale seismicity to...

276

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEDCO, RARE Technology, and Sercel, Inc. to combine multicomponent seismic technology and rock physics modeling that will lead to the ability to image and analyze geothermal...

277

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity...

278

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steck, Et Al., 1998) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

279

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of geothermal prospects beneath volcanic outcrops. Seismic-based quantification of fracture orientation and intensity will result in optimal positioning of geothermal wells....

280

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of geothermal prospects beneath volcanic outcrops. * Seismic-based quantification of fracture orientation and intensity will result in optimal positioning of geothermal wells. *...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office eere.energy.gov * EGS operations rely on small-scale seismicity to delineate fracture extent, fracture type and pathways for water * EGS operations need to understand...

282

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Michael Batzle, PI Colorado School of Mines Track Name: Fluid...

283

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W....

284

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and...

285

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central...

286

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001)...

287

Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful...

288

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

289

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1993 - 1993 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

290

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

291

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Abstract In...

292

Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness...

293

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet & Aki, 1981) Exploration Activity Details...

294

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Exploration Activity Details Location...

295

Field Mapping At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness could be...

296

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown...

297

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1991)...

298

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration...

299

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

300

Refraction Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Central...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Roberts, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

302

Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell Monitoring...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell Monitoring Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This Technology (a) Peizotube source, as deployed...

303

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Nishimura, Et Al., 1997)...

304

Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JCRM All rights reserved. Volume x, Number x, Month 200x, pp.x-x. [Issue paper]. Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction. Seiji NAKAGAWA.

Toru Takahashi

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Abstract Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft...

306

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Application of seismic tomographic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Application of seismic tomographic techniques in the investigation of geothermal systems Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

307

Seismic Imaging of the Earth's Interior (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2006: Earth scientist Barbara Romanowicz discusses how she explores the deep structure and dynamics of the Earth using seismic tomography.

Romanowicz, Barbara

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Abstract This report describes the development and...

309

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Seismic and Wind Load Combinations 8.5.2 Extremeextrapolation for wind turbine extreme loads. Wind Energy,extrapolation for wind turbine extreme loads. 46th AIAA

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Assisted Seismic Matching: Joint Inversion of Seismic, Rock Physics and Basin Modeling Ulisses T. Mello*, IBM T. J. Watson Res. Center, Stewart A. Levin, Halliburton, Vanessa Lopez, Andrew Conn,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assisted Seismic Matching: Joint Inversion of Seismic, Rock Physics and Basin Modeling Ulisses T physics, and seismic attributes, including seismic amplitude to match seismic data. Introduction a match to seismic data. In particular, we seek to match not just event timing (phase) but also reflection

Zhang, Hongchao

311

A direct displacement-based design of low-rise seismic resistant steel moment frames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lateral Force Distribution for Seismic Design StructuralLateral Force Distribution for Seismic Design . 169stiffness distribution are additional design choices that

Harris, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoid seismic pounding Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of years) to avoid solidification. Seismic observations indicate... of thou- sands of hydrothermal vent complexes identified on seismic reflection profiles from the Vring......

313

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

314

Improving the design and performance of concrete bridges in seismic regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response of a hybrid system, the energy dissipaters shouldof a hybrid system to dissipate seismic energy and cansystem to dissipate seismic energy. 14.3 Relationships for Hybrid

Tobolski, Matthew Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

On the Solution of an Inverse Scattering Problem in Seismic While ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 27, 2001 ... bore and regarded as a seismic source, from measurements of the ... the wave speeds in model problems within the context of the seismic.

1910-20-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing seismic guided Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure beneath the central Lucky Strike Segment from seismic... during a 3D seismic reflection survey, shows an offaxis velocity increase (1 kms), a lowvelocity...

317

Seismic data obtained using. 50-caliber machine gun as high-resolution seismic source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic line across a shoestring sandstone served as a test of a .50-caliber machine gun as a high-resolution seismic source in exploring for shallow sandstones. The line crosses part of the Bronson-Xenia oil field, which produces from the Bartlesville sandstone of the Cherokee Group (Pennsylvanian) in Bourbon County, Kansas, at a depth of 622 ft (190 m). The reservoir, which has a flat base and an irregular top, may represent a superposition of fluvial sandstones. The seismic line clearly depicts a lenticular sandstone that is up to 56 ft (17 m) thick. Both the lateral extent of the sandstone body and a slight velocity pull-up of the underlying layers are evident. In addition to the target sandstone, two additional sandstone bodies may be present at the east end of the line, where well control is not available. Analysis of the seismic data indicates that the frequency of the .50-caliber sources is from 30 to 170 Hz. The high frequencies are retained deep into the section. Two shots per shotpoint are the minimum number necessary for acquiring high-quality data, and 12-fold is the minimum acceptable common-depth-point (CDP) coverage. 11 figures.

Seeber, M.D.; Steeples, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred close to the Willow Creek coal mine in the Book Cliffs area on February 5, 1998 (UTC date), just prior to the start of this project; a magnitude 4.2 shock on March 7,2000 (UTC date), in the same area as the February 5 event; and a magnitude 4.3 shock that occurred on January 30,2000 (UTC and local date), associated with a panel collapse at the Solvay trona mine in southwestern Wyoming. This is the same mine in which an earlier collapse event of magnitude 5.2 occurred in February 1995, attracting considerable attention from the CTBT community.

Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

John Rogers

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as minor with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN PHILOSOPHY FOR STEEL STRUCTURES IN MODERATE SEISMIC REGIONS E.M. Hines1 and L.A. Fahnestock2 ABSTRACT The authors propose a design philosophy for steel buildings in moderate seismic regions that draws to the continued development and validation of this philosophy. Introduction Recent widespread adoption

Hines, Eric

322

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Detection of Underground Marlpit Quarries Using High Resolution Seismic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of Underground Marlpit Quarries Using High Resolution Seismic B. Piwakowski* (Ecole of high resolution reflection seismic for the detection and location of underground marlpit quarries of the geological structure, the results show that the detection of marlpit underground quarries, often considered

Boyer, Edmond

324

Using Expert Knowledge in Solving the Seismic Inverse Problem ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practical applications, it it important to solve the seismic inverse problem, i.e., to measure seismic exhausted. Even under the best conservation policies, there is (and there will be) a constant need to find that there are resources such as minerals at a certain location is to actually drill a borehole and analyze the materials

Ward, Karen

325

Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Logistic Regression Applied to Seismic Discrimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The usefulness of logistic discrimination was examined in an effort to learn how it performs in a regional seismic setting. Logistic discrimination provides an easily understood method, works with user-defined models and few assumptions about the population distributions, and handles both continuous and discrete data. Seismic event measurements from a data set compiled by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) of Chinese events recorded at station WMQ were used in this demonstration study. PNNL applied logistic regression techniques to the data. All possible combinations of the Lg and Pg measurements were tried, and a best-fit logistic model was created. The best combination of Lg and Pg frequencies for predicting the source of a seismic event (earthquake or explosion) used Lg{sub 3.0-6.0} and Pg{sub 3.0-6.0} as the predictor variables. A cross-validation test was run, which showed that this model was able to correctly predict 99.7% earthquakes and 98.0% explosions for this given data set. Two other models were identified that used Pg and Lg measurements from the 1.5 to 3.0 Hz frequency range. Although these other models did a good job of correctly predicting the earthquakes, they were not as effective at predicting the explosions. Two possible biases were discovered which affect the predicted probabilities for each outcome. The first bias was due to this being a case-controlled study. The sampling fractions caused a bias in the probabilities that were calculated using the models. The second bias is caused by a change in the proportions for each event. If at a later date the proportions (a priori probabilities) of explosions versus earthquakes change, this would cause a bias in the predicted probability for an event. When using logistic regression, the user needs to be aware of the possible biases and what affect they will have on the predicted probabilities.

BG Amindan; DN Hagedorn

1998-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Seismic active control by neutral networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

Tang, Yu

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Seismic active control by neural networks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to activate structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feed-forward neural network architecture and an adaptive back-propagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the back-propagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator's capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

Tang, Y.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

On the seismic age of the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use low-degree acoustic modes obtained by the BiSON to estimate the main-sequence age $t_\\odot$ of the Sun. The calibration is accomplished by linearizing the deviations from a standard solar model the seismic frequencies of which are close to those of the Sun. Formally, we obtain the preliminary value $t_\\odot=4.68\\pm0.02 $Gy, coupled with an initial heavy-element abundance $Z=0.0169\\pm0.0005$. The quoted standard errors, which are not independent, are upper bounds implied under the assumption that the standard errors in the observed frequencies are independent.

G. Houdek; D. O. Gough

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

330

Seismic metamaterials based on isochronous mechanical oscillators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Letter introduces a seismic metamaterial (SM) composed by a chain of mass-in-mass system able to filter the S-waves of an earthquake. We included the effect of the SM into the mono dimensional model for the soil response analysis. The SM modifies the soil behavior and in presence of an internal damping the amplitude of the soil amplification function is reduced also in a region near the resonance frequency. This SM can be realized by a continuous structure with inside a 3d-matrix of isochronous oscillators based on a sphere rolling over a cycloidal trajectory.

Finocchio, G., E-mail: gfinocchio@unime.it; Garesc, F.; Azzerboni, B. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, C.da di Dio, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Casablanca, O.; Chiappini, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Via Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma (Italy); Ricciardi, G. [Department of Civil, Informatic, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering and Applied Mathematics, C.da di Dio, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Alibrandi, U. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

331

Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

Amos Nur

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

332

Seismic risk assessment of a BWR: status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seismic risk methodology developed in the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was demonstrated by its application to the Zion nuclear power plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR). A detailed model of Zion, including systems analysis models (initiating events, event trees, and fault trees), SSI and structure models, and piping models was developed and analyzed. The SSMRP methodology can equally be applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR). To demonstrate its applicability, to identify fundamental differences in seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR, and to provide a basis of comparison of seismic risk between a PWR and a BWR when analyzed with comparable methodology and assumptions, a seismic risk analysis is being performed on the LaSalle County Station nuclear power plant.

Chuang, T.Y.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Wells, J.E.; Johnson, J.J.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nonlinear acoustic/seismic waves in earthquake processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear dynamics induced by seismic sources and seismic waves are common in Earth. Observations range from seismic strong ground motion (the most damaging aspect of earthquakes), intense near-source effects, and distant nonlinear effects from the source that have important consequences. The distant effects include dynamic earthquake triggering-one of the most fascinating topics in seismology today-which may be elastically nonlinearly driven. Dynamic earthquake triggering is the phenomenon whereby seismic waves generated from one earthquake trigger slip events on a nearby or distant fault. Dynamic triggering may take place at distances thousands of kilometers from the triggering earthquake, and includes triggering of the entire spectrum of slip behaviors currently identified. These include triggered earthquakes and triggered slow, silent-slip during which little seismic energy is radiated. It appears that the elasticity of the fault gouge-the granular material located between the fault blocks-is key to the triggering phenomenon.

Johnson, Paul A. [Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

334

The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B. [Departement of Physics Intitut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

Seismic fragility test of a 6-inch diameter pipe system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the test results and assessments of seismic fragility tests performed on a 6-inch diameter piping system. The test was funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted by ETEC. The objective of the test was to investigate the ability of a representative nuclear piping system to withstand high level dynamic seismic and other loadings. Levels of loadings achieved during seismic testing were 20 to 30 times larger than normal elastic design evaluations to ASME Level D limits would permit. Based on failure data obtained during seismic and other dynamic testing, it was concluded that nuclear piping systems are inherently able to withstand much larger dynamic seismic loadings than permitted by current design practice criteria or predicted by the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and several proposed nonlinear methods of failure analysis.

Chen, W. P.; Onesto, A. T.; DeVita, V.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 81 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2010. Sixty-five of these earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter is a continuation of the swarm events observed during fiscal year 2009 and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, and 2009d). Most of the events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with only 1 event in the 2.0-3.0 range; the maximum magnitude event (2.5 Mc) occurred on December 22 at depth 2.1 km. The average depth of the Wooded Island events during the quarter was 1.4 km with a maximum depth estimated at 3.1 km. This placed the Wooded Island events within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The low magnitude of the Wooded Island events has made them undetectable to all but local area residents. The Hanford SMA network was triggered several times by these events and the SMA recordings are discussed in section 6.0. During the last year some Hanford employees working within a few miles of the swarm area and individuals living directly across the Columbia River from the swarm center have reported feeling many of the larger magnitude events. Strong motion accelerometer (SMA) units installed directly above the swarm area at ground surface measured peak ground accelerations approaching 15% g, the largest values recorded at Hanford. This corresponds to strong shaking of the ground, consistent with what people in the local area have reported. However, the duration and magnitude of these swarm events should not result in any structural damage to facilities. The USGS performed a geophysical survey using satellite interferometry that detected approximately 1 inch uplift in surface deformation along an east-west transect within the swarm area. The uplift is thought to be caused by the release of pressure that has built up in sedimentary layers, cracking the brittle basalt layers with the Columbia River Basalt Formation (CRBG) and causing the earthquakes. Similar earthquake swarms have been recorded near this same location in 1970, 1975 and 1988 but not with SMA readings or satellite imagery. Prior to the 1970s, swarming may have occurred, but equipment was not in place to record those events. The Wooded Island swarm, due its location and the limited magnitude of the events, does not appear to pose any significant risk to Hanford waste storage facilities. Since swarms of the past did not intensify in magnitude, seismologists do not expect that these events will persist or increase in intensity. However, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor the activity. Outside of the Wooded Island swarm, sixteen earthquakes were recorded, all minor events. Seven earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments and nine earthquakes at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, seven earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and nine earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

Application of seismic tomographic techniques in the investigation of geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The utility of microearthquake data for characterizing the Northwest Geysers geothermal field and the Long Valley Caldera (LVC) was investigated. Three-dimensional (3-D) P- and S-wave seismic velocity models were estimated for the Coldwater Creek Steam Field (CCSF) in the Northwest Geysers region. Hypocenters relocated using these 3-D models appear to be associated with the steam producing zone, with a deeper cluster of hypocenters beneath an active injection well. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit strong correlation with geothermal exploitation. A 3-D differential attenuation model was also developed for the CCSF from spectral ratios corrected for strong site effects. High-velocity anomalies and low attenuation in the near surface correspond to Franciscan metagraywacke and greenstone units. Microearthquakes recorded at seismographic stations located near the metagraywacke unit exhibit high corner frequencies. Low-velocity anomalies and higher attenuation in the near surface are associated with sections of Franciscan melange. Near-surface high attenuation and high Vp/Vs are interpreted to indicate liquid-saturated regions affected by meteoric recharge. High attenuation and low Vp/Vs marks the steam producing zone, suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. The extent of the high attenuation and low Vp/Vs anomalies suggest that the CCSF steam reservoir may extend northwestward beyond the known producing zone. This study concludes that microearthquake monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool. Seismic velocity and attenuation structures as well as the distribution of microearthquake activity can be used to identify and delineate the geothermal reservoir, while temporal variations in these quantities would be useful in tracking changes during exploitation.

Romero, A.E. Jr.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

339

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

342

First quarter Hanford seismic report for fiscal year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EW uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 311 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twelve seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree}N latitude and 119--120{degree}W longitude; 2 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 1 was a quarry blast. Two earthquakes appear to be related to a major geologic structure, no earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 9 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the first quarter of FY 2000.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its con-tractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (E WRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 818 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Thirteen seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46-47{degree} N latitude and 119-120{degree} W longitude; 7 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 1 was an earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments, and 5 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement. Three earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 10 earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the third quarter of FY 2000.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The HSN uses 21 sites and the EWRN uses 36 sites; both networks share 16 sites. The networks have 46 combined data channels because Gable Butte and Frenchman Hills East are three-component sites. The reconfiguration of the telemetry and recording systems was completed during the first quarter. All leased telephone lines have been eliminated and radio telemetry is now used exclusively. For the HSN, there were 506 triggers on two parallel detection and recording systems during the second quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2000. Twenty-seven seismic events were located by the Hanford Seismic Network within the reporting region of 46--47{degree} N latitude and 119--120{degree} W longitude; 12 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 2 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 9 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement, and 5 were quarry blasts. Three earthquakes appear to be related to geologic structures, eleven earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and seven earthquakes were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the second quarter of FY 2000.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Seismic Survey Report for Central Nevada Test Area, Subsurface, Correction Action Unit 443, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seismic survey was successful in imaging the water table and underlying structures at the site. The configuration of the water table reflector confirms the general southeast horizontal flow direction in the alluvial aquifer. Offsets in the water table reflector, both at known faults that reach the surface and at subsurface faults not previously recognized, indicate that both extension and blast-related faults are barriers to lateral groundwater flow. The results from this study have been used to optimally locate two new wells designed to monitor head levels and possible contaminant migration in the alluvial aquifer at CTNA.

None

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Geophysical and transport properties of reservoir rocks. Final report for task 4: Measurements and analysis of seismic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of research on the seismic properties of reservoir rocks is to develop a basic understanding of the effects of rock microstructure and its contained pore fluids on seismic velocities and attenuation. Ultimately, this knowledge would be used to extract reservoir properties information such as the porosity, permeability, clay content, fluid saturation, and fluid type from borehole, cross-borehole, and surface seismic measurements to improve the planning and control of oil and gas recovery. This thesis presents laboratory ultrasonic measurements for three granular materials and attempts to relate the microstructural properties and the properties of the pore fluids to P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation. These experimental results show that artificial porous materials with sintered grains and a sandstone with partially cemented grains exhibit complexities in P- and S-wave attenuation that cannot be adequately explained by existing micromechanical theories. It is likely that some of the complexity observed in the seismic attenuation is controlled by details of the rock microstructure, such as the grain contact area and grain shape, and by the arrangement of the grain packing. To examine these effects, a numerical method was developed for analyzing wave propagation in a grain packing. The method is based on a dynamic boundary integral equation and incorporates generalized stiffness boundary conditions between individual grains to account for viscous losses and grain contact scattering.

Cook, N.G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Satish Pullammanappallil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Satish to compute travel times for seismic waves. However, in practice, we have to solve the inverse problem: travel synthetic seismic models shows that large population sizes are crit- ical to generating good seismic

Louis, Sushil J.

348

SEISMIC RISK MAPS FOR EUROCODE-8 DESIGNED BUILDINGS Thomas Ulrich1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SEISMIC RISK MAPS FOR EUROCODE-8 DESIGNED BUILDINGS Thomas Ulrich1 , John Douglas2 , Caterina Negulescu3 There is currently a move towards seismic design maps that are risk-targeted (e.g. Luco et al of such maps relies on three independent inputs: a) seismic hazard curves derived using probabilistic seismic

349

Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimisation of seismic network design: Application to a geophysical international lunar network. Informations about lunar seismicity and seismic subsurface models from the Apollo missions are used as a priori information in this study to optimise the geometry of future lunar seismic networks in order to best resolve

Sambridge, Malcolm

350

Seismic Screening, Evaluation, Rehabilitation, and Design Provisions for Wood-Framed Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Screening, Evaluation, Rehabilitation, and Design Provisions for Wood-Framed Structures Preston Baxter, M.ASCE1 ; Thomas H. Miller, M.ASCE2 ; and Rakesh Gupta, M.ASCE3 Abstract: Seismic Database subject headings: Seismic analysis; Seismic design; Wood structures; Shear walls; Diaphragms

Gupta, Rakesh

351

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A. Sethian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. We derive a relation between the true seismic velocities and the routinely

Sethian, James A.

352

Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO Basin pilot test include acquisition of geophysical logs, time lapse VSP and analysis of 3D seismic data on the analysis of 3D seismic from the area. 3D seismic interpretation reveals that the Late Cretaceous Fruitland

Wilson, Thomas H.

353

Revised crustal architecture of the southeastern Carpathian foreland from active and passive seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seismic data Dana M. Enciu,1 Camelia C. Knapp,1 and James H. Knapp1 Received 3 August 2008; revised 12 seismic data is employed in order to study the nature of the relationships between crustal seismicity with the Vrancea Seismogenic Zone (VSZ) of intermediate- depth seismicity, one of the most active earthquake- prone

Knapp, Camelia Cristina

354

Direct seismic energy modeling and application to the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct seismic energy modeling and application to the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake Pascal or miscellaneous. Citation: Favreau, P., and R. J. Archuleta, Direct seismic energy modeling and application models [see Peyrat et al., 2001]. 2. The Seismic Energy [3] To be universal, the seismic energy must

Archuleta, Ralph

355

7th NCEE, Boston, July, 2002 SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF DEEP SITES USING FREQUENCY AND PRESSURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-A prediction of the seismic amplification in Treasure Island during the Loma Prieta earthquake. Introduction

Entekhabi, Dara

356

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. They also locate and identify sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consists of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY99 for stations in the HSN was 99.8%. There were 121 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year 1999. Fourteen triggers were local earthquakes; seven (50%) were in the Columbia River Basalt Group, no earthquakes occurred in the pre-basalt sediments, and seven (50%) were in the crystalline basement. One earthquake (7%) occurred near or along the Horn Rapids anticline, seven earthquakes (50%) occurred in a known swarm area, and six earthquakes (43%) were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer during the first quarter of FY99.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

Multi-Resolution Seismic Tomography Based on Recursive Tessellation Hierarchy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 3-D global tomographic model that reconstructs velocity structure at multiple scales and incorporates laterally variable seismic discontinuities is currently being developed. The model parameterization is node-based where nodes are placed along vertices defined by triangular tessellations of a spheroidal surface. The triangular tessellation framework is hierarchical. Starting with a tetrahexahedron representing the whole globe (1st level of the hierarchy, 24 faces), they divide each triangle of the tessellation into daughter triangles. The collection of all daughter triangles comprises the 2nd level of the tessellation hierarchy and further recursion produces an arbitrary number of tessellation levels and arbitrarily fine node-spacing. They have developed an inversion procedure that takes advantage of the recursive properties of the tessellation hierarchies by progressively solving for shorter wavelength heterogeneities. In this procedure, we first perform the tomographic inversion using a tessellation level with coarse node spacing. They find that a coarse node spacing of approximately 8{sup o} is adequate to capture bulk regional properties. They then conduct the tomographic inversion on a 4{sup o} tessellation level using the residuals and inversion results from the 8{sup o} run. In practice they find that the progressive tomography approach is robust, providing an intrinsic regularization for inversion stability and avoids the issue of predefining resolution levels. Further, determining average regional properties with coarser tessellation levels enables long-wavelength heterogeneities to account for sparsely sampled regions (or regions of the mantle where longer wavelength patterns of heterogeneity suffice) while allowing shorter length-scale heterogeneities to emerge where necessary. They demonstrate the inversion approach with a set of synthetic test cases that mimic the complex nature of data arrangements (mixed-determined inversion) common to most tomographic problems. They also apply the progressive inversion approach with Pn waves traveling within the Middle East region and compare the results to simple tomographic inversions. As expected from synthetic testing, the progressive approach results in detailed structure where there is high data density and broader regional anomalies where seismic information is sparse. The ultimate goal is to use these methods to produce a seamless, multi-resolution global tomographic model with local model resolution determined by the constraints afforded by available data. They envisage this new technique as the general approach to be employed for future multi-resolution model development with complex arrangements of regional and teleseismic information.

Simmons, N A; Myers, S C; Ramirez, A

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well.

Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Seismic Attenuation Inversion with t* Using tstarTomog.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic attenuation is defined as the loss of the seismic wave amplitude as the wave propagates excluding losses strictly due to geometric spreading. Information gleaned from seismic waves can be utilized to solve for the attenuation properties of the earth. One method of solving for earth attenuation properties is called t*. This report will start by introducing the basic theory behind t* and delve into inverse theory as it pertains to how the algorithm called tstarTomog inverts for attenuation properties using t* observations. This report also describes how to use the tstarTomog package to go from observed data to a 3-D model of attenuation structure in the earth.

Preston, Leiph

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Continuous Time Random Walks and South Spain Seismic Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levy flights were introduced through the mathematical research of the algebra or random variables with infinite moments. Mandelbrot recognized that the Levy flight prescription had a deep connection to scale-invariant fractal random walk trajectories. The theory of Continuous Time Random Walks (CTRW) can be described in terms of Levy distribution functions and it can be used to explain some earthquake characteristics like the distribution of waiting times and hypocenter locations in a seismic region. This paper checks the validity of this assumption analyzing three seismic series localized in South Spain. The three seismic series (Alboran, Antequera and Loja) show qualitatively the same behavior, although there are quantitative differences between them.

A. Posadas; J. Morales; F. Vidal; O. Sotolongo-Costa; J. C. Antoranz

2002-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Subsystem fragility: Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (Phase I)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic fragility levels of safety related equipment are developed for use in a seismic oriented Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) being conducted as part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The Zion Nuclear Power Plant is being utilized as a reference plant and fragility descriptions are developed for specific and generic safety related equipment groups in Zion. Both equipment fragilities and equipment responses are defined in probabilistic terms to be used as input to the SSMRP event tree/fault tree models of the Zion systems. 65 refs., 14 figs., 11 tabs.

Kennedy, R. P.; Campbell, R. D.; Hardy, G.; Banon, H.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Post-processing of seismic parameter data based on valid seismic event determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automated seismic processing system and method are disclosed, including an array of CMOS microprocessors for unattended battery-powered processing of a multi-station network. According to a characterizing feature of the invention, each channel of the network is independently operable to automatically detect, measure times and amplitudes, and compute and fit Fast Fourier transforms (FFT's) for both P- and S- waves on analog seismic data after it has been sampled at a given rate. The measured parameter data from each channel are then reviewed for event validity by a central controlling microprocessor and if determined by preset criteria to constitute a valid event, the parameter data are passed to an analysis computer for calculation of hypocenter location, running b-values, source parameters, event count, P- wave polarities, moment-tensor inversion, and Vp/Vs ratios. The in-field real-time analysis of data maximizes the efficiency of microearthquake surveys allowing flexibility in experimental procedures, with a minimum of traditional labor-intensive postprocessing. A unique consequence of the system is that none of the original data (i.e., the sensor analog output signals) are necessarily saved after computation, but rather, the numerical parameters generated by the automatic analysis are the sole output of the automated seismic processor.

McEvilly, Thomas V. (733 Alvarado Rd., Berkeley, CA 94705)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Estimation of Parigi reservoir characteristics using seismic attributes, AVO analysis and AVO inversion, and seismic inversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the carbonate reservoir, the gas was trapped in the cavity of the formation. First of all, to identify the cavity as the distribution of the cavity or porous zone will be done by reflection strength and instantaneous frequency from the seismic attribute analysis. After the zone has been identified, the existing gas and the value of porosity can be estimated using AVO analysis and AVO inversion technique. This idea was applied to the carbonate reservoir within the Parigi Formation in the Northwest Java Basin (Indonesia) by Santoso et al. The result shows a clear zone of high reflection strength and low instantaneous frequency in the carbonate build up. The porosity estimated by AVO inversion gives a value of the porosity about 38% and the Poisson`s ratio around 0.22-0.26. This paper is continuation of Santoso et al. study. It is done by the delineation of the porosity which can be displayed by the acoustic impedance section as a result of seismic inversion process. The delineation of the reservoir characters to the horizontal direction as previous study gives around a similar value as shown by acoustic impedance value. When these results were compared to the borehole data in the location, they are very close. Therefore this idea has given a satisfactory result in estimating porosity from seismic data and delineating the carbonate reservoir away from the borehole.

Santoso, D.; Hendrajaya, L.; Watkins, J.S. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Seismicity and seismic response of the Soviet-designed VVER (Water-cooled, Water moderated Energy Reactor) reactor plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On March 4, 1977, a strong earthquake occurred at Vrancea, Romania, about 350 km from the Kozloduy plant in Bulgaria. Subsequent to this event, construction of the unit 2 of the Armenia plant was delayed over two years while seismic features were added. On December 7, 1988, another strong earthquake struck northwest Armenia about 90 km north of the Armenia plant. Extensive damage of residential and industrial facilities occurred in the vicinity of the epicenter. The earthquake did not damage the Armenia plant. Following this event, the Soviet government announced that the plant would be shutdown permanently by March 18, 1989, and the station converted to a fossil-fired plant. This paper presents the results of the seismic analyses of the Soviet-designed VVER (Water-cooled, Water moderated Energy Reactor) plants. Also presented is the information concerning seismicity in the regions where VVERs are located and information on seismic design of VVERs. The reference units are the VVER-440 model V230 (similar to the two units of the Armenia plant) and the VVER-1000 model V320 units at Kozloduy in Bulgaria. This document provides an initial basis for understanding the seismicity and seismic response of VVERs under seismic events. 1 ref., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Wang, C.Y.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Seidensticker, R.W.; Purvis, E.E. III

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Advanced Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Demonstration Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratories (INL) has an ongoing research and development (R&D) project to remove excess conservatism from seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRA) calculations. These risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. This report presents a plan for improving our current traditional SPRA process using a seismic event recorded at a nuclear power plant site, with known outcomes, to improve the decision making process. SPRAs are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility).

Justin Coleman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

Jan, Badr H.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Seismic retrofitting of the Ste-Justine Hospital in Montreal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic engineering provides design and construction techniques so that buildings and other structures can survive the tremendous forces of earthquakes. While codes and design practices have resulted in greatly improved ...

Chartrand, Valerie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Seismic rehabilitation of a reinforced concrete flat-slab structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effectiveness of seismic rehabilitation techniques used to eliminate punching shear failures was assessed for flat-slab structural systems. This type of retrofit was evaluated for a four-story reinforced concrete (RC) frame office building...

Jimenez, Laila Margarita

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient...

371

Mapping bedrock beneath glacial till using CDP seismic reflection methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a case history demonstrating the applicability of the common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to image bedrock beneath glacial till in northwestern Iowa. Reflections from the base of the 40-m thick glacial till are clearly...

Keiswetter, Dean; Black, Ross A.; Steeples, Don W.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Applicaiton of the Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Computer Program SASSI for Seismic SSI Analysis of WTP Facilities Farhang Ostadan (BNI) & Raman Venkata (DOE-WTP-WED) Presented by Lisa Anderson (BNI) US DOE NPH Workshop October...

373

Rapid Spatial Distribution Seismic Loss Analysis for Multistory Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tall building frames that respond to large seismic ground motions tend to have significant spatial variability of damage over their height, often with a concentration of that damage in the lower stories. In spite of this spatial variability...

Deshmukh, Pankaj Bhagvatrao

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

Seismic Analysis Using Wavelet Transform for Hydrocarbon Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result in successful hydrocarbon finds because abnormal seismic amplitude variations can sometimes be caused by other factors, such as alternative lithology and residual hydrocarbons in certain depositional environments. Furthermore, not all gas fields...

Cai, Rui

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

Seismic rehabilitation of wood diaphragms in unreinforced masonary buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the seismic performance of existing and rehabilitated wood floor and roof diaphragms in typical pre-1950's, unreinforced masonry (URM) buildings found in the Central and Eastern portions of the United States...

Grubbs, Amber Jo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Seismic response of wharf structures supported in liquefiable soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research analyzes the vulnerability of wharf structures supported on loose granular waterfront fills that are susceptible to liquefaction during seismic events and considers the effectiveness of pre-fabricated Vertical ...

Panagiotidou, Andriani Ioanna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Seismic Signal Processing for Single Well Imaging Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the concept of Single Well Imaging (SWI) in which a seismic source and receivers are deployed in a borehole to investigate the surrounding geology. The Uniwell project (1997-1999) was the first ...

Walsh, Brendan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advance Seismic Data Analysis Program: (The "Hot Pot Project")  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: To improve geothermal well target selection and reduce drilling risk through an innovative and advanced analytical method for interpreting seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures.

379

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk Michael Salmon, LANL Larry, Goen, LANL Voice: 505-665-7244 Fax: 505-665-2897 salmon@lanl.gov 10222008 p. 2, LA-UR 11-06024...

380

Seismic evolution of low/intermediate mass PMS stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article presents a study of the evolution of the internal structure and seismic properties expected for low/intermediate mass Pre-Main Sequence (PMS) stars. Seismic and non-seismic properties of PMS stars were analysed. This was done using 0.8 to 4.4M$_\\odot$ stellar models at stages ranging from the end of the Hayashi track up to the Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS). This research concludes that, for intermediate-mass stars (M$>$1.3M$_\\odot$), diagrams comparing the effective temperature ($T_{eff}$) against the small separation can provide an alternative to Christensen-Dalsgaard (C-D) diagrams. The impact of the metal abundance of intermediate mass stars (2.5-4.4M$_\\odot$) has over their seismic properties is also evaluated.

F. J. G. Pinheiro

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs using 3D double beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. We use both singly scattered and multiply scattered ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Simulation of anisotropic wave propagation in Vertical Seismic Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they are powerful tools to simulate seismic wave propagation in three-dimensional anisotropic subsurface models. The code is currently under development using a C++ object oriented programming approach because it provides high flexibility in the design of new...

Durussel, Vincent Bernard

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Advanced Seismic Data Analysis...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Advanced Seismic Data Analysis Program (The Hot Pot Project), DOE Award: DE-EE0002839, Phase 1 Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us |...

385

Design of innovative dynamic systems for seismic response mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rocking wall systems consist of shear walls, laterally connected to a building, that are moment-released in their strong plane. Their purpose is to mitigate seismic structural response by constraining a building primarily ...

Seymour, Douglas (Douglas Benjamin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Influence of Basalt Layers on Seismic Wave Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are to examine the effects of basalts on seismic wave propagation and the concequent implications for imaging sedimentary structures beneath them. From studies of basalt propertiesand borehole data in connection with foreward modelling and real data, I show...

Hanssen, Peter

387

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

The retrofitting of existing buildings for seismic criteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the process for retrofitting a building for seismic criteria. It explains the need for a new, performance-based design code to provide a range of acceptable building behavior. It then outlines the ...

Besing, Christa, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Evaluation of Horizontal Seismic Hazard of Shahrekord, Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents probabilistic horizontal seismic hazard assessment of Shahrekord, Iran. It displays the probabilistic estimate of Peak Ground Horizontal Acceleration (PGHA) for the return period of 75, 225, 475 and 2475 years. The output of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is based on peak ground acceleration (PGA), which is the most common criterion in designing of buildings. A catalogue of seismic events that includes both historical and instrumental events was developed and covers the period from 840 to 2007. The seismic sources that affect the hazard in Shahrekord were identified within the radius of 150 km and the recurrence relationships of these sources were generated. Finally four maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Shahrekord in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines for different hazard levels by using SEISRISK III software.

Amiri, G. Ghodrati [Iran University of Science and Technology--Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord, Narmak, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehkordi, M. Raeisi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrei, S. A. Razavian [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kamali, M. Koohi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

390

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y. (1984). Response of a wind turbine blade to seismic andM. (2006). Swept wind turbine blade aeroelastic modelingto fatigue for wind turbine blades than earthquake loads. In

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Short-period seismic rotations and translations recorded by Rotaphone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-period Rotaphone records of events induced by natural and/or anthropogenic sources 31 5.1 Records of quarry blasts Rotation to translation relations 39 7 The problem of seismic translational components being contaminated

Cerveny, Vlastislav

392

COLLOQUIUM: Seismic Imaging and Inversion Based on Spectral-Element...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shear attenuation and impedance contrasts. We apply this method to study seismic inverse problems at various scales, from exploration-scale full-waveform inversion to global-scale...

393

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, fourteen local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the third quarter (May 18, 2008 - magnitude 3.7 Mc) was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, five earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events. The largest event recorded by the network during the third quarter occurred on May 18 (magnitude 3.7 Mc) and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. This earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded in the 46-47 N. latitude / 119-120 W. longitude sector since 1975. The May 18 event, not reported as being felt on the Hanford site or causing any damage, was communicated to the PNNL Operations Center per HSAP communications procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the sites seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and the 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The reportable action level of 2% g for Hanford facilities is approximately 12 times larger than the peak acceleration (0.17%) observed at the 300 Area SMA station and no action was required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Rayleigh wave filter for three-component seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis by SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M Lrniversity in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1991 Major Subject: Geophysics RAYLEIGH WAVE FILTER FOR THREE ? COMPONENT SEISMIC DATA A Thesis SYED ALI ASIF ZAIDI Approved as to style and content by: Steven . Harder air of Committee) Joel S. Watkins (Member) Ronald M. Brimhall (1...

Zaidi, Syed Ali Asif

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

Identifying fracture zones in the Austin Chalk using seismic attributes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

varies with time and in areas of known production. Areas of production were identified from gas flares documented on the mud logs and drilling reports. These locations were measured from the end of the lateral and were then placed on the seismic grid... flares Strong correlations were found between gas flares and both raw amplitude and instantaneous reflection magnitude of the base of the Austin Chalk. In order to prove that these correlations were not in response to noise, the seismic data...

Bafia, Daniel Joseph

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Method for determining formation quality factor from seismic data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for calculating the quality factor Q from a seismic data trace. The method includes calculating a first and a second minimum phase inverse wavelet at a first and a second time interval along the seismic data trace, synthetically dividing the first wavelet by the second wavelet, Fourier transforming the result of the synthetic division, calculating the logarithm of this quotient of Fourier transforms and determining the slope of a best fit line to the logarithm of the quotient.

Taner, M. Turhan; Treitel, Sven

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Inflection point analysis for Greek seismicity 1900-2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The seismicity of Greek region is studied under the prism of ESE & EDE methods for finding the inflection point of cumulative energy released. Main shocks are chosen from 106 years data. The result is that with both methods a critical time region exist at the end of 1982 to early 1983. After this time the seismicity tends to increase and gives remarkable events, like Athens Sep 1999 earthquake.

Demetris T. Christopoulos

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the HSN, there were 477 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2001 on the data acquisition system. Of these triggers, 176 were earthquakes. Forty-five earthquakes were located in the HSN area; 1 earthquake occurred in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 43 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, and 1 was earthquakes in the crystalline basement. Geographically, 44 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, 1 earthquake was on a major structure, and no earthquakes were classified as random occurrences. The Horse Heaven Hills earthquake swarm area recorded all but one event during the first quarter of FY 2001. The peak of the activity occurred over December 12th, 13th, and 14th when 35 events occurred. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometers during the first quarter of FY 2001.

Hartshorn, Donald C.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Valenta, Michelle M.

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

Seismicity related to geothermal development in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A ten-station seismic network was operated in and around the Dixie Valley area from January 1980 to November 1981; three of these stations are still in operation. Data from the Dixie Valley network were analyzed through 30 Jun 1981, and results of analysis were compared with analysis of somewhat larger events for the period 1970-1979. The seismic cycle in the Western Great Basic, the geologic structural setting, and the instrumentation are also described.

Ryall, A.S.; Vetter, U.R.

1982-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

"Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls", A. Astaneh-Asl, SEAONC Seminar, November 2001, San Francisco. of 181 Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls", A. Astaneh-Asl, SEAONC Seminar, November 2001, San Francisco. of 181 Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls By Abolhassan Astaneh-Asl, Ph.ce.berkeley.edu/~astaneh Introduction Steel plate shear wall systems have been used in recent years in highly seismic areas to resist

Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rock containing a compliant, fluid-filled fracture can be viewed as one case of heterogeneous poroelastic media. When this fracture is subjected to seismic waves, a strong contrast in the elastic stiffness between the fracture itself and the background can result in enhanced grain-scale local fluid flow. Because this flow--relaxing the pressure building up within the fracture--can increase the dynamic compliance of the fracture and change energy dissipation (attenuation), the scattering of seismic waves can be enhanced. Previously, for a flat, infinite fracture, we derived poroelastic seismic boundary conditions that describe the relationship between a finite jump in the stress and displacement across a fracture, expressed as a function of the stress and displacement at the boundaries. In this paper, we use these boundary conditions to determine frequency-dependent seismic wave transmission and reflection coefficients. Fluid-filled fractures with a range of mechanical and hydraulic properties are examined. From parametric studies, we found that the hydraulic permeability of a fracture fully saturated with water has little impact on seismic wave scattering. In contrast, the seismic response of a partially water-saturated fracture and a heterogeneous fracture filled with compliant liquid (e.g., supercritical CO{sub 2}) depended on the fracture permeability.

Nakagawa, Seiji

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Seismic Behavior of Spent Fuel Dry Cask Storage Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting a research program to investigate technical issues concerning the dry cask storage systems of spent nuclear fuel by conducting confirmatory research for establishing criteria and review guidelines for the seismic behavior of these systems. The program focuses on developing 3-D finite element analysis models that address the dynamic coupling of a module/cask, a flexible concrete pad, and an underlying soil/rock foundation, in particular, the soil-structure-interaction. Parametric analyses of the coupled models are performed to include variations in module/cask geometry, site seismicity, underlying soil properties, and cask/pad interface friction. The analyses performed include: 1) a rectangular dry cask module typical of Transnuclear West design at a site in Western USA where high seismicity is expected; 2) a cylindrical dry cask typical of Holtec design at a site in Eastern USA where low seismicity is expected; and 3) a cylindrical dry cask typical of Holtec design at a site in Western USA with medium high seismicity. The paper includes assumptions made in seismic analyses performed, results, and conclusions. (authors)

Shaukat, Syed K. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Luk, Vincent K. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0744 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Seismic diagnostics for transport of angular momentum in stars 1. Rotational splittings from the PMS to the RGB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rotational splittings are currently measured for several main sequence stars and a large number of red giants with the space mission Kepler. This will provide stringent constraints on rotation profiles. Our aim is to obtain seismic constraints on the internal transport and surface loss of angular momentum of oscillating solar-like stars. To this end, we study the evolution of rotational splittings from the pre-main sequence to the red-giant branch for stochastically excited oscillation modes. We modified the evolutionary code CESAM2K to take rotationally induced transport in radiative zones into account. Linear rotational splittings were computed for a sequence of $1.3 M_{\\odot}$ models. Rotation profiles were derived from our evolutionary models and eigenfunctions from linear adiabatic oscillation calculations. We find that transport by meridional circulation and shear turbulence yields far too high a core rotation rate for red-giant models compared with recent seismic observations. We discuss several uncert...

Marques, J P; Lebreton, Y; Talon, S; Palacios, A; Belkacem, K; Ouazzani, R -M; Mosser, B; Moya, A; Morel, P; Pichon, B; Mathis, S; Zahn, J -P; Turck-Chize, S; Nghiem, P A P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Seismic Moment Tensor Report for the 06 Aug 2007, M3.9 Seismic Event in Central Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed a complete moment tensor analysis (Minson and Dreger, 2007) of the seismic event, which occurred on Monday August 6, 2007 at 08:48:40 UTC, 21 km from Mount Pleasant, Utah. The purpose of this report is to present our scientific results, making them available to other researchers working on seismic source determination problems, and source type identification. In our analysis we used complete, three-component seismic records recorded by stations operated by the USGS, the University of Utah and EarthScope. The results of our analysis show that most of the seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse, however the cause of the mine collapse is still unknown.

Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R; Hellweg, M; Urhammer, R

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

230Th/U ages Supporting Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This product represents a USGS Administrative Report that discusses samples and methods used to conduct uranium-series isotope analyses and resulting ages and initial 234U/238U activity ratios of pedogenic cements developed in several different surfaces in the Hanford area middle to late Pleistocene. Samples were collected and dated to provide calibration of soil development in surface deposits that are being used in the Hanford Site-Wide probabilistic seismic hazard analysis conducted by AMEC. The report includes description of sample locations and physical characteristics, sample preparation, chemical processing and mass spectrometry, analytical results, and calculated ages for individual sites. Ages of innermost rinds on a number of samples from five sites in eastern Washington are consistent with a range of minimum depositional ages from 17 ka for cataclysmic flood deposits to greater than 500 ka for alluvium at several sites.

Paces, James B. [U.S. Geological Survey] [U.S. Geological Survey

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communications procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the sites seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

407

Seismic facies and growth history of Miocene carbonate platforms, Wonocolo Formation, North Madura area, East Java Basin, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seismic data and information from several wells across the region were used to map all Wonocolo platforms across the study area. Five growth phases are recognizable in the platforms, based on seismic facies analysis and internal seismic...

Adhyaksawan, Rahadian

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Nonlinear regularization techniques for seismic tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of several nonlinear regularization techniques are discussed in the framework of 3D seismic tomography. Traditional, linear, l{sub 2} penalties are compared to so-called sparsity promoting l{sub 1} and l{sub 0} penalties, and a total variation penalty. Which of these algorithms is judged optimal depends on the specific requirements of the scientific experiment. If the correct reproduction of model amplitudes is important, classical damping towards a smooth model using an l{sub 2} norm works almost as well as minimizing the total variation but is much more efficient. If gradients (edges of anomalies) should be resolved with a minimum of distortion, we prefer l{sub 1} damping of Daubechies-4 wavelet coefficients. It has the additional advantage of yielding a noiseless reconstruction, contrary to simple l{sub 2} minimization ('Tikhonov regularization') which should be avoided. In some of our examples, the l{sub 0} method produced notable artifacts. In addition we show how nonlinear l{sub 1} methods for finding sparse models can be competitive in speed with the widely used l{sub 2} methods, certainly under noisy conditions, so that there is no need to shun l{sub 1} penalizations.

Loris, I. [Mathematics Department, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: igloris@vub.ac.be; Douma, H. [Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Guyot Hall, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Nolet, G. [Geosciences Azur, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS/IRD, 250 Rue Albert Einstein, Sophia Antipolis 06560 (France); Daubechies, I. [Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Fine Hall, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Regone, C. [BP America Inc., 501 Westlake Park Blvd., Houston, TX 77079 (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hanford annual first quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 98.5%. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.1%. For the first quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 184 times. Of these triggers 23 were local earthquakes: 7 in the Columbia River Basalt Group, and 16 in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant earthquakes in this quarter were a series of six events which occurred in the Cold Creek depression (approximately 4 km SW of the 200 West Area), between November 6 and November 11, 1997. All events were deep (> 15 km) and were located in the crystalline basement. The first event was the largest, having a magnitude of 3.49 M{sub c}. Two events on November 9, 1997 had magnitudes of 2.81 and 2.95 M{sub c}, respectively. The other events had magnitudes between 0.7 and 1.2 M{sub c}.

Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Rohay, A.C.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A new seismic probe for coal seam hazard detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental hole-to-hole seismic probe system has been developed for use in coal measure geology as a means of determining the structural conditions of coal seams. The source probe produces a 500-joule electric arc discharge whose seismic wavelet has a spectrum in the 200 to 2,000 Hz frequency range. Low compliance hydrophones contained in the source probe as well as in a separate seismic detector probe are matched to the frequency range of the source. Both probes are constructed with 5.72 cm diameter housings. The transducers in the probes are equipped with fluid-inflatable boots to permit operation in either wet or dry boreholes. Preliminary tests in vertical boreholes drilled 213 m apart in sedimentary rock formations show reliable operation and useful seismic propagation measurements along horizontal and oblique paths up to 232 m in length. Because the seismic wavelet has an accurately repeatable waveshape, multiple shots and signal averaging techniques can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and extend the transmission distances.

Peters, W.R.; Owen, T.E.; Thill, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Seismic response analyses for reactor facilities at Savannah River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactor facilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were designed during the 1950's. The original seismic criteria defining the input ground motion was 0.1 G with UBC (uniform building code) provisions used to evaluate structural seismic loads. Later ground motion criteria have defined the free field seismic motion with a 0.2 G ZPA (free field acceleration) and various spectral shapes. The spectral shapes have included the Housner spectra, a site specific spectra, and the US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) Reg. Guide 1.60 shape. The development of these free field seismic criteria are discussed in the paper. The more recent seismic analyses have been of the following type: fixed base response spectra, frequency independent lumped parameter soil/structure interaction (SSI), frequency dependent lumped parameter SSI, and current state of the art analyses using computer codes such as SASSI. The results from these computations consist of structural loads and floor response spectra (used for piping and equipment qualification). These results are compared in the paper and the methods used to validate the results are discussed. 14 refs., 11 figs.

Miller, C.A. Costantino, C.J. (City Univ. of New York, NY (USA)); Xu, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX); Parra, Jorge O. (Helotes, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Surface Soil  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

415

Analysis of PS-converted wave seismic data in the presence of azimuthal anisotropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shear-wave splitting and azimuthal variations of seismic attributes are two major anisotropic effects induced by vertically-aligned fractures. They both have influences on seismic data processing and interpretation, and ...

Liu, Weining

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Danish Energy Agency EFP-98 4D-Seismic in Chalk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Danish Energy Agency EFP-98 4D-Seismic in Chalk Reservoirs Final Report - Reservoir Simulation March 2001 #12;The Danish Energy Agency EFP-98 4D-Seismic in Chalk Reservoirs Final Report - Reservoir

417

Induced seismicity analysis for reservoir characterization at a petroleum field in Oman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the analysis and interpretation of passive seismic data collected in a 20-month monitoring period. The investigation is divided into four studies, each focusing on a different aspect of the seismic ...

Sze, Edmond Kin-Man

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Seismic amplitude and coherency response of channel sand, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological drilling hazards are a major concern in the ics. drilling and development of offshore reservoirs. Some of these hazards may display high amplitudes on seismic profiles and some may be associated with stratigraphic features. Seismic...

Fischer, Elena Mikhaylovna

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchhill Co., NV A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data...

420

Joint flow-seismic inversion for characterizing fractured reservoirs: theoretical approach and numerical modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditionally, seismic interpretation is performed without any account of the flow behavior. Here, we present a methodology to characterize fractured geologic media by integrating flow and seismic data. The key element of ...

Kang, Peter K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Seismic Attribute Analysis of the Mississippian Chert at the Wellington Field, south-central Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mississippian chert reservoirs, important hydrocarbon resources in North America, are highly heterogeneous, typically below seismic resolution and, therefore, present a challenging task for predicting reservoir properties from seismic data...

Sirazhiev, Ayrat

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

DOE/EH-0545, Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Equipment in U...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOEEH-0545, Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Equipment in U.S. Department of Energy Facilities, 1997 DOEEH-0545, Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Equipment in U.S. Department of...

423

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project will develop a model for seismicity-based reservoir characterization (SBRC) by combining rock mechanics; finite element modeling; geo-statistical concepts to establish relationships between micro-seismicity; reservoir flow and geomechanical characteristics.

424

E-Print Network 3.0 - advancements seismic refraction Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19 Seismic Tomography Robert L. Nowack and Cuiping Li Summary: Ves Experiment Data In this example, seismic refraction data from the TomoVes experiment 54 is used to...

425

Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

Barrash, Warren

426

Frequency dependent seismic reflection analysis: a path to new direct hydrocarbon indicators for deep water reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To better study frequency related e?ects such as attenuation and tuning, we developed a frequency dependent seismic re?ection analysis. Comprehensive tests on full waveform synthetics and observations from the Teal South ocean bottom seismic (OBS...

Yoo, Seung Chul

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Potential impacts of vertical cable seismic: modeling, resolution and multiple attenuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertical cable seismic methods are becoming more relevant as we require high quality and high resolution seismic data in both land and marine environments. Our goal in this thesis is to demonstrate the impacts of vertical cable surveying...

Wilson, Ryan Justin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Assessment of the impact of degraded shear wall stiffnesses on seismic plant risk and seismic design loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test results sponsored by the USNRC have shown that reinforced shear wall (Seismic Category I) structures exhibit stiffnesses and natural frequencies which are smaller than those calculated in the design process. The USNRC has sponsored Sandia National Labs to perform an evaluation of the effects of the reduced frequencies on several existing seismic PRAs in order to determine the seismic risk implications inherent in these test results. This report presents the results for the re-evaluation of the seismic risk for three nuclear power plants: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, the Zion Nuclear Power Plant, and Arkansas Nuclear One -- Unit 1 (ANO-1). Increases in core damage frequencies for seismic initiated events at Peach Bottom were 25 to 30 percent (depending on whether LLNL or EPRI hazard curves were used). At the ANO-1 site, the corresponding increases in plant risk were 10 percent (for each set of hazard curves). Finally, at Zion, there was essentially no change in the computed core damage frequency when the reduction in shear wall stiffness was included. In addition, an evaluation of deterministic ``design-like`` structural dynamic calculations with and without the shear stiffness reductions was made. Deterministic loads calculated for these two cases typically increased on the order of 10 to 20 percent for the affected structures.

Klamerus, E.W.; Bohn, M.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.J.; Asfura, A.P.; Doyle, D.J. [EQE Engineering, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Seismic issues at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A seismic expert workshop was held at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on March 13--15, 1989. the PGDP is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). During the last twenty years the design criteria for natural phenomenon hazards has steadily become more demanding at all of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) sites. The purpose of the two-day workshop was to review the seismic vulnerability issues of the PGDP facilities. Participants to the workshop included recognized experts in the fields of seismic engineering, seismology and geosciences, and probabilistic analysis, along with engineers and other personnel from Energy Systems. A complete list of the workshop participants is included in the front of this report. 29 refs.

Fricke, K.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Methods for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

Source-independent full waveform inversion of seismic data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A set of seismic trace data is collected in an input data set that is first Fourier transformed in its entirety into the frequency domain. A normalized wavefield is obtained for each trace of the input data set in the frequency domain. Normalization is done with respect to the frequency response of a reference trace selected from the set of seismic trace data. The normalized wavefield is source independent, complex, and dimensionless. The normalized wavefield is shown to be uniquely defined as the normalized impulse response, provided that a certain condition is met for the source. This property allows construction of the inversion algorithm disclosed herein, without any source or source coupling information. The algorithm minimizes the error between data normalized wavefield and the model normalized wavefield. The methodology is applicable to any 3-D seismic problem, and damping may be easily included in the process.

Lee, Ki Ha

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Selecting ground-motion models developed for induced seismicity in geothermal areas1 Benjamin Edwards1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: geothermal power, induced seismicity, ground-motion prediction, seismic hazard, spectral35 analysis3642 Landau (Germany) geothermal power plant in 2009, which caused macroseismic intensities up to V+,431 Selecting ground-motion models developed for induced seismicity in geothermal areas1 Benjamin

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

433

SEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a quarter of the proven natural gas reserves in the United States. Rulison Field, located in the PiceanceSEISMIC ANISOTROPY IN TIGHT GAS SANDSTONES, RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Gerardo J-based rock physics to estimate the seismic anisotropy of the tight gas reservoir at Rulison Field. Seismic

434

Geophys. J. Int. (1999) 139, 317324 Fractal clustering of induced seismicity in The Geysers geothermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal area, California J. R. Henderson, D. J. Barton and G. R. Foulger Department of Geological Sciences geothermal field in California, an area where industrial activity induces seismicity. The seismicity of the build-up of the rate of water injection into the reservoir. Key words: fractal, geothermal, seismicity

Foulger, G. R.

435

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomous buoy for seismic reflection data acquisition in the inaccessible parts of the Arctic Instrumentation, Bergen, Norway An autonomous buoy which collects seismic reflection data and transmits to shore of the seismic buoy (thick red, green and black lines). - we have successfully developed an autonomous buoy

Kristoffersen, Yngve

436

Seasonal modulation of seismicity in the Himalaya of Nepal L. Bollinger,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seasonal modulation of seismicity in the Himalaya of Nepal L. Bollinger,1 F. Perrier,2 J.-P. Avouac; accepted 19 March 2007; published 26 April 2007. [1] For the period 1995­2000, the Nepal seismic network. Sapkota, U. Gautam, and D. R. Tiwari (2007), Seasonal modulation of seismicity in the Himalaya of Nepal

Avouac, Jean-Philippe

437

Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bidirectional Seismic Behavior of Controlled Rocking Four-Legged Bridge Steel Truss Piers Michael rocking bridge steel truss piers to three components of seismic excitation are presented in this paper. The controlled rocking approach for seismic protection allows a pier to uplift from its base, limiting the force

Bruneau, Michel

438

SEISMIC PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR STEEL MOMENT FRAMES By Seung-Yul Yun1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR STEEL MOMENT FRAMES By Seung-Yul Yun1 , Ronald O. Hamburger2 , C than existing buildings designed and built with older technologies. Key words: seismic behavior; seismic performance evaluation; performance-based design; earthquake engineering; steel moment frame

Sweetman, Bert

439

Seismic Properties of Anita Bay Dunite: an Exploratory Study of the Influence of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Properties of Anita Bay Dunite: an Exploratory Study of the Influence of Water YOSHITAKA As a pilot study of the role of water in the attenuation of seismic waves in the Earth's upper mantle, we have performed a series of seismic-frequency torsional forced-oscillation experiments on a natural

440

Seismic retrofit of concrete-encased riveted stiffened seat angle connections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic retrofit of concrete-encased riveted stiffened seat angle connections Michel Bruneau Ottawa: Seismic retrofit, semi-rigid connections, concrete-encased, stiffened seat, ductile steel fuse, riveted frequently found in buildings constructed in the seismic zones of Eastern North America prior

Bruneau, Michel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Seismic reliability of lifeline systems He Nan Building Research Institute, Zhengzhou, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic reliability of lifeline systems Yang Han He Nan Building Research Institute, Zhengzhou kinds, i.e., continuous and segment. We often use the segment pipe in China, so the seismic reliability to the seismic damage state of buried pipelines we established the probabilistic prediction model

Spencer Jr., B.F.

442

1 Mayne & Schneider EVALUATING AXIAL DRILLED SHAFT RESPONSE BY SEISMIC CONE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mayne & Schneider EVALUATING AXIAL DRILLED SHAFT RESPONSE BY SEISMIC CONE Paul W. Mayne1 , M using the results of seismic piezocone penetration tests (SCPTU) to provide continuous profiles of small to discuss the use of seismic piezocone testing for the evaluation of both axial capacity (obtained from

Mayne, Paul W.

443

Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation, and Lepolt Linkimer Online Material: Plot of viable focal mechanisms and table of regional seismic velocity model. INTRODUCTION Rate and distribution of seismic activity are important indica- tors of the overall

Fouch, Matthew J.

444

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S E R I E S SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES FP7- INFRASTRUCTURES-2008-1 SP4-Capacities #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES

445

Infrasonic and Seismic Signals from Earthquake and Explosions in Arequipa, Peru  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrasonic and Seismic Signals from Earthquake and Explosions in Arequipa, Peru J. Chilo, A. Jabor in characterization of infrasonic and seismic signals from mining explosions and an earthquake. Wavelet transform infrasonic and seismic signals. The ampligram may be considered as an analogy to signal decomposition

Haviland, David

446

The Value of Seismic Amplitude Information Jo Eidsvik1, Debarun Bhattacharjya2 and Tapan Mukerji3,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Value of Seismic Amplitude Information Jo Eidsvik1, Debarun Bhattacharjya2 and Tapan Mukerji3 with a simple example based on valuing seismic AVO data for decisions regarding well locations a prospect from seismic traveltime data, but must now evaluate the options of purchasing zero

Eidsvik, Jo

447

Seismic Response Analysis of Different Buildings using Time-Invariant and Time-Variant Damping Coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Response Analysis of Different Buildings using Time- Invariant and Time- Variant Damping@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic signals are characterized by strong excitations, short durations, non-linearity and non has been introduced to help in adapting to the seismic signals where the amplitude is damped

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

448

Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake Yih-Min Wu a , Chien the variations in seismicity patterns in the Taiwan region before and after the Chi-Chi earthquake. We have found that the areas with relatively high seismicity in the eastern Taiwan became abnormally quiet before the Chi

Wu, Yih-Min

449

Fast Seismic Modeling and Reverse Time Migration on a GPU Cluster R. Abdelkhalek1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Seismic Modeling and Reverse Time Migration on a GPU Cluster R. Abdelkhalek1 , H. Calandra1 equation in an oil exploration industrial context aims at speeding up seismic modeling and Reverse Time application over a sequential code running on general purpose CPU. KEYWORDS: Seismic modeling, Finite

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

450

Global seismic monitoring: A Bayesian approach Nimar S. Arora and Stuart Russell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global seismic monitoring: A Bayesian approach Nimar S. Arora and Stuart Russell University sudderth@cs.brown.edu Abstract The automated processing of multiple seismic signals to de- tect and localize seismic events is a central tool in both geo- physics and nuclear treaty verification. This paper

Russell, Stuart

451

Constraints on backstop geometry of the southwest Ryukyu subduction based on reection seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints on backstop geometry of the southwest Ryukyu subduction based on re¯ection seismic data 1999; revised 10 May 2000 Abstract Based on the analysis of 45 seismic re¯ection pro®les, the top from the frontal part (southernmost extremity) of the Ryukyu margin. From seismic re¯ection pro®les, we

Demouchy, Sylvie

452

Seismic Data Reconstruction via Matrix Yi Yang, Jianwei Ma and Stanley Osher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Seismic Data Reconstruction via Matrix Completion Yi Yang, Jianwei Ma and Stanley Osher Abstract In seismic processing, one goal is to recover missing traces when the data is sparsely and incom- pletelyFit) are discussed in this paper. The seismic data can then be recovered by the conversion of the completed matrix

Soatto, Stefano

453

Seismic cycle stress change in western Taiwan over the last M. Mouyen,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Seismic cycle stress change in western Taiwan over the last 270 years M February 2010. [1] The island of Taiwan is affected by intense seismic activity, which includes large events as the disastrous 1999 ChiChi earthquake. To improve seismic hazard assessment in this area, we

Demouchy, Sylvie

454

SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF BRIDGES IN NEW YORK CITY M. K. Yegian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OSP 4 1 SEISMIC GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF BRIDGES IN NEW YORK CITY M. K. Yegian Department of Civil Engineering Northeastern University Boston, MA. 02115 ABSTRACT Seismic vulnerability assessment to seismic retrofitting of an existing bridge or enhancement of the design of a new bridge, often

Yegian, Mishac

455

Analysis of the Seismic Activity Associated with the 20101 Eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the Seismic Activity Associated with the 20101 Eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java2 3 4 Keywords16 Merapi Volcano, Volcano Seismology, Eruption Forecasting, Pre-eruptive Seismicity,17 RSAM. The main features of the seismic activity during the23 pre-eruptive period and the crisis are presented

Boyer, Edmond

456

A Natural Seismic Isolating System: The Buried Mangrove Effects Philippe Gueguen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Natural Seismic Isolating System: The Buried Mangrove Effects Philippe Gueguen1 , Mickael for liquefaction stud- ies. The seismic response of the soil column at the test site is computed using three. This configuration is widely found at the border-coast of the Caribbean region, which is exposed to high seismic

Boyer, Edmond

457

COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY Pierre Gehl1 , Ariane Ducellier2 , Caterina Negulescu3 , Jaime Abad4 and John Douglas5 Seismic risk evaluations play of decades hundreds of such studies have been conducted. However, the assessment of seismic risk is always

458

Seismic vulnerability assessment to slight dam-age based on experimental modal parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic vulnerability assessment to slight dam- age based on experimental modal parameters Clotaire Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich, Switzerland. Michel C., Gueguen P., Causse M. 2011. Seismic higher modes and full seismic ground motion, (2) using a single-degree of freedom model considering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

459

Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare J.C. Mart´inez-Oliveros, H. Moradi, A characteristics appeared to closely correspond with previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic sig- natures produced

California at Berkeley, University of

460

Seismic Risk -Why It Should Be Considered and Impediments to Implementation -An Earthquake Center Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic Risk - Why It Should Be Considered and Impediments to Implementation - An Earthquake Center Selection of acceptable seismic risk revolves around significant societal and engineering concerns. One approach relies on cost-effective quantitative enhancement of seismic resilience for critical structures

Bruneau, Michel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Seismic signals are crucial for male mating success in a visual specialist jumping spider (Araneae: Salticidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic signals are crucial for male mating success in a visual specialist jumping spider (Araneae of multicomponent seismic courtship signals in addition to and produced in concert with its multiple visual ornaments and movement displays. Here, we demonstrate the importance of these seismic signals

Hoy, Ronald R.

462

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES E. Coelho, A. Campos Costa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NESDE 2013 SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES E. Coelho, A. Campos Contribution to Global Seismic Performance Approaches SERIES Concluding Workshop - Joint with US;NESDE 2013 SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES LNEC Campus ­ 220 000m2

463

What is a seismic reflector like? Nathalie Favretto-Cristini1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is a seismic reflector like? Nathalie Favretto-Cristini1 , Paul Cristini1 , and Eric de of reflectors from a seismic viewpoint. This region is repre- sented by a volume of integration of medium and syncline type. The maximum vertical extent might be larger than the seismic wavelengths for subcritical

Boyer, Edmond

464

Time lapse seismic signal analysis for Cranfield, MS, EOR and CCS site Ditkof, J.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-delay along a horizon below the reservoir. Keywords: time lapse, 4D seismic, CO2 sequestration, EOR, seismic under continuous CO2 injection by Denbury Onshore LLC since 2008. To date, more than 3 million tons of CO2 remain in the subsurface. In 2007 and 2010, 3D seismic surveys were shot and an initial 4D

Texas at Austin, University of

465

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 23 local earthquakes during the third quarter of FY 2010. Sixteen earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, twelve earthquakes were located in known swarm areas, 3 earthquakes occurred near a geologic structure (Saddle Mountain anticline), and eight earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (3.0 Mc) was recorded on May 8, 2010 at depth 3.0 km with epicenter located near the Saddle Mountain anticline. Later in the quarter (May 24 and June 28) two additional earthquakes were also recorded nearly at the same location. These events are not considered unusual in that earthquakes have been previously recorded at this location, for example, in October 2006 (Rohay et al; 2007). Six earthquakes were detected in the vicinity of Wooded Island, located about eight miles north of Richland just west of the Columbia River. The Wooded Island events recorded this quarter were a continuation of the swarm events observed during the 2009 and 2010 fiscal years and reported in previous quarterly and annual reports (Rohay et al; 2009a, 2009b, 2009c, 2010a, and 2010b). All events were considered minor (coda-length magnitude [Mc] less than 1.0) with a maximum depth estimated at 1.7 km. Based upon this quarters activity it is likely that the Wooded Island swarm has subsided. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will continue to monitor for activity at this location.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

466

Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: a concluding look  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) was started in 1978 with the goal of developing tools and data bases to compute the probability of earthquake - caused radioactive release from commercial nuclear power plants. These tools and data bases were to help NRC to assess seismic safety at nuclear plants. The methodology to be used was finalized in 1982 and applied to the Zion Nuclear Power Station. The SSMRP will be completed this year with the development of a more simplified method of analysis and a demonstration of its use on Zion. This simplified method is also being applied to a boiling-water-reactor, LaSalle.

Cummings, G.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Testing the potential and limitations of seismic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I describe the advantage of using singular value decomposition as a diagnostic tool for exploring the potential and limitations of seismic data. Using stellar models coupled with the expected errors in seismic and complementary data we can predict the precision in the stellar parameters. This in turn allows us to quantify if and to what extent we can distinguish between various descriptions of the interior physical processes. This method can be applied to a wide range of astrophysical problems, and here I present one such example which shows that the convective core overshoot parameter can be constrained with one identified mode if the pulsating component is in an eclipsing binary system.

Orlagh L. Creevey

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

468

Seismic Fragility Analysis and Loss Estimation for Concrete Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structures ranges from one story to five stories, and these structures are used most commonly as multi-residential and office buildings. 1.2.3. Evaluation of Seismic Performance ASCE/SEI 41-06 (ASCE 2007), formerly FEMA 356 (ASCE 2000), is a standard... qualitatively. ASCE/SEI 41-06 provides analytical procedures and criteria for the performance-based evaluation of existing buildings and the design of seismic rehabilitation alternatives. Structural performance levels in ASCE/SEI 41-06 include Immediate...

Bai, Jong Wha

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

The Seismic Stratigraphy and Sedimentation along the Ninetyeast Ridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a pelagic environment. This seismic unit includes nannofossil and foraminifer ooze and along with chalk at certain sites. The second unit, Seismic Unit II, is characterized by reflectors with variable amplitude and frequency, with transparent....73? N, 90? 12.48? E (Figure 5; von der Borch et al., 1974). The bathymetry data show that the depth to the top of the ridge is 2-2.5 km. The eastern flank of NER here is characterized by a scarp of variable steepness. Directly east of DSDP Site 216...

Eisin, Amy Elizabeth

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

470

New results on the resistivity structure of Merapi Volcano (Indonesia), derived from 3D restricted inversion of long-offset transient electromagnetic data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Res. , 104, 725736. Camus, G. , Gourgaud, A. & Mossand-2200 years before present (Camus et al. 2000; Newhall et al.supposed by Van Bemmelen (Camus et al. 2000). Aside from the

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan, L.; Hordt, Andreas; Scholl, Carsten; Tezkan, Bulent

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Seismic Characterization of Basalt Topography at Two Candidate Sites for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the seismic refraction results from the depth to bed rock surveys for two areas being considered for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RH-LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first area (Site 5) surveyed is located southwest of the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and the second (Site 34) is located west of Lincoln Boulevard near the southwest corner of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). At Site 5, large area and smaller-scale detailed surveys were performed. At Site 34, a large area survey was performed. The purpose of the surveys was to define the topography of the interface between the surficial alluvium and underlying basalt. Seismic data were first collected and processed using seismic refraction tomographic inversion. Three-dimensional images for both sites were rendered from the data to image the depth and velocities of the subsurface layers. Based on the interpreted top of basalt data at Site 5, a more detailed survey was conducted to refine depth to basalt. This report briefly covers relevant issues in the collection, processing and inversion of the seismic refraction data and in the imaging process. Included are the parameters for inversion and result rendering and visualization such as the inclusion of physical features. Results from the processing effort presented in this report include fence diagrams of the earth model, for the large area surveys and iso-velocity surfaces and cross sections from the detailed survey.

Jeff Sondrup; Gail Heath; Trent Armstrong; Annette Shafer; Jesse Bennett; Clark Scott

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Seismic topographic scattering in the context of GW detector site selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present a calculation of seismic scattering from irregular surface topography in the Born approximation. Based on US-wide topographic data, we investigate topographic scattering at specific sites to demonstrate its impact on Newtonian-noise estimation and subtraction for future gravitational-wave detectors. We find that topographic scattering at a comparatively flat site in Oregon would not pose any problems, whereas scattering at a second site in Montana leads to significant broadening of wave amplitudes in wavenumber space that would make Newtonian-noise subtraction very challenging. Therefore, it is shown that topographic scattering should be included as criterion in the site-selection process of future low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors.

Michael Coughlin; Jan Harms

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

473

Independent seismic evaluation of the 24-580-680 south connector ramps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site response analyses were performed using the computer program SHAKE at the I-24/580/980 site to provide seismic ground motions for independent evaluations of the freeway interchange structure. Analytical models and soil parameters for SHAKE analysis were developed from geotechnical data obtained from several site investigation programs conducted at the site in 1960, 1991 and 1995. Two sets of rock outcropping input motions were used: (1) modified Santa Cruz earthquake records provided by Caltrans, and (2) LLNL synthetic strong ground motions. The LLNL synthetic ground motions were developed using LLNL Empirical Green functions method simulating strong earthquakes of moment magnitude 7.25 from the nearby Hayward Fault about 4 km from the site. Calculated ground surface motions using LLNL median rock input-motions are compatible with Caltrans design/evaluation motions.

Chen, J.C.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic behavior in central Taiwan: Response to stress evolution following the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi of seismicity occurred in the Nantou region of central Taiwan. Among the seismic activities, eight Mw P 5 magnitudes took place from 1900 to 1998. Since the seismicity rate during the Chi-Chi postseismic period has

Wu, Yih-Min

475

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled and seismic test 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled & seismic test, 2012

Jaffe, Todd

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Double Seismic Zone of the Nazca Plate in Northern Chile: High Resolution Velocity Structure, Petrological Implications and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Double Seismic Zone of the Nazca Plate in Northern Chile: High Resolution Velocity Structure presents an interdisciplinary study of the Northern Chile Double Seismic Zone. First, a high resolution method. The double seismic zone (DSZ) is observed between 80 and 140 km depth and the two seismic planes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

477

CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND-SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE BOISE HYDROGEOPHYSICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CROSSWELL SEISMIC REFLECTION IMAGING OF A SHALLOW COBBLE-AND- SAND AQUIFER: AN EXAMPLE FROM Crosswell seismic data contain first-arrival information for velocity inversion and reflec- tions for seismic stratigraphic analysis. Seismic velocity information is useful for directly com- paring to

Barrash, Warren

478

Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled and seismic test 2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Map showing location of wells permitted, drilled & seismic test, 2012

Jaffe, Todd

479

A Preliminary Look at the Crust and Upper Mantle of North Africa Using Libyan Seismic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, LLNL has been developing methods to jointly invert both surface wave dispersion data and teleseismic receiver functions. The technique holds great promise in accurately estimating seismic structure, including important tectonic parameters such as basin thickness, crustal thickness, upper mantle velocity, etc. We proposed applying this method to some recently available data from several Libyan stations, as we believe the technique has not been applied to any stations in Libya. The technique holds the promise of improving our understanding of the crust and upper mantle in Libya and North Africa. We recently requested seismic data from stations GHAR (Gharyan) and MARJ (Al Marj) in Libya for about 20 events. The events were large events at regional distances suitable for making dispersion measurements. An example of waveforms recorded at the two stations from an earthquake in Italy is shown in Figure 1. The paths traverse the Ionian Sea. Notice the slow short period group velocities of the surface waves across the Mediterranean, particularly to the easternmost station MARJ. However, because of data availability, signal-to-noise ratio, etc. we were unable to make measurements for every one of these events at both stations. Figure 2 shows a map of paths for 20 sec Rayleigh waves in the eastern Mediterranean region. Paths measured at the two Libyan stations are shown in green. Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements at 20 sec period are sensitive to velocities in the upper 20 km or so, and reveal sediment thickness, crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. Tomographic inversions reveal the sharp group velocity contrast between regions with deep sedimentary basins and those without. Figure 3, the result of an inversion made before adding the new dispersion measurements, shows slow group velocities in the Black Sea, Adriatic Sea, and Eastern Mediterranean. In general, these features correspond well with the sediment thickness model from Laske, shown in Figure 4. Details in and around the Sirt (Sirte) Basin in northern Libya, however, are poorly defined.

Pasyanos, M

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

480

Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

Department of Geophysics

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "long-offset surface seismic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

April 6, 2010 Seismic Reflection I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the surface area of a sphere is proportional to the square of the radius, the energy per unit area (energy Geometrical Spreading As waves radiate away from the source, the energy spreads out. The energy of a wave is proportional to the square of the amplitude, so as the energy spreads out, the amplitude decreases, although

Ito, Garrett

482

Seismic equipment qualification at Rocky Flats Plant: Lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic equipment qualification is being evaluated as a part of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Initially it was believed that the experience database developed by the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) for commercial nuclear power plants, as outlined in their Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP), would provide a substantial benefit for the seismic adequacy verification of equipment at RFP. However, further review of the simplified guidelines contained in the GIP with respect to the specific RFP structures and components revealed substantial differences from the GIP criteria. Therefore, the number of ``outliers`` from the experience database defined in the GIP is greater than was initially anticipated. This paper presents details of the differences found between the RFP structures and components and those represented in the GIP, and the challenges presented for their evaluation at RFP. Approaches necessary to develop seismic verification data are also discussed. The discussions focus on experience with one of the nuclear facilities at RFP, Building 707. However, the conclusions are generally applicable to other similar facilities that typically comprise the RFP nuclear facilities.

Peregoy, W.; Herring, K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Qualification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For certification of Quality Management Systems: EN ISO 9001:2008 ­ Quality management systems - Requirements the ability to fulfill specified requirements (ISO 9000) #12;SEISMIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURES FOR EUROPEAN SYNERGIES Conformity Assessment Bodies ISO/IEC 17011 - Conformity assessment -- General

484

Long term study of the seismic environment at LIGO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LIGO experiment aims to detect and study gravitational waves using ground based laser interferometry. A critical factor to the performance of the interferometers, and a major consideration in the design of possible future upgrades, is isolation of the interferometer optics from seismic noise. We present the results of a detailed program of measurements of the seismic environment surrounding the LIGO interferometers. We describe the experimental configuration used to collect the data, which was acquired over a 613 day period. The measurements focused on the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, in which the secondary microseismic peak and noise due to human activity in the vicinity of the detectors was found to be particularly critical to interferometer performance. We compare the statistical distribution of the data sets from the two interferometer sites, construct amplitude spectral densities of seismic noise amplitude fluctuations with periods of up to 3 months, and analyze the data for any long term trends in the amplitude of seismic noise in this critical frequency range.

E. J. Daw; J. A. Giaime; D. Lormand; M. Lubinski; J. Zweizig

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

485

Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

Mellors, Robert J.

486

Review Article Generalised receiver functions and seismic interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into virtual sensors (seismometers) that record seis- mograms from other real earthquakes, man-made sources sources and sensors at desired times and locations (rather than having to wait for earthquake sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4. Background to the theory of seismic interferometry

487

Sensitivity of piping seismic responses to input factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the sensitivity of peak dynamic seismic responses to input parameters. The responses have been modeled and calculated for the Zion Unit 1 plant as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) performed by the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The SSMRP was supported by the US NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Two sensitivity topics motivated the study. The first is the sensitivity of piping response to the mean value of piping damping. The second is the sensitivity of all the responses to the earthquake and model input parameters including soil, structure and piping parameters; this information is required for another study, the sensitivity of the plant system response (in terms of risk) to these dynamic input parameters and to other input factors. We evaluate the response sensitivities by performing a linear regression analysis (LRA) of the computer code SMACS. With SMACS we have a detailed model of the Zion plant and of the important dynamic processes in the soil, structures and piping systems. The qualitative results change with the location of the individual response. Different responses are in locations where the many potential influences have different effectiveness. The results give an overview of the complexity of the seismic dyanmic response of a plant. Within the diversity trends are evident in the influences of the input variables on the responses.

O'Connell, W.J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Importance and sensitivity of parameters affecting the Zion Seismic Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study on the importance and sensitivity of structures, systems, equipment, components and design parameters used in the Zion Seismic Risk Calculations. This study is part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) supported by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of this study is to provide the NRC with results on the importance and sensitivity of parameters used to evaluate seismic risk. These results can assist the NRC in making decisions dealing with the allocation of research resources on seismic issues. This study uses marginal analysis in addition to importance and sensitivity analysis to identify subject areas (input parameter areas) for improvements that reduce risk, estimate how much the improvement dfforts reduce risk, and rank the subject areas for improvements. Importance analysis identifies the systems, components, and parameters that are important to risk. Sensitivity analysis estimates the change in risk per unit improvement. Marginal analysis indicates the reduction in risk or uncertainty for improvement effort made in each subject area. The results described in this study were generated using the SEISIM (Systematic Evaluation of Important Safety Improvement Measures) and CHAIN computer codes. Part 1 of the SEISIM computer code generated the failure probabilities and risk values. Part 2 of SEISIM, along with the CHAIN computer code, generated the importance and sensitivity measures.

George, L.L.; O'Connell, W.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

490

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori- entations and intensity anisotropy as a routine technique for fracture characterization is partly because of its inability to pro- vide information about sizes and vol- ume of fractures. Although both grain-scale micro

Edinburgh, University of

491

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have studied (1) Methods for detection of stress-induced velocity anisotropy in sands. (2) We have initiated efforts for velocity upscaling to quantify long-wavelength and short-wavelength velocity behavior and the scale-dependent dispersion caused by sediment variability in different depositional environments.

Gary Mavko

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

492

Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

Mellors, Robert J.

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

493

On Seismic Imaging: Geodesics, Isochrons, and Fermat's Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The particular application was suggested by Baker Atlas, PanCanadian Petroleum, Petro-Canada Oil and Gas, and Talisman Energy, i.e., the companies involved in seismic data acquisition, processing and interpretation the information about the subsurface, which includes spatial positions of re ectors. In the case of exploration

Bohun, C. Sean

494

Astronomical alignments as the cause of ~M6+ seismicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I here demonstrate empirically my georesonator concept in which tidally induced magnification of Earth masses' resonance causes seismicity. To that end, I show that all strong (~M6+) earthquakes of 2010 occurred during the Earth's long (t>3 day) astronomical alignments within our solar system. I then show that the same holds true for all very strong (~M8+) earthquakes of the decade of 2000s. Finally, the strongest (M8.6+) earthquakes of the past century are shown to have occurred during the Earth's multiple long alignments, whereas half of the high-strongest (M9+) ones occurred during the Full Moon. I used the comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin), as it has been adding to robustness in terms of very strong seismicity since 2007 (in terms of strongest seismicity: since 1965). The Elenin will continue intensifying the Earth's very strong seismicity until August-October, 2011. Approximate forecast of earthquakes based on my discoveries is feasible. This demonstration proves my hyperresonator concept, arrived at earlier as a...

Omerbashich, Mensur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Effect of aging on the seismic performance of petrochemical facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the effects of aging of petrochemical facilities with regard to the impact on seismic performance. Examples of typical construction and serious concerns are presented. Requirements in evaluation and retrofits are discussed. A comparison is made with the current state-of-practice in offshore platforms and nuclear power plants.

Johnson, G.S. (EQE International, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Guideline for the seismic technical evaluation of replacement items for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic qualification for equipment originally installed in nuclear power plants was typically performed by the original equipment suppliers or manufactures (OES/OEM). Many of the OES/OEM no longer maintain quality assurance programs with adequate controls for supplying nuclear equipment. Utilities themselves must provide reasonable assurance in the continued seismic adequacy of such replacement items. This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques which can be used to provide reasonable assurance that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. It also provides a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items (STERI) is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items. Guidance on supplier program requirements necessary to maintain continued seismic adequacy and on documentation of maintaining required seismic adequacy is also included.

Harris, S.P.; Cushing, R.W. (EQE International, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Johnson, H.W. (Programmatic Solutions, Smithtown, NY (United States)); Abeles, J.M. (System 1, Inc., Potomac, MD (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

498

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined