Sample records for lone star wind

  1. Lone Star Wind Alliance LSWA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  3. Lone Star II (4Q07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Lone Star Healthy Streams Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin; Redmon, Larry

    13 Progress Report ? July 15, 2010 TWRI submitted Quarter 14 Progress Report ? October 13, 2010 TWRI submitted Quarter 15 Progress Report ? January 14, 2011 TWRI submitted Quarter 16 Progress Report Subtask 1.3: Coordination of project... on July 1, 2010 to provide a 6-month no-cost extension that extended the project end date to March 31, 2011 to allow completion of the Bacteroides analysis and development of the final report. Lone Star Healthy Streams Final Report 13 Subtask...

  5. Effective Lone Star program reduces unaccounted-for gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.E.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lone Star's program for holding down its gas losses implements individual remedies for each of six broad categories of unaccounted-for gas: measurement at other than base conditions, meter inaccuracy, meter-reading errors, accounting mistakes, unmetered or unrecorded gas use, and leakage. Even though some of these remedies will not be fully effective for 2 more years, the program's first year of operation has reduced unaccounted-for gas volumes by 9.2%.

  6. Lone Star Healthy Streams: Keeping Texas streams clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutwell, Kathryn S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time. #31;is prevents fecal material from accumulating in creek pastures during rainy seasons and ending up in streams. ?Results showed that when alternative o -stream water was provided, the amount of time ca#20;le spent in the creek was reduced... Corporation. LONE STAR HEALTHY STREAMS Keeping Texas streams clean Think contaminated water only occurs in developing countries? Even in the United States, high levels of bacteria in some water bodies make them potentially unsuitable for recreation...

  7. Lone Star Transmission LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation,

  8. Development of a Synergistic, Comprehensive Statewide Lone Star Healthy Streams Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, K.; Redmon, L.; Peterson, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to expand the Lone Star Healthy Streams Program and establish it as the State’s mechanism to provide a coordinated and comprehensive education program designed to increase awareness of the bacteria issues associated with grazing and dairy cattle, poultry...

  9. Lone Star I (Q3) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other AlternativePark,CedarPowerViewLomaQ2)

  10. Winds of Planet Hosting Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, B A; Brookshaw, L; Vidotto, A A; Carter, B D; Marsden, S C; Soutter, J; Waite, I A; Horner, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of exoplanetary science is one of the most rapidly growing areas of astrophysical research. As more planets are discovered around other stars, new techniques have been developed that have allowed astronomers to begin to characterise them. Two of the most important factors in understanding the evolution of these planets, and potentially determining whether they are habitable, are the behaviour of the winds of the host star and the way in which they interact with the planet. The purpose of this project is to reconstruct the magnetic fields of planet hosting stars from spectropolarimetric observations, and to use these magnetic field maps to inform simulations of the stellar winds in those systems using the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. The BATS-R-US code was originally written to investigate the behaviour of the Solar wind, and so has been altered to be used in the context of other stellar systems. These simulations will give information about the velocity, pressur...

  11. LoneSTAR Program: Maximizing Energy Efficiency while Protecting the Envrionment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevino, E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maximiz ing Energy Eff ic iency whi le Protect ing the Envi ronment LoanSTAR PROGRAM ESL-KT-14-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 ? Executed 240 loans totaling $407,923,762.32 ? 93 loans to publ... Storage ESL-KT-14-11-31 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 ? LoanSTAR is out of money. ? Must use ESPC. ? Maximum loan amount is too small. ? I have an existing loan so I am ineligible. ? Prepayment penalt ies...

  12. Policy Recommendations for Establishing the LoneSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy consumption analyzed?sometimes with monthly data and sometimes with 15-minute or hourly demand data. 6 The levels of monitoring and analysis recommended can be grouped in three categories: 1) Facility/whole building(s) utility data: These data... receiving retrofits 3) Improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR Program - 4) Provide a detailed data base of energy use in commercial* buildings located in Texas The money for each retrofit financed from the LoanSTAR Program must...

  13. Spectral Modeling Hot Star Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    supernovaeProduce supernovae (neutron stars, black holes)(neutron stars, black holes) ·· Found near birth

  14. NLTE wind models for SMC stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiri Krticka

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study stellar wind properties of selected late O stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We calculate NLTE line-driven wind models for these stars and compare predicted wind parameters with observed values. We found satisfactory agreement between theoretical and observed terminal velocities. On the other hand, predicted and observed mass-loss rates are in a good agreement only for higher mass-loss rates. For mass-loss rates lower than approximately 10^{-7} M_sun / year we found large discrepancy between theoretical and observed values. We propose a new explanation of this effect based on dynamical decoupling of some atoms. Finally, we study the dependence of wind terminal velocities and mass-loss rates on metallicity.

  15. Lone Star I (4Q07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  16. Lone Star II (1Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. Lone Star II (2Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Relativistic MHD Winds from Rotating Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Bucciantini; T. A. Thompson; J. Arons; E. Quataert

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve the time-dependent dynamics of axisymmetric, general relativistic MHD winds from rotating neutron stars. The mass loss rate is obtained self consistently as a solution of the MHD equations, subject to a finite thermal pressure at the stellar surface. Conditions are chosen to be representative of the neutrino driven phase in newly born magnetars, which have been considered as a possible engine for GRBs. We compute the angular momentum and energy losses as a function of $\\sigma$ and compare them with the analytic expectation from the classical theory of pulsar winds. We observe the convergence to the force-free limit in the energy loss and we study the evolution of the closed zone for increasing magnetization. Results also show that the dipolar magnetic field and the presence of a closed zone do not modify significantly the acceleration and collimation properties of the wind.

  19. Spectral Modeling of X-rays from Hot Star Winds Emma E. Wollman, Swarthmore College `09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    and absorption. Consequently, the more luminous a star is, the stronger the wind it can support. This wind-driving1 Spectral Modeling of X-rays from Hot Star Winds Emma E. Wollman, Swarthmore College `09 Prof x-ray spectra from Chandra's archive. Models of x-ray production in hot star winds predict broad

  20. The influence of clumping on predicted O star wind parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiri Krticka; Joachim Puls; Jiri Kubat

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the influence of clumping on the predicted wind structure of O-type stars. For this purpose we artificially include clumping into our stationary wind models. When the clumps are assumed to be optically thin, the radiative line force increases compared to corresponding unclumped models, with a similar effect on either the mass-loss rate or the terminal velocity (depending on the onset of clumping). Optically thick clumps, alternatively, might be able to decrease the radiative force.

  1. Colliding Winds in Low-Mass Binary Star Systems: wind interactions and implications for habitable planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C P; Pilat-Lohinger, E; Bisikalo, D; Güdel, M; Eggl, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. In binary star systems, the winds from the two components impact each other, leading to strong shocks and regions of enhanced density and temperature. Potentially habitable circumbinary planets must continually be exposed to these interactions regions. Aims. We study, for the first time, the interactions between winds from low-mass stars in a binary system, to show the wind conditions seen by potentially habitable circumbinary planets. Methods. We use the advanced 3D numerical hydrodynamic code Nurgush to model the wind interactions of two identical winds from two solar mass stars with circular orbits and a binary separation of 0.5 AU. As input into this model, we use a 1D hydrodynamic simulation of the solar wind, run using the Versatile Advection Code. We derive the locations of stable and habitable orbits in this system to explore what wind conditions potentially habitable planets will be exposed to during their orbits. Results. Our wind interaction simulations result in the formation of two stron...

  2. ON HIGHLY CLUMPED MAGNETIC WIND MODELS FOR COOL EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, G. M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, it has been proposed that the winds of non-pulsating and non-dusty K and M giants and supergiants may be driven by some form of magnetic pressure acting on highly clumped wind material. While many researchers believe that magnetic processes are responsible for cool evolved stellar winds, existing MHD and Alfven wave-driven wind models have magnetic fields that are essentially radial and tied to the photosphere. The clumped magnetic wind scenario is quite different in that the magnetic flux is also being carried away from the star with the wind. We test this clumped wind hypothesis by computing continuum radio fluxes from the {zeta} Aur semiempirical model of Baade et al., which is based on wind-scattered line profiles. The radio continuum opacity is proportional to the electron density squared, while the line scattering opacity is proportional to the gas density. This difference in proportionality provides a test for the presence of large clumping factors. We derive the radial distribution of clump factors (CFs) for {zeta} Aur by comparing the nonthermal pressures required to produce the semiempirical velocity distribution with the expected thermal pressures. The CFs are {approx}5 throughout the sub-sonic inner wind region and then decline outward. These implied clumping factors lead to excess radio emission at 2.0 cm, while at 6.2 cm it improves agreement with the smooth unclumped model. Smaller clumping factors of {approx}2 lead to better overall agreement but also increase the discrepancy at 2 cm. These results do not support the magnetic clumped wind hypothesis and instead suggest that inherent uncertainties in the underlying semiempirical model probably dominate uncertainties in predicted radio fluxes. However, new ultraviolet line and radio continuum observations are needed to test the new generations of inhomogeneous magnetohydrodynamic wind models.

  3. Wind Circulation in Selected Rotating Magnetic Early-B Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myron A. Smith; Detlef Groote

    2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotating magnetic B stars have oblique dipolar magnetic fields and often anomalous helium and metallic compositions. These stars develop co-rotating torus-shaped clouds by channelling winds from their magnetic poles to an anchored planar disk over the magnetic equator. The line absorptions from the cloud can be studied as the complex rotates and periodically occults the star. We describe an analysis of the clouds of four stars (HD184927, beta Cep, sigma Ori E, and HR6684). From line synthesis models, we find that the metallic compositions are spatially uniform over the stars' surfaces. Next, using the Hubeny CIRCUS code, we demonstate that periodic UV continuum fluxes can be explained by the absorption of low-excitation lines. The analysis also quantifies the cloud temperatures, densities, and turbulences, which appear to increase inward toward the stars. The temperatures range from about 12,000K for the weak Fe lines up to temperatures of 33,000K for N V absorptions, which is in excess of temperatures expected from radiative equilibrium. The spectroscopic hallmark of this stellar class is the presence of strong C IV and N V resonance line absorptions at occultation phases and of redshifted emissions at magnetic pole-on phases. The emissions have characteristics which seem most compatible with the generation of high-energy shocks at the wind-cloud interface, as predicted by Babel.

  4. Star Point Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  5. Wind acceleration in AGB stars: Solid ground and loose ends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Höfner, Susanne

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The winds of cool luminous AGB stars are commonly assumed to be driven by radiative acceleration of dust grains which form in the extended atmospheres produced by pulsation-induced shock waves. The dust particles gain momentum by absorption or scattering of stellar photons, and they drag along the surrounding gas particles through collisions, triggering an outflow. This scenario, here referred to as Pulsation-Enhanced Dust-DRiven Outflow (PEDDRO), has passed a range of critical observational tests as models have developed from empirical and qualitative to increasingly self-consistent and quantitative. A reliable theory of mass loss is an essential piece in the bigger picture of stellar and galactic chemical evolution, and central for determining the contribution of AGB stars to the dust budget of galaxies. In this review, I discuss the current understanding of wind acceleration and indicate areas where further efforts by theorists and observers are needed.

  6. Evolution of Super Star Cluster Winds with Strong Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Richard; Palous, Jan; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of Super Star Cluster (SSC) winds driven by stellar winds and supernova (SN) explosions. Time-dependent rates at which mass and energy are deposited into the cluster volume, as well as the time-dependent chemical composition of the re-inserted gas, are obtained from the population synthesis code Starburst99. These results are used as input for a semi-analytic code which determines the hydrodynamic properties of the cluster wind as a function of cluster age. Two types of winds are detected in the calculations. For the quasi-adiabatic solution, all of the inserted gas leaves the cluster in the form of a stationary wind. For the bimodal solution, some of the inserted gas becomes thermally unstable and forms dense warm clumps which accumulate inside the cluster. We calculate the evolution of the wind velocity and energy flux and integrate the amount of accumulated mass for clusters of different mass, radius and initial metallicity. We consider also conditions with low heating efficiency of ...

  7. Wind accretion in binary stars II. Accretion rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Theuns; Henri Boffin; Alain Jorissen

    1996-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to estimate accretion rates of mass, linear and angular momentum in a binary system where one component undergoes mass loss through a wind. Physical parameters are chosen such as to model the alleged binary precursors of barium stars, whose chemical peculiarities are believed to result from the accretion of the wind from a companion formerly on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). The binary system modelled consists of a 3 solar masses AGB star on the main sequence, in a 3AU circular orbit. Three-dimensional simulations are performed for gases with polytropic indices gamma=1, 1.1 and 1.5, to bracket more realistic situations that would include radiative cooling. Mass accretion rates are found to depend on resolution and we estimate typical values of 1-2% for the gamma=1.5 case and 8% for the other models. The highest resolution obtained (with 400k particles) corresponds to an accretor of linear size 16 solar radii. Despite being (in the gamma = 1.5 case) about ten times smaller than theoretical estimates based on the Bondi-Hoyle prescription, the SPH accretion rates remain large enough to explain the pollution of barium stars. Uncertainties in the current SPH rates remain however, due to the simplified treatment of the wind acceleration mechanism, as well as to the absence of any cooling prescription and to the limited numerical resolution. Angular momentum transfer leads to significant spin up of the accretor and can account for the rapid rotation of HD165141, a barium star with a young white dwarf companion and a rotation rate unusually large among K giants.

  8. VARIABLE WINDS AND DUST FORMATION IN R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Zhang Wanshu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Geballe, T. R., E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: wzhan21@lsu.edu, E-mail: tgeballe@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed P-Cygni and asymmetric, blue-shifted absorption profiles in the He I {lambda}10830 lines of 12 R Coronae Borealis stars over short (1 month) and long (3 yr) timescales to look for variations linked to their dust-formation episodes. In almost all cases, the strengths and terminal velocities of the line vary significantly and are correlated with dust formation events. Strong absorption features with blue-shifted velocities {approx}400 km s{sup -1} appear during declines in visible brightness and persist for about 100 days after recovery to maximum brightness. Small residual winds of somewhat lower velocity are present outside of the decline and recovery periods. The correlations support models in which recently formed dust near the star is propelled outward at high speed by radiation pressure and drags the gas along with it.

  9. Line formation in the inner winds of classical T Tauri stars: testing the conical wind solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurosawa, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the emission line profile models of hydrogen and helium based on the results from axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of the wind formed near the disk-magnetosphere boundary of classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). We extend the previous outflow models of `the conical wind' by Romanova et al. to include a well defined magnetospheric accretion funnel flow which is essential for modelling the optical and near-infrared hydrogen and helium lines of CTTSs. Our MHD model shows outflows in conical shape with a half opening angle about 35 degrees. The flow properties such as the maximum outflow speed in the conical wind, maximum inflow speed in the accretion funnel, mass-accretion and mass-loss rates are comparable to those found in a typical CTTS. The density, velocity and temperature from the MHD simulations are used in a separate radiative transfer model to predict the line profiles and test the consistency of the MHD models with observations. The line profiles are computed with various combi...

  10. The dominant X-ray wind in massive star binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Pittard; I. R. Stevens

    2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate which shocked wind is responsible for the majority of the X-ray emission in colliding wind binaries, an issue where there is some confusion in the literature, and which we show is more complicated than has been assumed. We find that where both winds rapidly cool (typically close binaries), the ratio of the wind speeds is often more important than the momentum ratio, because it controls the energy flux ratio, and the faster wind is generally the dominant emitter. When both winds are largely adiabatic (typically long-period binaries), the slower and denser wind will cool faster and the stronger wind generally dominates the X-ray luminosity.

  11. ON THE WEAK-WIND PROBLEM IN MASSIVE STARS: X-RAY SPECTRA REVEAL A MASSIVE HOT WIND IN ? COLUMBAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huenemoerder, David P.

    ? Columbae is a prototypical weak-wind O star for which we have obtained a high-resolution X-ray spectrum with the Chandra LETG/ACIS instrument and a low-resolution spectrum with Suzaku. This allows us, for the first time, ...

  12. BroadStar Wind Systems | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation,Biogen Jump to:BroadStar

  13. Evolution of Mass Functions of Coeval Stars through Wind Mass Loss and Binary Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, F R N; Langer, N; de Mink, S E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate determinations of stellar mass functions and ages of stellar populations are crucial to much of astrophysics. We analyse the evolution of stellar mass functions of coeval main sequence stars including all relevant aspects of single- and binary-star evolution. We show that the slope of the upper part of the mass function in a stellar cluster can be quite different to the slope of the initial mass function. Wind mass loss from massive stars leads to an accumulation of stars which is visible as a peak at the high mass end of mass functions, thereby flattening the mass function slope. Mass accretion and mergers in close binary systems create a tail of rejuvenated binary products. These blue straggler stars extend the single star mass function by up to a factor of two in mass and can appear up to ten times younger than their parent stellar cluster. Cluster ages derived from their most massive stars that are close to the turn-off may thus be significantly biased. To overcome such difficulties, we propose t...

  14. THE r-PROCESS IN PROTO-NEUTRON-STAR WIND REVISITED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanajo, Shinya, E-mail: shinya.wanajo@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the r-process in the neutrino-driven proto-neutron-star (PNS) wind of core-collapse supernovae in light of the recent findings of massive neutron stars in binaries as well as of an indication of neutron-richness in the PNS ejecta because of the nucleon potential corrections on neutrino opacities. To this end, a spherically symmetric, general relativistic, steady-state wind model is applied for a wide range of PNS masses between 1.2 M{sub Sun} and 2.4 M{sub Sun} with the latter reaching the causality limit. Nucleosynthesis calculations with these PNS models are performed by assuming a time evolution of electron fraction with its minimal value of Y{sub e} = 0.4, which mimics recent hydrodynamical results. The fundamental nucleosynthetic aspect of the PNS wind is found to be the production of Sr, Y, and Zr in quasi-equilibrium and of the elements with A Almost-Equal-To 90-110 by a weak r-process, which can be an explanation for the abundance signatures in r-process-poor Galactic halo stars. PNSs more massive than 2.0 M{sub Sun} can eject heavy r-process elements, however, with substantially smaller amount than what is needed to account for the solar content. PNS winds can be thus the major origin of light trans-iron elements but no more than 10% of those heavier than A {approx} 110, although they may be the sources of the low-level abundances of Sr and Ba found in numerous metal-poor stars if the maximum mass of PNSs exceeds 2.0 M{sub Sun }.

  15. Winds from Neutron Stars and Strong Type I X--Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Nobili; Roberto Turolla; Iosif Lapidus

    1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for stationary, radiatively driven winds from X--ray bursting neutron stars is presented. General relativistic hydrodynamical and radiative transfer equations are integrated from the neutron star surface outwards, taking into account for helium nuclear burning in the inner, dense, nearly hydrostatic shells. Radiative processes include both bremsstrahlung emission--absorption and Compton scattering; only the frequency--integrated transport is considered here. It is shown that each solution is characterized by just one parameter: the mass loss rate $\\Mdot$, or, equivalently, the envelope mass $\\Menv$. We found that, owing to the effects of Comptonization, steady, supersonic winds can exist only for $\\Mdot$ larger than a limiting value $\\Mdot_{min} \\approx\\Mdot_{E}$. Several models, covering about two decades in mass loss rate, have been computed for given neutron star parameters. We discuss how the sequence of our solutions with decreasing $\\Menv$ can be used to follow the time evolution of a strong X--ray burst during the expansion/contraction phase near to the luminosity maximum. The comparison between our numerical results and the observational data of Haberl {\\it et al.\\/} (1987) for the bursts in 4U/MXB 1820-30 gives an estimate for both the spectral hardening factor and the accretion rate in this source.

  16. X-ray Emission Line Profiles from Wind Clump Bow Shocks in Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignace, R; Cassinelli, J P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two component flow structure of wind and clumps using two "beta" velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the...

  17. Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

  18. Massive stars and the energy balance of the interstellar medium. II. The 35 solar mass star and a solution to the "missing wind problem"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Freyer; Gerhard Hensler; Harold W. Yorke

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We continue our numerical analysis of the morphological and energetic influence of massive stars on their ambient interstellar medium for a 35 solar mass star that evolves from the main sequence through red supergiant and Wolf-Rayet phases, until it ultimately explodes as a supernova. We find that structure formation in the circumstellar gas during the early main-sequence evolution occurs as in the 60 solar mass case but is much less pronounced because of the lower mechanical wind luminosity of the star. Since on the other hand the shell-like structure of the HII region is largely preserved, effects that rely on this symmetry become more important. At the end of the stellar lifetime 1% of the energy released as Lyman continuum radiation and stellar wind has been transferred to the circumstellar gas. From this fraction 10% is kinetic energy of bulk motion, 36% is thermal energy, and the remaining 54% is ionization energy of hydrogen. The sweeping up of the slow red supergiant wind by the fast Wolf-Rayet wind produces remarkable morphological structures and emission signatures, which are compared with existing observations of the Wolf-Rayet bubble S308. Our model reproduces the correct order of magnitude of observed X-ray luminosity, the temperature of the emitting plasma as well as the limb brightening of the intensity profile. This is remarkable, because current analytical and numerical models of Wolf-Rayet bubbles fail to consistently explain these features. A key result is that almost the entire X-ray emission in this stage comes from the shell of red supergiant wind swept up by the shocked Wolf-Rayet wind rather than from the shocked Wolf-Rayet wind itself as hitherto assumed and modeled. This offers a possible solution to what is called the ``missing wind problem'' of Wolf-Rayet bubbles.

  19. The soft and hard X-rays thermal emission from star cluster winds with a supernova explosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castellanos-Ramirez, A; Esquivel, A; Toledo-Roy, J C; Olivares, J; Velazquez, P F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive young star clusters contain dozens or hundreds of massive stars that inject mechanical energy in the form of winds and supernova explosions, producing an outflow which expands into their surrounding medium, shocking it and forming structures called superbubbles. The regions of shocked material can have temperatures in excess of 10$^6$ K, and emit mainly in thermal X-rays (soft and hard). This X-ray emission is strongly affected by the action of thermal conduction, as well as by the metallicity of the material injected by the massive stars. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations exploring these two effects, metallicity of the stellar winds and supernova explosions, as well as thermal conduction.

  20. Narrow He II emission in star-forming galaxies at low metallicity. Stellar wind emission from a population of Very Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gräfener, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent study star-forming galaxies with HeII emission at moderate redshifts have been found to occur in two modes, distinguished by the width of their HeII emission lines. Broad HeII emission has been attributed to stellar emission from a population of evolved Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars while narrow HeII emission has been attributed to nebular emission excited by a population of very hot PopIII stars formed in pockets of pristine gas at moderate redshifts. In this work we propose an alternative scenario for the origin of the narrow HeII emission, namely very massive stars (VMS) at low metallicity (Z) which form strong but slow WR-type stellar winds due to their proximity to the Eddington limit. We estimate the expected HeII line fluxes and equivalent widths based on wind models for VMS and population synthesis models, and compare the results with recent observations of star-forming galaxies at moderate redshifts. The observed HeII line strengths and equivalent widths are in line with what is expected for a po...

  1. Lone Star Healthy Streams: Teaching best managment practices statewide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bacterial loading, was developed through the project Copano Bay Water Quality Education. That program was developed and implemented in response to bacterial water quality issues in Copano Bay that impaired oyster harvest in the bay and contact... practices statewide Institute (TWRI). ?It will provide a one-stop shop for the livestock industry and natural resource agencies to access information regarding bacterial water quality issues related to livestock, as well as measures that can...

  2. Clean Cities: Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowaLand

  3. The Interaction of Venus-like, M-dwarf Planets with the Stellar Wind of Their Host Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, O; Drake, J J; Glocer, A; Garraffo, C; Bell, J M; Gombosi, T I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the interaction between the atmospheres of Venus-like, non-magnetized exoplanets orbiting an M-dwarf star, and the stellar wind using a multi-species Magnetohydrodynaic (MHD) model. We focus our investigation on the effect of enhanced stellar wind and enhanced EUV flux as the planetary distance from the star decreases. Our simulations reveal different topologies of the planetary space environment for sub- and super-Alfvenic stellar wind conditions, which could lead to dynamic energy deposition in to the atmosphere during the transition along the planetary orbit. We find that the stellar wind penetration for non-magnetized planets is very deep, up to a few hundreds of kilometers. We estimate a lower limit for the atmospheric mass-loss rate and find that it is insignificant over the lifetime of the planet. However, we predict that when accounting for atmospheric ion acceleration, a significant amount of the planetary atmosphere could be eroded over the course of a billion years.

  4. Vortex Shedding on Hydrofoils Its dark and lonely down there...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vortex Shedding on Hydrofoils Its dark and lonely down there... Improving marine vehicle an underwater vehicle moves, it displaces water, genera6ng a unique velocity that it can u6lize rather than fight those flows, saving energy and improving

  5. X-RAY EMISSION-LINE PROFILE MODELING OF O STARS: FITTING A SPHERICALLY SYMMETRIC ANALYTIC WIND-SHOCK MODEL TO THE CHANDRA SPECTRUM OF PUPPIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    X-RAY EMISSION-LINE PROFILE MODELING OF O STARS: FITTING A SPHERICALLY SYMMETRIC ANALYTIC WIND Received 2002 November 22; accepted 2003 March 17 ABSTRACT X-ray emission-line profiles provide the most the surfaces of OB stars. The O supergiant Puppis shows broad, blueshifted, and asymmetric line profiles

  6. Exploring wind-driving dust species in cool luminous giants III. Wind models for M-type AGB stars: dynamic and photometric properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bladh, S; Aringer, B; Eriksson, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar winds observed in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are usually attributed to a combination of stellar pulsations and radiation pressure on dust. Shock waves triggered by pulsations propagate through the atmosphere, compressing the gas and lifting it to cooler regions, which create favourable conditions for grain growth. If sufficient radiative acceleration is exerted on the newly formed grains through absorption or scattering of stellar photons, an outflow can be triggered. Strong candidates for wind-driving dust species in M-type AGB stars are magnesium silicates (Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ and MgSiO$_3$). Such grains can form close to the stellar surface, they consist of abundant materials and, if they grow to sizes comparable to the wavelength of the stellar flux maximum, they experience strong acceleration by photon scattering. We use a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamics code with a detailed description for the growth of Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ grains to calculate the first extensive set of time-dependent wi...

  7. The interplay of disk wind and dynamical ejecta in the aftermath of neutron star - black hole mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Fernández; Eliot Quataert; Josiah Schwab; Daniel Kasen; Stephan Rosswog

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the evolution of the different ejecta components generated during the merger of a neutron star (NS) and a black hole (BH). Our focus is the interplay between material ejected dynamically during the merger, and the wind launched on a viscous timescale by the remnant accretion disk. These components are expected to contribute to an electromagnetic transient and to produce r-process elements, each with a different signature when considered separately. Here we introduce a two-step approach to investigate their combined evolution, using two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Starting from the output of a merger simulation, we identify each component in the initial condition based on its phase space distribution, and evolve the accretion disk in axisymmetry. The wind blown from this disk is injected into a three-dimensional computational domain where the dynamical ejecta is evolved. We find that the wind can suppress fallback accretion on timescales longer than ~100 ms. Due to self-similar viscous evolution, the disk accretion at late times nevertheless approaches a power-law time dependence $\\propto t^{-2.2}$. This can power some late-time GRB engine activity, although the available energy is significantly less than in traditional fallback models. Inclusion of radioactive heating due to the r-process does not significantly affect the fallback accretion rate or the disk wind. We do not find any significant modification to the wind properties at large radius due to interaction with the dynamical ejecta. This is a consequence of the different expansion velocities of the two components.

  8. An Observational Summary of Convective Storm-generated Winds NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ), GOES sounding profile over Patuxent River, MD at 2100 UTC (top right), GOES imager product at 2232 UTC River Buoy near Dahlgren, Virginia (left) compared to a hypothetical microburst wind speed trace (right

  9. Magnetically driven winds from differentially rotating neutron stars and X-ray afterglows of short gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Siegel; Riccardo Ciolfi; Luciano Rezzolla

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Besides being among the most promising sources of gravitational waves, merging neutron star binaries also represent a leading scenario to explain the phenomenology of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Recent observations have revealed a large subclass of SGRBs with roughly constant luminosity in their X-ray afterglows, lasting $10\\!-\\!10^4$ s. These features are generally taken as evidence of a long-lived central engine powered by the magnetic spin-down of a uniformly rotating, magnetized object. We propose a different scenario in which the central engine powering the X-ray emission is a differentially rotating hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) that launches a quasi-isotropic and baryon-loaded wind driven by the magnetic field, which is built-up through differential rotation. Our model is supported by long-term, three-dimensional, general-relativistic, and ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations, showing that this isotropic emission is a very robust feature. For a given HMNS, the presence of a collimated component depends sensitively on the initial magnetic field geometry, while the stationary electromagnetic luminosity depends only on the magnetic energy initially stored in the system. We show that our model is compatible with the observed timescales and luminosities and express the latter in terms of a simple scaling relation.

  10. Dead poets' society New England, the 1950s. Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke), a lonely and painfully

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    Dead poets' society New England, the 1950s. Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke), a lonely and painfully shy in it. After seeing that Mr. Keating listed "Dead Poets Society" as one of his activities at the school

  11. The stellar-wind envelope around the supernova XRF/GRB060218/SN2006aj massive progenitor star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonbas, E; Fatkhullin, T A; Sokolov, V V; Castro-Tirado, A J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Gorosabel, J; Guziy, S; Jelinek, M; Sokolova, T N; Chernenkov, V N

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In BTA spectra of the supernova SN2006aj, identified with the X-ray flash (XRF) and gamma-ray burst XRF/GRB060218/SN2006aj, we detected details interpreted as hydrogen lines, which is a sign of stellar-wind envelope around a massive progenitor star of the gamma-ray burst. Results of modeling two early spectra obtained with the BTA in 2.55 and 3.55 days after the explosion of Type Ic supernova SN2006aj (z=0.0331) are presented. The spectra were modeled in the Sobolev approximation with the SYNOW code (Branch et al. 2001; Elmhamdi et al. 2006). In the spectra of the optical afterglow of the X-ray flash XRF/GRB060218 we detected spectral features interpreted as (1) the H_alpha PCyg profile for the velocity 33000 km s$^{-1}$ -- a wide and almost unnoticeable deformation of continuum in the range of $\\simeq5600 - 6600\\AA$ for the first epoch (2.55 days) and (2) a part (``remnant'') of the H_alpha PCyg profile in absorption blueshifted by 24000 km s$^{-1}$ -- a wide spectral feature with a minimum at $\\simeq6100\\AA...

  12. LINEAR RELATION FOR WIND-BLOWN BUBBLE SIZES OF MAIN-SEQUENCE OB STARS IN A MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENT AND IMPLICATION FOR SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Yang; Zhou Ping [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chu Youhua [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a linear relationship between the size of a massive star's main-sequence bubble in a molecular environment and the star's initial mass: R{sub b} Almost-Equal-To 1.22 M/M{sub Sun} - 9.16 pc, assuming a constant interclump pressure. Since stars in the mass range of 8 to 25-30 M{sub Sun} will end their evolution in the red supergiant phase without launching a Wolf-Rayet wind, the main-sequence wind-blown bubbles are mainly responsible for the extent of molecular gas cavities, while the effect of the photoionization is comparatively small. This linear relation can thus be used to infer the masses of the massive star progenitors of supernova remnants (SNRs) that are discovered to evolve in molecular cavities, while few other means are available for inferring the properties of SNR progenitors. We have used this method to estimate the initial masses of the progenitors of eight SNRs: Kes 69, Kes 75, Kes 78, 3C 396, 3C 397, HC 40, Vela, and RX J1713-3946.

  13. STAR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobsJuly throughR E Q U E N C4Safety STAR

  14. Development of a Synergistic, Comprehensive Statewide Lone Star Healthy Streams Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, K.; Redmon, L.; Peterson, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resource manuals and five presentations on bacteria issues and associated BMPs for four major classes of livestock as well as feral hogs. These materials have been made available through not only a resource website, which alone reached almost 1........................................................................................................................ 12 Task 4: Development of an Interactive Website to Increase Access to LSHS Program ........... 14 Subtask 4.1: Distribution of education materials developed in Task 2 though development of an interactive website...

  15. Doing science: teachers' authentic experiences at the Lone Star Dinosaur Field Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiles, Thomas William

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to participate in the Institute. The teachers willingly shared their expert views on science teaching and learning and kindly allowed me to document all their activities as they participated in the processes of field paleontology. The scientists Dr. Dale...'s, when professional development was commonly referred to as teacher inservice, experts were often hired to teach teachers about particular teaching innovations and programs that were to be implemented in their schools (Louckes-Horsley, Hewson...

  16. Physiological Ageing as it is Related to Gene Function in the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catena, Amanda M.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ..................... 12 Figure 2 Electrophoresis gel results for the expression of the ATP synthase gene in Amblyomma americanum subdivided by the mortality percentile to the right of the result, the sample number over the top of the result, and the group... ............................ 15 Figure 4 Electrophoresis gel results for the expression of the 16S gene in Amblyomma americanum subdivided by the mortality percentile to the right of the result, the sample number over the top of the result, and the group...

  17. "Climate Wise" in the Lone Star State: A Successful Partnership for Energy Efficiency in Austin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, S. J.; Schare, S.

    The City of Austin, Texas is forming partnerships with local companies to lower energy consumption and improve environmental performance within the industrial sector. As a local government participant in the federal Climate Wise program, Austin...

  18. Energy Engineering Analysis (EEA) program for Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant, Texas. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Energy Engineering Analysis (EEA) for LSAAP is threefold: Develop a systematic plan of projects which will result in reducing energy consumption. Consider renewable energy sources with the objective of establishing an orderly procedure for reducing use of non-renewable energy sources. Determine the feasibility of Total Energy (TE), Selective Energy (SE), and Central Heating Plant (CHP) concepts using alternative fuels. In essence, an assessment of the entire energy picture at LSAAP was undertaken. This report is a summary of that effort. LSAAP was originally built during 1941 and 1942 as a shell loading plant for the Army. After World War II, the facility was deactivated until 1951 when it was reactivated as a Government Owned, Contractor Operated (GOCO) facility. Day and Zimmerman was selected as the operator in 1951 and has been the operating contractor ever since. Located just west of Texarkana, Texas, LSAAP encompasses an area of approximately 15,546 acres. The primary mission of LSAAP is to load, assemble and pack ammunition and ammunition components for the Army.

  19. Audit of Lone Star Gas Invoices and Billing Procedures, Task #3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    desires that Transporter (a) receive gas from Shipper (or its designee) at the Point(s) of Receipt hereinafter set forth and (b) redeliver gas to the Point(s) of Delivery hereinafter set forth; and WHEREAS, Transporter owns and operates a pipeline system... of this Agreement, (iii) available pipeline capacity necessary to maintain Transporter's sales service to its residential and commercial customers and higher priorities of sales service under tariffs filed with applicable regulatory authorities, and (iv) any other...

  20. "Climate Wise" in the Lone Star State: A Successful Partnership for Energy Efficiency in Austin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, S. J.; Schare, S.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of Austin, Texas is forming partnerships with local companies to lower energy consumption and improve environmental performance within the industrial sector. As a local government participant in the federal Climate Wise program, Austin...

  1. Lone Star Reds: the Socialist Party and cotton tenancy in Texas, 1901-1917

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellard, Jason Dean

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    starting somewhere north of Dallas-Fort Worth, running south-southwest along the route of present day Interstate 35 through Waco and Austin, and narrowing to a point just above San Antonio. Here, the rich, sticky, black soil produced the most bales per...

  2. Audit of Lone Star Gas Invoices and Billing Procedures, Task #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    receives gas delivered to it by Shipper or by the designee of Shipper for Shipper's account. (k) "Point of Delivery" or "Delivery Point" shall mean the point where Transporter delivers gas to Shipper. 2. Measuring Equipment and Testing (a) The gas delivered... by meters of standard type which shall be installed, operated and maintained by Transporter (or its designee). Measurement devices and equipment shall be tested and adjusted for accuracy on a regular schedule by the party metering the gas (the "metering...

  3. Lonely Ladies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Lee Yu-jin sleeps with a "guy pillow" shaped like half a man's torso with one arm inexplicably encased in the sleeve of a blue dress shirt. Hong Yun-jeong confides in Dori-Dori, a little doll that ...

  4. FORMATION OF SiC GRAINS IN PULSATION-ENHANCED DUST-DRIVEN WIND AROUND CARBON-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi, E-mail: yuki@antares-a.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Natural History Sciences, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T{sub v} is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T{sub v} is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M{sub *} = 1.0 M{sub Sun }, luminosity L{sub *} = 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }, effective temperature T{sub eff} = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of {approx}10{sup -8} is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability {alpha}{sub s} = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at {approx}0.2-0.3 {mu}m in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

  5. 2D Simulations of the Line-Driven Instability in Hot-Star Winds: II. Approximations for the 2D Radiation Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Dessart; S. P. Owocki

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present initial attempts to include the multi-dimensional nature of radiation transport in hydrodynamical simulations of the small-scale structure that arises from the line-driven instability in hot-star winds. Compared to previous 1D or 2D models that assume a purely radial radiation force, we seek additionally to treat the lateral momentum and transport of diffuse line-radiation, initially here within a 2D context. A key incentive is to study the damping effect of the associated diffuse line-drag on the dynamical properties of the flow, focusing particularly on whether this might prevent lateral break-up of shell structures at scales near the lateral Sobolev angle of ca. $1^{\\rm o}$. We first explore nonlinear simulations that cast the lateral diffuse force in the simple, local form of a parallel viscosity. Second, to account for the lateral mixing of radiation associated with the radial driving, we next explore models in which the radial force is azimuthally smoothed over a chosen scale. Third, to account for both the lateral line-drag and the lateral mixing in a more self-consistent way, we explore further a method first proposed by Owocki (1999), which uses a restricted 3-ray approach that combines a radial ray with two oblique rays set to have an impact parameter $p < R_{\\ast}$ within the stellar core. From numerical simulations, we find that, compared to equivalent 1-ray simulations, the high-resolution 3-ray models show systematically a much higher lateral coherence.... (Full abstract in paper)

  6. Stellar Winds on the Main-Sequence I: Wind Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C P; Lüftinger, T; Toth, G; Brott, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 and 1.1 solar masses at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run ...

  7. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyril Georgy; Georges Meynet; André Maeder

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass loss is a determinant factor which strongly affects the evolution and the fate of massive stars. At low metallicity, stars are supposed to rotate faster than at the solar one. This favors the existence of stars near the critical velocity. In this rotation regime, the deformation of the stellar surface becomes important, and wind anisotropy develops. Polar winds are expected to be dominant for fast rotating hot stars. These polar winds allow the star to lose large quantities of mass and still retain a high angular momentum, and they modifie the evolution of the surface velocity and the final angular momentum kept in the star's core. We show here how these winds affect the final stages of massive stars, according to our knowledge about Gamma Ray Bursts. Computation of theoretical Gamma Ray Bursts rate indicates that our models have too fast rotating cores, and that we need to include an additional effect to spin them down. Magnetic fields in stars act in this direction, and we show how they modify the evolution of massive star up to the final stages.

  8. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loads from the wind inflow through rotor aerodynamics, drive train and power electronics is stillWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wächter ForWind-Center for Wind

  9. Modeling T Tauri Winds from He I 10830 Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Kwan; Suzan Edwards; William Fischer

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The high opacity of He I 10830 makes it an exceptionally sensitive probe of the inner wind geometry of accreting T Tauri stars. In this line blueshifted absorption below the continuum results from simple scattering of stellar photons, a situation which is readily modeled without definite knowledge of the physical conditions and recourse to multi-level radiative transfer. We present theoretical line profiles for scattering in two possible wind geometries, a disk wind and a wind emerging radially from the star, and compare them to observed He I 10830 profiles from a survey of classical T Tauri stars. The comparison indicates that subcontinuum blueshifted absorption is characteristic of disk winds in ~30% of the stars and of stellar winds in ~40%. We further conclude that for many stars the emission profile of helium likely arises in stellar winds, increasing the fraction of accreting stars inferred to have accretion-powered stellar winds to ~60%. Stars with the highest disk accretion rates are more likely to have stellar wind than disk wind signatures and less likely to have redshifted absorption from magnetospheric funnel flows. This suggests the possibility that when accretion rates are high, disks can extend closer to the star, magnetospheric accretion zones can be reduced in size and conditions arise that favor radially outflowing stellar winds.

  10. Ligand Lone-Pair Influence on Hydrocarbon C-H Activation: A Computational Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ess, Daniel H; Gunnoe, T. Brent; Cundari, Thomas R; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mid to late transition metal complexes that break hydrocarbon C?H bonds by transferring the hydrogen to a heteroatom ligand while forming a metal?alkyl bond offer a promising strategy for C?H activation. Here we report a density functional (B3LYP, M06, and X3LYP) analysis of cis-(acac){sub 2}MX and TpM(L)X (M = Ir, Ru, Os, and Rh; acac = acetylacetonate, Tp = tris(pyrazolyl)borate; X = CH{sub 3}, OH, OMe, NH{sub 2}, and NMe{sub 2}) systems for methane C?H bond activation reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. We address the importance of whether a ligand lone pair provides an intrinsic kinetic advantage through possible electronic d{sub ?}?p{sub ?} repulsions for M?OR and M?NR{sub 2} systems versus M?CH{sub 3} systems. This involves understanding the energetic impact of the X ligand group on ligand loss, C?H bond coordination, and C?H bond cleavage steps as well as understanding how the nucleophilicity of the ligand X group, the electrophilicity of the transition metal center, and cis-ligand stabilization effect influence each of these steps. We also explore how spectator ligands and second- versus third-row transition metal centers impact the energetics of each of these C?H activation steps.

  11. Gas & Stars Aging low-mass stars eject their outer layers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Joshua Edward

    Recycling Gas & Stars #12;Aging low-mass stars eject their outer layers. M57:The Ring Nebula #12;Thor's Emerald Helmet Winds from high-mass stars blow bubbles of hot gas. #12;Supernova blast waves in stars are mixed back into the gas. NGC 6992: Filaments of theVeil Nebula #12;Bubbles blown by high

  12. Evaluation and Demonstration of BMPs for Cattle on Grazing Lands for the Lone Star Healthy Streams Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, K.; Redmon, L.; Gentry, T.; Clary, C.

    dissemination ........................................................... 8 Subtask 1.7 Oversight of the LSHS Project Steering Committee .......................................................... 9 Subtask 1.8 Development of the final project report... all work performed under this project including technical and financial supervision and preparation of status reports. Subtask 1.1: Preparation of quarterly progress reports TWRI prepared and submitted Quarterly Progress Reports which can be viewed...

  13. Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, a...

  14. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

  15. Stellar Winds on the Main-Sequence II: the Evolution of Rotation and Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C P; Brott, I; Lüftinger, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We study the evolution of stellar rotation and wind properties for low-mass main-sequence stars. Our aim is to use rotational evolution models to constrain the mass loss rates in stellar winds and to predict how their properties evolve with time on the main-sequence. Methods: We construct a rotational evolution model that is driven by observed rotational distributions of young stellar clusters. Fitting the free parameters in our model allows us to predict how wind mass loss rate depends on stellar mass, radius, and rotation. We couple the results to the wind model developed in Paper I of this series to predict how wind properties evolve on the main-sequence. Results: We estimate that wind mass loss rate scales with stellar parameters as $\\dot{M}_\\star \\propto R_\\star^2 \\Omega_\\star^{1.33} M_\\star^{-3.36}$. We estimate that at young ages, the solar wind likely had a mass loss rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that of the current solar wind. This leads to the wind having a higher density at y...

  16. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  17. Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  18. Different Virtual Stator Winding Configurations of Open-End Winding Five-Phase PM Machines for Wide Speed Range without Flux Weakening Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Different Virtual Stator Winding Configurations of Open-End Winding Five-Phase PM Machines for Wide of double-ended inverter system for wide-speed range of open- winding five phase PM machines. Different virtual winding configurations (star, pentagon, pentacle and bipolar) can be obtained by choosing

  19. GALEX Detection of Shock Breakout in Type II-P Supernova PS1-13arp: Implications for the Progenitor Star Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gezari, S; Sanders, N E; Soderberg, A M; Hung, T; Heinis, S; Smartt, S J; Rest, A; Scolnic, D; Chornock, R; Berger, E; Foley, R J; Huber, M E; Stubbs, P Price C W; Riess, A G; Kirshner, R P; Smith, K; Wood-Vasey, W M; Schiminovich, D; Martin, D C; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Flewelling, H; Kaiser, N; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the GALEX detection of a UV burst at the time of explosion of an optically normal Type II-P supernova (PS1-13arp) from the Pan-STARRS1 survey at z=0.1665. The temperature and luminosity of the UV burst match the theoretical predictions for shock breakout in a red supergiant, but with a duration a factor of ~50 longer than expected. We compare the $NUV$ light curve of PS1-13arp to previous GALEX detections of Type IIP SNe, and find clear distinctions that indicate that the UV emission is powered by shock breakout, and not by the subsequent cooling envelope emission previously detected in these systems. We interpret the ~ 1 d duration of the UV signal with a shock breakout in the wind of a red supergiant with a pre-explosion mass-loss rate of ~ 10^-3 Msun yr^-1. This mass-loss rate is enough to prolong the duration of the shock breakout signal, but not enough to produce an excess in the optical plateau light curve or narrow emission lines powered by circumstellar interaction. This detection of non-st...

  20. Pulsar Wind Nebulae in the SKA era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfand, J D; Ng, C -Y; Hessels, J W T; Stappers, B; Roberts, M S E; Possenti, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars lose the bulk of their rotational energy in the form of a pulsar wind: an ultra-relativistic outflow of predominantly electrons and positrons. This pulsar wind significantly impacts the environment and possible binary companion of the neutron star, and studying the resultant pulsar wind nebulae is critical for understanding the formation of neutron stars and millisecond pulsars, the physics of the neutron star magnetosphere, the acceleration of leptons up to PeV energies, and how these particles impact the interstellar medium. With the SKA1 and the SKA2, it could be possible to study literally hundreds of PWNe in detail, critical for understanding the many open questions in the topics listed above.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  2. Feedback from Protostellar Outflows in Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner

    2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic stresses collimate protostellar winds into a common distribution of force with angle. Sweeping into the ambient medium, such winds drive bipolar molecular outflows whose properties are insensitive to the distribution of ambient gas and to the details of how the wind is launched, and how its intensity varies over time. Moreover, these properties are in accord with the commonly observed features of outflows. This model is simple enough to permit a quantitative study of the feedback effects from low-mass star formation. It predicts the rate at which star-forming gas is ejected by winds, and hence the efficiency with which stars form. Applied to individual star formation, it relates the stellar initial mass function to the distribution of pre-stellar cores. Applied to cluster formation, it indicates whether the resulting stellar system will remain gravitationally bound. Using the energy injection and mass ejection implied by this model, we investigate the dynamical evolution of a molecular clump as a stellar cluster forms within it. This depends critically on the rate at which turbulence decays: it may involve equilibrium star formation (slow decay), overstable oscillations, or collapse (fast decay).

  3. Wind anisotropies and GRB progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georges Meynet; Andre Maeder

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of wind anisotropies on the stellar evolution leading to collapsars. Rotating models of a 60 M$_\\odot$ star with $\\Omega/\\Omega_{\\rm crit}=0.75$ on the ZAMS, accounting for shellular rotation and a magnetic field, with and without wind anisotropies, are computed at $Z$=0.002 until the end of the core He-burning phase. Only the models accounting for the effects of the wind anisotropies retain enough angular momentum in their core to produce a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB). The chemical composition is such that a type Ic supernova event occurs. Wind anisotropies appear to be a key physical ingredient in the scenario leading to long GRBs.

  4. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  5. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  6. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  7. Winding Trail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, the demand for clean renewable energy continues to rise drastically in Europe, the US, and other countries. Wind energy in the ocean can possibly be one of those future renewable clean energy sources as long...

  8. Triggered Star Formation in the Environment of Young Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gritschneder; T. Naab; F. Heitsch; A. Burkert

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope show clear evidence that star formation takes place in the surrounding of young massive O-type stars, which are shaping their environment due to their powerful radiation and stellar winds. In this work we investigate the effect of ionising radiation of massive stars on the ambient interstellar medium (ISM): In particular we want to examine whether the UV-radiation of O-type stars can lead to the observed pillar-like structures and can trigger star formation. We developed a new implementation, based on a parallel Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code (called IVINE), that allows an efficient treatment of the effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their turbulent gaseous environment. Here we present first results at very high resolution. We show that ionising radiation can trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable molecular cloud. The arising structures resemble observed structures (e.g. the pillars of creation in the Eagle Nebula (M16) or the Horsehead Nebula B33). Including the effect of gravitation we find small regions that can be identified as formation places of individual stars. We conclude that ionising radiation from massive stars alone can trigger substantial star formation in molecular clouds.

  9. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

  10. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett Mattapoisett, Massachusetts December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  13. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  14. Wind emission of OB supergiants and the influence of clumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaela Kraus; Jiri Kubat; Jiri Krticka

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the wind to the total continuum of OB supergiants is discussed. For wind velocity distributions with \\beta > 1.0, the wind can have strong influence to the total continuum emission, even at optical wavelengths. Comparing the continuum emission of clumped and unclumped winds, especially for stars with high \\beta values, delivers flux differences of up to 30% with maximum in the near-IR. Continuum observations at these wavelengths are therefore an ideal tool to discriminate between clumped and unclumped winds of OB supergiants.

  15. Silver Star Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPowerSilcio SA JumpProject Jump

  16. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  17. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWind Industry SoarsWind

  18. Danehy Park Wind Turbine Project Preliminary Assessment Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danehy Park Wind Turbine Project Preliminary Assessment Report Danehy Park Project Group Wind turbine. Katherine Dykes and Sungho Lee for their leadership, guidance, and feedback. #12;1 Introduction sensors were mounted is marked with a yellow star. #12;2 Turbine Evaluation Set This report evaluates

  19. Chemical Enrichment from Massive Stars in Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry A. Kobulnicky

    1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The warm ionized gas in low-mass, metal-poor starforming galaxies is chemically homogeneous despite the prevalence of large H II regions which contain hundreds of evolved massive stars, supernovae, and Wolf-Rayet stars with chemically-enriched winds. Galaxies with large Wolf-Rayet star content are chemically indistinguishable from other vigorously star-forming galaxies. Furthermore, no significant localized chemical fluctuations are present in the vicinity of young star clusters, despite large expected chemical yields of massive stars. An ad-hoc fine-tuning of the release, dispersal and mixing of the massive star ejecta could give rise to the observed homogeneity, but a more probable explanation is that fresh ejecta from massive stars reside in a hard-to-observe hot or cold phase. In any case, the observed chemical homogeneity indicates that heavy elements which have already mixed with the warm interstellar medium (thus accessible to optical spectroscopy) are homogeneously dispersed over scales exceeding 1 kpc. Mixing of fresh ejecta with the surrounding warm ISM apparently requires longer than the lifetimes of typical H II regions (>10^7 yrs). The lack of observed localized chemical enrichments is consistent with a scenario whereby freshly-synthesized metals from massive stars are expelled into the halos of galaxies in a hot, 10^6 K phase by supernova-driven winds before they cool and ``rain'' back down upon the galaxy, creating gradual enrichments on spatial scales >1 kpc.

  20. Efficiencies of Low-Mass Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner; Christopher F. McKee

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quantitative model for bipolar outflows driven by hydromagnetic protostellar winds, we calculate the efficiency of star formation assuming that available gas is either converted into stars or ejected in outflows. We estimate the efficiency of a single star formation event in a protostellar core, finding 25%-70% for cores with various possible degrees of flattening. The core mass function and the stellar initial mass function have similar slopes, because the efficiency is not sensitive to its parameters. We then consider the disruption of gas from a dense molecular clump in which a cluster of young stars is being born. In both cases, we present analytical formulae for the efficiencies that compare favorably against observations and, for clusters, against numerical simulations. We predict efficiencies in the range 30%-50% for the regions that form clusters of low-mass stars. In our model, star formation and gas dispersal happen concurrently. We neglect the destructive effects of massive stars: our results are therefore upper limits to the efficiency in regions more massive than about 3000 Msun.

  1. The r-Process in Black Hole Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Wanajo; Hans-Thomas Janka

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    All the current r-process scenarios relevant to core-collapse supernovae are facing severe difficulties. In particular, recent core-collapse simulations with neutrino transport show no sign of a neutron-rich wind from the proto-neutron star. In this paper, we discuss nucleosynthesis of the r-process in an alternative astrophysical site, "black hole winds", which are the neutrino-driven outflow from the accretion torus around a black hole. This condition is assumed to be realized in double neutron star mergers, neutron star - black hole mergers, or hypernovae.

  2. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  3. Hydrodynamics and High-Energy Physics of WR Colliding Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir V. Usov

    1994-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main properties of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars is a very intense outflow of gas. No less than 40\\% \\ of WR stars belong to binary systems. Young massive O and B stars are the secondary components of such systems. OB stars also have an intense stellar wind. If the intensities of the stellar winds of WR and OB stars are more or less comparable or if the distance between the components of the binary is large enough, the winds flowing out of WR and OB stars can collide and the shock waves are formed. In the shock the gas is heated to temperature $\\sim 10^7$ K and generates X-ray emission. Stellar wind collision may be responsible not only for the X-ray emission of WR + OB binaries and for their radio, IR and $\\gamma$-ray emision as well. Stellar wind collision, gas heating, particle acceleration, and generation of X-ray, $\\gamma$-ray, radio and IR emission in WR + OB binaries are discussed.

  4. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  5. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  6. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar October 20, 2014 8:00AM EDT...

  7. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  8. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab Helps Engineers Improve Wind Power On November 15, 2011, in Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Researchers at the Wind Energy...

  12. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  13. Star Wreck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Kusenko; Mikhail Shaposhnikov; P. G. Tinyakov; Igor I. Tkachev

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroweak models with low-energy supersymmetry breaking predict the existence of stable non-topological solitons, Q-balls, that can be produced in the early universe. The relic Q-balls can accumulate inside a neutron star and gradually absorb the baryons into the scalar condensate. This causes a slow reduction in the mass of the star. When the mass reaches a critical value, the neutron star becomes unstable and explodes. The cataclysmic destruction of the distant neutron stars may be the origin of the gamma-ray bursts.

  14. Theoretical mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Holzwarth; M. Jardine

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model for the wind properties of cool main-sequence stars, which comprises their wind ram pressures, mass fluxes, and terminal wind velocities. The wind properties are determined through a polytropic magnetised wind model, assuming power laws for the dependence of the thermal and magnetic wind parameters on the stellar rotation rate. We use empirical data to constrain theoretical wind scenarios, which are characterised by different rates of increase of the wind temperature, wind density, and magnetic field strength. Scenarios based on moderate rates of increase yield wind ram pressures in agreement with most empirical constraints, but cannot account for some moderately rotating targets, whose high apparent mass loss rates are inconsistent with observed coronal X-ray and magnetic properties. For fast magnetic rotators, the magneto-centrifugal driving of the outflow can produce terminal wind velocities far in excess of the surface escape velocity. Disregarding this aspect in the analyses of wind ram pressures leads to overestimations of stellar mass loss rates. The predicted mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars do not exceed about ten times the solar value. Our results are in contrast with previous investigations, which found a strong increase of the stellar mass loss rates with the coronal X-ray flux. Owing to the weaker dependence, we expect the impact of stellar winds on planetary atmospheres to be less severe and the detectability of magnetospheric radio emission to be lower then previously suggested. Considering the rotational evolution of a one solar-mass star, the mass loss rates and the wind ram pressures are highest during the pre-main sequence phase.

  15. Wind Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warmingGlobal »Wind

  16. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly UserWhat's New Today aboutWind

  17. XX--ray Emission from O Starsray Emission from O Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    XX--ray Emission from O Starsray Emission from O Stars David CohenDavid Cohen Swarthmore College windstheir magnetically channeled winds 2.2. After ~1After ~1 MyrMyr XX--ray emission is weaker andray emission is weaker and softer: embedded wind shocks in early Osofter: embedded wind shocks in early O

  18. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  19. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  20. Sunflower Wind Farm EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunflower Wind Farm EA Sunflower Wind Farm Draft EA (25mb pdf) Note: If you have problems downloading this file, pelase contact Lou Hanebury at (406) 255-2812 Sunflower Wind Farm...

  1. Wind/Hydro Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

  2. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  3. Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind turbine reliability issues are often linked to failures of contacting components, such as bearings, gears, and actuators. Therefore, special consideration to tribological design in wind...

  4. Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

  5. The evolution of very massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Belkus; J. Van Bever; D. Vanbeveren

    2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Core collapse of dense massive star clusters is unavoidable and this leads to the formation of massive objects, with a mass up to 1000 $\\msun$ and even larger. When these objects become stars, stellar wind mass loss determines their evolution and final fate, and decides upon whether they form black holes (with normal mass or with intermediate mass) or explode as a pair instability supernova. In the present paper, we discuss the evolution of very massive stars and we present a convenient evolution recipe that can be implemented in a gravitational N-body code to study the dynamics of dense massive clusters.

  6. Electron lone pair distortion facilitated metal-insulator transition in ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wangoh, L.; Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Marley, P. M.; Banerjee, S. [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Sallis, S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires has been studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The recent synthesis of defect-free ?-Pb{sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanowires resulted in the discovery of an abrupt voltage-induced metal insulator transition. First principle calculations predicted an additional V-O-Pb hybridized “in-gap” state unique to this vanadium bronze playing a significant role in facilitating the transition. We confirm the existence, energetic position, and orbital character of the “in-gap” state. Moreover, we reveal that this state is a hybridized Pb 6s–O 2p antibonding lone pair state resulting from the asymmetric coordination of the Pb{sup 2+} ions.

  7. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States. Specifically, Bluewater Wind and Delmarva PowerLLC Babcock & Brown Acquisition Bluewater Wind Good Energies

  8. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy support for other renewable energy sources, wind mayrenewable energy and climate policy initiatives. With wind

  9. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

  10. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  11. Howard County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets up provisions for allowing small wind energy systems in various zoning districts.

  12. Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

  13. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  14. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  15. RHIC | STAR Detector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about the collision. STAR TPC The Heart of STAR STAR's "heart" is the Time Projection Chamber which tracks and identifies particles emerging from heavy ion collisions. As each...

  16. Old and new neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruderman, M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis 2014 Collegiate Teams Boise State...

  18. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  19. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  20. Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

  1. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a new vision for wind energy through 2050. Taking into account all facets of wind energy (land-based, offshore, distributed), the new Wind Vision Report defines the...

  2. Simulations of stellar/pulsar wind interaction along one full orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosch-Ramon, V; Khangulyan, D; Perucho, M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The winds from a non-accreting pulsar and a massive star in a binary system collide forming a bow-shaped shock structure. The Coriolis force induced by orbital motion deflects the shocked flows, strongly affecting their dynamics. We study the evolution of the shocked stellar and pulsar winds on scales in which orbital motion is important. Potential sites of non-thermal activity are investigated. Relativistic hydrodynamical simulations in two dimensions, performed with the code {\\it PLUTO}{} and using the adaptive mesh refinement technique, are used to model interacting stellar and pulsar winds on scales ~80 times the distance between the stars. The hydrodynamical results suggest the location of sites suitable for particle acceleration and non-thermal emission. In addition to the shock formed towards the star, the shocked and unshocked components of the pulsar wind flowing away from the star terminate through additional strong shocks produced by orbital motion. Strong instabilities lead to the development of t...

  3. Sandia Energy - Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind Software Downloads Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Sandia Wind...

  4. Shocks and Wind Bubbles Around Energetic Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Gaensler

    2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Crab Nebula demonstrates that neutron stars can interact with their environments in spectacular fashion, their relativistic winds generating nebulae observable across the electromagnetic spectrum. At many previous conferences, astronomers have discussed, debated and puzzled over the complicated structures seen in the Crab, but have been limited to treating most other pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as simple calorimeters for a pulsar's spin-down energy. However, with the wealth of high-quality data which have now become available, this situation has changed dramatically. I here review some of the main observational themes which have emerged from these new measurements. Highlights include the ubiquity of pulsar termination shocks, the unambiguous presence of relativistic jets in PWNe, complicated time variability seen in PWN structures, and the use of bow shocks to probe the interaction of pulsar winds with the ambient medium.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Staff On March 24, 2011, in Wind Energy On November 10, 2010, in Wind Plant Opt. Rotor Innovation Materials, Reliability & Standards Siting & Barrier Mitigation...

  6. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  7. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's2008. Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillary

  8. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power'sthe Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  14. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  1. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  3. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 8 Figure 30. Wind Integration Costs at Various LevelsOperations and Maintenance Costs Wind project operations andPublic Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Prepared

  4. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,Canada (8%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  5. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the section on offshore wind; Donna Heimiller and Billyof 2012, global cumulative offshore wind capacity stood ats (DOE’s) investments in offshore wind energy research and

  6. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 81 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  7. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 88 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  8. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xcel Energy. 2011. Wind Induced Coal Plant Cyclingand the Implications of Wind Curtailment for Public Serviceof Colorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study.

  9. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.Newark, DE. 16 pages. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) (

  10. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. In March 2011, NRG Bluewater Wind?s Delaware projectPurchaser Delmarva NRG Bluewater Wind (Delaware) Universitythe project, while NRG Bluewater would retain the remaining

  11. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy to the top of (andperformance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –cost, performance, and price of wind energy, some of these

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  13. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA March 26th 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June 1st 2004- May 31st 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions......................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions.......

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA December 1st , 2006 ­ February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed D

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts March 24th to May 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA December 2006 ­ February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 12 Wind Speed Di

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts December, 2006 1st to February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts June 1, 2006 - August 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Di

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA March 2007 ­ May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA September ­ November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts September 1, 2006 - November 30, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions..................

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Sep 1st 2004 to Nov 30th 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA June ­ August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Lynn, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts September 1st to November 30th , 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts June 1st to August 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributi

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2004 ­ November 30, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution.............

  20. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA March 1st , 2007 ­ May 31st , 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA April 14 ­ May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Dec 1st 2004 to Feb 28th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology ...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA March 1st 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA June 1st 2006 to July 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI June 1, 2007 ­ August 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies show that wind energy integration costs are below $do not represent wind energy generation costs. This sectioncomponent of the overall cost of wind energy, but can vary

  11. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    do not represent wind energy generation costs. Based on thisproduction-cost reduction value of wind energy, without anwith wind energy. Generally, these costs are associated with

  12. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyand absent supportive policies for wind energy. That said,

  13. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such

  14. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyPTC. Moreover, federal policy towards wind energy remainsand policy announcements demonstrate accelerated activity in the offshore wind energy

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribut

  16. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Report vii potential wind energy generation withinthat nearly 8% of potential wind energy generation withinAreas, in GWh (and % of potential wind generation) Electric

  17. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity), with 17% of all potential wind energy generationthat roughly 17% of potential wind energy generation withinexample, roughly 1% of potential wind energy output in 2009

  18. Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    of the hurricane surface winds from NOAA and U.S. Air Force Weather Squadron aircraft flights. Further, results1 Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons Pet Laupattarakasem and W This paper presents a new hurricane ocean vector wind (OVW) product known as Q-Winds produced from the SeaWinds

  19. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [Institute for Basic Research, Eurasian National University, Astana, 010008 (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science of the NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, 265 a, Chui Street, Bishkek, 720071 (Kyrgyzstan); Folomeev, Vladimir [Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science of the NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, 265 a, Chui Street, Bishkek, 720071 (Kyrgyzstan); Singleton, Douglas [Institute for Basic Research, Eurasian National University, Astana, 010008 (Kazakhstan); Physics Department, CSU Fresno, Fresno, California 93740-8031 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  20. Wind Power Career Chat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  1. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  2. Wind power today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

  3. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  4. Feedback Processes [in Massive Star Formation]: A Theoretical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordecai-Mark Mac Low

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the evidence for the importance of feedback from massive stars at small and large scales. The feedback mechanisms include accretion luminosity, ionizing radiation, collimated outflows, and stellar winds. The good news is that feedback doesn't entirely prevent the formation of massive stars, while the bad news is that we don't know what does limit their masses. Feedback from massive stars also influences their surroundings. I argue that this does not produce a triggering efficiency above unity, nor does it prevent lots of prompt star formation in GMCs, though it may preserve massive remnants of the clouds for many dynamical times.

  5. X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED BUBBLE IN THE WIND OF VELA X-1 PULSAR SUPERGIANT COMPANION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krticka, Jiri; Skalicky, Jan [Ustav teoreticke fyziky a astrofyziky, Masarykova univerzita, Kotlarska 2, CZ-611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kubat, Jiri [Astromomicky ustav Akademie ved Ceske republiky, Fricova 298, CZ-251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

  6. 2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

  7. Star Power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  8. Star Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  9. Eruptive Mass Loss in Very Massive Stars and Population III Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the role played by short-duration eruptive mass loss in the evolution of very massive stars. Giant eruptions of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) like the 19th century event of eta Carinae can remove large quantities of mass almost instantaneously, making them significant in stellar evolution. They can potentially remove much more mass from the star than line-driven winds, especially if stellar winds are highly clumped such that previous estimates of O star mass-loss rates need to be revised downward. When seen in other galaxies as ``supernova impostors'', these LBV eruptions typically last for less than a decade, and they can remove of order 10 Msun as indicated by massive nebulae around LBVs. Such extreme mass-loss rates cannot be driven by radiation pressure on spectral lines, because the lines will completely saturate during the events. Instead, these outbursts must either be continuum-driven super-Eddington winds or outright hydrodynamic explosions, both of which are insensitive to metallicity. As such, this eruptive mode of mass loss could also play a pivotal role in the evolution and ultimate fate of massive metal-poor stars in the early universe. If they occur in these Population III stars, such eruptions would also profoundly affect the chemical yield and types of remnants from early supernovae and hypernovae thought to be the origin of long gamma ray bursts.

  10. Turbulence in Line-Driven Stellar Winds By Stanley P. Owocki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owocki, Stanley P.

    -scattering of the star's continuum radiation. This line-driving mechanism is understood to be highly unstable to small the inherently non-local radiative transfer in the large number of wind-driving lines. Results of 1-D simulationsTurbulence in Line-Driven Stellar Winds By Stanley P. Owocki Bartol Research Institute, University

  11. Turbulence in LineDriven Stellar Winds By Stanley P. Owocki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owocki, Stanley P.

    ­scattering of the star's continuum radiation. This line­driving mechanism is understood to be highly unstable to small the inherently non­local radiative transfer in the large number of wind­driving lines. Results of 1­D simulationsTurbulence in Line­Driven Stellar Winds By Stanley P. Owocki Bartol Research Institute, University

  12. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA?s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI?s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 9 wind turbineswind energy continues to decline as a result of lower wind turbine

  13. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 8 wind turbinesTurbine Market Report. Washington, D.C. : American Wind Energy

  14. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  15. Massive stars and the energy balance of the ISM. I. The impact of an isolated 60 Msun star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Freyer; Gerhard Hensler; Harold W. Yorke

    2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of numerical simulations carried out with a 2D radiation hydrodynamics code in order to study the impact of massive stars on their surrounding interstellar medium. This first paper deals with the evolution of the circumstellar gas around an isolated 60 Msun star. The interaction of the photoionized HII region with the stellar wind bubble forms a variety of interesting structures like shells, clouds, fingers, and spokes. These results demonstrate that complex structures found in HII regions are not necessarily relics from the time before the gas became ionized but may result from dynamical processes during the course of the HII region evolution. We have also analyzed the transfer and deposit of the stellar wind and radiation energy into the circumstellar medium until the star explodes as a supernova. Although the total mechanical wind energy supplied by the star is negligible compared to the accumulated energy of the Lyman continuum photons, the kinetic energy imparted to the circumstellar gas over the star's lifetime is 4 times higher than for a comparable windless simulation. Furthermore, the thermal energy of warm photoionized gas is lower by some 55%. Our results document the necessity to consider both ionizing radiation and stellar winds for an appropriate description of the interaction of OB stars with their circumstellar environment.

  16. Wind Wave Float

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Peer Review WindWaveFloat Alla Weinstein Principle Power, Inc. aweinstein@principlepowerinc.com November 1, 2011 2 | Wind and Water Power Program eere.energy.gov...

  17. Wind Energy Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the...

  18. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  19. Airplane and the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airplane and the wind. An airplane starts from the point A and flies to B. The speed of the airplane with respect to the air is v (constant). There is also a wind of

  20. See the Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    See the Wind Grades: 5-8 , 9-12 Topic: Wind Energy Owner: Kidwind Project This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency...

  1. Wind JOC Conference - Wind Control Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Wind Control Changes JOC August 10, 2012 Presentation updated on July 30, 2012 at 11:00 AM B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 Wind Control Changes B O N...

  2. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind Engineering, 28:Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of Solar

  3. Kent County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance establishes provisions and standards for small wind energy systems in various zoning districts in Kent County, Maryland.

  4. Wind Webinar Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on wind renewable energy.

  5. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation and frequency response services charge to wind energyRegulation and Frequency Response Service rate for wind energy

  6. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.

  7. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space constraints. Ohio: The Lake Erie Energy DevelopmentGreat Lakes Ohio Wind, and Great Lakes Wind Energy LLC. In

  8. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of larger balancing areas, the use of regional wind powerbalancing areas. The successful use of regional wind power

  9. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directly charging wind power projects for balancing servicesin smaller balancing areas. The successful use of wind power

  10. Stereo-Active Lone-Pair Control on the Ferromagnetic Behavior in VO(SeO2OH)2:A new acentric ferromagnetic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Hwan [University of Houston, Houston; Yeon, J [University of Houston, Houston; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Halasyamani, P Shiv [University of Houston, Houston

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new acentric ferromagnetic material, VO(SeO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, has been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG), and magnetization measurements. The crystal structure of VO(SeO{sub 2}OH){sub 2} consists of linear chains of corner-shared V{sup 4+}O{sub 6} octahedra that are connected by SeO{sub 2}OH groups. The material exhibits a weak SHG efficiency, comparable to {alpha}-SiO{sub 2}, and a ferromagnetic transition (T{sub C}) at 2.5 K with a saturated magnetic moment of 1.09 {mu}B per formula unit ({mu}B/FU). The origin of the ferromagnetism is explained by the suppression of the antiferromagnetic superexchange (SE) and supersuper-exchange (SSE) interactions in the intra-chain and inter-chain magnetic interactions, respectively. In addition, using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that the SSE interactions depend on the O(2)-Se{sup 4+}-O(3) angle. As we demonstrate, the stereoactive lone-pair on Se{sup 4+} is the driving force for the inter-chain ferromagnetic interactions.

  11. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  12. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  13. Wind power outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  14. Wind Turbine Competition Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    Wind Turbine Competition Introduction: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, SHPE at UTK, wishes to invite you to participate in our first `Wind Turbine' competition as part of Engineer's Week). You will be evaluated by how much power your wind turbine generates at the medium setting of our fan

  15. Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples geoff@clearpathenergyllc.com #12;Frequently Unanswered Ques?ons · Why don't "they" build more offshore wind? · Why not make States Cape Wind PPA at 18 c/kWh #12;The cycle of non-innova?on Offshore

  16. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  17. Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Fun Facts Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind· vanes are also called weather vanes. What do wind vanes look like on a weather station? Wind vanes that are on weather stations look a lot like the one you· made! The biggest differences

  18. Planet Migration and Disk Destruction due to Magneto-Centrifugal Stellar Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. V. E. Lovelace; M. M. Romanova; A. W. Barnard

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the influence of magneto-centrifugally driven or simply magnetic winds of rapidly-rotating, strongly-magnetized T Tauri stars in causing the inward or outward migration of close-in giant planets. The azimuthal ram pressure of the magnetized wind acting on the planet tends to increase the planet's angular momentum and cause outward migration if the star's rotation period $P_*$ is less than the planet's orbital period $P_p$. In the opposite case, $P_* > P_p$, the planet migrates inward. Thus, planets orbiting at distances larger (smaller) than $0.06 {\\rm AU}(P_*/5{\\rm d})^{2/3}$ tend to be pushed outward (inward), where $P_*$ is the rotation period of the star assumed to have the mass of the sun. The magnetic winds are likely to occur in T Tauri stars where the thermal speed of the gas close to the star is small, where the star's magnetic field is strong, and where the star rotates rapidly. The time-scale for appreciable radial motion of the planet is estimated as $\\sim 2 - 20$ Myr. A sufficiently massive close-in planet may cause tidal locking and once this happens the radial migration due to the magnetic wind ceases. The magnetic winds are expected to be important for planet migration for the case of a multipolar magnetic field rather than a dipole field where the wind is directed away from the equatorial plane and where a magnetospheric cavity forms. The influence of the magnetic wind in eroding and eventually destroying the accretion disk is analyzed. A momentum integral is derived for the turbulent wind/disk boundary layer and this is used to estimate the disk erosion time-scale as $\\sim 1-10^2$ Myr, with the lower value favored.

  19. Spectrum and light curve of a supernova shock breakout through a thick Wolf-Rayet wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svirski, Gilad; Nakar, Ehud, E-mail: swirskig@post.tau.ac.il [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Wolf-Rayet stars are known to eject winds. Thus, when a Wolf-Rayet star explodes as a supernova, a fast (? 40, 000 km s{sup –1}) shock is expected to be driven through a wind. We study the signal expected from a fast supernova shock propagating through an optically thick wind and find that the electrons behind the shock driven into the wind are efficiently cooled by inverse Compton over soft photons that were deposited by the radiation-mediated shock that crossed the star. Therefore, the bolometric luminosity is comparable to the kinetic energy flux through the shock, and the spectrum is found to be a power law, whose slope and frequency range depend on the number flux of soft photons available for cooling. Wolf-Rayet supernovae that explode through a thick wind have a high flux of soft photons, producing a flat spectrum, ?F {sub ?} = Const, in the X-ray range of 0.1 ? T ? 50 keV. As the shock expands into an optically thin wind, the soft photons are no longer able to cool the shock that plows through the wind, and the bulk of the emission takes the form of a standard core-collapse supernova (without a wind). However, a small fraction of the soft photons is upscattered by the shocked wind and produces a transient unique X-ray signature.

  20. On the extreme positive star-formation feedback condition in SCUBA sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silich, S; Munoz-Tunon, C; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, F; Wunsch, R; Palous, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted by massive stars via stellar winds and supernovae explosions in young assembling galaxies. We show that the interplay between the thermalization of the kinetic energy provided by massive stars, radiative cooling of the thermalized plasma and the gravitational pull of the host galaxy, lead to three different hydrodynamic regimes. These are: a) The quasi-adiabatic supergalactic winds. b) The bimodal flows, with mass accumulation in the central zones and gas expulsion from the outer zones of the assembling galaxy. c) The gravitationally bound regime, for which all of the gas returned by massive stars remains bound to the host galaxy and is likely to be reprocessed into futher generations of stars. Which of the three possible solutions takes place, depends on the mass of the star forming region its mechanical luminosity (or star formation rate) and its size. The model predicts that massive assembling galaxies with large star formation rates...

  1. Energy Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reihl, K.; Tullos, A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is a joint program of: ? U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ? U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ? Mission: ? ?Help us all save money and protect the environment through energy efficient products and practices.? ? History: ? 1992 ? Energy... Star Label introduced for energy-efficient products ? Expanded to include technical information & tools ? Website: www.energystar.gov ESL-KT-12-10-08 CATEE 2012: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, Galveston, TX, October 9-11, 2012...

  2. Wind energy applications guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

  3. Radiatively Driven Stellar Winds and Aspherical Mass Stan Owocki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owocki, Stanley P.

    (Castor, Abbott, and Klein 1975) model for radiative driving by scattering in a ensemble of lines from driving, fo­ cussing first on the standard CAK formalism for steady, line­driven stellar winds, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 Abstract. The high luminosity of massive stars can drive substantial

  4. Radiatively Driven Stellar Winds and Aspherical Mass Stan Owocki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owocki, Stanley P.

    (Castor, Abbott, and Klein 1975) model for radiative driving by scattering in a ensemble of lines from driving, fo- cussing first on the standard CAK formalism for steady, line-driven stellar winds, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 Abstract. The high luminosity of massive stars can drive substantial

  5. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  6. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  7. West Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff,Holt WindInformationWestWinds Wind

  8. the risk issue of wind measurement for wind turbine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Sciences, National Taiwan University #12;outline · Wind measurement in meteorology and wind farm design-related issues on wind turbine operation 3/31/2011 2 #12;WIND MEASUREMENT IN METEOROLOGY & WIND FARM DESIGN 3.brainybetty.com 11 wind farm at ChangHwa Coastal Industrial Park 70m wind tower 70m 50m 30m 10m #12;1 2 3 4 5 1 (70M

  9. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac, E-mail: thomas.peters@ita.uni-heidelberg.d [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  10. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  11. The r-Process in Supersonic Neutrino-Driven Winds: The Roll of Wind Termination Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takami Kuroda; Shinya Wanajo; Ken'ichi Nomoto

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent hydrodynamic studies of core-collapse supernovae imply that the neutrino-heated ejecta from a nascent neutron star develops to supersonic outflows. These supersonic winds are influenced by the reverse shock from the preceding supernova ejecta, forming the wind termination shock. We investigate the effects of the termination shock in neutrino-driven winds and its roll on the r-process. Supersonic outflows are calculated with a semi-analytic neutrino-driven wind model. Subsequent termination-shocked, subsonic outflows are obtained by applying the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. We find a couple of effects that can be relevant for the r-process. First is the sudden slowdown of the temperature decrease by the wind termination. Second is the entropy jump by termination-shock heating, up to several 100NAk. Nucleosynthesis calculations in the obtained winds are performed to examine these effects on the r-process. We find that 1) the slowdown of the temperature decrease plays a decisive roll to determine the r-process abundance curves. This is due to the strong dependences of the nucleosynthetic path on the temperature during the r-process freezeout phase. Our results suggest that only the termination-shocked winds with relatively small shock radii (~500km) are relevant for the bulk of the solar r-process abundances (A~100-180). The heaviest part in the solar r-process curve (A~180-200), however, can be reproduced both in shocked and unshocked winds. These results may help to constrain the mass range of supernova progenitors relevant for the r-process. We find, on the other hand, 2) negligible roles of the entropy jump on the r-process. This is a consequence that the sizable entropy increase takes place only at a large shock radius (~10,000km) where the r-process has already ceased.

  12. Torque on an exoplanet from an anisotropic evaporative wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teyssandier, Jean; Adams, Fred C; Quillen, Alice C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winds from short-period Earth and Neptune mass exoplanets, driven by high energy radiation from a young star, may evaporate a significant fraction of a planet's mass. If the momentum flux from the evaporative wind is not aligned with the planet/star axis, then it can exert a torque on the planet's orbit. Using steady-state one-dimensional evaporative wind models we estimate this torque using a lag angle that depends on the product of the speed of the planet's upper atmosphere and a flow timescale for the wind to reach its sonic radius. We also estimate the momentum flux from time-dependent one-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. We find that only in a very narrow regime in planet radius, mass and stellar radiation flux is a wind capable of exerting a significant torque on the planet's orbit. Similar to the Yarkovsky effect, the wind causes the planet to drift outward if atmospheric circulation is prograde (super-rotating) and in the opposite direction if the circulation is retrograde. A close-in super Ear...

  13. AGN Jet Mass Loading and Truncation by Stellar Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Eric G. Blackman

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Active Galactic Nuclei can produce extremely powerful jets. While tightly collimated, the scale of these jets and the stellar density at galactic centers implies that there will be many jet/star interactions, which can mass-load the jet through stellar winds. Previous work employed modest wind mass outflow rates, but this does not apply when mass loading is provided by a small number of high mass-loss stars. We construct a framework for jet mass-loading by stellar winds for a broader spectrum of wind mass-loss rates than has been previously considered. Given the observed stellar mass distributions in galactic centers, we find that even highly efficient (0.1 Eddington luminosity) jets from supermassive black holes of masses $M_{BH} \\la 10^4M_{\\odot}$ are rapidly mass loaded and quenched by stellar winds. For $10^4 M_{\\odot}jets is independent of the jet's mechanical luminosity. Stellar wind mass-loading is unable to quench efficient jets from more massive engines, but can account for the observed truncation of the inefficient M87 jet, and implies a baryon dominated composition on scales $\\ga 2$ kpc therein even if the jet is initially pair plasma dominated.

  14. Superbubble Activity in Star-Forming Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical feedback from massive stars, primarily from supernovae, can dominate ISM structuring and phase balance, thereby profoundly affecting galactic evolutionary processes. Our understanding of mechanical feedback is based on the adiabatic, wind-driven bubble model, applied on size scales ranging over three decades. Tests of the model, and our consequent understanding of feedback, are reviewed. While the model is broadly successful, critical unknowns still prevent a comprehensive understanding of the consequences of feedback.

  15. A photoactive titanate with a stereochemically active Sn lone pair: Electronic and crystal structure of Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} from computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Lee A. [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom); Walsh, Aron, E-mail: a.walsh@bath.ac.uk [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    TiO{sub 2} remains the most widely studied metal oxide for photocatalytic reactions. The standard approach to reduce the band gap of titania, for increasing the absorption of visible light, is anion modification. For example the formation of an oxynitride compound, where the nitrogen 2p states decrease the binding energy of the valence band. We demonstrate that cation modification can produce a similar effect through the formation of a ternary oxide combining Ti and an ns{sup 2} cation, Sn(II). In Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}, the underlying Ti 3d conduction states remain largely unmodified and an electronic band gap of 2.1 eV (590 nm) is predicted by hybrid density functional theory. Our analysis indicates a strong potential for Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} in visible-light driven photocatalysis, which should prove superior to the alternative (SnO{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TiO{sub 2}){sub x} solid-solution. - Graphical abstract: Sn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} is predicted to be a semiconductor with potential for bipolar conductivity and visible-light photocatalysis. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tin titanate adopts the Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4} crystal structure with a sterically active Sn(II) lone pair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tin titanate is thermodynamically stable with respect to TiO{sub 2} and SnO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tin titanate is predicted have a band gap of 590 nm, ideal for photocatalytic applications.

  16. Preprint typeset using LATEX style emulateapj "PROPELLER" REGIME OF DISK ACCRETION TO RAPIDLY ROTATING STARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    propellers are char- acterized by a powerful disk wind and a collimated magnetically dominated outflow or jet-averaged characteristics of the interaction between the main elements of the system, the star, the disk, the wind from to be expelled from the disk if the centrifu- gal force is sufficiently larger than the gravitational force

  17. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy assessment and wind farm simulation in Triunfo- Pernambuco, Brazil,wind resources for electrical energy production. Wind resources as- sessment of Brazil

  18. Sandia Energy - Wind & Water Power Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind & Water Power Newsletter Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind & Water Power Newsletter Wind & Water Power NewsletterTara...

  19. Effect of the Coriolis Force on the Hydrodynamics of Colliding Wind Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Nicole Lemaster; James M. Stone; Thomas A. Gardiner

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using fully three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the effect of the Coriolis force on the hydrodynamic and observable properties of colliding wind binary systems. To make the calculations tractable, we assume adiabatic, constant velocity winds. The neglect of radiative driving, gravitational deceleration, and cooling limit the application of our models to real systems. However, these assumptions allow us to isolate the effect of the Coriolis force, and by simplifying the calculations, allow us to use a higher resolution (up to 640^3) and to conduct a larger survey of parameter space. We study the dynamics of collidng winds with equal mass loss rates and velocities emanating from equal mass stars on circular orbits, with a range of values for the ratio of the wind to orbital velocity. We also study the dynamics of winds from stars on elliptical orbits and with unequal strength winds. Orbital motion of the stars sweeps the shocked wind gas into an Archimedean spiral, with asymmetric shock strengths and therefore unequal postshock temperatures and densities in the leading and trailing edges of the spiral. We observe the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the contact surface between the shocked winds in systems with orbital motion even when the winds are identical. The change in shock strengths caused by orbital motion increases the volume of X-ray emitting post-shock gas with T > 0.59 keV by 63% for a typical system as the ratio of wind velocity to orbital velocity decreases to V_w/V_o = 2.5. This causes increased free-free emission from systems with shorter orbital periods and an altered time-dependence of the wind attenuation. We comment on the importance of the effects of orbital motion on the observable properties of colliding wind binaries.

  20. High-Speed Optical Spectroscopy of a Cataclysmic Variable Wind BZ Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringwald, F A

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BZ Cam is the first cataclysmic variable star with an accretion disk wind evident in its optical spectrum. The wind was found by Thorstensen, who discovered intermittent P Cygni profiles occurring simultaneously in He I 5876 Angstroms and H alpha. We have since obtained spectra with 0.4-Angstroms/pixel dispersion and 60-s time resolution. We find a wind much faster and more rapidly variable than the radiatively accelerated winds of OB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, or luminous blue variables. Instead of showing blob ejection, the whole wind of BZ Cam appears to turn on and off. We use this to measure the acceleration law of a CV wind for the first time. The velocity increases linearly with time, attaining blue edge velocities near -3000 km/s, and absorption velocities near -1700 km/s, in 6 to 8 min after starting near rest. We also find a subsequent linear deceleration to nearly rest in 30 to 40 min, perhaps an effect of dilution as the wind expands. No periodicity from rotational outflow is obvious. This wind is e...

  1. Wind Tunnel Building - 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Energy Systems Laboratory 1 A METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAMS AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE WIND FARMS IN THE TEXAS ERCOT REGION Zi Liu, Jeff Haberl, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Kris Subbarao, Charles... on Sweetwater I Wind Farm Capacity Factor Analysis Application to All Wind Farms Uncertainty Analysis Emissions Reduction Summary Energy Systems Laboratory 3 SUMMARYEMISSIONS REDUCTION UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS APPLICATIONMETHODOLOGYINTRODUCTION Background...

  2. Wind Energy and Spatial Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    2/3/2011 1 Wind Energy and Spatial Technology Lori Pelech Why Wind Energy? A clean, renewable 2,600 tons of carbon emissions annually ­ The economy · Approximately 85,000 wind energy workers to Construct a Wind Farm... Geo-Spatial Components of Wind Farm Development Process Selecting a Project Site

  3. Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

  4. Proceedings Nordic Wind Power Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Possible Power for Wind Plant Control Power Fluctuations from Offshore Wind Farms; Model Validation System grounding of wind farm medium voltage cable grids Faults in the Collection Grid of Offshore systems of wind turbines and wind farms. NWPC presents the newest research results related to technical

  5. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    hub heights of 110 meters (m) (which are already in wide commercial deployment in Germany and other European countries), the technical potential for wind deployment is...

  6. Allegany County Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets requirements for industrial wind energy conversion systems. These requirements include minimum separation distances, setback requirements, electromagnetic interference analysis ...

  7. Talkin’ Bout Wind Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The amount of electricity generated by the wind industry started to grow back around 1999, and since 2007 has been increasing at a rapid pace.

  8. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    including natural gas, and competing renewable power resources such as solar photovoltaics. Figure 4-3. Wind turbine hub height trends in Germany from 2007 to 2014 Source:...

  9. Accelerating Offshore Wind Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today the Energy Department announced investments in seven offshore wind demonstration projects. Check out our map to see where these projects will be located.

  10. wind_guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance to Accompany Non-Availability Waiver of the Recovery Act Buy American Provisions for 5kW and 50kW Wind Turbines

  11. Barstow Wind Turbine Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Barstow Wind Turbine project for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  12. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  13. Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in the world. To stay competitive in this sector, the Energy Department invests in wind projects, both on land and offshore, to advance technology innovations, create job...

  14. Northern Wind Farm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities to accommodate the interconnection. The EA also includes a review of the potential environmental impacts of Northern Wind, LLC, constructing, operating, and...

  15. Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  16. DOE Offers Conditional Commitment to Cape Wind Offshore Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    step toward issuing a 150 million loan guarantee to support the construction of the Cape Wind offshore wind project with a conditional commitment to Cape Wind Associates, LLC. The...

  17. Theoretical X-ray Line Profiles from Colliding Wind Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, D B; Pittard, J M

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical X-ray line profiles from a range of model colliding wind systems. In particular, we investigate the effects of varying the stellar mass-loss rates, the wind speeds, and the viewing orientation. We find that a wide range of theoretical line profile shapes is possible, varying with orbital inclination and phase. At or near conjunction, the lines have approximately Gaussian profiles, with small widths (HWHM ~ 0.1 v_infty) and definite blue- or redshifts (depending on whether the star with the weaker wind is in front or behind). When the system is viewed at quadrature, the lines are generally much broader (HWHM ~ v_infty), flat-topped and unshifted. Local absorption can have a major effect on the observed profiles - in systems with mass-loss rates of a few times 10^{-6} Msol/yr the lower energy lines (E wind of the primary. The orbital variation ...

  18. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

  19. HighResolution Spectroscopic Diagnostics of the Hot Plasma in the Stellar Wind of ee Canis Majoris (B2 II) David H. Cohen, Stanley P. Owocki, Joseph P. Cassinelli, & Joseph J. MacFarlane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    , and disks. However, it is well known that line­driving is subject to an inherent instability 2,3 , which caused by perturbations at the base of the outflow responsible? Numerical modeling of the line­driving structure in the shocked winds of hot stars. OB stars are characterized by fast line­driven winds, and our

  20. Kahuku Wind Power (First Wind) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The project employs the integration of Clipper LibertyTM wind turbine generators and a control system to more efficiently integrate wind power with the utility's power grid....

  1. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar will be attended by representatives in the financial sector, businesses, bankers, government and other nonprofit...

  2. WIND POWER PROGRAM WIND PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS U.S. Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    capturing more wind than ever before through the installation of innovative offshore wind turbines and systems in U.S. waters, the Atmosphere to Electrons initiative which...

  3. Public Acceptance of Wind: Foundational Study Near US Wind Facilities

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Group * Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Public Acceptance of Wind Power Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory WindExchange Webinar June 17, 2015...

  4. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development...

  5. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  6. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the drop in wind power plant installations, for example,the decrease in new wind power plant construction. A GrowingRelative Economics of Wind Power Plants Installed in Recent

  7. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the drop in wind power plant installations since 2009and the drop in wind power plant installations since 2009towers used in U.S. wind power plants increases from 80% in

  8. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportAssociates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little10, 2010. David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Trade

  9. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on

  10. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedused to estimate wind integration costs and the ability toColorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study. Denver,

  11. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. BeaconP. and Mueller, A. (2010) Wind Farm Announcements and RuralProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &

  12. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to natural gas. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report 1% windforward gas market. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report 4.Market Report Wind Penetration (Capacity Basis) Arizona Public Service Avista Utilities California RPS Idaho Power Xcel-PSCo-2008 at 2006 Gas

  13. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forward gas market. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report TheMarket Report Wind Penetration (Capacity Basis) Xcel-PSCo-2008 at 2006 Gasgas facilities run at even lower capacity factors. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

  14. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies Market Report Wind Gas Coal Other Renewablethe forward gas market. 2011 Wind Technologies Market ReportMarket Report Nameplate Capacity (GW) Entered queue in 2011 Total in queue at end of 2011 Wind Natural Gas

  15. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 10 wind turbineswind energy became more challenging, orders for new turbines

  16. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. and Mueller, A. (2010) Wind Farm Announcements and RuralProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &Economic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. Beacon

  17. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy from the bottom toover the cost and price of wind energy that it receives. Asweighted-average price of wind energy in 1999 was $65/MWh (

  18. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices, though the economic value of wind energyenergy and climate policy initiatives. With wind turbine pricesprices reported here would be at least $20/MWh higher without the PTC), they do not represent wind energy

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weighted-average price of wind energy in 1999 was roughly $reduced near-term price expectations, wind energy?s primaryelectricity prices in 2009 pushed wind energy to the top of

  20. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA). 2010b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Survey,html David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Tradewhich new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 2009 (

  1. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shows that 8.5% of potential wind energy generation withinin GWh (and as a % of potential wind generation) Electricreport also laid out a potential wind power deployment path

  2. On the enrichment of the intergalactic medium by galactic winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biman Nath; Neil Trentham

    1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of metal lines in $\\lyal$ absorption systems of small H~I column density and their ubiquitous nature suggest that the intergalactic medium (IGM) was enriched to about $Z \\sim 0.01 \\> Z_{\\odot}$ by a redshift $z \\sim 3$. We investigate the role of winds from small star-forming galaxies at high $z$ in enriching the IGM. The existence of large numbers of small galaxies at high $z$ follows naturally from hierarchical clustering theories (e.g. CDM). For analytical simplicity we assume that the galactic winds escape the galaxies at a single characteristic redshift $z_{in}$, and we model the galactic winds as spherical shock waves propagating through the IGM. We then calculate the probability distribution of the metallicity of the IGM, as a function of time (for different values of $z_{in}$), adopting plausible galaxy mass functions (from Press-Schechter formalism), cooling physics, star-formation efficiencies, gas ejection dynamics, and nucleosynthesis yields. We compare this expected distribution with the observed distribution of metallicities in the Ly$\\alpha$ forest at $z=3$, the metal poor stars in the halo of our Galaxy, and with other observational constraints on such a scenario. We find that galactic winds at high $z$ could have enriched the IGM to a mean metallicity of $Z \\sim 0.01 Z_{\\odot}$ at $z \\sim 3$, with a standard deviation of the same order, if $z_{in} \\la 5$, and that this satisfies all the observational constraints.

  3. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  4. VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatinderpal Singh

    Wind energy is currently the fastest-growing renewable source of energy in India; India is a key market for the wind industry, presenting substantial opportunities for both the international and domestic players. In India the research is carried out on wind energy utilization on big ways.There are still many unsolved challenges in expanding wind power, and there are numerous problems of interest to systems and control researchers. In this paper we study the pitch control mechanism of wind turbine. The pitch control system is one of the most widely used control techniques to regulate the output power of a wind turbine generator. The pitch angle is controlled to keep the generator power at rated power by reducing the angle of the blades. By regulating, the angle of stalling, fast torque changes from the wind will be reutilized. It also describes the design of the pitch controller and discusses the response of the pitch-controlled system to wind velocity variations. The pitch control system is found to have a large output power variation and a large settling time.

  5. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  6. Carbon smackdown: wind warriors

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

  7. Diablo Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs TypeWinds Wind Farm Jump to:

  8. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  9. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation and frequency response services charge for wind energyRegulation and Frequency Response Service that charges a higher rate for wind energy

  10. Wind Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Below is an industry calendar with meetings, conferences, and webinars of interest to the wind energy technology communities. IEA Wind Task 34 (WREN) Quarterly Webinar 3:...

  11. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forward gas market. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report 4.Market Report Entered queue in 2010 Total in queue at end of 2010 Nameplate Capacity (GW) Wind Natural Gas

  12. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine VerificationTurbine Global Market Study: Year Ending 2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy

  13. Wind Energy Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of wind energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply wind energy within the Federal sector.

  14. Large Wind Property Tax Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2001, North Dakota established property tax reductions for commercial wind turbines constructed before 2011. Originally, the law reduced the taxable value of centrally-assessed* wind turbines...

  15. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power projects in the United States to date have been installed on land,on developing wind power projects on public lands. State

  16. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power projects in the United States to date have been installed on land,of developing wind power projects on public lands. State

  17. Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

  18. Ris National Laboratory DTU Wind Energy Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind speed, wind direction relative to the spinner and flow inclination angle. A wind tunnel concept anemometer is a wind measurement concept in which measurements of wind speed in the flow over a wind turbine on a modified 300kW wind turbine spinner, was mounted with three 1D sonic wind speed sensors. The flow around

  19. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential on Hong Kong islands - an analysis of wind power and wind turbine characteristics, Renewable Energy,

  20. Signature of wide-spread clumping in B supergiant winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinja, Raman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to establish additional observational signatures of the effects of clumping in OB star winds. The action of clumping on strategic wind-formed spectral lines is tested to steer the development of models for clumped winds and thus improve the reliability of mass-loss determinations for massive stars.The SiIV 1400 resonance line doublets of B0 to B5 supergiants are analysed using empirical line-synthesis models. The focus is on decoding information on wind clumping from measurements of ratios of the radial optical depths (tau_(rad)(w)) of the red and blue components of the SiIV doublet. We exploit in particular the fact that the two doublet components are decoupled and formed independently for targets with relatively low wind terminal velocities. Line-synthesis analyses reveal that the mean ratio of tau_(rad)(w) of the blue to red SiIV components are rarely close to the canonical value of ~ 2 (expected from atomic constants), and spread instead over a range of values between ~1 and 2. These results are i...

  1. X-rays from Massive StarsX-rays from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    star wind Radiation line driving is inherently unstable:Radiation line driving is inherently unstable (RR ~ 1000 ~ 300 km s~ 1000 ~ 300 km s-1-1)) 11 Ori C: hotter plasma, narrower emission linesOri C: hotter plasma, narrower emission lines Pup (O4 I): cooler plasma, broad emission linesPup (O4 I): cooler

  2. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  3. He II {lambda}4686 IN {eta} CARINAE: COLLAPSE OF THE WIND-WIND COLLISION REGION DURING PERIASTRON PASSAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teodoro, M.; Damineli, A. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Arias, J. I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile); De Araujo, F. X.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Pereira, C. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua General Jose Cristino 77, Sao Cristovao, Rio de Janeiro 20921-400 (Brazil); Barba, R. H.; Gonzalez, J. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Astronomicas, de la Tierra, y del Espacio (ICATE-CONICET), Avenida Espana Sur 1512, J5402DSP San Juan (Argentina); Corcoran, M. F. [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G. R. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, La Plata, BA, B1900FWA (Argentina); Fraga, L. [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Colina El Pino s/n, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Marshall, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); McGregor, P. J.; Nicholls, D. C.; Parkin, E. R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA), Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M., E-mail: mairan@astro.iag.usp.br [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The periodic spectroscopic events in {eta} Carinae are now well established and occur near the periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations of different spectral features, such as an eclipse by the wind-wind collision (WWC) boundary, a shell ejection from the primary star or accretion of its wind onto the secondary. All of them have problems explaining all the observed phenomena. To better understand the nature of the cyclic events, we performed a dense monitoring of {eta} Carinae with five Southern telescopes during the 2009 low-excitation event, resulting in a set of data of unprecedented quality and sampling. The intrinsic luminosity of the He II {lambda}4686 emission line (L {approx} 310 L{sub Sun }) just before periastron reveals the presence of a very luminous transient source of extreme UV radiation emitted in the WWC region. Clumps in the primary's wind probably explain the flare-like behavior of both the X-ray and He II {lambda}4686 light curves. After a short-lived minimum, He II {lambda}4686 emission rises again to a new maximum, when X-rays are still absent or very weak. We interpret this as a collapse of the WWC onto the 'surface' of the secondary star, switching off the hard X-ray source and diminishing the WWC shock cone. The recovery from this state is controlled by the momentum balance between the secondary's wind and the clumps in the primary's wind.

  4. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy Mark Z. Jacobsona,1 at 10 km above ground in the jet streams assuming airborne wind energy devices ("jet stream the theoretical limit of wind energy available at these altitudes, particularly because some recent studies

  5. Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models Nils Siebert George.siebert@ensmp.fr, georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized today as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind generation in power systems. This paper deals

  6. Wind Energy at NREL's National Wind Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Right now wind is in high demand and it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. NREL is at the forefront of wind energy research and development. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is a world-class facility dedicated to accelerating and deploying wind technology.

  7. Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    the spatial extent of the wake behind large offshore wind farms. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, LtdQuantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic

  8. Wind Energy at NREL's National Wind Technology Center

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Right now wind is in high demand and it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. NREL is at the forefront of wind energy research and development. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is a world-class facility dedicated to accelerating and deploying wind technology.

  9. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. 2013; 16:7790

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    energy industry lags far behind the wind energy industry, it has the potential to become a role player is equal to the long-term potential of onshore wind energy.1,2 Therefore, the utilisation of marineWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. 2013; 16:77­90 Published online 19 March 2012 in Wiley Online Library

  10. Wind | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacksof EnergyWhenWindWind ResearchWind

  11. Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind...

  12. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 6: Wind Power Markets Summary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6: Wind Power Markets Summary Slides 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 6: Wind Power Markets Summary Slides Summary slides overviewing wind power markets, growth, applications, and...

  13. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Looking forward, offshore wind costs are generally expectedachieving the U.S. 20% wind cost and performance trajectoryDissecting Wind Turbine Costs. ” WindStats Newsletter (21:

  14. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Trust. (2008). Offshore Wind Power: Big Challenge,Financial Support for Offshore Wind. The UK Department ofCost Reduction Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind

  15. wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation Investment WindEEE Dome at Advanced Manufacturing Park $31million Insurance Research Lab for Better Homes $8million Advanced Facility for Avian Research $9million #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

  16. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    some wind turbine manufacturers experienced blade andwind turbine manufacturers: Vestas (nacelles, blades, and

  17. Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

  18. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Analysis: Multi-Year Analysis Results and Recommendations. Consultant report prepared by the California Wind

  19. Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Kentish Flats Offshore Wind Farm #12;By August 2005 the offshore wind farm at Kentish Flats plateau just outside the main Thames shipping lanes. The Kentish Flats wind farm will comprise 30 of the wind farm could be up to 90 MW. For the benefit of the environment The British Government has set

  20. Optimization of Wind Turbine Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of Wind Turbine Operation by Use of Spinner Anemometer TF Pedersen, NN Sørensen, L Title: Optimization of Wind Turbine Operation by Use of Spinner Anemometer Department: Wind Energy prototype wind turbine. Statistics of the yaw error showed an average of about 10°. The average flow

  1. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  2. Social networks for lonely objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kestner, John Anthony

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Visions of ubiquitous computing describe a network of devices that quietly supports human goals, but this may also add complexity to an already frustrating relationship between humans and their electronic objects. As we ...

  3. Idaho_LonePinePeak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude:Peak Site

  4. Idaho_LonePineRidge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude:Peak

  5. UNLEASHING POSITIVE FEEDBACK: LINKING THE RATES OF STAR FORMATION, SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION, AND OUTFLOWS IN DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silk, Joseph [Institut d'Astrophysique, UMR 7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Blvd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beecroft Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure-regulated star formation is a simple variant on the usual supernova-regulated star formation efficiency that controls the global star formation rate as a function of cold gas content in star-forming galaxies, and accounts for the Schmidt-Kennicutt law in both nearby and distant galaxies. Inclusion of active galactic nucleus (AGN) induced pressure, by jets and/or winds that flow back onto a gas-rich disk, can lead, under some circumstances, to significantly enhanced star formation rates, especially at high redshift and most likely followed by the more widely accepted phase of star formation quenching. Simple expressions are derived that relate supermassive black hole growth, star formation, and outflow rates. The ratios of black hole to spheroid mass and of both black hole accretion and outflow rates to star formation rate are predicted as a function of time. I suggest various tests of the AGN-triggered star formation hypothesis.

  6. Wind Plant Ramping Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Kemper, J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing wind penetrations, utilities and operators (ISOs) are quickly trying to understand the impacts on system operations and planning. This report focuses on ramping imapcts within the Xcel service region.

  7. Wind Energy Systems Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee House Bill 809, enacted into law in Public Chapter 377, Acts of 2003 and codified under Title 67, Chapter 5, states that wind energy systems operated by public utilities, businesses or...

  8. Wind Energy Permitting Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All wind facilities larger than 0.5 megawatts (MW) that begin construction after July 1, 2010, must obtain a permit from any county in which the facility is located. Facilities must also obtain...

  9. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  10. Wind Agreements (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations address leases or lease options securing land for the study or production of wind-generated energy. The regulations describe agreement terms, compliance, and a prohibition on land...

  11. Suite for Wind Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Theodore

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    "Suite for Wind Ensemble" consists of three movements, each of which contains a main theme and several smaller themes. Each main theme is introduced within the first minute of the movement, and the main themes from the ...

  12. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  13. Wind Turbines Benefit Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takle, Gene

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

  14. After the Wind Storm 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar and wind power can be economical and environmentally friendly ways to pump water for homes, irrigation and/or livestock water wells. This publication explains how these pumps work, the advantages and disadvantages of using renewable energy...

  15. Wind Tunnel Building - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available...

  16. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A., E-mail: parkin@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  17. Wind Tunnel Building - 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF WIND FROM NIMBUS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis by WILLIAM EVERETT CARLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfil!. ment of the requirement for the deg. . ec of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1979 Major Subject: Meteorology DETEIQ&INATION OE WIND PROS1 NINEDS-6 SATELLITE SOUNDING DATA A Thesis WILLIA11 EVERETT CARLE Aporoved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi tee) Nember) (Head of Department) December 1979...

  18. Previous Wind Power Announcements (generation/wind)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergyEnergytransmission-rates Sign In About |Wind

  19. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  20. Winding for linear pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  1. Winding for linear pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kliman, Gerald B. (Schenectady, NY); Brynsvold, Glen V. (San Jose, CA); Jahns, Thomas M. (Schenectady, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  2. Independent Signs of Lower Mass-Loss Rates for O-Type Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss observational evidence -- independent of the direct spectral diagnostics of stellar winds themselves -- suggesting that mass-loss rates for O stars need to be revised downward by roughly a factor of three or more, in line with recent observed mass-loss rates for clumped winds. These independent constraints include the large observed mass-loss rates in LBV eruptions, the large masses of evolved massive stars like LBVs and WNH stars, WR stars in lower metallicity environments, observed rotation rates of massive stars at different metallicity, supernovae that seem to defy expectations of high mass-loss rates in stellar evolution, and other clues. I pay particular attention to the role of feedback that would result from higher mass-loss rates, driving the star to the Eddington limit too particular attention to the role of feedback that would result from higher mass-loss rates, driving the star to the Eddington limit too soon, and therefore making higher rates appear highly implausible. Some of these arguments by themselves may have more than one interpretation, but together they paint a consistent picture that steady line-driven winds of O-type stars have lower mass-loss rates and are significantly clumped.

  3. Light curves from supernova shock breakout through an extended wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Balberg, Shmuel [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations suggest that some supernovae may be the result of an explosion into an optically thick circumstellar material, the product of pre-explosion mass loss (wind) by the progenitor star. This scenario has been studied previously both analytically and numerically. However, many previous studies base their analysis on the diffusion approximation for radiation transfer, which is inappropriate in the optically thin outer layers of the wind. Here we study the deviations from diffusion and calculate light curves more accurately using a Monte Carlo approach to photon transfer. We distinguish between 'compact' winds, for which the diffusion approximation is appropriate, and 'extended' winds, which require a more delicate treatment of the radiation. We show that this effect is more significant than that of the light-travel time difference to a distant observer, which has a secondary influence on the light curves of extended-wind systems. We also comment on the applicability of the widely used flux-limited diffusion approximation in this context: we find that it generally does not reproduce the Monte Carlo results. The flux-limited diffusion approximation leads to results that are not only quantitatively but also qualitatively wrong in the extended-wind regime.

  4. Wind energy: Program overview, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Wind Energy Program assists utilities and industry in developing advanced wind turbine technology to be economically competitive as an energy source in the marketplace and in developing new markets and applications for wind systems. This program overview describes the commercial development of wind power, wind turbine development, utility programs, industry programs, wind resources, applied research in wind energy, and the program structure.

  5. From Neutron Stars to Strange Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses several most intruigung astrophysical implications connected with the possible absolute stability of strange quark matter.This is followed by a discussion of two astrophysical signals that may point at the existence of quark matter in both isolated neutron stars as well as in neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs).

  6. An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prowell, I.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Scope Wind energy is growing and turbines are regularlyfor Design of Wind Turbines. Wind Energy Department of Risøloads on wind turbines. ” European Wind Energy Conference

  7. Prairie Star (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation,Power Rental MarketEthanol LLC Jump to:Rose7)

  8. Prairie Star (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation,Power Rental MarketEthanol LLC Jump

  9. Wind Powering America Podcasts, Wind Powering America (WPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America and the National Association of Farm Broadcasters produce a series of radio interviews featuring experts discussing wind energy topics. The interviews are aimed at a rural stakeholder audience and are available as podcasts. On the Wind Powering America website, you can access past interviews on topics such as: Keys to Local Wind Energy Development Success, What to Know about Installing a Wind Energy System on Your Farm, and Wind Energy Development Can Revitalize Rural America. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource for podcast episodes.

  10. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) toolkit (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Draxl: NREL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional wind integration studies require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high penetration scenarios. The wind datasets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as being time synchronized with available load profiles.As described in this presentation, the WIND Toolkit fulfills these requirements by providing a state-of-the-art national (US) wind resource, power production and forecast dataset.

  11. From the atmosphere to the circumstellar environment in cool evolved stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittkowski, Markus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss and illustrate contributions that optical interferometry has made on our current understanding of cool evolved stars. We include red giant branch (RGB) stars, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and red supergiants (RSGs). Studies using optical interferometry from visual to mid-infrared wavelengths have greatly increased our knowledge of their atmospheres, extended molecular shells, dust formation, and winds. These processes and the morphology of the circumstellar environment are important for the further evolution of these stars toward planetary nebulae (PNe) and core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and for the return of material to the interstellar medium.

  12. Robi, Robichaud, Wind Technologies and Evolving Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RPS * Wind Technology Overview * Larger Rotors * Taller Towers * Improved Controls * Wind Resource * Improved Assessment 2 Innova+on for Our Energy Future National Wind Technology...

  13. ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2002 ­ February 28, 2003 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. Correlations in thermal comfort and natural wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Ki-Nam; Song, Doosam; Schiavon, Stefano

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic ?uctuation in natural wind and its application toof natural and mechanical wind in built environment usingcharacteristics of natural wind. Refrigeration 71 (821),

  15. Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory...................................................................... 8 Sound from Wind Turbines .............................................................................................. 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound

  16. WIND DATA REPORT January -December, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January - December, 2003 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric Cooperative...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1. Introduction 2. Modelparameterization at high wind speeds 1. Introduction 2. DataSupplementary Formulae 1. Wind Stress 2. Rankine Vortex A .

  18. WIND DATA REPORT January -March, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January - March, 2004 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric Cooperative...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall August 18, 2003 ­ December 4, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Integration Costs ..adequacy costs. Wind generation costs are also significantlyvalue. 3. We add wind integration cost to the levelized cost

  2. Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leite, Gladeston C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resource assessment and wind farm development in the UK. Inevaluation of oil spills and wind farms. Keywords: SAR; Winddata to characterize wind farms and their potential energy

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Offshore Wind Energy Simulation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Wind Energy Simulation Toolkit Sandia Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine Research Presented at Science of Making Torque from Wind Conference On July 8, 2014, in Computational...

  4. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Northern Europe offshore wind resource, Journal ofof theoretical offshore wind farm for Jacksonville, Florida,interesting areas for offshore wind farm construction and

  5. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis additional cost of fuelWind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Levelized Generation CostCoal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Notes: All Cost are in

  6. Wind Webinar Presentation Slides | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wind Webinar Presentation Slides Wind Webinar Presentation Slides Download presentation slides from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on wind renewable energy. DOE Office of...

  7. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic21 Figure 6. Comparison of ACWH and CCGT-Wind

  8. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of theoretical offshore wind farm for Jacksonville, Florida,interesting areas for offshore wind farm construction andof theoretical offshore wind farm on Jacksonville, Florida

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Quincy DPW, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Quincy DPW, MA September 1st 2006 to November 30th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Bishop and Clerks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Bishop and Clerks March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Quincy Quarry Hills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Quincy Quarry Hills December 2006 to February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Quincy DPW, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Quincy DPW, MA June 1st 2006 to August 31st 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Quincy Quarry Hills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Quincy Quarry Hills March 2007 to May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex Rockport, Massachusetts March 1, 2006 ­ May 31, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Quincy DPW, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Quincy DPW, MA March 1st 2007 to May 31st 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Tisbury, Martha's Vineyard,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Tisbury, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex Rockport, Massachusetts December 1st , 2007 ­ February 29...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex Rockport, Massachusetts September 1, 2005 - November 31.................................................................................................................... 12 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 12 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex Rockport, Massachusetts June 1, 2007 ­ August 31, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT December, 2004 28th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Orleans 1st December, 2004 ­28th February, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions.......................................................................................................

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Rockport School Complex Rockport, Massachusetts December 1, 2006 ­ February 28...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    distributed wind-wind turbines installed at homes, farms, and busi-nesses. Distributed wind allows Americans to generate their own clean electricity and cut their energy bills,...

  3. Sandia Energy - Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancement for Wind (CREW): Project Update Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy News & Events Systems Analysis Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind (CREW):...

  4. High-Speed Optical Spectroscopy of a Cataclysmic Variable Wind: BZ Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. A. Ringwald; T. Naylor

    1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    BZ Cam is the first cataclysmic variable star with an accretion disk wind evident in its optical spectrum. The wind was found by Thorstensen, who discovered intermittent P Cygni profiles occurring simultaneously in He I 5876 Angstroms and H alpha. We have since obtained spectra with 0.4-Angstroms/pixel dispersion and 60-s time resolution. We find a wind much faster and more rapidly variable than the radiatively accelerated winds of OB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, or luminous blue variables. Instead of showing blob ejection, the whole wind of BZ Cam appears to turn on and off. We use this to measure the acceleration law of a CV wind for the first time. The velocity increases linearly with time, attaining blue edge velocities near -3000 km/s, and absorption velocities near -1700 km/s, in 6 to 8 min after starting near rest. We also find a subsequent linear deceleration to nearly rest in 30 to 40 min, perhaps an effect of dilution as the wind expands. No periodicity from rotational outflow is obvious. This wind is erratic and incessantly variable, and perhaps bipolar and face-on, but not highly collimated. The P Cygni absorption events trace out sawtooth waves, occurring within 30 to 40 white dwarf radii from the disk. This is the approximate size of the disk, as well as the disk/wind transition region recently postulated by Knigge and Drew. We estimate a distance of 830 +/- 160 pc, and an orbital inclination i such that 12 < i(degrees) < 40.

  5. NREL: Wind Research - Wind Resource Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota Prius being drivenandWebmasterWind

  6. Wind Vision Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:Wilson Hot

  7. Prairie Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation,Power Rental MarketEthanol LLC JumpWinds ND

  8. High Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California: Energy Resources JumpSheldon Energy Wind

  9. NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6 DecemberWind Resource

  10. NREL: Wind Research - Site Wind Resource Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6Site Wind Resource

  11. NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6Site Wind ResourceSmall

  12. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

  13. Chaninik Wind Group Wind Heat Smart Grids Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiners, Dennis [Technical Contact

    2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report summarizes technology used, system design and outcomes for US DoE Tribal Energy Program award to deploy Wind Heat Smart Grids in the Chaninik Wind Group communities in southwest Alaska.

  14. Responses of floating wind turbines to wind and wave excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kwang Hyun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wind power has recently emerged as a promising alternative to conventional electricity generation. However, space requirements and public pressure to place unsightly wind turbines out of visual range make it ...

  15. Wind Powering America Webinar Series (Postcard), Wind Powering America (WPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America offers a free monthly webinar series that provides expert information on today?s key wind energy topics. This postcard is an outreach tool that provides a brief description of the webinars as well as the URL.

  16. Wind Energy Status and Future Wind Engineering Challenges: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R.; Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the current status of wind energy technology, the potential for future wind energy development and the science and engineering challenges that must be overcome for the technology to meet its potential.

  17. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50-47676 March 2010 Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets Final Subcontract Report 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009 3TIER Seattle, Washington National...

  18. Wind for Schools: A Wind Powering America Project (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Project, including a description of the project, the participants, funding sources, the basic configurations, and how interested parties can become involved.

  19. Wind for Schools: A Wind Powering America Project (Alaska) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Project, including a description of the project, the participants, funding sources, the basic configurations, and how interested parties can become involved.

  20. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0% Wind Energy by 2030 Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply DOEGO-102008-2578 * December 2008 More information is available on the web at:...

  1. Harvesting the wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahn, R.D.

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the wind farms in the Altamont Pass, the Tehachapi Mountains, and the San Gorgonio pass, all in California. The threat by Congress to eliminate federal tax credits could put the fledgling industry in the doldrums. The author shows how the selection of the right wind site can make the difference between a profitable venture and an expensive kinetic sculpture. To improve reliability wind-farm developers have turned to more durable Danish turbines from Zond, Windmatic, and Bonus. Recent research under DOE sponsorship has studied large-scale MOD-2 machines built by Boeing, several of which are now operating at a PGandL site north of San Francisco. The result of recent new standards may require the filing of quarterly reports on machine capacity, performance, and the amounts of electricity produced from the installation.

  2. Wind motor applications for transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B. [Moscow Aviation Inst. (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

  3. Wind Technology Advancements and Impacts on Western Wind Resources (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robi Robichaud made this presentation at the Bureau of Land Management West-wide Wind Opportunities and Constraints Mapping (WWOCM) Project public meeting in Denver, Colorado in September 2014. This presentation outlines recent wind technology advancements, evolving turbine technologies, and industry challenges. The presentation includes maps of mean wind speeds at 50-m, 80-m, and 100-m hub heights on BLM lands. Robichaud also presented on the difference in mean wind speeds from 80m to 100m in Wyoming.

  4. The divergent wind component in data sparse tropical wind fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Bruce Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boundary data were estimated by linear extrapolation from inner to outer grid points. Comparisons of level Illb wind data and cloud drift winds were made using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satelhte (GOES) West observed winds obtained from... for 0000 GMT 25 January 1979 were drawn and subjectively compared. Claudy regions viewed in enhanced GOES West imagery were superimposed on these streamline fields to determine whether the aliased wind fields correlated well with the convective activity...

  5. Super Massive Star Clusters: From Superwinds to a Cooling Catastrophe and the Re-processing of the Injected Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silich, S; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Palous, J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different hydrodynamic regimes for the gaseous outflows generated by multiple supernovae explosions and stellar winds occurring within compact and massive star clusters are discussed. It is shown that there exists the threshold energy that separates clusters whose outflows evolve in the quasi-adiabatic or radiative regime from those within which catastrophic cooling and a positive feedback star-forming mode sets in. The role of the surrounding ISM and the observational appearance of the star cluster winds evolving in different hydrodynamic regimes are also discussed.

  6. TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turtle Mountain Community College

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

  7. Winds of Education

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:Wilson HotWalkersWindridge Wind Farm

  8. Wind Vision: Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to globalWindWind Vision: Impacts

  9. Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS SeptemberRenewableAbout Key ActivitiesWhy EnergyWindPeer06 WindScience &

  10. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. 2013; 00:112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that by a novel change of variables, which focuses on power flows, we can transform the problem to one with linear rejection, model predictive control, convex optimization, wind power control, energy storage, power output to reliable operation of power systems due to the fluctuating nature of wind power. Thus, modern wind power

  11. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

  12. Utilizing Wind: Optimal Wind Farm Placement in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    Utilizing Wind: Optimal Wind Farm Placement in the United States By: Yintao Sun Advisor: Professor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.4.1 Carbon-based Fuels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4.2 Solar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 iv #12;CONTENTS v 3 Designing Wind Farm Portfolios 27 3.1 Applying Markowitz Portfolio Theory

  13. A Census of the Carina Nebula. I: Cumulative Energy Input from Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) The Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) is our richest nearby laboratory in which to study feedback through UV radiation and stellar winds from very massive stars during the formation of an OB association before supernova explosions have influenced the environment. This paper takes inventory of the combined effect from all the known massive stars that power the Carina Nebula. The present-day total ionizing photon luminosity produced by the 65 O stars and 3 WNL stars in Carina is about 1e51/s, the total bolometric luminosity of all stars earlier than B2 is 2.5e7 Lsun, and the total mechanical luminosity of stellar winds is about 1e5 Lsun. The total ionizing flux was about 25 per cent higher when eta Car was on the main sequence, before it and its companion were surrounded by its obscuring dust shell, and when the 3 WNL stars were on the main sequence. For the first 3 Myr, the net ionizing flux of the 70 O-type stars in Carina was about 150 times greater than in the Orion Nebula. About 400-500 Msun has been contributed to the region by stellar wind mass loss during the past 3 Myr. The net ionizing flux and mechanical luminosity are also given for the individual clusters Tr14, 15, and 16, and Bo10 and 11, which are relevant on smaller spatial scales.

  14. The Inside of a Wind Turbine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wind turbines harness the power of the wind and use it to generate electricity. Simply stated, a wind turbine works the opposite of a fan. Instead of using electricity to make wind, like a fan,...

  15. Wind Technologies and Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robi Robichaud

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of wind energy research being conducted at the National Wind Technology Center, market and technology trends in wind energy, and opportunities for wind technology.

  16. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  17. Cost of Offshore Wind Energy Charlene Nalubega

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    water as well as on land based wind farms. The specific offshore wind energy case under consideration, most of the offshore wind farms are in Europe, which started being developed in the early 1990's Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

  18. 20% Wind Energy by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis explores one clearly defined scenario for providing 20% of our nations electricity demand with wind energy by 2030 and contrasts it to a scenario of no new wind power capacity.

  19. The Solar Wind Energy Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

  20. Commercial Scale Wind Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon’s Commercial Scale Wind offering provides resources and cash incentives to help communities, businesses land owners, and government entities install wind turbine systems up...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    known that large amounts of wind energy are not effectively harvested in large wind farms because the turbines "shadow" each other and reduce the output of the turbines located...

  2. AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

  3. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generating sets. Wind turbine blades, hubs, generators,wind turbine components that include towers (trade category is “towers and lattice masts”), generators (“AC generators from 750 to 10,000 kVA”), blades

  4. San Diego County- Wind Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of San Diego has established zoning guidelines for wind turbine systems of varying sizes in the unincorporated areas of San Diego County. Wind turbine systems can be classified as small,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Energy with Less Weight On May 18, 2011, in Energy, News, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The following is from an article published in WindStats Newsletter Vol. 19, No. 4. The...

  6. Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be registered with the Department of Aeronautics if the...

  7. Solar and Wind Permitting Laws

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey has enacted three separate laws addressing local permitting practices for solar and wind energy facilities. The first deals with solar and wind facilities located in industrial-zoned...

  8. Value of Wind Power Forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, building on the extensive models developed for the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS), uses these WECC models to evaluate the operating cost impacts of improved day-ahead wind forecasts.

  9. October 11, 2011 Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    ;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;RPS: Renewable Portfolio Standard · Renewable: solar, biomass, geothermal, hydro, wind · 75% expected

  10. DWEA SMART Wind Composites Subgroup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Monday, February 16, 6:00 PMOpen to all SMART Wind participants: “Dutch Treat” group dinner, RSVP required | Location: TBD

  11. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Report, Actual Installations, Projected Growth As with other forms of energy development, a variety of concerns about public acceptance

  12. Probing Massive Stars Around Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wenbin; Smoot, George F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are produced by ultra-relativistic jets launched from core collapse of massive stars. Most massive stars form in binaries and/or in star clusters, which means that there may be a significant external photon field (EPF) around the GRB progenitor. We calculate the inverse-Compton scattering of EPF by the hot electrons in the GRB jet. Three possible cases of EPFs are considered: the progenitor is (I) in a massive binary system, (II) surrounded by a Wolf-Rayet-star wind, and (III) in a dense star cluster. Typical luminosities of 10^47 - 10^50 erg/s in the 10 - 100 GeV band are expected, depending on the stellar luminosity, binary separation (I), wind mass loss rate (II), stellar number density (III), etc. We calculate the lightcurve and spectrum in each case, taking fully into account the equal-arrival time surfaces and possible pair-production absorption with the prompt gamma-rays. Observations can put constraints on the existence of such EPFs (and hence on the nature of GRB progenit...

  13. Low-Maintenance Wind Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasson, Joseph E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved Vertical Axis Wind Turbine and Aerodynamic ControlDarrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbines and Aerodynamic Control

  14. SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact on birds, bats......... 2-3 school news........... 4-5 alumni news measurable benefits reaped by the use of wind energy. But, it is a fact: all energy sources, alternative Interactions with Offshore Wind Energy Facilities," involves the design, deployment and testing

  15. CCPExecutiveSummary Storing Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    CCPExecutiveSummary July 2011 Storing Wind for a Rainy Day W: www.uea.ac.uk/ccp T: +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ Storing Wind for a Rainy Day: What kind of electricity does Denmark export? BACKGROUND The last decade has seen a remarkable increase in the number of wind installations

  16. Bird orientation: compensation for wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorup, Kasper

    Bird orientation: compensation for wind drift in migrating raptors is age dependent Kasper Thorup1 14.04.03 Despite the potentially strong effect of wind on bird orientation, our understanding of how wind drift affects migrating birds is still very limited. Using data from satellite-based radio

  17. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Wind Farm Valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Wind Farm Valuation Kimlee Wong 13th April 2009 Professor Warren B. Powell was generous and encouraged me to participate in the group to perform research pertaining to wind farm, and has helped me think of hedging strategies for wind farm operations. I have learnt a lot from my

  18. Wind Turbine Blockset General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Turbine Blockset in Saber General Overview and Description of the Models Florin Iov, Adrian Turbine Blockset in Saber Abstract. This report presents a new developed Saber Toolbox for wind turbine, optimize and design wind turbines". The report provides a quick overview of the Saber and then explains

  19. Model Predictive Control Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Predictive Control of Wind Turbines Martin Klauco Kongens Lyngby 2012 IMM-MSc-2012-65 #12;Summary Wind turbines are the biggest part of the green energy industry. Increasing interest control strategies. Control strategy has a significant impact on the wind turbine operation on many levels

  20. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power installations in the United States have been located on land,wind power projects in the United States to date have been installed on land,wind power projects built in the United States to date have been sited on land.

  1. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  2. Version:April 2014 Wind Energy EFA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Version:April 2014 Wind Energy EFA Wind energy has become a major source of clean energy. Wind backgrounds and knowledge of wind energy fundamentals are needed to fill these jobs. The Wind Energy EFA prepares students for a career in wind energy, and allows for completing all requirements

  3. Windings and Axes 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    on a synchronous machine: · 3 stator windings (aphase, bphase, and cphase) · 1 main field winding · Amortissuer windings on the polefaces The stator windings and the field winding is familiar to you based will model a total of 7, with associated currents as designated below. · 3 stator windings: ia, ib

  4. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  5. Structural responses and power output of a wind turbine are strongly affected by the wind field acting on the wind turbine. Knowledge about the wind field and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ABSTRACT Structural responses and power output of a wind turbine are strongly affected by the wind field acting on the wind turbine. Knowledge about the wind field and its variations is essential not only for designing, but also for cost-efficiently managing wind turbines. Wind field monitoring

  6. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  7. The Future of Offshore Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 The Future of Offshore Wind Energy #12;2 #12;3 Offshore Wind Works · Offshore wind parks: 28 in 10 countries · Operational since 1991 · Current installed capacity: 1,250 MW · Offshore wind parks in the waters around Europe #12;4 US Offshore Wind Projects Proposed Atlantic Ocean Gulf of Mexico Cape Wind

  8. Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Models of Super Star Clusters with a Positive Star Formation Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wünsch, R; Palous, J; Silich, S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the hydrodynamic code ZEUS, we perform 2D simulations to determine the fate of the gas ejected by massive stars within super star clusters. It turns out that the outcome depends mainly on the mass and radius of the cluster. In the case of less massive clusters, a hot high velocity ($\\sim 1000$ km s$^{-1}$) stationary wind develops and the metals injected by supernovae are dispersed to large distances from the cluster. On the other hand, the density of the thermalized ejecta within massive and compact clusters is sufficiently large as to immediately provoke the onset of thermal instabilities. These deplete, particularly in the central densest regions, the pressure and the pressure gradient required to establish a stationary wind, and instead the thermally unstable parcels of gas are rapidly compressed, by a plethora of re-pressurizing shocks, into compact high density condensations. Most of these are unable to leave the cluster volume and thus accumulate to eventually feed further generations of star for...

  9. Assessment Of The Wind Farm Impact On The Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Evgeny D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study shows the means to evaluate the wind farm impact on the radar. It proposes the set of tools, which can be used to realise this objective. The big part of report covers the study of complex pattern propagation factor as the critical issue of the Advanced Propagation Model (APM). Finally, the reader can find here the implementation of this algorithm - the real scenario in Inverness airport (the United Kingdom), where the ATC radar STAR 2000, developed by Thales Air Systems, operates in the presence of several wind farms. Basically, the project is based on terms of the department "Strategy Technology & Innovation", where it has been done. Also you can find here how the radar industry can act with the problem engendered by wind farms. The current strategies in this area are presented, such as a wind turbine production, improvements of air traffic handling procedures and the collaboration between developers of radars and wind turbines. The possible strategy for Thales as a main pioneer was given as ...

  10. Monolithic or hierarchical star formation? A new statistical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marios Kampakoglou; Roberto Trotta; Joe Silk

    2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an analytic model of cosmic star formation which incorporates supernova feedback, gas accretion and enriched outflows, reproducing the history of cosmic star formation, metallicity, supernovae type II rates and the fraction of baryons allocated to structures. We present a new statistical treatment of the available observational data on the star formation rate and metallicity that accounts for the presence of possible systematics. We then employ a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to compare the predictions of our model with observations and derive constraints on the 7 free parameters of the model. We find that the dust correction scheme one chooses to adopt for the star formation data is critical in determining which scenario is favoured between a hierarchical star formation model, where star formation is prolonged by accretion, infall and merging, and a monolithic scenario, where star formation is rapid and efficient. We distinguish between these modes by defining a characteristic minimum mass, M > 10^{11} M_solar, in our fiducial model, for early type galaxies where star formation occurs efficiently. Our results indicate that the hierarchical star formation model can achieve better agreement with the data, but that this requires a high efficiency of supernova-driven outflows. In a monolithic model, our analysis points to the need for a mechanism that drives metal-poor winds, perhaps in the form of supermassive black hole-induced outflows. Furthermore, the relative absence of star formation beyond z ~ 5 in the monolithic scenario requires an alternative mechanism to dwarf galaxies for reionizing the universe at z ~ 11, as required by observations of the microwave background. While the monolithic scenario is less favoured in terms of its quality-of-fit, it cannot yet be excluded.

  11. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  12. Wind shear climatology for large wind turbine generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Heflick, S.K.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climatological wind shear analyses relevant to the design and operation of multimegawatt wind turbines are provided. Insight is provided for relating the wind experienced by a rotating blade in a shear flow to the analysis results. A simple analysis of the wind experienced by a rotating blade for three types of wind shear profiles under steady-state conditions is presented in graphical form. Comparisons of the magnitude and frequency of the variations in 1) the wind sensed by a single blade element, 2) the sum, and 3) the difference of the winds sensed by opposite blade elements show strong sensitivity to profile shape. These three items represent forcing functions that can be related to 1) flatwise bending moment, 2) torque on the shaft, and 3) teeter angle. A computer model was constructed to simulate rotational sampling of 10-s sampled winds from a tall tower for three different types of large wind turbines. Time series produced by the model indicated that the forcing functions on a rotating blade vary according to the shear profile encountered during each revolution as opposed to a profile derived from average wind conditions, e.g., hourly average winds. An analysis scheme was developed to establish a climatology of wind shear profiles derived from 10-s sampled winds and hourly average winds measured over a one-year period at several levels on a tall tower. Because of the sensitivity of the forcing function variability to profile shape, the analyses performed and presented are in the form of joint frequency distributions of velocity differences of the the top-to-hub versus the hub-to-bottom portion of disks of rotation for the three turbine configurations.

  13. 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Barbose, G.; Darghouth, N.; Hoen, B.; Mills, A.; Weaver, S.; Porter, K.; Buckley, M.; Oteri, F.; Tegen, S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report provides a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2013. This 2013 edition updates data presented in previous editions while highlighting key trends and important new developments. The report includes an overview of key installation-related trends; trends in wind power capacity growth; how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources; the amount and percentage of wind energy in individual states; the status of offshore wind power development and the quantity of proposed wind power capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States.

  14. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  15. The effects of stellar winds on the magnetospheres and potential habitability of exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    See, Victor; Vidotto, Aline A; Petit, Pascal; Marsden, Stephen C; Jeffers, Sandra V; Nascimento, José Dias do

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: The principle definition of habitability for exoplanets is whether they can sustain liquid water on their surfaces, i.e. that they orbit within the habitable zone. However, the planet's magnetosphere should also be considered, since without it, an exoplanet's atmosphere may be eroded away by stellar winds. Aims: The aim of this paper is to investigate magnetospheric protection of a planet from the effects of stellar winds from solar-mass stars. Methods: We study hypothetical Earth-like exoplanets orbiting in the host star's habitable zone for a sample of 124 solar-mass stars. These are targets that have been observed by the Bcool collaboration. Using two wind models, we calculate the magnetospheric extent of each exoplanet. These wind models are computationally inexpensive and allow the community to quickly estimate the magnetospheric size of magnetised Earth-analogues orbiting cool stars. Results: Most of the simulated planets in our sample can maintain a magnetosphere of ~5 Earth radii or larger. T...

  16. Relics of metal-free low mass stars exploding as thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama

    2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewed interest in the first stars that were formed in the universe has led to the discovery of extremely iron-poor stars. Since several competing scenarios exist, our understanding of the mass range that determines the observed elemental abundances remains unclear. In this study, we consider three well-studied metal-poor stars in terms of the theoretical supernovae (SNe) model. Our results suggest that the observed abundance patterns in the metal-poor star BD +80 245 and the pair of stars HD 134439/40 agree strongly with the theoretical possibility that these stars inherited their heavy element abundance patterns from SNe initiated by thermonuclear runaways in the degenerate carbon-oxygen cores of primordial asymptotic giant branch stars with \\~3.5-5 solar masses. Recent theoretical calculations have predicted that such SNe could be originated from metal-free stars in the intermediate mass range. On the other hand, intermediate mass stars containing some metals would end their lives as white dwarfs after expelling their envelopes in the wind due to intense momentum transport from outgoing photons to heavy elements. This new pathway for the formation of SNe requires that stars are formed from the primordial gas. Thus, we suggest that stars of a few solar masses were formed from the primordial gas and that some of them caused thermonuclear explosions when the mass of their degenerate carbon-oxygen cores increased to the Chandrasekhar limit without experiencing efficient mass loss.

  17. Dynamos in Asymptotic-Giant-Branch Stars As the Origin of Magnetic Fields Shaping Planetary Nebulale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Blackman; Adam Frank; J. Andrew Markiel; John H. Thomas; Hugh M. Van Horn

    2001-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Planetary nebulae are thought to be formed when a slow wind from the progenitor giant star is overtaken by a subsequent fast wind generated as the star enters its white dwarf stage$^{1}$. A shock forms near the boundary between the winds, which creates a relatively dense shell that provides the characteristic appearance of a planetary nebula. A spherically symmetric wind will produce a spherically symmetric shell, yet over half of known planetary nebulae are not spherical; rather, they are elliptical or bipolar in shape$^{2}$. While a magnetic field could launch and collimate a bipolar outflow, the origin of such a field has hitherto been unclear, as previous work suggested that a field could not be generated${^3}$. Here we show that an asymptotic-giant-branch (AGB) star can indeed generate a strong magnetic field, in a dynamo at the interface between a rapidly rotating core and the more slowly rotating envelope of the star. The field is strong enough to shape the bipolar outflows that produce the observed bipolar planetary nebulae. Magnetic braking of the stellar core during this process may also explain the puzzlingly$^{4}$ slow rotation of most white dwarf stars.

  18. Hot galactic winds constrained by the X-ray luminosities of galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Dong; Thompson, Todd A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Murray, Norman [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Quataert, Eliot, E-mail: dzhang@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galactic superwinds may be driven by very hot outflows generated by overlapping supernovae within the host galaxy. We use the Chevalier and Clegg (CC85) wind model and the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities of galaxies and their star formation rates (SFRs) to constrain the mass-loss rates ( M-dot {sub hot}) across a wide range of SFRs, from dwarf starbursts to ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We show that for fixed thermalization and mass-loading efficiencies, the X-ray luminosity of the hot wind scales as L{sub X} ?SFR{sup 2}, significantly steeper than is observed for star-forming galaxies: L{sub X} ?SFR. Using this difference, we constrain the mass-loading and thermalization efficiency of hot galactic winds. For reasonable values of the thermalization efficiency (? 1) and for SFR ? 10 M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} we find that M-dot {sub hot}/SFR? 1, which is significantly lower than required by integrated constraints on the efficiency of stellar feedback in galaxies and potentially too low to explain observations of winds from rapidly star-forming galaxies. In addition, we highlight the fact that heavily mass-loaded winds cannot be described by the adiabatic CC85 model because they become strongly radiative.

  19. Varieties of Cotton for North Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunkle, P. B. (Paul Burtch)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .............. Lone Star ........... Rowden Ladd Acre yield. pounds in 1 c%Z?n Variety Rowden ................ Lone Star .............. Matchless E . E . Big Boll . Per cent lint .... M'annamaker I3ank Account . . ICleveland... ............................ ............... Cleveland's Rig Roll ................. Kasch's Improved ........................ Lone Star ............ Ferguson's Round Nose .................. Broadwell's 11 . J ...................... Early King .................. Mexican jig ~oll...

  20. The Biological and Molecular Analysis of a Tick-Encoded Serine Protease Inhibitor (S6) and its Role in the Feeding Cycle of the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum (L) (Acari: ixodidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalaire, Katelyn Cox

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a large superfamily of proteins that regulate critical proteolytic pathways by inhibiting serine proteases. Tick-encoded serpins are thought to play a vital role in the feeding ...